What is the active ingredient in dramamine?

Dramamine

Dramamine is the brand name of dimenhydrinate, anantihistamine that can be bought over-the-counter (OTC) to help prevent the symptoms of motion sickness, which range from nausea and vomiting to dizziness.

It is also used off-label to treat nausea and dizziness associated with inner ear conditions like Meniere’s disease.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1949, the brand name Dramamine is marketed by Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. It comes in tablet form but can also be bought as a liquid or chewable tablet.

At dosages of 800 to 1,250 milligrams (mg), Dramamine has been known to produce hallucinations. On the street it goes by the names dime, dime tabs, “D-Q,” “substance D,” “d-house,” and “drams,” and those abusing it often say they are dramatizing or going a dime a dozen, which is often considered the dosage necessary to produce the effect.

The medication has also been used as a sedative and/or to prevent vomiting and nausea in some pets.

Children under 2 years of age should not be given Dramamine unless directed to do so by a pediatrician.

If you are pregnant, do not take Dramamine unless your doctor prescribes it for you. The medication will pass into your breast milk so you should not breastfeed while using it.

It’s very important that you not take Dramamine if there is any chance you might be allergic to it or to similar medications.

Never exceed the recommended dose or use this medication more often or for longer periods of time without first asking your doctor if it is okay to do so.

Dramamine is known to make you feel dizzy, and adding alcohol, very hot weather, exercise, or a fever into the mix, can make this effect worse. To help prevent dizziness, try not to jump up quickly after sitting or lying down, especially first thing in the morning. If you are feeling dizzy, try to sit or lie down right away.

If possible, avoid becoming overheated since you could have a heatstroke.

Don’t combine Dramamine with other drugs that contain diphenhydramine. Read all the labels on your products, including skin products, to make sure they do not contain this ingredient or any antihistamines. If they do, or if you’re unsure, contact your doctor.

If you are elderly you should be aware that you may be more sensitive to Dramamine’s side effects, especially problems like dizziness, sedation, or feeling lightheaded when you stand.

To help your doctor decide if Dramamine is right for you, it’s important that you give her/him a complete medical history.

Let your doctor know about any allergies to foods, medicines, or other substances.

Tell your physician if you have any of the following health conditions:

  • Asthma
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Emphysema
  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lung disease
  • Sleep apnea
  • Blockages in your stomach, intestines, or urinary tract
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Diabetes
  • Ulcers
  • Enlargement of the prostate
  • Glaucoma
  • Heart disease
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • High blood pressure
  • Thyroid disease along with a group of rare disorders called
  • Porphyrias (a group of rare genetic disorders that result in part of your hemoglobin not being made properly)

Generic Name: Dimenhydrinate
Product Name: Dramamine

Indication

Dramamine is used for prevention and relief of nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, vertigo, electroshock therapy, anaesthesia and surgery, labyrinthitis and radiation sickness.

Action

Dramamine is an antihistamine. It also acts as a sedative agent and has anticholinergic properties. These properties enhances its effects on the vestibular system and its antinauseant properties.

Dose advice

Dose information:

  • Dramamine should be taken with food.
  • Dramamine may cause drowsiness. If you are affected, do not drive or operate machineries as your alerness may be compromised.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol or other medications that may potentiate the sedating effects of Dramamine.

Contraindications:

Dramamine should not be used

  • if you have known allergy to active ingredient of Dramamine, dimenhydrinate
  • in children under 2 years old

Precautions:

You must tell your doctor if you

  • have glaucoma
  • have emphysema
  • have chronic pulmonary disease
  • have shortness of breath
  • have difficulty in breathing
  • have difficulty in urination due to enlargement of the prostat gland
  • have urinary retention
  • have acute porphyria
  • have epilepsy or seizure disorders
  • are taking any other medicines, including those that you buy without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food store
  • are pregnant
  • are breasfeeding or intend to breastfeed

Use in pregnancy (Category A):

Despite it is consider safe to use Dramamine during pregnancy, you should check with your doctor before using Dramamine.

Lactation:

Small amounts of Dramamine are excreted in breast milk. Dramamine should not be given to breastfeeding mothers unless the benefits of therapy outweigh the potential risks.

Schedule

Dramamine is Schedule 2.

Common side effects

All medicines have side effects. Most commonly the side effects are minor, however some can be more serious. Usually the benefits of taking a medication outweigh the associated side effects. Your doctor would have considered these side effects before starting you on Dramamine.

Common side effects are those which occur in more than 1% of patients given Drmamine. These include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Blurred vision
  • Tinnitus
  • Incoordination
  • Palpitations
  • Low blood presure
  • Dry mouth
  • Lassitude
  • Excitement
  • Nausea

Uncommon side effects

Side effects which occur in less than 0.1% of patients given Dramamine are considered uncommon. Patients do not necessarily experience any of these side effects, so do not become alarmed by this list:

If you experience any of the listed side effects, or any other symptoms which appear abnormal or unusual, please tell your doctor.

  • blood dyscrasias (prolonged therapy)
  • fixed drug erruption

For further information talk to your doctor.

Antivert

Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Last reviewed on RxList 01/04/2019

Antivert (meclizine HCl) is an antihistamine used to prevent or treat nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness and may be used to reduce lightheadedness, dizziness, and loss of balance (vertigo) caused by diseases that affect the inner ear. Antivert is available as a generic drug, and should be taken by mouth with or without food, or as directed by your doctor. Some common side effects of Antivert include:

    • blurred vision,
    • dry mouth,
    • constipation,
    • dizziness,
    • drowsiness,
    • headache,
    • vomiting, or
    • tiredness.

    This is not a complete list of side effects, and others may occur.

    For the control of vertigo associated with diseases affecting the vestibular system, the recommended dose of Antivert is 25 to 100 mg daily, in divided dosage, depending upon clinical response. The initial dose of 25 to 50 mg of Antivert should be taken one hour prior to embarkation for protection against motion sickness. Thereafter, the dose may be repeated every 24 hours for the duration of the journey. Antivert may interact with alcohol, other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing (such as sleeping pills, narcotics, muscle relaxers, or medicines for anxiety, depression, or seizures), cinacalcet, quinidine, terbinafine, or antidepressants. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Antivert (meclizine HCl) should be used during pregnancy only if clearly necessary. It is unknown if Antivert passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

    Our Antivert (meclizine HCl) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

    This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Meclizine Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 6, 2019.

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For the Consumer

Applies to meclizine: oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

Along with its needed effects, meclizine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking meclizine:

Incidence not known

  • Cough
  • difficulty swallowing
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • fast heartbeat
  • hives
  • itching
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash
  • tightness in the chest
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects of meclizine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Rare

  • Blurred vision

Incidence not known

  • Dry mouth
  • headache

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to meclizine: compounding powder, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

Nervous system

Frequency not reported: Drowsiness, headache

Immunologic

Frequency not reported: Anaphylactoid reaction

Gastrointestinal

Frequency not reported: Dry mouth, vomiting

Ocular

Rare (less than 0.1%): Blurred vision

Other

Frequency not reported: Fatigue

1. “Product Information. Antivert (meclizine).” Roerig Division, New York, NY.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about meclizine

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 180 Reviews
  • Drug class: anticholinergic antiemetics

Consumer resources

  • Meclizine
  • Meclizine Chewable Tablets
  • Meclizine Tablets
  • Meclizine (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Antivert, Bonine, Dramamine Less Drowsy, Meclicot, … +4 more

Professional resources

  • Meclizine Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +2 more

Related treatment guides

  • Vertigo
  • Nausea/Vomiting
  • Motion Sickness

Brand Names: Antivert, Bonine, D-Vert, Dramamine II, Dramamine Less Drowsy, Meclicot, Meni-D, Ru-Vert-M, Travel-Ease, VertiCalm

Generic Name: meclizine

  • What is meclizine?
  • What are the possible side effects of meclizine?
  • What is the most important information I should know about meclizine?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking meclizine?
  • How should I take meclizine?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while taking meclizine?
  • What other drugs will affect meclizine?
  • Where can I get more information?

Meclizine is used to treat or prevent nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness.

Meclizine is also used to treat symptoms of vertigo (dizziness or spinning sensation) caused by disease that affects your inner ear.

Meclizine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of meclizine?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common side effects may include:

  • drowsiness;
  • dry mouth;
  • headache;
  • vomiting; or
  • feeling tired.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about meclizine?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Blog: Meclizine – Condensed

Blog Page | October 2015 Hearing Review

The following is Alan Desmond’s August 18, 2015 blog at his Dizziness Depot column at HearingHealthMatters.org.

By Alan Desmond, AuD

What is Meclizine?

Meclizine is an antihistamine with anticholinergic properties. According to Drugs.com, the mechanism of action is described as:

Antiemetic; antivertigo agent—Exhibits CNS depressant, anticholinergic, antiemetic, antispasmodic, and local anesthetic effects in addition to antihistaminic activity.

Depresses labyrinth excitability and conduction in vestibular-cerebellar pathways.

Antiemetic and antimotion-sickness actions result, at least in part, from central anticholinergic and CNS depressant properties.

Back in 2013, I did a three-part series1 reviewing the literature regarding the use of meclizine for complaints of “dizziness.” Today’s post updates and condenses those three posts into one, with some additional new information, hoping that this shorter version might serve as a patient handout.

Most patients complaining of dizziness or vertigo have been prescribed meclizine at some point. For a medication that is so widely used, there is very little solid information, creating potential for confusion regarding application and potential side effects. Meclizine is also packaged under the names Antivert, Bonine, and Dramamine II. So many patients come into our balance clinic having received a prescription for meclizine that I am in the habit of asking them about perceived benefit. After listening to their symptoms (some of which include vertigo, nausea, or motion sickness, but just as many do not), I ask them “What is it that the meclizine is treating?” The most common answer is “the dizziness.”

The term “dizziness” is very vague and can mean many different things. Some types of dizziness can be helped by a temporary prescription of meclizine; many types won’t be affected at all, and some could be made worse. In acute inner ear disease (such as Vestibular Neuritis/ Labyrinthitis or a Meniere’s episode), what is making you spin and nauseous is the brain trying to resolve the conflict between a healthy ear and an unhealthy ear sending different signals to the brain. The brain would rather receive no information from the inner ears than to receive conflicting information. Meclizine can help reduce this conflict and reduce vertigo and nausea. Medication taken to suppress vestibular symptoms ideally should be used only during the acute stage following vestibular insult, typically lasting 3 to 5 days. In order for maximal recovery to take place, the brain eventually must be made aware that a conflict exists, so meclizine must be withdrawn.

Meclizine and BPPV. A therapeutic dosage of meclizine creates a lasting sedating effect only to minimally reduce the intensity of symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which last only a few seconds. Canalith Repositioning procedures (also known as Epley maneuvers) are extremely effective in relieving the symptoms of positional vertigo. BPPV does not resolve any faster, and likelihood of future episodes is not affected by meclizine. The AAO-HNS Clinical Practice Guideline for BPPV released in 2008 recommends against the use of vestibular suppressants for BPPV.2

The Physicians Desk Reference lists potential adverse reactions for meclizine, noting that “Drowsiness, dry mouth and, on rare occasions, blurred vision have been reported.” But what about functional impact? Could meclizine potentially make your symptoms worse, or have other undesirable side effects?

Manning et al3 explored the central nervous system effects of meclizine and dimenhydrate (Dramamine I). Their results “demonstrate that both dimenhydrate and meclizine, in recommended doses, produce drowsiness and impaired mental performance greater than placebo.” These authors attempt to “interpret the meaning of the observed decrement in test scores” by comparing their results to the effects of ethanol (alcohol): “Ethanol serves as a unique drug to reference degree of impairment because there are epidemiologic data that relate to blood alcohol concentrations with a known risk (.07%) for being involved in a traffic accident.” Comparison of the data demonstrates that the effect of dimenhydrate and meclizine on mental reaction time is equal to that observed while blood alcohol levels were .04 percent to .06 percent. (In most states, .08 is legally drunk.) A more recent study found that long-term use of anticholinergics has been associated with higher-than-average rates of cognitive deficit and dementia.

The use of centrally sedating medication may impede the benefits of vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Vestibular patients taking vestibular suppressants, antidepressants, tranquilizers, and anticonvulsants ultimately achieve the same level of recovery as patients not taking similar medications, but the length of therapy needed tends to be longer.

The bottom line? Meclizine is helpful for vertigo associated with sudden acute vestibular asymmetry due to Meniere’s disease or Vestibular Neuritis/Labyrinthitis, but should be withdrawn once the acute symptoms have diminished. It is not recommended for complaints of lightheadedness, unsteadiness, loss of balance, or dysequilibrium, whether of vestibular origin or not. Vertigo related to BPPV is better treated through canalith repositioning techniques.

Alan Desmond, AuD

Alan Desmond, AuD, is the author of two textbooks, several book chapters, and two educational booklets for primary care physicians, all related to dizziness and vertigo. He is a co-author of the Clinical Practice Guideline for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, and represents the American Academy of Audiology at the American Medical Assn. He is the director of the new Balance Disorders Program at Wake Forest Univ Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC.

Chime in on Alan Desmond’s Dizziness Depot column at HearingHealthMatters.org

Original citation for this article: Desmond A. Meclizine – Condensed. Hearing Review. 2015;22(10):10.

Meclizine

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Dec 21, 2018.

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  • Dosage
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What is meclizine?

Meclizine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body.

Meclizine is used to treat or prevent nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness. It is also used to treat symptoms of vertigo (dizziness or spinning sensation) caused by disease that affects your inner ear.

Meclizine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to meclizine.

Before you take meclizine, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, asthma, glaucoma, an enlarged prostate, or urination problems.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of meclizine.

Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by meclizine.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use meclizine if you are allergic to it.

To make sure meclizine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have any of these conditions:

  • liver disease;

  • kidney disease;

  • asthma;

  • glaucoma;

  • enlarged prostate; or

  • urination problems.

FDA pregnancy category B. Meclizine is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether meclizine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

This medicine should not be given to a child younger than 12 years old.

How should I take meclizine?

Use meclizine exactly as directed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

To prevent motion sickness, take meclizine about 1 hour before you travel or engage in activity that causes motion sickness. You may take a dose once every 24 hours while you are traveling, to further prevent motion sickness.

To treat vertigo, you may need to take meclizine several times daily. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

This medication can affect the results of allergy skin tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using meclizine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since meclizine is sometimes taken only when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of meclizine.

Meclizine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to meclizine: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common meclizine side effects may include:

  • headache;

  • vomiting;

  • dry mouth;

  • tired feeling; or

  • drowsiness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect meclizine?

Taking meclizine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can increase these effects. Ask your doctor before taking meclizine with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with this medicine, especially:

  • cinacalcet;

  • quinidine;

  • terbinafine; or

  • the antidepressants bupropion, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline.

Other drugs may interact with meclizine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use now, and any medicine you start or stop using.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use meclizine only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 6.01.

Medical Disclaimer

Meclizine is the generic name for the prescription drug called Antivert and the over-the-counter (OTC) medicines known as Dramamine and Bonine. Meclizine is used to treat motion sickness and dizziness.

The drug belongs to a class of drugs called antihistamines, which are generally used to treat allergies. However, meclizine works a little differently, reducing nausea and muscle spasms.

Meclizine was originally approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1957 under the brand name Antivert, manufactured by Citron Pharmaceuticals.

The ‘Meclizine High’ and Abuse

Because meclizine causes drowsiness, there may be potential for abuse.

Dramamine comes in two versions with different active ingredients. There is more concern about abuse of the original version of Dramamine, because it contains the antihistamine dimenhydrinate, which can cause euphoria and hallucinations at high doses.

The other Dramamine contains meclizine and is referred to as the “less drowsy” version.

Meclizine Warnings

Meclizine can create or worsen problems for some people. You should talk to your doctor before taking meclizine if:

  • You have an allergy to meclizine or any of its ingredients
  • You take other medications that dull the nervous system
  • You are a person of advanced age
  • If you live where there is extremely hot weather

Before taking meclizine, you should talk to your doctor if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Poor kidney function
  • Poor liver function
  • Glaucoma or increased pressure between the eyes (intraocular pressure, or IOP)
  • Overactive thyroid
  • Heart disease
  • A breathing condition, such as asthma
  • Emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Blockage in your stomach or intestines
  • Acid reflux or stomach ulcers
  • Trouble urinating or an enlarged prostate
  • Blockage in the neck of your bladder

You should not take meclizine if you are taking any of the following:

  • Sodium oxybate (Xyrem), used to treat narcolepsy and some kinds of muscle problems
  • Potassium drugs, including potassium phosphate (K Phos), chloride (Klor Con), or citrate (Urocit-K)

Pregnancy and Meclizine

Meclizine falls under the FDA’s Pregnancy Category B, which means it has not been shown to harm a fetus.

Regardless, you should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before taking this medication.

You should also alert your physician if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It’s recommended that breastfeeding mothers not take this medication.

GENERIC NAME: MECLIZINE – ORAL (MECK-lih-zeen)

BRAND NAME(S): Antivert, D-vert, Dramamine II, Univert, Vertin

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: Meclizine is an antihistamine that is used to prevent or treat nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness. It may also be used to reduce lightheadedness, dizziness, and loss of balance (vertigo) caused by diseases that affect the inner ear.

HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth with or without food, or as directed by your doctor. To prevent motion sickness, take the first dose one hour before starting an activity such as travel. You may take another dose every 24 hours if needed. Chewable tablets must be chewed thoroughly before swallowing.Follow the directions on the label, or take as directed by your doctor. Do not take more medication than recommended. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions.For control of vertigo and other conditions, take as directed by your doctor. Your dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy.Inform your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

SIDE EFFECTS: Drowsiness, dry mouth, and tiredness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Some patients, particularly children, may experience excitability rather than drowsiness.If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: vision changes, decreased/painful urination, seizures.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking meclizine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (e.g., asthma, emphysema), glaucoma, prostate problems, seizure disorder.This drug may make you drowsy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.Caution is advised when using this drug in the elderly because they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially drowsiness.This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.This drug may pass into breast milk and could have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Therefore, breast-feeding is not recommended while using this medication. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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