When to take antacids?

Contents

Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate) Drug Interactions

A total of 231 drugs are known to interact with Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate).

  • 10 major drug interactions
  • 127 moderate drug interactions
  • 94 minor drug interactions

Show all medications in the database that may interact with Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate).

Check for interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interactions with Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate).

Most frequently checked interactions

View interaction reports for Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate) and the medicines listed below.

  • acetaminophen
  • amlodipine
  • aspirin
  • atorvastatin
  • Fish Oil (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids)
  • furosemide
  • gabapentin
  • ibuprofen
  • levothyroxine
  • lisinopril
  • lorazepam
  • metformin
  • multivitamin
  • Nexium (esomeprazole)
  • omeprazole
  • trazodone
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen)
  • Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin)
  • Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol)

Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate) alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate)

Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate) disease interactions

There are 2 disease interactions with Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate) which include:

  • constipation
  • renal dysfunction

More about Heartburn Antacid Extra Strength (alginic acid / aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug class: antacids

Related treatment guides

  • GERD
  • Indigestion

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major

Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.

Moderate

Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.

Minor

Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Unknown

No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

Antacids

Antacids are a group of medications that are used to lower acid levels in the stomach.

Antacids are often used to relieve symptoms of reflux disease (GORD), heartburn (dyspepsia) and peptic ulcer. Antacids help to relieve pain and discomfort but do not help to heal these conditions or prevent them from happening again.
There are lifestyle changes you can make to that can help prevent symptoms from occurring. These include:

  • avoiding foods that trigger your symptoms
  • quitting smoking
  • reducing alcohol and caffeine intake (tea and coffee)
  • avoiding or reducing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and diclofenac.

Antacids are usually used only when needed and are not often prescribed long-term. If you find that you need to take antacids regularly, every day for more than 1 or 2 weeks, talk to your doctor.

Taking antacids may not be suitable if you have any of the following problems:

  • Bringing up (vomiting) blood. This may be fresh blood but it can look like ground coffee (called coffee-ground vomit).
  • Blood in your stools (faeces). This may be look like blood, or it may just make your stools look black.
  • Unintentional weight loss.
  • Difficulty swallowing, including food getting stuck in your throat (oesophagus).
  • Ongoing tummy (abdominal) pain or vomiting.

If you have any of the symptoms listed above you should contact your doctor urgently.

How do antacids work?

Antacids work by neutralising (lowering) the acid in your stomach that is used to help digestion. This can reduce the symptoms of heartburn and relieve pain.

Some antacids also coat the surface of the oesophagus (the tube between your mouth and your stomach) with a protective barrier against stomach acid, or form a gel on the stomach’s surface which helps stop acid going into the oesophagus.

Types and formulations of antacids

Antacids are available as chewable tablets or liquid. Liquids are more effective than tablets. They are sold as many brand names, but they have similar ingredients, including:

  • aluminium hydroxide
  • magnesium carbonate
  • magnesium trisilicate

Sometimes extra ingredients are added to help treat other problems, such as:

  • simethicone to relieve flatulence
  • alginates to prevent acid flowing into your oesophagus.

Examples of antacids

  • Alu-tab®
  • Chewy Quick-Eze®
  • Mylanta P®
  • Mylanta Original®
  • Mylanta Double Strength®
  • Mylanta Rolltabs®
  • Quick-Eze®

How to take antacids

  • The dose of different antacids will be different – follow the dose instructions on the label or check with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Antacids come as chewable tablets or liquid.
    • Chewable tablets: chew the tablets well; do not swallow them whole.
    • Liquid: shake the liquid well before each dose so that the medicine is evenly mixed.
  • Antacids are best taken when symptoms occur or are expected, usually after meals and just before going to bed (about 4 times a day). It’s best to take antacids soon after eating because this is when you’re most likely to get indigestion or heartburn.

Precautions – before taking antacids

While most people can safely use antacids now and again, and they can be bought from supermarkets or over-the-counter from your pharmacy, they are not suitable for everyone. For example people with:

  • heart failure
  • problems with their kidneys or liver
  • high blood pressure.

If any of these apply to you, it’s important that you tell your doctor or pharmacist before taking antacids.
Some antacids are not suitable if you have an illness where you need to control how much salt (sodium) is in your diet, such as high blood pressure or some liver conditions. This is because antacids have high levels of sodium, which could make you unwell.

Precautions – when taking antacids

  • Other medicines: antacids can interfere with the absorption of other medicines, so you should not take these together. Generally, do not take other medicines within 2-4 hours of taking antacids.
  • Alcohol: this can irritate your stomach and make your symptoms worse.
  • Do not use antacids all the time: antacids are usually used every now and again and not usually prescribed regularly or long-term. If you find that you need to take antacids regularly, every day for more than 1 or 2 weeks, talk to your doctor.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, antacids can cause side effects, although most people who take antacids do not have any. Common side effects are:

Side effects What should I do?
  • Diarrhoea (runny poo)
  • This can happen with magnesium-containing antacids
  • Tell your doctor if troublesome
  • Constipation

  • This can happen with aluminium-containing antacids
  • Tell your doctor if troublesome
  • Bloating, gas or flatulence (wind)
  • Stomach cramps
  • Feeling sick (nausea)
  • Tell your doctor if troublesome

Learn more

The following links have more information on antacids. Be aware that websites from other countries may have information that differs from New Zealand recommendations.

Antacids Patient Info, UK

  1. Antacids and simeticone New Zealand Formulary
  2. Managing dyspepsia and heartburn in general practice – an update BPAC, 2011
  3. Managing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in adults BPAC, 2014

Why Does Eating Tums Cure Heartburn?

If you’ve ever come down with a really bad case of heartburn, you know how uncomfortable it can be. Thankfully, there are plenty of over the counter heartburn medications on the market that can put an end to the distress, seemingly by magic. Tums is probably the most well-known antacid of all, but how exactly does it work?

First, a little primer on what exactly heartburn is. When we eat too much fatty or spicy food, drink too much alcohol, or eat right before bed, stomach acids and enzymes (which break down the food we eat) can back up in the stomach, flowing up into the esophagus and causing the irritation we call heartburn.

When you eat an antacid like Tums, Rolaids, or Alka-Seltzer, the gastric acid in the esophagus is neutralized as it works its way to your stomach, where excess gastric acid is neutralized as well. The active ingredient in Tums is the chemical compound calcium carbonate; other antacids use other compounds like potassium, sodium, aluminum, or magnesium bicarbonates. The common denominator here is that they’re all alkaline, the opposite of acidic. When something alkaline comes into contact with something acidic, the acid is neutralized. In this case, the acid that’s neutralized is stomach acid, and voila, the pain is gone.

Keep in mind, however, that just because the excess stomach acid is neutralized, that doesn’t mean that the underlying factors are cured. If you have persistent heartburn, it’s suggested that you see a doctor.

Blocking stomach acid may promote chronic liver disease

At a Glance

  • A new study found that blocking stomach acid can lead to an overgrowth of intestinal bacteria that likely contributes to liver inflammation and damage.
  • The findings suggest that some widely used acid reflux (heartburn) medications may worsen chronic liver disease.

The use of medications to suppress stomach acid has been on the rise. New research suggests certain kinds may have an impact on chronic liver disease. champja/iStock/Thinkstock

The liver has many important functions, including helping to digest food and process and distribute nutrients. A healthy liver is necessary for survival. The liver can regenerate after being damaged. However, repeated or long-lasting injury can cause scar tissue to form. Scarring of the liver may lead to cirrhosis, a condition in which the liver is unable to function normally. Liver cirrhosis is a leading cause of death worldwide.

Many conditions can contribute to the development of cirrhosis, including obesity, which is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a form of NAFLD in which you also have inflammation and liver cell damage. But alcohol misuse accounts for about half of cirrhosis-related deaths.

Changes in your gut’s microorganisms, or microbiota, can affect the progression of liver disease. Misusing alcohol alters the microbes in your gut. So can a commonly used class of heartburn medication called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block stomach acid secretion. PPIs are often used by people who have chronic liver disease. However, the impact of these medications on liver disease progression has been unknown.

In mice, some common acid reflux medications promote growth of Enterococcus bacteria, shown here artificially glowing red, in the intestines. These bacteria can move to the liver and affect its function. UC San Diego Health

To investigate whether blocking stomach acid affects chronic liver disease, a team led by Dr. Bernd Schnabl at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine looked at PPIs in mouse models of three types of liver disease—alcohol-induced liver disease, NAFLD, and NASH—and in humans. The study was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Results were published on October 16, 2017 in Nature Communications.

The team blocked stomach acid in the mice either by genetically deleting the gene that controls stomach acid secretion or by administering the PPI omeprazole (Prilosec). Liver conditions in all three disease models were worsened when the mice lacked stomach acid.

The researchers found that mice lacking stomach acid had higher levels of intestinal bacteria as well as imbalances among the microbes. In particular, the mice had increased levels of Enterococcus in their guts. Further experiments suggested that these bacteria can reach the liver, where they can cause liver inflammation and damage.

The team looked at whether people taking PPIs have similar microbiota changes. They collected fecal samples from healthy people before and after PPI treatment. After two weeks, those taking the PPI treatment also had a higher number of Enterococcus.

The researchers next investigated whether there might be a link between PPIs and the development of alcoholic liver disease. They looked at 4,830 patients with a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder. Among these, 36% had been using PPIs. The analysis showed that PPI use increased the 10-year risk of developing liver disease (20.7% for active users; 16.1% for previous users; 12.4% for those who had never used PPIs).

“Our findings indicate that the recent rise in use of acid-suppressing medications might have contributed to the increased incidence of chronic liver disease,” Schnabl says. “We believe clinicians should consider withholding medications that suppress acid unless there is a strong medical indication.”

—Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D.

Gaviscon

Generic Name: Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Carbonate Suspension (a LOO min uhm/mag NEE zee uhm)
Brand Name: Acid Gone, Gaviscon

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 30, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • More

Uses of Gaviscon:

  • It is used to treat heartburn and upset stomach.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Gaviscon?

  • If you have an allergy to aluminum, magnesium, or any other part of Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have kidney problems.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Gaviscon?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • If you are on a low-salt diet (Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) has salt), talk with your doctor.
  • If you are on a low-magnesium diet, talk with your doctor.
  • Do not take Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) for longer than you were told by your doctor.
  • This medicine may prevent other drugs taken by mouth from getting into the body. If you take other drugs by mouth, you may need to take them at some other time than Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension). Talk with your doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

How is this medicine (Gaviscon) best taken?

Use Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) after meals and at bedtime or as you have been told by your doctor.
  • Shake well before use.
  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring device that comes with Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension). If there is none, ask the pharmacist for a device to measure Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension).

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • If you take Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) on a regular basis, take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.
  • Many times Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension) is taken on an as needed basis. Do not take more often than told by the doctor.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

What are some other side effects of Gaviscon?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Constipation.
  • Diarrhea.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Gaviscon?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Do not freeze.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Consumer information use

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate suspension), please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Gaviscon Regular Strength Liquid (aluminum hydroxide / magnesium carbonate)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Drug class: antacids

Consumer resources

Other brands: Gaviscon Extra Strength, Acid Gone

  • Indigestion

gaviscon

uses

This combination of three medications is used to treat heartburn and other symptoms caused by too much acid in the stomach (acid indigestion). Famotidine is a drug that blocks acid release in the stomach and can help stop heartburn and acid indigestion from coming back. Calcium carbonate and magnesium hydroxide are antacids that work quickly to lower acid in the stomach and stop heartburn.

how to use

Chew one tablet completely and swallow as needed to stop/prevent the symptoms of heartburn and indigestion, or take as directed by your doctor. Do not swallow the tablets whole.Do not take more than 2 tablets within 24 hours. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.This product contains an antacid which may react with other medications, preventing them from being fully absorbed by your body. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about how to schedule your medications to prevent this problem.Stop taking this medication and call your doctor promptly if your symptoms continue after you begin taking it, or if they do not improve after you have been taking this medication for 14 days in a row. Do not take this medicine for more than 14 days in a row without talking with your doctor.

side effects

Diarrhea, headache, constipation, or stomach cramps may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: easy bruising/bleeding, signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn’t go away, fever, chills), mental/mood changes (e.g., restlessness, confusion, depression, hallucinations).Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, severe dizziness, fainting, seizure.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice any other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

precautions

Before taking this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to famotidine; or to other H2 blockers (e.g., cimetidine, ranitidine); or to other antacids containing calcium/magnesium; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this product: kidney problems, liver problems, other stomach problems (e.g., tumors).Some symptoms may actually be signs of a more serious condition. Get medical help right away if you have: heartburn with lightheadedness/sweating/dizziness, chest/jaw/arm/shoulder pain (especially with shortness of breath, unusual sweating), unexplained weight loss.In addition, before you self-treat with this medication, get medical help right away if you have any of these signs of a serious condition: trouble/pain swallowing food, bloody vomit, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, bloody/black stools, heartburn for over 3 months, frequent chest pain, frequent wheezing (especially with heartburn), nausea/vomiting, stomach pain.Do not use this medication in children younger than 12 unless directed by the doctor.Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially mental/mood changes (such as confusion), seizure, or unusual tiredness.During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using this medication.This drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

drug interactions

See also How To Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.Some products that may interact with this drug include: bisphosphonates (such as alendronate), tetracycline antibiotics (such as doxycycline, minocycline), quinolone antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), thyroid medicine (such as levothyroxine), calcium channel blockers (such as diltiazem, verapamil), quinidine, digoxin, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, phosphate supplements (such as potassium phosphate), raltegravir.Some products need stomach acid so that the body can absorb them properly. Famotidine decreases stomach acid, so it may change how well these products work. Some affected products include atazanavir, dasatinib, delavirdine, certain azole antifungals (such as itraconazole, ketoconazole), pazopanib, among others.Do not take this medication with other products that contain famotidine or other H2 blockers (cimetidine, nizatidine, ranitidine).

overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

notes

Lifestyle changes such as stress reduction programs, stopping smoking, limiting alcohol, and diet changes (such as avoiding caffeine and certain spices) may help this medication work better. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Rolaids

Generic Name: calcium carbonate and magnesium hydroxide (KAL see um KAR boe nate and mag NEE zee um hye DROX ide)
Brand Name: Mi-Acid Double Strength, Mylanta Supreme, Rolaids

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Mar 5, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • Images
  • More

What is Rolaids?

Calcium and magnesium are naturally occurring minerals that are necessary for many systems in the body. Calcium is necessary for bone formation and maintenance.

Rolaids is a combination antacid used to treat indigestion, upset stomach, and heartburn.

Rolaids may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Rolaids if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an antacid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have kidney disease.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy or while you are nursing.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take Rolaids?

This medication is usually taken between meals or at bedtime. Follow the instructions on the medicine label. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or more often than recommended.

The chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not take Rolaids for longer than 14 days in a row without medical advice.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse after 2 weeks of using Rolaids.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since antacids are used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are on a schedule, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Rolaids?

Avoid taking other medications at the same time you take an antacid. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb certain drugs, making them less effective. Take your other medications at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take Rolaids.

Rolaids side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Rolaids and call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of high calcium or magnesium levels in your blood:

  • nausea, vomiting, constipation;

  • increased thirst or urination;

  • muscle weakness, bone pain;

  • confusion, weakness, feeling tired;

  • trouble breathing; or

  • slow heart rate, feeling light-headed.

Common side effects may include:

  • diarrhea;

  • constipation; or

  • upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Rolaids?

Many drugs can interact with Rolaids. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • an antibiotic;

  • heart or blood pressure medication;

  • HIV or AIDS medications; or

  • medication to treat osteoporosis or Paget’s disease of bone.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with Rolaids. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Rolaids Regular Strength (calcium carbonate / magnesium hydroxide)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • Drug class: antacids
  • FDA Alerts (1)
  • Rolaids

Other brands: Masanti Supreme, Mi-Acid Double Strength, Mylanta Supreme, Mylanta Ultra

  • Indigestion

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *