What is cefdinir for?

Contents

How Long Does Omnicef Take To Work

How long does Omnicef take to work? | Yahoo AnswersResolved Doctor insights on: Cefdinir How Long Does It Take To Work Dr. Semel on cefdinir how long does it take to work: Doctor insights on: Cefdinir How Long Does It Take To Work How long does it take for omnicef how long for omnicef to work – MedHelpHow long for omnicef to work. I don’t know what to do, I still have to take the meds for another does allegra work for animal allergies 6 days and who knows how long it will take to go back to normal!Omnicef – Antibiotics Home PageHow Does Omnicef Work? For the medication to work properly, you have to take it as prescribed. What Are the Long-Term Effects of Stimulants for Adult ADHD?Cefdinir: MedlinePlus Drug InformationAntibiotics lansoprazole 15 mg bid such as cefdinir will not work for colds, Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Omnicef take to work?How long does Omnicef – mcrh.orgOmnicef is cefdinir, How long does Omnicef take to work? Omnicef is cefdinir, When you ask “how long it is”, Omnicef Reviews & Ratings at Drugs.comShe took amox for all of them but it just didn’t work. Dr gave her Can I take omnicef or erythromycin for uti or bladder How long will he break out with How long does it take for omnicef (cefdinir) to work for I usually expect most antibiotics to begin to take hold within 24-48 hrs. That doesn’t mean “cure, ” but rather noticeable improvement. Be sure to complete the full How long does it usually take for antibiotics to start How long does it usually take for antibiotics to How long does antibiotics take to work for How long does it take to recover from tonsillitis without cefdinir oral – WebMDFind patient medical information for cefdinir oral on WebMD including its uses, Omnicef. GENERIC NAME(S): CEFDINIR. It will not work for viral infections

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How long does it take for cefdinir to work. How long for omnicef to work. What does cefdinir treat. How long is cefdinir good. MedHelp. Develop. Join our team.Omnicef: Uses, Dosage & Side Effects – Drugs.comTake Omnicef exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Lost Work March 10, 2017;Omnicef Drug and Medication User Reviews on RxListOmnicef User Reviews My 10 month old daughter was prescribed this for an ear infection after amoxicilin didn’t work. it was bad and it took a long time to Ear Infection: How Long Does It Take for Antibiotics to How Long Does It Take for Antibiotics to Start Working? against which the first line antibiotics do no longer work. Omnicef (more powerful Omnicef for treating UTI? | Bladder, Ureters & Urethral 2 posts Omnicef oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions – WebMDFind patient medical information for Omnicef oral on WebMD How to use Omnicef. Take this medication by mouth Antibiotics work best when the amount of Omnicef (Cefdinir) Drug vua dau bep soma chap 123 Overview and Uses for Patients and Consumer drug overview and uses for the medication Omnicef (Cefdinir). It will not work for viral infections HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth, Cefdinir – Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions | Everyday Cefdinir (Omnicef) is an antibiotic which work by killing bacteria or halting be aware that side effects might be heightened because cefdinir will take longer cefdinir (Omnicef has been discontinued) – MedicineNetCefdinir is an antibiotic in the cephalosporin drug class prescribed to treat cefdinir (Omnicef has been discontinued) Pharmacy Author: Omudhome How long does it take for omnicef to get out of your systemHow amiodarone in atrial fibrillation journals long does it take for omnicef to get out of your system Nov 6, 2011 . 1 Answer really so if the Benadryl does not work go back and get steriods

Cefdinir vs Amoxicillin: Main Differences and Similarities

Cefdinir and amoxicillin are two generic antibiotics that can treat a number of infections. Both drugs are grouped in a class of antibiotics called beta-lactams. They work by interrupting the cell wall of the bacteria so that they eventually shrivel and die. Although both antibiotics can treat similar infections, they also have distinct features that separate them from each other.

Cefdinir is a beta-lactam that is further classified as a third generation cephalosporin. It is effective against strains of gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

Compared to other cephalosporin antibiotics, cefdinir has broader coverage for gram-negative bacteria. Cefdinir can treat infections such as community acquired pneumonia, acute otitis media, bronchitis, and pharyngitis.

Cefdinir can be administered as an oral capsule or suspension. Duration of treatment can often last up to 10 days although this heavily depends on the infection being treated. Treatment is most effective after determining that the bacteria is susceptible to cefdinir.

Amoxicillin

Amoxicillin is a beta-lactam that is further classified as a penicillin. Like cefdinir, it can also treat gram positive and gram negative bacteria. However, specific strains of bacteria may differ.

Amoxicillin can treat H. pylori infections, lower respiratory tract infections, and gonorrhea among other infections. Amoxicillin works best when it is treating susceptible bacteria. Otherwise, there is a risk of bacterial resistance and treatment failure.

Amoxicillin is available as an oral capsule, tablet, suspension, and chewable tablet. Treatment duration depends your doctor’s instruction and the infection being treated.

Cefdinir vs Amoxicillin Side by Side Comparison

Cefdinir and Amoxicillin are generic antibiotics that can treat similar infections. Their similarities and differences are further outlined in the table below.

Cefdinir Amoxicillin
Prescribed For
  • Skin and soft tissue infections
  • Pharyngitis
  • Sinusitis
  • Lower respiratory tract infections
  • Ear, nose, and throat infection
  • Community acquired pneumonia
  • Acute otitis media
  • Bronchitis
  • Skin and soft tissue infections
  • Pharyngitis
  • Sinusitis
  • Lower respiratory tract infections
  • Ear, nose, and throat infection
  • H. pylori infection
  • Gonorrhea
  • Genitourinary tract infections
  • Bacterial endocarditis
Drug Classification
  • Beta-lactam
  • Cephalosporin
  • Beta-lactam
  • Penicillin
Manufacturer
  • Generic
  • Generic
Common Side Effects
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Candida vaginitis
  • Rash
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Headache
  • Changes in taste
Is there a generic?
  • Cefdinir is the generic name.
  • Amoxicillin is the generic name.
Is it covered by insurance?
  • Varies according to your provider
  • Varies according to your provider
Dosage Forms
  • Oral capsule
  • Oral powder for suspension
  • Oral tablet
  • Oral tablet, chewable
  • Oral capsule
  • Oral powder for suspension
Average Cash Price
  • $82 per 20, 300mg, capsules
  • $9 per 14 chewable tablets
SingleCare Discount Price
  • Cefdinir Price
  • Amoxicillin Price
Drug Interactions
  • Antacids
  • Probenecid
  • Warfarin
  • Iron
  • Probenecid
  • Chloramphenicol
  • Macrolides
  • Sulfonamides
  • Tetracyclines
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Methotrexate
  • Warfarin
Can I use while planning pregnancy, pregnant, or breastfeeding?
  • Cefdinir is in Pregnancy Category B. It does not pose a risk for fetal harm. Consult a doctor regarding steps to take if planning pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Amoxicillin is in Pregnancy Category B. It does not pose a risk for fetal harm. Consult a doctor regarding steps to take if planning pregnancy or breastfeeding.

Summary

Cefdinir and amoxicillin are generic beta-lactam antibiotics. While they work in similar ways, they can treat different infections. Someone with community acquired pneumonia may be more likely to get cefdinir as opposed to amoxicillin. On the other hand, someone with gonorrhea may be prescribed amoxicillin instead of cefdinir.

Both antibiotics share similar side effects such as abdominal discomfort and diarrhea. They also have similar drug interactions with medications like probenecid and warfarin. Taking these medications together may cause increased side effects.

Because of the possibility of bacterial resistance, it is important that the right antibiotic is taken. Depending on what infection you have, one antibiotic may be more effective over the other. Cefdinir and amoxicillin should only be used after a complete examination by a doctor.

Omnicef

Brand Names: Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac

Generic Name: cefdinir

  • What is cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What are the possible side effects of cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • How should I take cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What should I avoid while taking cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • What other drugs will affect cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?
  • Where can I get more information (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?

What is cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?

Cefdinir is a cephalosporin (SEF a low spor in) antibiotic that is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria.

Cefdinir may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling).

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;
  • pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • fever, weakness, confusion;
  • dark colored urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
  • kidney problems–little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea;
  • vaginal itching or discharge;
  • headache; or
  • rash (including diaper rash in an infant taking liquid cefdinir.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about cefdinir (Omnicef, Omnicef Omni-Pac)?

Do not take this medicine if you are allergic to cefdinir, or to similar antibiotics, such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Keflex, and others.

Foxy
Fast Facts

What is foxy?

Foxy and foxy methoxy are common names for a synthetic drug with the chemical name 5-methoxy-N, N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT). Abused for the hallucinogenic effects it produces, foxy belongs to a class of chemical compounds known as tryptamines. (Other hallucinogenic tryptamines include psilocybin and psilocyn.)

What does foxy look like?

Foxy is typically available as a powder, capsule, or tablet. (Generally the powder is placed into capsules or pressed into tablets before it is sold to users.) Some capsules and tablets contain foxy powder mixed with blue, green, red, purple, tan, orange, gray, or pink powders. The tablets sometimes are embossed with logos such as a spider or an alien head.


Emptied foxy capsule.
DEA


Foxy tablet with spider logo.
DEA


Capsule with blue foxy powder.
NDIC

How is foxy used?

Foxy is typically consumed orally in 6- to 20-milligram dosages, although dosage amounts vary widely. The drug also may be administered via smoking or snorting. Typically, users begin to feel the drug’s effects 20 to 30 minutes after administration. The hallucinogenic effects peak after approximately 60 to 90 minutes and generally last for 3 to 6 hours.

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Who abuses foxy?

Foxy typically is abused by teenagers and young adults. The drug often is used at raves, nightclubs, and other venues where the use of club drugs, particularly MDMA (ecstasy), is well-established. In order to capitalize on the popularity of MDMA and other club drugs, dealers sell foxy and other noncontrolled synthetic substances in these environments. However, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) made foxy a controlled substance through emergency scheduling in April 2003.

What are the risks?

Foxy produces a variety of negative physical and psychological effects in users. The physical effects include dilated pupils, visual and auditory disturbances and distortions, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The psychological effects associated with the use of foxy include hallucinations, talkativeness, and emotional distress. Foxy also diminishes user inhibitions, often resulting in high-risk sexual activity.

In addition, foxy is a dose-dependent drug. This means that increasing the dose results in a corresponding increase in the intensity of the drug’s effects. Doubling a 6-milligram dose, for instance, may produce effects similar to those associated with LSD.

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Is foxy illegal?

Yes, foxy is illegal. In April 2003 DEA temporarily designated foxy a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act. Schedule I drugs, which include heroin and MDMA, have a high potential for abuse and serve no legitimate medical purpose in the United States.

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Sinusitis in Children

  • Symptoms (nasal congestion, sinus pressure/headache, facial pain, sore throat, cough) lasting for 10 days or more and not improving
  • Symptoms (as above) with fever over 102 degrees lasting for 3-4 days in a row
  • Cold symptoms lasting 5-6 days that improved but were then followed by new fever, headache, cough, nasal discharge or facial pain
  • Xrays are NOT accurate for diagnosing sinusitis. They can result in both under-diagnosis and over-diagnosis. The best test to detect the presence of infection is a CT scan of the sinuses.

  • Adults meeting the criteria above can be treated with antibiotics for just 5-7 days. Children should still get 10-14 days of treatment.
  • Which antibiotics are best for sinus infections in children?

    • The antibiotic of choice for both children and adults who are not allergic to penicillin is amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (Augmentin™).
    • Azithromycin (Zithromax™, Z-pack™) is NOT recommended for sinusitis due to bacterial resistance.
    • Cefinir (Omnicef™) and other cephalosporins are NOT recommended for sinusitis except in combination therapy with clindamycin for children with non-life- threatening allergic reactions to penicillin. In these cases, the cephalosporin of choice is cefixime (Suprax™).
    • Levofloxacin (Levaquin™) or doxycycline are the recommended antibiotics for adults with true penicillin allergies. Levofloxacin can also be considered for the treatment of children with life-threatening allergic reactions to penicillin. Doxycyline is not for use in children.
    • Oral decongestants are not recommended for the treatment of sinusitis. Antihistamines may be used if there are underlying seasonal/environmental allergies.
    • Nasal steroid sprays and nasal saline flushes can be helpful for sinusitis.

    Lou Romig, MD, FAAP, FACEP, Medical Director

    After Hours Pediatrics Urgent Care

    CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

    Pharmacokinetics And Drug Metabolism

    Absorption

    Oral Bioavailability

    Maximal plasma cefdinir concentrations occur 2 to 4 hours postdose following capsule or suspension administration. Plasma cefdinir concentrations increase with dose, but the increases are less than dose-proportional from 300 mg (7 mg/kg) to 600 mg (14 mg/kg). Following administration of suspension to healthy adults, cefdinir bioavailability is 120% relative to capsules. Estimated bioavailability of cefdinir capsules is 21% following administration of a 300 mg capsule dose, and 16% following administration of a 600 mg capsule dose. Estimated absolute bioavailability of cefdinir suspension is 25%. Cefdinir oral suspension of 250 mg/5 mL strength was shown to be bioequivalent to the 125 mg/5 mL strength in healthy adults under fasting conditions.

    Effect of Food

    The Cmax and AUC of cefdinir from the capsules are reduced by 16% and 10%, respectively, when given with a high-fat meal. In adults given the 250 mg/5 mL oral suspension with a high-fat meal, the Cmax and AUC of cefdinir are reduced by 44% and 33%, respectively. The magnitude of these reductions is not likely to be clinically significant because the safety and efficacy studies of oral suspension in pediatric patients were conducted without regard to food intake. Therefore, cefdinir may be taken without regard to food.

    Cefdinir Capsules

    Cefdinir plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameter values following administration of single 300- and 600-mg oral doses of cefdinir to adult subjects are presented in the following table:

    Mean (± SD) Plasma Cefdinir Pharmacokinetic Parameter Values Following Administration of Capsules to Adult Subjects

    Dose Cmax (μg/mL) tmax (hr) AUC (μg•hr/mL)
    300 mg 1.6 (0.55) 2.9 (0.89) 7.05 (2.17)
    600 mg 2.87 (1.01) 3 (0.66) 11.1 (3.87)

    Cefdinir Suspension

    Cefdinir plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameter values following administration of single 7- and 14-mg/kg oral doses of cefdinir to pediatric subjects (age 6 months-12 years) are presented in the following table:

    Mean (± SD) Plasma Cefdinir Pharmacokinetic Parameter Values Following Administration of Suspension to Pediatric Subjects

    Dose Cmax(μg/mL) tmax(hr) AUC(μg•hr/mL)
    7 mg/kg 2.3 (0.65) 2.2 (0.6) 8.31 (2.5)
    14 mg/kg 3.86 (0.62) 1.8 (0.4) 13.4 (2.64)

    Multiple Dosing

    Cefdinir does not accumulate in plasma following once- or twice-daily administration to subjects with normal renal function.

    Distribution

    The mean volume of distribution (Vdarea) of cefdinir in adult subjects is 0.35 L/kg (± 0.29); in pediatric subjects (age 6 months-12 years), cefdinir Vdarea is 0.67 L/kg (± 0.38). Cefdinir is 60% to 70% bound to plasma proteins in both adult and pediatric subjects; binding is independent of concentration.

    Skin Blister

    Tonsil Tissue

    In adult patients undergoing elective tonsillectomy, respective median tonsil tissue cefdinir concentrations 4 hours after administration of single 300- and 600-mg doses were 0.25 (0.220.46) and 0.36 (0.22-0.80) μg/g. Mean tonsil tissue concentrations were 24% (± 8) of corresponding plasma concentrations.

    Sinus Tissue

    In adult patients undergoing elective maxillary and ethmoid sinus surgery, respective median sinus tissue cefdinir concentrations 4 hours after administration of single 300- and 600-mg doses were < 0.12 ( < 0.12-0.46) and 0.21 ( < 0.12-2.0) μg/g. Mean sinus tissue concentrations were 16% (± 20) of corresponding plasma concentrations.

    Lung Tissue

    Middle Ear Fluid

    In 14 pediatric patients with acute bacterial otitis media, respective median middle ear fluid cefdinir concentrations 3 hours after administration of single 7- and 14-mg/kg doses were 0.21 ( < 0.09-0.94) and 0.72 (0.14-1.42) μg/mL. Mean middle ear fluid concentrations were 15% (± 15) of corresponding plasma concentrations.

    CSF

    Data on cefdinir penetration into human cerebrospinal fluid are not available.

    Metabolism and Excretion

    Cefdinir is not appreciably metabolized. Activity is primarily due to parent drug. Cefdinir is eliminated principally via renal excretion with a mean plasma elimination half-life (t½) of 1.7 (± 0.6) hours. In healthy subjects with normal renal function, renal clearance is 2.0 (± 1.0) mL/min/kg, and apparent oral clearance is 11.6 (± 6.0) and 15.5 (± 5.4) mL/min/kg following doses of 300- and 600-mg, respectively. Mean percent of dose recovered unchanged in the urine following 300- and 600-mg doses is 18.4% (± 6.4) and 11.6% (± 4.6), respectively. Cefdinir clearance is reduced in patients with renal dysfunction (see Special Populations – Patients with Renal Insufficiency).

    Because renal excretion is the predominant pathway of elimination, dosage should be adjusted in patients with markedly compromised renal function or who are undergoing hemodialysis (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

    Special Populations

    Patients with Renal Insufficiency

    Cefdinir pharmacokinetics were investigated in 21 adult subjects with varying degrees of renal function. Decreases in cefdinir elimination rate, apparent oral clearance (CL/F), and renal clearance were approximately proportional to the reduction in creatinine clearance (CLcr). As a result, plasma cefdinir concentrations were higher and persisted longer in subjects with renal impairment than in those without renal impairment. In subjects with CLcr between 30 and 60 mL/min, Cmax and t½ increased by approximately 2-fold and AUC by approximately 3-fold. In subjects with CLcr < 30 mL/min, Cmax increased by approximately 2-fold, t½ by approximately 5fold, and AUC by approximately 6-fold. Dosage adjustment is recommended in patients with markedly compromised renal function (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min; see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

    Hemodialysis

    Cefdinir pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 adult subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Dialysis (4 hours duration) removed 63% of cefdinir from the body and reduced apparent elimination t½ from 16 (± 3.5) to 3.2 (± 1.2) hours. Dosage adjustment is recommended in this patient population (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

    Hepatic Disease

    Because cefdinir is predominantly renally eliminated and not appreciably metabolized, studies in patients with hepatic impairment were not conducted. It is not expected that dosage adjustment will be required in this population.

    Geriatric Patients

    The effect of age on cefdinir pharmacokinetics after a single 300-mg dose was evaluated in 32 subjects 19 to 91 years of age. Systemic exposure to cefdinir was substantially increased in older subjects (N = 16), Cmax by 44% and AUC by 86%. This increase was due to a reduction in cefdinir clearance. The apparent volume of distribution was also reduced, thus no appreciable alterations in apparent elimination t½ were observed (elderly: 2.2 ± 0.6 hours vs young: 1.8 ± 0.4 hours). Since cefdinir clearance has been shown to be primarily related to changes in renal function rather than age, elderly patients do not require dosage adjustment unless they have markedly compromised renal function (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min, see Patients with Renal Insufficiency, above).

    Gender and Race

    The results of a meta-analysis of clinical pharmacokinetics (N = 217) indicated no significant impact of either gender or race on cefdinir pharmacokinetics.

    Microbiology

    Mechanism of Action

    As with other cephalosporins, bactericidal activity of cefdinir results from inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Cefdinir is stable in the presence of some, but not all, β-lactamase enzymes. As a result, many organisms resistant to penicillins and some cephalosporins are susceptible to cefdinir.

    Mechanism of Resistance

    Resistance to cefdinir is primarily through hydrolysis by some β-lactamases, alteration of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and decreased permeability. Cefdinir is inactive against most strains of Enterobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp., Enterococcus spp., penicillin-resistant streptococci, and methicillin-resistant staphylococci. β-lactamase negative, ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) H. influenzae strains are typically non-susceptible to cefdinir.

    Antimicrobial Activity

    Cefdinir has been shown to be active against most strains of the following microorganisms, both in vitro and in clinical infections as described in INDICATIONS AND USAGE.

    Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible strains only)
    Streptococcus pneumoniae (penicillin-susceptible strains only)
    Streptococcus pyogenes

    Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Haemophilus influenzae
    Haemophilus parainfluenzae
    Moraxella catarrhalis

    The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown.

    Cefdinir exhibits in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 1 mcg/mL or less against ( ≥ 90%) strains of the following microorganisms; however, the safety and effectiveness of cefdinir in treating clinical infections due to these microorganisms have not been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials.

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (methicillin-susceptible strains only)
    Streptococcus agalactiae
    Viridans group streptococci

    Citrobacter koseri
    Escherichia coli
    Klebsiella pneumoniae
    Proteus mirabilis

    Susceptibility Test Methods

    When available, the clinical microbiology laboratory should provide periodic reports that describe the regional/local susceptibility profile of potential nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. These reports should aid the physician in selecting an antibacterial drug for treatment.

    Dilution Techniques

    Quantitative methods are used to determine antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). These MICs provide estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The MICs should be determined using a standardized test method1 (broth and/or agar). The MIC values should be interpreted according to criteria provided in Table 1.

    Diffusion Techniques

    Quantitative methods that require measurement of zone diameters also provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The zone size should be determined using a standardized method.2 The procedure uses paper disks impregnated with 5 mcg cefdinir to test the susceptibility of bacteria. The disk diffusion interpretive criteria are provided in Table 1.

    Table 1: Susceptibility Test Interpretive Criteria for Cefdinir

    Microorganismsa Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (mcg/mL) Zone Diameter (mm)
    S I R S I R
    Haemophilus influenzae ≤ 1 ≥ 20
    Haemophilus parainfluenzae ≤ 1 ≥ 20
    Moraxella catarrhalis ≤ 1 2 ≥ 4 ≥ 20 17 – 19 ≤ 16
    Streptococcus pneumoniaeb ≤ 0.5 1 ≥ 2
    Streptococcus pyogenes ≤ 1 2 ≥ 4 ≥ 20 17 – 19 ≤ 16
    aStreptococci other than S. pneumoniae that are susceptible to penicillin (MIC ≤ 0.12 mcg/mL), can be considered susceptible to cefdinir.
    bS. pneumoniae that are susceptible to penicillin (MIC ≤ 0.06 mcg/mL) can be considered susceptible to cefdinir. Isolates of S. pneumoniae tested against a 1-μg oxacillin disk with oxacillin zone sizes ≥ 20 mm are susceptible to penicillin and can be considered susceptible to cefdinir. Testing of cefdinir against penicillin-intermediate or penicillin-resistant isolates is not recommended. Reliable interpretive criteria for cefdinir are not available.

    Susceptibility of staphylococci to cefdinir may be deduced from testing penicillin and either cefoxitin or oxacillin. Staphylococci susceptible to oxacillin (cefoxitin) can be considered susceptible to cefdinir.3

    A report of “Susceptible” indicates that antimicrobial is likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial compound reaches the concentrations at the site of infection necessary to inhibit growth of the pathogen. A report of “Intermediate” indicates that the result should be considered equivocal, and, if the microorganism is not fully susceptible to alternative, clinically feasible drugs, the test should be repeated. This category implies possible clinical applicability in body sites where the drug is physiologically concentrated or in situations where a high dosage of drug can be used. This category also provides a buffer zone that prevents small uncontrolled technical factors from causing major discrepancies in interpretation. A report of “Resistant” indicates that the antimicrobial is not likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial compound reaches the concentrations usually achievable at the infection site; other therapy should be selected.

    Quality Control

    Standardized susceptibility test procedures require the use of laboratory controls to monitor and ensure the accuracy and precision of supplies and reagents used in the assay, and the techniques of the individual performing the test.1,2,3 Standard cefdinir powder should provide the following range of MIC values as noted in Table 2. For the diffusion technique using a 5 mcg disk the criteria in Table 2 should be achieved.

    Table 2: Acceptable Quality Control Ranges for Cefdinir

    Clinical Studies

    Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    In a controlled, double-blind study in adults and adolescents conducted in the US, cefdinir BID was compared with cefaclor 500 mg TID. Using strict evaluability and microbiologic/clinical response criteria 6 to 14 days posttherapy, the following clinical cure rates, presumptive microbiologic eradication rates, and statistical outcomes were obtained:

    US Community-Acquired Pneumonia Study Cefdinir vs Cefaclor

    In a second controlled, investigator-blind study in adults and adolescents conducted primarily in Europe, cefdinir BID was compared with amoxicillin/clavulanate 500/125 mg TID. Using strict evaluability and clinical response criteria 6 to 14 days posttherapy, the following clinical cure rates, presumptive microbiologic eradication rates, and statistical outcomes were obtained:

    European Community-Acquired Pneumonia Study Cefdinir vs Amoxicillin/Clavulanate

    Streptococcal Pharyngitis/Tonsillitis

    In four controlled studies conducted in the United States, cefdinir was compared with 10 days of penicillin in adult, adolescent, and pediatric patients. Two studies (one in adults and adolescents, the other in pediatric patients) compared 10 days of cefdinir QD or BID to penicillin 250 mg or 10 mg/kg QID. Using strict evaluability and microbiologic/ clinical response criteria 5 to 10 days posttherapy, the following clinical cure rates, microbiologic eradication rates, and statistical outcomes were obtained:

    Pharyngitis/Tonsillitis Studies Cefdinir (10 days) vs Penicillin (10 days)

    Two studies (one in adults and adolescents, the other in pediatric patients) compared 5 days of cefdinir BID to 10 days of penicillin 250 mg or 10 mg/kg QID. Using strict evaluability and microbiologic/clinical response criteria 4 to 10 days posttherapy, the following clinical cure rates, microbiologic eradication rates, and statistical outcomes were obtained:

    Pharyngitis/Tonsillitis Studies Cefdinir (5 days) vs Penicillin (10 days)

    1. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically; Approved Standard – Tenth Edition. CLSI Document M07-A10 , Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

    2. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Diffusion Susceptibility Tests; Approved Standard – Twelfth Edition. CLSI Document M02-A12 , Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

    3. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing; Twenty-fifth Informational Supplement, CLSI Document M100-S25 , Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

    4. Cockcroft DW, Gault MH. Prediction of creatinine clearance from serum creatinine. Nephron 1976;16:31-41.

    5. Schwartz GJ, Haycock GB, Edelmann CM, Spitzer A. A simple estimate of glomerular filtration rate in children derived from body length and plasma creatinine. Pediatrics 1976;58:259-63.

    6. Schwartz GJ, Feld LG, Langford DJ. A simple estimate of glomerular filtration rate in full-term infants during the first year of life. J Pediatrics 1984;104:849-54.

    Can You Get a Cefdinir Prescription Online?

    Table of Contents

    Do you need an antibiotic? If you have a pretty good idea of what you’re dealing with and just need a prescription for an antibiotic, the frustration of having to make an appointment to go to your doctor’s office can be overwhelming. That may be why you’re wondering if you can get a cefdinir prescription online.

    The short answer is yes, you can get cefdinir or another antibiotic prescribed online. To book an appointment with an online doctor and get cefdinir prescribed online click here. To read more about how online doctor consultations work, including pricing and insurance info, click here.

    However, not all antibiotics are created equal. That’s why we’re going to discuss what cefdinir is, how it works, the benefits and risks, and other considerations and precautions of cefdinir. Then, we’ll talk more about how you can get a cefdinir prescription online.

    What is Cefdinir?

    Cefdinir is a cephalosporin antibiotic that’s also known under the brand name of Omnicef. It’s used to treat bacterial infections. It does not treat viral infections like a cold or the flu.

    How Does Cefdinir Work?

    Like all antibiotics, cefdinir prevents the growth of bacteria.

    Cefdinir Dosage and Treatment

    These dosages are only a guideline. Always follow your doctor’s dosage instructions as they may vary from these guidelines.

    The typical dosage of cefdinir is 600 mg once a day or 300 mg twice per day for 10 days.

    Always take the entire course of antibiotics prescribed by your doctor, even if you start feeling better. Failing to do so can lead to a recurrence of your infection or the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Benefits of Cefdinir

    Cefdinir is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including:

    • Pneumonia
    • Bronchitis
    • Sinus infection
    • Ear infection
    • Skin infection
    • Tonsillitis
    • Throat infection

    Do not use cefdinir for viral infections like a cold or the flu.

    For information on cold treatment click here.

    For information on flu treatment click here.

    Side Effects of Cefdinir

    Like any medication, cefdinir does carry a risk of side effects. Potential side effects that you could experience while taking cefdinir include:

    • Headache
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Diarrhea
    • Indigestion
    • Dizziness
    • Reddish stool
    • Abdominal or stomach pain
    • Fatigue
    • Easy bleeding or bruising
    • Kidney problems
    • Mental or mood changes (like confusion)
    • Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (a severe intestinal condition)
    • Oral thrush
    • Vaginal yeast infection
    • Skin rash
    • Severe allergic reaction
    • Chest pain
    • Flu symptoms
    • Seizure
    • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
    • Diaper rash (in infants)
    • Increased thirst
    • Lack of appetite

    Considerations and Precautions of Cefdinir

    While cefdinir is generally considered safe, it isn’t appropriate for every individual or condition. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you take and your complete medical history.

    Cefdinir Interactions

    Cefdinir may interact with certain medications. Make sure you tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including vitamins, supplements, and over the counter medications. Be especially sure to mention any of the following:

    • Hormonal birth control
    • Other antibiotics
    • Probenecid (Benemid)
    • Vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron

    Other Cefdinir Considerations

    Cefdinir may cause complications with certain medical conditions. Always share your complete medical history with your doctor, especially:

    • Allergies to penicillin, other cephalosporin antibiotics, or other medications
    • Colitis (intestinal disease)
    • Kidney disease
    • Diabetes

    Cefdinir and Pregnancy or Breastfeeding

    Always talk to your doctor before taking any medication if you are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant. Cefdinir appears to be safe for pregnant women, but you should discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor if you are pregnant or become pregnant while taking cefdinir.

    Cefdinir does not seem to pass into breast milk. However, you should still talk to your doctor about using cefdinir if you are breastfeeding.

    Can You Buy Cefdinir Online?

    While it is possible to buy cefdinir online, you need to exercise some caution. Federal law requires everybody to speak to a doctor before getting a prescription medication like cefdinir, so websites that claim to be able to ship you medication from other countries without talking to a doctor first are skirting the law.

    Fortunately, there is a legal, reputable, and safe way to buy cefdinir online. With PlushCare, you can have a phone or video appointment with a licensed physician. If they determine that cefdinir is right for you, they can electronically send a prescription to a pharmacy near you.

    Getting started is easy. Simply or call (888) 418-5710 any time to schedule an appointment.

    At your appointment time, we’ll ask you to provide your medical history and current medications. This helps reduce the risk of complications or interactions.

    Then, you’ll have a video or phone appointment with one of our trusted doctors. You’ll talk to the doctor about your symptoms and concerns. If they feel like you would benefit from cefdinir (or a different medication), they will send an electronic prescription to your preferred pharmacy, and you can pick up your prescription as soon as it has been filled.

    It really is that easy to get a cefdinir prescription online. or call (888) 418-5710 now and find out how easy it can be to buy cefdinir online.

    PlushCare takes content accuracy seriously so we can be your trusted source of medical information. Most articles are reviewed by M.D.s, Ph.D.s, NPs, or NDs. Click here to meet the healthcare professionals behind the blog.

    Read More About Getting a Cefdinir Prescription Online

    • Can an Online Doctor Write a Prescription?
    • How Do Online Doctor Visits Work?
    • What Conditions Can Online Doctors Treat?
    • Can You Buy Antibiotics Online

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