What is prochlorperazine 10 mg used for?

Compazine

Brand Names: Compazine

Generic Name: prochlorperazine (oral)

  • What is prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • What are the possible side effects of prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • How should I take prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Compazine)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Compazine)?
  • What should I avoid while taking prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • What other drugs will affect prochlorperazine (Compazine)?
  • Where can I get more information (Compazine)?

What is prochlorperazine (Compazine)?

Prochlorperazine is an anti-psychotic medicine in a group of drugs called phenothiazines (FEEN-oh-THYE-a-zeens). It works by changing the actions of chemicals in your brain.

Prochlorperazine oral (taken by mouth) is used to treat psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. It is also used to treat anxiety, and to control severe nausea and vomiting.

Prochlorperazine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of prochlorperazine (Compazine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking prochlorperazine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of a serious movement disorder:

  • tremors or shaking in your arms or legs;
  • uncontrolled muscle movements in your face (chewing, lip smacking, frowning, tongue movement, blinking or eye movement); or
  • any new or unusual muscle movements you cannot control.

Also call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • little or no urinating;
  • trouble swallowing, stiffness or muscle spasms in your neck;
  • feeling restless, jittery, or agitated;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • fast or slow heart rate;
  • low white blood cell counts–sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, swollen gums, mouth sores, pain when swallowing, skin sores, cough, trouble breathing;
  • lupus-like syndrome–joint pain or swelling with fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, chest pain, vomiting, unusual thoughts or behavior, and patchy skin color; or
  • severe nervous system reaction–very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out.

Side effects such as painful or difficult urination, constipation, and confusion may be more likely in older adults.

Common side effects may include:

  • dizziness, drowsiness;
  • blurred vision;
  • itching or rash;
  • missed menstrual periods; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about prochlorperazine (Compazine)?

You should not use prochlorperazine if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications.

Prochlorperazine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old or weighing less than 20 pounds. Do not give this medicine to a child before or after a surgery.

Prochlorperazine is not approved for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Prochlorperazine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

What is Prochlorperazine?

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

    For chlorpromazine

  • For oral extended-release capsule dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—30 to 300 milligrams (mg) one to three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
  • For oral concentrate, syrup, or tablet dosage forms:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 10 to 25 mg two to four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 to 25 mg every four to six hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 to 25 mg every four to six hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For sedation before surgery:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg two to three hours before surgery.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, two to three hours before surgery.
    • For treatment of hiccups:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg three or four times a day. If hiccups remain after two to three days of oral treatment, treatment by injection may be needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For porphyria:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg three or four times a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For severe mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated in one hour, and every three to twelve hours thereafter. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults—At first, 25 mg injected into a muscle. If needed, doses of 25 to 50 mg may be given every three to four hours.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting during surgery:
      • Adults—At first, 12.5 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated if needed. Or up to 25 mg may be diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.275 mg per kg (0.125 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle or diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For sedation before surgery:
      • Adults—12.5 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle one to two hours before surgery.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle one to two hours before surgery.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For treatment of hiccups:
      • Adults—25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle three or four times a day. If hiccups remain after treatment by injection into muscle, 25 to 50 mg may be diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For porphyria:
      • Adults—25 mg injected into a muscle every six to eight hours.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For tetanus:
      • Adults—25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle three or four times a day. Or 25 to 50 mg, diluted and injected slowly into a vein. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours or diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For rectal dosage form (suppositories):
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—50 to 100 mg, inserted into the rectum every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 1 mg per kg (0.45 mg per pound) of body weight, inserted into the rectum every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For fluphenazine

  • For oral dosage form (elixir, solution, or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, a total of 2.5 to 10 milligrams (mg) a day, taken in smaller doses every six to eight hours during the day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day.
      • Children—0.25 to 0.75 mg one to four times a day.
      • Older adults—1 to 2.5 mg a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
  • For long-acting decanoate injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 12.5 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every one to three weeks. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 100 mg.
      • Children 12 years of age and older—At first, 6.25 to 18.75 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin once a week. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg every one to three weeks.
      • Children 5 to 12 years of age—3.125 to 12.5 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every one to three weeks.
  • For long-acting enanthate injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 25 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every two weeks. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 100 mg.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For short-acting hydrochloride injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 1.25 mg, injected into a muscle. Your doctor may repeat and increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Older adults—1 to 2.5 mg a day, injected into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.

    For mesoridazine

  • For oral dosage form (solution or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 milligrams (mg) three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated in thirty to sixty minutes if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For pericyazine

  • For oral dosage form (capsules or solution):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) taken in the morning, and 10 mg taken in the evening. Your doctor may change your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg taken in the morning and 40 mg taken in the evening.
      • Children 5 years of age and older—2.5 to 10 mg taken in the morning, and 5 to 30 mg taken in the evening.
      • Children up to 5 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Older adults—At first, 5 mg a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 30 mg a day.

    For perphenazine

  • For oral dosage form (solution):
    • For mental or emotional disorders in hospitalized patients:
      • Adults and teenagers—8 to 16 milligrams (mg) two to four times a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For oral dosage form (tablet):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—4 to 16 mg two to four times a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 8 to 16 mg a day, taken in smaller doses during the day. Your doctor will lower your dose as soon as possible.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg injected into a muscle every six hours.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 to 10 mg injected into a muscle, or 5 mg diluted and injected slowly into a vein. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For pipotiazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders in hospitalized patients:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 to 100 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle every two to three weeks. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg every four weeks.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For prochlorperazine

  • For long-acting oral dosage form (extended-release capsules):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 15 mg taken once a day in the morning, or 10 mg taken every twelve hours. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
  • For oral dosage forms (solution or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 to 10 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—2.5 mg two or three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, for children 2 through 5 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day. For children 6 to 12 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg three or four times a day.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 mg taken one to three times a day.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 10 to 20 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated if needed. Later, the dose is usually 10 to 20 mg every four to six hours. However, the dose usually is not more than 200 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.132 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.06 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose for children 2 through 5 years of age usually is not more than 20 mg a day. The dose for children 6 to 12 years of age usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle every three to four hours as needed. Or 2.5 to 10 mg injected slowly into a vein. The dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.132 mg per kg (0.06 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose for children 2 through 5 years of age usually is not more than 20 mg a day. The dose for children 6 to 12 years of age usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting in surgery:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle or injected slowly into a vein. The dose may be repeated if needed. However, the total dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For rectal dosage form (suppositories):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 mg inserted into the rectum three or four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—2.5 mg inserted into the rectum two or three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, for children 2 through 5 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day. For children 6 to 12 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 mg inserted into the rectum two times a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 mg inserted into the rectum one to three times a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For promazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 50 to 150 mg, injected into a muscle or, in hospitalized patients, diluted and injected into a vein. Later, 10 to 200 mg, injected into a muscle every four to six hours.
      • Children 12 years of age and older—10 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For thioproperazine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 11 years of age and older—At first, a total of 1 to 3 mg a day taken all at one time in a single dose each day or divided and taken in smaller doses several times during the day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 3 through 10 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For thioridazine

  • For oral dosage forms (suspension, solution, or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 to 100 milligrams (mg) one to three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 800 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—At first, 10 to 25 mg two or three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose, if needed, based on body weight or size.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For trifluoperazine

  • For oral dosage forms (syrup or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 2 to 5 milligrams (mg) one or two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children 6 to 12 years of age—At first, 1 mg one or two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—1 to 2 mg, injected into a muscle every four to six hours as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children 6 to 12 years of age—1 mg injected into a muscle one or two times a day.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For triflupromazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—60 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg a day.
      • Children 2½ years of age and older—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.2 to 0.25 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.09 to 0.11 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2½ years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 15 mg injected into a muscle every four hours, as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 60 mg a day injected into a muscle. Or 1 mg injected into a vein, the dose being repeated as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 3 mg a day injected into a vein.
      • Children 2½ years of age and older—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.2 to 0.25 mg per kg (0.09 to 0.11 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2½ years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

SIDE EFFECTS

Drowsiness, dizziness, amenorrhea, blurred vision, skin reactions and hypotension may occur. Cholestatic jaundice has occurred. If fever with grippe-like symptoms occurs, appropriate liver studies should be conducted. If tests indicate an abnormality, stop treatment. There have been a few observations of fatty changes in the livers of patients who have died while receiving the drug. No causal relationship has been established.

Leukopenia and agranulocytosis have occurred. Warn patients to report the sudden appearance of sore throat or other signs of infection. If white blood cell and differential counts indicate leukocyte depression, stop treatment and start antibiotic and other suit- able therapy.

Neuromuscular (Extrapyramidal) Reactions

These symptoms are seen in a significant number of hospitalized mental patients. They may be characterized by motor restlessness, be of the dystonic type, or they may resemble parkinsonism. Depending on the severity of symptoms, dosage should be reduced or discontinued. If therapy is reinstituted, it should be at a lower dosage. Should these symptoms occur in children or pregnant patients, the drug should be stopped and not reinstituted. In most cases barbiturates by suitable route of administration will suffice. (Or, injectable diphenhydramine may be useful.) In more severe cases, the administration of an anti-parkinsonism agent, except levodopa (see PDR), usually produces rapid reversal of symptoms. Suitable supportive measures such as maintaining a clear airway and adequate hydration should be employed.

Motor Restlessness

Symptoms may include agitation or jitteriness and sometimes insomnia. These symptoms often disappear spontaneously. At times these symptoms may be similar to the original neurotic or psychotic symptoms. Dosage should not be increased until these side effects have subsided. If these symptoms become too troublesome, they can usually be controlled by a reduction of dosage or change of drug. Treatment with anti-parkinsonian agents, benzodiazepines or propranolol may be helpful.

Dystonia

Class Effect

Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment.

Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups.

Pseudo-parkinsonism

Symptoms may include: mask-like facies; drooling; tremors; pillrolling motion; cogwheel rigidity; and shuffling gait. Reassurance and sedation are important. In most cases these symptoms are readily controlled when an anti-parkinson- ism agent is administered concomitantly. Antiparkinsonism agents should be used only when required. Generally, therapy of a few weeks to 2 or 3 months will suffice. After this time patients should be evaluated to determine their need for continued treatment. (Note: Levodopa has not been found effective in pseudo-parkinsonism.) Occasionally it is nec- essary to lower the dosage of prochlorperazine or to discontinue the drug.

Tardive Dyskinesia

As with all antipsychotic agents, tardive dyskinesia may appear in some patients on long-term therapy or may appear after drug therapy has been discontinued. The syndrome can also develop, although much less frequently, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses. This syndrome appears in all age groups. Although its prevalence appears to be highest among elderly patients, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict at the inception of neuroleptic treatment which patients are likely to develop the syndrome. The symptoms are persis- tent and in some patients appear to be irreversible. The syndrome is characterized by rhythmical involuntary movements of the tongue, face, mouth or jaw (e.g., protrusion of tongue, puffing of cheeks, puckering of mouth, chewing movements). Sometimes these may be accompanied by involuntary movements of extremities. In rare instances, these involuntary movements of the extremities are the only manifestations of tardive dyskinesia. A variant of tardive dyskinesia, tardive dystonia, has also been described.

There is no known effective treatment for tardive dyskinesia; anti-parkinsonism agents do not alleviate the symptoms of this syndrome. It is suggested that all antipsychotic agents be discontinued if these symptoms appear.

Should it be necessary to reinstitute treatment, or increase the dosage of the agent, or switch to a different antipsychotic agent, the syndrome may be masked.

It has been reported that fine vermicular movements of the tongue may be an early sign of the syndrome and if the medication is stopped at that time the syndrome may not develop.

Adverse Reactions Reported With Prochlorperazine Or Other Phenothiazine Derivatives

Adverse reactions with different phenothiazines vary in type, frequency and mechanism of occurrence, i.e., some are dose-related, while others involve individual patient sensitivity. Some adverse reactions may be more likely to occur, or occur with greater intensity, in patients with special medical problems, e.g., patients with mitral insufficiency or pheochromocytoma have experienced severe hypotension following recommended doses of certain phenothiazines.

Not all of the following adverse reactions have been observed with every phenothiazine derivative, but they have been reported with 1 or more and should be borne in mind when drugs of this class are administered: extrapyramidal symptoms (opisthotonos, oculogyric crisis, hyperreflexia, dystonia, akathisia, dyskinesia, parkinsonism) some of which have lasted months and even years- particularly in elderly patients with previous brain damage; grand mal and petit mal convulsions, particularly in patients with EEG abnormalities or history of such disorders; altered cerebrospinal fluid proteins; cerebral edema; intensification and prolongation of the action of central nervous system depressants (opiates, analgesics, antihistamines, barbiturates, alcohol), atropine, heat, organophosphorus insecticides; autonomic reactions (dryness of the mouth, nasal congestion, headache, nausea, constipation, obstipation, adynamic ileus, ejaculatory disorders/impotence, priapism, atonic colon, urinary retention, miosis and mydriasis); reactivation of psychotic processes, catatonic-like states; hypotension (sometimes fatal); cardiac arrest; blood dyscrasias (pancytopenia, thrombocytopenic purpura, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, eosinophilia, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia); liver damage (jaundice, biliary stasis); endocrine disturbances (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, glycosuria, lactation, galactorrhea, gynecomastia, menstrual irregularities, false-positive pregnancy tests); skin disorders (photosensitivity, itching, erythema, urticaria, eczema up to exfoliative dermatitis); other allergic reactions (asthma, laryngeal edema, angioneurotic edema, anaphylactoid reactions); peripheral edema; reversed epinephrine effect; hyperpyrexia; mild fever after large I.M. doses; increased appetite; increased weight; a systemic lupus erythematosus-like syndrome; pigmentary retinopathy; with prolonged administration of substantial doses, skin pigmentation, epithelial keratopathy, and lenticular and corneal deposits.

EKG changes-particularly nonspecific, usually reversible Q and T wave distortions – have been observed in some patients receiving phenothiazine tranquilizers.

Although phenothiazines cause neither psychic nor physical dependence, sudden discontinuance in long-term psychiatric patients may cause temporary symptoms, e.g., nausea and vomiting, dizziness, tremulousness.

Note: There have been occasional reports of sudden death in patients receiving phenothiazines. In some cases, the cause appeared to be cardiac arrest or asphyxia due to failure of the cough reflex.

To Report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Perrigo at 1-800-328-5113, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Compazine (Prochlorperazine)

Compazine Side Effects

Generic Name: prochlorperazine

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 6, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about prochlorperazine. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Compazine.

For the Consumer

Applies to prochlorperazine: oral tablet

Other dosage forms:

  • rectal suppository

Warning

Oral route (Tablet)

Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death compared with placebo. Although the causes of death in clinical trials were varied, most deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (eg, heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (eg, pneumonia) in nature. Observational studies suggest that, similar to atypical antipsychotic drugs, treatment with conventional antipsychotic drugs may increase mortality. It is unclear from these studies to what extent the mortality findings may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to patient characteristics. Prochlorperazine maleate is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis.

Along with its needed effects, prochlorperazine (the active ingredient contained in Compazine) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking prochlorperazine:

Incidence not known

  • Agitation
  • black, tarry stools
  • chest pain
  • clay-colored stools
  • constipation
  • dark urine
  • decrease in how much or how often you urinate
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty in swallowing and breathing
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when suddenly getting up from a lying or sitting position
  • drooling
  • drowsiness
  • dryness of the mouth
  • fever and chills
  • headache
  • inability to have or keep an erection
  • loss of appetite
  • mask-like face
  • nasal congestion
  • nausea
  • painful or difficult urination
  • shuffling walk
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • stomach pain
  • swollen glands
  • tightness of the throat
  • trembling and shaking of the fingers and hands
  • uncontrolled chewing movements and movements of the arms and legs
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes or skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking prochlorperazine:

Symptoms of overdose

  • Change in consciousness
  • fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat
  • loss of consciousness
  • seizures
  • severe sleepiness

Some side effects of prochlorperazine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known

  • Blurred vision
  • increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight
  • irregular menstrual periods
  • itching, rash, redness, or discoloration of the skin
  • jitteriness
  • trouble sleeping

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to prochlorperazine: compounding powder, injectable solution, oral capsule extended release, oral syrup, oral tablet, rectal suppository

Hematologic

Very common (10% or more): Mild leukopenia (up to 30%)

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Blood dyscrasia

Frequency not reported: Agranulocytosis, pancytopenia, thrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, eosinophilia, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, atypical lymphocytes

Blood dyscrasias included pancytopenia, thrombocytopenic purpura, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, eosinophilia, hemolytic anemia, and aplastic anemia.

Mild leukopenia occurred in patients given high doses for prolonged durations.

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Drowsiness, dyskinesia, akathisia, parkinsonism, tremor/tremulousness

Frequency not reported: Convulsion, grand mal/petit mal convulsion, seizures, dizziness, altered consciousness, extrapyramidal reactions, dystonia/acute dystonia/acute dystonic reactions, akinesia, tardive dyskinesia, autonomic dysfunction, headache, opisthotonos, hyperreflexia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, cerebral edema, EEG changes, altered cerebrospinal fluid proteins

Acute dystonia was usually transitory, but was more commonly reported in young adults and children shortly after beginning treatment or increasing the dosage.

Akathisia usually occurred in patients who were given large initial doses.

Autonomic dysfunction included dry mouth, nasal congestion, headache, nausea, constipation, obstipation, adynamic ileus, ejaculatory disorders/impotence, priapism, atonic colon, urinary retention, miosis, and mydriasis.

Extrapyramidal reactions include acute dystonia, akathisia, parkinsonism, and tardive dyskinesia. These reactions have lasted months to years, especially in elderly patients with brain damage.

Grand and petit mal convulsions have occurred in patients with/with a history of EEG abnormalities.

Parkinsonism typically occurred in adults and elderly patients after weeks to months of treatment, and included tremor, rigidity, akinesia, and most commonly, tremor.

Gastrointestinal

Common (1% to 10%): Constipation, dry mouth

Frequency not reported: Gum/mouth irritation, obstipation, atonic colon, paralytic/adynamic ileus, nausea and vomiting

Ocular

Lenticular and corneal deposits occurred in patients who received large doses over a prolonged duration.

Common (1% to 10%): Blurred vision

Frequency not reported: Oculogyric crisis, ocular changes, miosis, mydriasis, pigmentary retinopathy, lenticular and corneal deposits

Musculoskeletal

Common (1% to 10%): Rigidity

Frequency not reported: Trismus, torticollis, systemic lupus erythematosus-like syndrome

Cardiovascular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypotension, peripheral edema, cardiac arrhythmia, ECG changes, QT prolongation, deep vein thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, cyanosis, sudden death of cardiac origin

Frequency not reported: Fatal hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, ST depression, ventricular/atrial arrhythmias, atrioventricular block, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, cardiac arrest, U-Wave and T-Wave changes/distortions

Cardiovascular side effects may be correlated with higher doses and may occur more frequently in patients with risk factors (e.g., patients with cardiac disease, hypokalemia, receiving tricyclic antidepressants, and/or who are elderly).

Cyanosis occurred in pediatric patients who developed laryngospasm form serious dystonic tractions.

Hypotension occurred more frequently in patients who received IM doses of this drug.

Hepatic

Elevated bilirubin and hepatic enzyme levels occurred in patients who developed cholestatic jaundice.

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Elevated bilirubin and hepatic enzyme levels

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Jaundice/transient jaundice

Frequency not reported: Liver damage, cholestatic jaundice, cholestasis/biliary stasis

Other

Mild fever usually occurred after patients were given large IM doses.

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Sudden death/unexplained sudden death

Frequency not reported: Neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome, hyperthermia, hyperpyrexia, mild fever, reversed epinephrine effect, intensification and prolongation of the action of atropine, heat, organophosphorous insecticides, and central nervous system depressants (e.g., opiates, analgesics, antihistamines, barbiturates, alcohol)

Genitourinary

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Galactorrhea, amenorrhea/menstrual irregularities

Frequency not reported: Ejaculation disorder/inhibition, priapism, impotence, lactation, urinary retention

Endocrine

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hyperprolactinemia/elevated prolactin levels, gynecomastia,

Frequency not reported: Endocrine disturbances, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), false-positive pregnancy tests

Dermatologic

Frequency not reported: Rash, dermatitis, skin disorders/reaction, photosensitivity, itching, erythema, urticaria, eczema, exfoliative dermatitis, angioneurotic edema, contact skin sensitization/dermatitis, maculopapular eruptions, erythema multiforme, abnormal pigmentation/skin pigmentation and epithelial keratopathy

Skin pigmentation and epithelial keratopathy occurred in patients who received large doses over a prolonged duration.

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Insomnia, agitation, activation/reactivation of psychotic processes, catatonia/catatonic-like states

Metabolic

Frequency not reported: Hyponatremia, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, increased appetite, increased weight, impaired glucose tolerance

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Asthma, laryngeal edema, pulmonary embolism/fatal pulmonary embolism, nasal stuffiness/congestion, respiratory depression

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Angioedema, anaphylactoid reactions, hypersensitivity reactions/type I hypersensitivity reaction

Local

Frequency not reported: Metallic gray-mauve coloration to exposed skin

Renal

Frequency not reported: Glycosuria

1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

3. “Product Information. Compazine (prochlorperazine).” SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Compazine (prochlorperazine)

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • 167 Reviews
  • Drug class: phenothiazine antiemetics
  • FDA Alerts (2)

Consumer resources

  • Compazine (Advanced Reading)
  • Compazine Rectal (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Compro

Professional resources

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Related treatment guides

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Before using prochlorperazine,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to prochlorperazine, other phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, perphenazine, promethazine (Phenergan), thioridazine, and trifluoperazine; or any other medications. If you will be taking prochlorperazine tablets, also tell your doctor if you are allergic to tartrazine (a yellow dye found in some foods and medications) or aspirin.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); antidepressants; antihistamines; atropine (in Motofen, in Lomotil, in Lonox); barbiturates such as pentobarbital (Nembutal), phenobarbital (Luminal), and secobarbital (Seconal); diuretics (‘water pills’); epinephrine (Epipen); guanethidine (not available in the US); ipratropium (Atrovent); lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid), medications for anxiety, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, motion sickness, ulcers, or urinary problems; medications for seizures such as phenytoin (Dilantin); narcotic medications for pain; propranolol (Inderal); sedatives; sleeping pills; and tranquilizers. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had glaucoma (condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual loss of vision), trouble keeping your balance, seizures, an abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG; test that measures electrical activity in the brain), brain damage, pheochromocytoma (tumor on a small gland near the kidneys), breast cancer, any condition that affects the production of blood cells by your bone marrow, or heart disease. Also tell your doctor if you have ever had to stop taking a medication for mental illness due to severe side effects and if you plan to work with organophosphorus insecticides (a type of chemical used to kill insects).
  • if you will be giving prochlorperazine to a child, tell the child’s doctor if the child has chickenpox, measles, a stomach virus, or an infection of the brain or spinal cord. Also tell the child’s doctor if the child has any of the following symptoms: vomiting, listlessness, drowsiness, confusion, aggression, seizures, yellowing of the skin or eyes, weakness, or flu-like symptoms. Be sure to tell the child’s doctor if the child has not been drinking normally, has excessive diarrhea, or appears dehydrated.
  • if you will be using prochlorperazine to treat nausea and vomiting, it is important to tell your doctor about any other symptoms you are experiencing, especially listlessness; drowsiness; confusion; aggression; seizures; headaches; problems with vision, hearing, speech, or balance; stomach pain or cramps; or constipation. Nausea and vomiting that is experienced along with these symptoms may be a sign of a more serious condition that should not be treated with prochlorperazine.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy, or if you plan to become pregnant or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking prochlorperazine, call your doctor. Ptrochlorperazine may cause problems in newborns following delivery if it is taken during the last months of pregnancy.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using prochlorperazine.
  • if you will be having a myelogram (x-ray examination of the spine), tell your doctor and the radiographer that you are taking prochlorperazine. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take prochlorperazine for 2 days before the myelogram and for one day after the myelogram.
  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy and may affect your thinking and movements, especially at the beginning of your treatment. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • ask your doctor about the safe use of alcohol during your treatment with prochlorperazine. Alcohol can make the side effects of prochlorperazine worse.
  • you should know that prochlorperazine may cause dizziness, especially when you get up from a lying position. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up.
  • you should know that prochlorperazine may make it harder for your body to cool down when it gets very hot. Tell your doctor if you plan to do vigorous exercise or be exposed to extreme heat.

  • Prepak Systems Inc.
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  • Sandoz
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  • Stat Rx Usa
  • Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
  • UDL Laboratories
  • Vangard Labs Inc.
  • Dosage forms

    Form Route Strength
    Capsule, extended release Oral 10 mg/1
    Capsule, extended release Oral 15 mg/1
    Injection, solution Intramuscular; Intravenous 5 mg/1mm
    Suppository Rectal 2.5 mg/1
    Suppository Rectal 5 mg/1
    Syrup Oral 5 mg/5mL
    Tablet, coated Oral 10 mg/1
    Tablet, coated Oral 5 mg/1
    Suppository Rectal
    Tablet Oral
    Suppository Rectal 25 mg/1
    Injection Intramuscular 5 mg/1mL
    Injection Intramuscular; Intravenous 5 mg/1mL
    Injection, solution Intramuscular; Intravenous 5 mg/1mL
    Tablet Oral 10 mg/1
    Tablet Oral 5 mg/1
    Tablet Oral 5 mg/61
    Tablet, film coated Oral 10 mg/1
    Tablet, film coated Oral 5 mg/1
    Liquid Intramuscular; Intravenous
    Solution Intramuscular; Intravenous
    Syrup Oral

    Prices

    Unit description Cost Unit
    Prochlorperazine mal powder 4.77USD g
    Compazine 25 mg suppository 4.25USD suppository
    Prochlorperazine 25 mg suppository 3.13USD suppository
    Compro 25 mg suppository 3.05USD suppository
    Compazine 5 mg tablet 1.82USD tablet
    Compazine 10 mg tablet 1.8USD tablet
    Prochlorperazine 5 mg/ml vial 1.22USD ml
    Prochlorperazine 5 mg/ml 0.91USD ml
    Prochlorperazine Maleate 10 mg tablet 0.88USD tablet
    Sandoz Prochlorperazine 10 mg Suppository 0.87USD suppository
    Prochlorperazine 10 mg tablet 0.85USD tablet
    Prochlorperazine Maleate 5 mg tablet 0.59USD tablet
    Prochlorperazine 5 mg tablet 0.57USD tablet
    Apo-Prochlorazine 10 mg Tablet 0.21USD tablet
    Apo-Prochlorazine 5 mg Tablet 0.17USD tablet
    Novamine 15% iv solution 0.09USD ml

    DrugBank does not sell nor buy drugs. Pricing information is supplied for informational purposes only. Patents Not Available

    Properties

    State Solid Experimental Properties Predicted Properties

    Property Value Source
    Water Solubility 0.011 mg/mL ALOGPS
    logP 4.67 ALOGPS
    logP 4.38 ChemAxon
    logS -4.5 ALOGPS
    pKa (Strongest Basic) 8.39 ChemAxon
    Physiological Charge 1 ChemAxon
    Hydrogen Acceptor Count 3 ChemAxon
    Hydrogen Donor Count 0 ChemAxon
    Polar Surface Area 9.72 Å2 ChemAxon
    Rotatable Bond Count 4 ChemAxon
    Refractivity 109.81 m3·mol-1 ChemAxon
    Polarizability 41.77 Å3 ChemAxon
    Number of Rings 4 ChemAxon
    Bioavailability 1 ChemAxon
    Rule of Five Yes ChemAxon
    Ghose Filter Yes ChemAxon
    Veber’s Rule Yes ChemAxon
    MDDR-like Rule No ChemAxon

    Predicted ADMET features

    Property Value Probability
    Human Intestinal Absorption + 0.9821
    Blood Brain Barrier + 0.9781
    Caco-2 permeable + 0.7729
    P-glycoprotein substrate Substrate 0.8537
    P-glycoprotein inhibitor I Inhibitor 0.817
    P-glycoprotein inhibitor II Inhibitor 0.8577
    Renal organic cation transporter Inhibitor 0.7615
    CYP450 2C9 substrate Non-substrate 0.7702
    CYP450 2D6 substrate Non-substrate 0.5179
    CYP450 3A4 substrate Non-substrate 0.5346
    CYP450 1A2 substrate Inhibitor 0.9376
    CYP450 2C9 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.907
    CYP450 2D6 inhibitor Inhibitor 0.9723
    CYP450 2C19 inhibitor Inhibitor 0.8994
    CYP450 3A4 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.7676
    CYP450 inhibitory promiscuity High CYP Inhibitory Promiscuity 0.8557
    Ames test Non AMES toxic 0.8999
    Carcinogenicity Non-carcinogens 0.9456
    Biodegradation Not ready biodegradable 1.0
    Rat acute toxicity 2.3496 LD50, mol/kg Not applicable
    hERG inhibition (predictor I) Weak inhibitor 0.8165
    hERG inhibition (predictor II) Inhibitor 0.786

    ADMET data is predicted using admetSAR, a free tool for evaluating chemical ADMET properties. (23092397)

    Spectra

    Mass Spec (NIST) (10.4 KB) Spectra

    Spectrum Spectrum Type Splash Key
    Predicted GC-MS Spectrum – GC-MS Predicted GC-MS Not Available
    GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-01vo-9853000000-ba88fedd94e150c34e1a
    GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0229-7933000000-4e14a9a9728c361941d3
    Mass Spectrum (Electron Ionization) MS splash10-022c-9752000000-533ac31876b44d82f2aa
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    MS/MS Spectrum – , positive LC-MS/MS splash10-00fr-0219000000-abf2f9a1f6a1efb497b8

    Taxonomy

    Description This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenothiazines. These are polycyclic aromatic compounds containing a phenothiazine moiety, which is a linear tricyclic system that consists of a two benzene rings joined by a para-thiazine ring. Kingdom Organic compounds Super Class Organoheterocyclic compounds Class Benzothiazines Sub Class Phenothiazines Direct Parent Phenothiazines Alternative Parents Alkyldiarylamines / Diarylthioethers / N-methylpiperazines / Benzenoids / Aryl chlorides / 1,4-thiazines / Trialkylamines / Azacyclic compounds / Organopnictogen compounds / OrganochloridesHydrocarbon derivatives show 1 more Substituents Phenothiazine / Alkyldiarylamine / Diarylthioether / Aryl thioether / Tertiary aliphatic/aromatic amine / N-alkylpiperazine / N-methylpiperazine / Para-thiazine / Aryl chloride / Aryl halide1,4-diazinane / Benzenoid / Piperazine / Tertiary aliphatic amine / Tertiary amine / Azacycle / Thioether / Organic nitrogen compound / Organonitrogen compound / Organochloride / Organohalogen compound / Hydrocarbon derivative / Organopnictogen compound / Amine / Aromatic heteropolycyclic compound show 15 more Molecular Framework Aromatic heteropolycyclic compounds External Descriptors phenothiazines, organochlorine compound, N-alkylpiperazine, N-methylpiperazine (CHEBI:8435)

    Targets

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Antagonist General Function Potassium channel regulator activity Specific Function Dopamine receptor whose activity is mediated by G proteins which inhibit adenylyl cyclase. Gene Name DRD2 Uniprot ID P14416 Uniprot Name D(2) dopamine receptor Molecular Weight 50618.91 Da Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Antagonist Curator comments This binding interaction is theoretical based on the actions of the phenothiazine drug class and requires further investigation. General Function Histamine receptor activity Specific Function In peripheral tissues, the H1 subclass of histamine receptors mediates the contraction of smooth muscles, increase in capillary permeability due to contraction of terminal venules, and catecholamin… Gene Name HRH1 Uniprot ID P35367 Uniprot Name Histamine H1 receptor Molecular Weight 55783.61 Da Kind Protein group Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Antagonist Curator comments This binding interaction is theoretical based on the actions of the phenothiazine drug class and requires further investigation. General Function Protein heterodimerization activity Specific Function This alpha-adrenergic receptor mediates its action by association with G proteins that activate a phosphatidylinositol-calcium second messenger system. Its effect is mediated by G(q) and G(11) prot…

    Components:

    Kind Protein group Organism Humans Pharmacological action No Actions Antagonist Curator comments This binding interaction is theoretical based on the actions of the phenothiazine drug class and requires further investigation. General Function Thioesterase binding Specific Function Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors mediate the catecholamine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase through the action of G proteins. The rank order of potency for agonists of this receptor is oxymetazo…

    Enzymes

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Steroid hydroxylase activity Specific Function Responsible for the metabolism of many drugs and environmental chemicals that it oxidizes. It is involved in the metabolism of drugs such as antiarrhythmics, adrenoceptor antagonists, and tricyclic… Gene Name CYP2D6 Uniprot ID P10635 Uniprot Name Cytochrome P450 2D6 Molecular Weight 55768.94 Da ×Unlock Data

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    Drug created on June 13, 2005 07:24 / Updated on February 02, 2020 04:13

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