What happens if you take too much nyquil?

Are you taking too much NyQuil? The surprising futility of drug labeling

“A consumer who takes a cold medicine containing, for instance, acetaminophen, may see nothing wrong with taking an additional medicine that also contains acetaminophen,” write authors Jesse R. Catlin (California State University, Sacramento), Connie Pechmann (University of California, Irvine), and Eric P. Brass (UCLA). “But in that case, he or she will likely ingest at least 1300 mg of acetaminophen, and if those doses are repeated every 4-6 hours, the consumer will take in at least 5200 mg of acetaminophen per day, well over the limit.”

Study participants included people with and without medical expertise. They were asked to read the labels on the packages of two different OTC drugs and report whether the two contained the same active ingredients. They were also asked to judge the risks of taking the two drugs at the same time. Both groups of participants–those with and without medical expertise–correctly determined whether the two drugs contained the same active ingredients. But only participants with medical expertise used that information to weigh the risks of taking two medications together.

In other words, the typical consumer, who is unlikely to have any medical expertise, may very well believe that there is no danger in taking any two OTC medications at the same time–even medications with the same active ingredients. This, the authors suggest, reflects the fact that the average person believes OTC drugs to be risk-free. Because of that “naïve” belief, most consumers are at risk of overdosing on nonprescription drugs. The authors suggest that standard labels be supplemented with public service announcements and explicit warnings on the labels themselves.

“Programs to educate the public on the risks of double-dosing must clearly emphasize that even over-the-counter medications can be dangerous when combined or misused. More broadly, this study suggests that it is vitally important for practitioners and policymakers to address safety issues by first working to understand what is at the root of the consumer’s misunderstanding,” conclude the authors.

64 Shares By Chris Crawford Editor Camille Renzoni Reviewer Jessica Pyhtila Updated on01/27/20

Most cough and cold medicines are over-the-counter drugs designed to treat cold symptoms. However, some people — especially teens — use cough and cold medicines to get high. This use can be risky enough on its own, but mixing Nyquil with other substances, including alcohol, can be dangerous. It’s important to know, and weigh, the risks of drinking alcohol along with Nyquil.

What Is Nyquil?

Nyquil is a brand-name medication that is available over the counter. When you have a bad cough or cold, the active ingredients in Nyquil are meant to remedy sleep issues.

It contains several different drugs under the Nyquil brand name. There are several different kinds of Nyquil, and they all contain different drugs in varying amounts. However, Nyquil usually contains some combination of:

  • Acetaminophen, a pain reliever also found in Tylenol
  • Dextromethorphan (also known as DXM), a cough suppressant
  • Doxylamine, an antihistamine which can be used to soothe allergies or sleep issues

Some Nyquil also contains alcohol. Nyquil Cold and Flu Nighttime Relief Liquid contains 10 percent alcohol by volume.

Can You Mix Alcohol and Nyquil?

It’s not a good idea to mix alcohol and Nyquil. Because alcohol interacts with many drugs, and because Nyquil contains several drugs, if you take them together, you are at high risk of experiencing drug interactions. It is not recommended to drink alcohol when you are using Nyquil, especially if you’re taking Nyquil Liquid, which already contains some alcohol.

Nyquil contains acetaminophen and doxylamine, and both react badly with alcohol. The two most significant drug interactions between Nyquil and alcohol are:

  • Alcohol and acetaminophen: Acetaminophen can harm your liver if you take too much. Taking acetaminophen with alcohol — even if you take lower doses — can cause severe liver damage.
  • Alcohol and doxylamine: Doxylamine is a central nervous system depressant. It can make you extremely sleepy. When you take it with alcohol, side effects are worse.

Alcohol and Nyquil Side Effects

Alcohol and Nyquil have many side effects in common. The side effects may be even more intense if you take them together because of the drug interactions between alcohol and Nyquil.

Common side effects of alcohol and Nyquil include:

  • Extreme drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of coordination
  • Impaired judgment
  • Increased risk of alcohol addiction

Some of the drugs in Nyquil have side effects of their own which can be worse when you drink alcohol. For example, in high doses, DXM can cause hallucinations, which is one of the reasons why DXM is abused, as the effect is similar to being high on ketamine or LSD.

Alcohol and Nyquil Addiction

If you drink in excess regularly (more than one drink a day for a woman and more than two drinks a day for a man) are at risk for alcohol abuse and addiction. Alcohol addiction is a big problem in America, and mixing Nyquil and alcohol only contributes to this issue.

However, cough and cold medicine like Nyquil can be addictive too, and not only because Nyquil may contain alcohol. In high doses, some of the ingredients in Nyquil, like DXM, can affect the reward center of the brain, giving you a sense of pleasure and increasing your risk of dependence and addiction.

The problem of cough and cold medicine abuse among teens has become so significant that Arizona, California, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, Virginia, and Washington have now banned the sale of DXM to people under 18 years old.

Because misuse of cough and cold medications like Nyquil is a relatively new development, the long-term effects of Nyquil abuse are not known. The long-term effects of alcohol abuse are very well known, however. Long-term alcohol addiction can damage your brain, heart, liver, pancreas and immune system, and alcohol use can even cause cancer.

Key Points: Alcohol and Nyquil

Remember these important points when considering drinking or taking Nyquil:

  • Cough and cold medicines like Nyquil are often used as directed to help relieve colds. However, they are sometimes used by people — especially teens — trying to get high
  • It is not safe to combine cough and cold medicines like Nyquil with alcohol
  • Drug interactions that alcohol has with common cough and cold medicine ingredients may occur when mixing alcohol and Nyquil
  • It is best to skip alcohol when taking cough or cold medicines

If you or a loved one struggle with alcohol or cough medicine addiction, trained professionals at The Recovery Village can help. The Recovery Village offers many different treatment options to help you overcome addiction. Reach out to us today for more information.

  • Sources

    Vicks. “Vicks Nyquil FAQ.” (n.d.) Accessed March 30, 2019.

    National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens. “Cough and Cold Medicine.” Updated March 2019. Accessed March 30, 2019.

    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. “Alcohol’s Effects on the Body.” (n.d.) Accessed March 30, 2019.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.

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Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu Side effects

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  • Side effects of Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu in details
  • Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu reviews

Side effects of Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu in details

A side effect of any drug can be defined as the unwanted or undesired effect produced by the drug. The side effect can be major or in few medications minor that can be ignored. Side effects not only vary from drug to drug, but it also depends on the dose of the drug, the individual sensitivity of the person, brand or company which manufactures it. If side effects overweigh the actual effect of the medicine, it may be difficult to convince the patient to take the drug. Few patients get specific side effects to specific drugs; in that case, a doctor replaces the drug with another. If you feel any side effect and it troubles you, do not forget to share with your healthcare practitioner. sponsored

Other dosage forms:

  • liquid

Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur while taking Acetaminophen (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu) / Dextromethorphan (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu) / Guaifenesin (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu) / Phenylephrine (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu):

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); confusion; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; hallucinations; redness; seizures; severe dizziness, drowsiness, lightheadedness, or headache; severe or persistent nervousness or trouble sleeping; shortness of breath; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, stomach pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes); tremor; trouble urinating or inability to urinate; vision changes.

What is the most important information I should know about Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu?

Contraindication can be described as a special circumstance or a disease or a condition wherein you are not supposed to use the drug or undergo particular treatment as it can harm the patient; at times, it can be dangerous and life threatening as well. When a procedure should not be combined with other procedure or when a medicine cannot be taken with another medicine, it is called Relative contraindication. Contraindications should be taken seriously as they are based on the relative clinical experience of health care providers or from proven research findings.

  • Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu may cause drowsiness or dizziness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it.
  • Do not take appetite suppressants while you use Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu unless your doctor tells you to.
  • Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu contains Acetaminophen (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu), Dextromethorphan (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu), Guaifenesin (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu), and Phenylephrine (Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu). Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has any of these medicines in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor.
  • If your symptoms do not get better within 7 days or if they get worse, check with your doctor.
  • Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu may harm your liver. Your risk may be greater if you drink alcohol while you are using Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu. Talk to your doctor before you take Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu or other fever reducers if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day.
  • A very bad skin reaction (Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) may happen. It can cause very bad health problems that may not go away and sometimes death. Get medical help right away if you have signs like red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin (with or without fever); red or irritated eyes; or sores in your mouth, throat, nose, or eyes.
  • Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu may interfere with certain lab tests. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu.
  • Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.
  • Use Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects.
  • Caution is advised when using Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu in CHILDREN; they may be more sensitive to its effects.
  • Different brands of Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu may have different dosing instructions for CHILDREN. Follow the dosing instructions on the package labeling. If your doctor has given you instructions, follow those. If you are unsure of the dose to give a child, check with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: It is not known if Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu can cause harm to the fetus. If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu while you are pregnant. It is not known if Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu.

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Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Dayquil Severe Cold & Flu. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

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Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

Why Do You Poop More When You Have A Cold? Here’s How Seasonal Illnesses Can Mess Up Your Gut

Let’s get straight to the (gross) point: have you ever gotten a cold and noticed that your poop, well, seems to get all weird? Turns out, you poop more when you have a cold, and more grossly, thanks to how your sick germs mess with your gut. Feces can actually tell you quite a lot about your health, because the body’s waste production system is highly influenced by things like viruses, diet and other factors. The gastrointestinal system and the colon do reflect what’s happening in the rest of your body, so don’t be surprised if you notice something odd in the toilet bowl during a bout of winter illness.

There are numerous ways in which colds and flu can influence your poop. One is the body’s production of mucus, though this is actually pretty rare. When you’re battling a cold or the flu, your respiratory system tends to go into overdrive to produce mucus-y phlegm, because it’s part of its protective healing process. Occasionally mucus can end up in your stool too, but that’s not really considered normal.

More common is the incidence of diarrhea. This is considered a signal that you’ve got a serious virus rather than just a mild cold; sniffles aren’t usually accompanied by diarrhea, but flu definitely is. Certain strains of the flu manifest themselves early through diarrhea and vomiting.

Astrostar/

Tests on mice in 2014 found that influenza viruses can cause changes in the gut microbiome, the careful balance of bacteria and other things in our intestinal tract that helps us digest food and protects against illness. These alterations seemed to “damage” the intestinal balance of the mice, causing symptoms like nausea and, yep, diarrhea. It’s not entirely clear if that’s precisely what happens in humans, but it’s definitely a pretty viable hypothesis.

Even if you don’t have the flu, though, colds can also change the composition of your stool because of one main factor: dehydration. Colds that include fevers or sweating can induce dehydration because the body loses moisture, and that can cause constipation. When you’re dehydrated, the colon uses water from your waste to try and support its hydration needs, leaving you with hard, dry stools. Yet another reason to drink lots of fluids when you’re getting over a cold.

Dmytro Zinkevych/

And there’s another reason that poop can change composition when you’re down with a cold or the flu, but it’s not due to the illnesses themselves. Medications that help you deal with the symptoms of colds and flus often have side effects that cause issues for your body’s waste disposal system. Pseudoephedrine, a common ingredient in cold medications, can cause diarrhea, while pain medications that don’t use steroids, known as NSAIDS, are known to produce constipation. This is particularly difficult for people who already have gastrointestinal conditions like irritable bowel syndrome, because dealing with a cold or flu can make their symptoms flare up.

If you do have a cold or a strain of flu, there are certain things that should come to your notice about your poop. It shouldn’t have blood in it, and constipation or diarrhea that lasts for long periods and doesn’t resolve itself is an issue that you should talk to a doctor about. Make sure you’re staying hydrated, look carefully at the side effects of all the medicine you might be taking to help yourself feel better, and see a doctor if your poop doesn’t look right after a few days.

DayQuil and NyQuil Severe with Vicks VapoCOOL Cough, Cold & Flu Relief Caplet Convenience Pack – 24 ct

DayQuil: Liver warning: This product contains acetaminophen. Severe liver damage may occur if you take more than 8 LiquiCaps in 24 hours, which is the maximum daily amount for this product, with other drugs containing acetaminophen, 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product. Allergy Alert: Acetaminophen may cause severe skin reactions. Symptoms may include: Skin reddening, Blisters, Rash. If a skin reaction occurs, stop use and seek medical help right away. Sore throat warning: If sore throat is severe, persists for more than 2 days, is accompanied or followed by fever, headache, rash, nausea, or vomiting, consult a doctor promptly. Do not use with any other drug containing acetaminophen (prescription or nonprescription). If you are not sure whether a drug contains acetaminophen, ask a doctor or pharmacist. If you are now taking a prescription monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) (certain drugs for depression, psychiatric or emotional conditions, or Parkinson’s disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If you do not know if your prescription drug contains an MAOI, ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking this product. Ask a doctor before use if you have liver disease, heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, diabetes, trouble urinating due to enlarged prostate gland, cough that occurs with too much phlegm (mucus), persistent or chronic cough such as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking the blood thinning drug warfarin. When using this product, do not use more than directed. Stop use and ask a doctor if you get nervous, dizzy or sleepless, pain, nasal congestion, or cough gets worse or lasts more than 7 days, fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, redness or swelling is present, new symptoms occur, cough comes back or occurs with rash or headache that lasts. These could be signs of a serious condition. If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health professional before use. Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away. Quick medical attention is critical for adults as well as for children even if you do not notice any signs or symptoms. NyQuil: Liver warning: This product contains acetaminophen. Severe liver damage may occur if you take more than 8 LiquiCaps in 24 hours, which is the maximum daily amount for this product, with other drugs containing acetaminophen, 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product. Allergy Alert: Acetaminophen may cause severe skin reactions. Symptoms may include: Skin reddening, Blisters, Rash. If a skin reaction occurs, stop use and seek medical help right away. Sore throat warning: If sore throat is severe, persists for more than 2 days, is accompanied or followed by fever, headache, rash, nausea, or vomiting, consult a doctor promptly. Do not use with any other drug containing acetaminophen (prescription or nonprescription). If you are not sure whether a drug contains acetaminophen, ask a doctor or pharmacist. If you are now taking a prescription monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) (certain drugs for depression, psychiatric or emotional conditions, or Parkinson’s disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If you do not know if your prescription drug contains an MAOI, ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking this product. Ask a doctor before use if you have liver disease, heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, diabetes, glaucoma, cough that occurs with too much phlegm (mucus), a breathing problem or chronic cough that lasts or as occurs with smoking, asthma, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema, trouble urinating due to enlarged prostate gland. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking sedatives or tranquilizers, taking the blood thinning drug warfarin. When using this product do not use more than directed. Excitability may occur, especially in children, marked drowsiness may occur. Avoid alcoholic drinks. Be careful when driving a motor vehicle or operating machinery. Alcohol, sedatives, and tranquilizers may increase drowsiness. Stop use and ask a doctor if you get nervous, dizzy or sleepless, pain, nasal congestion, or cough gets worse or lasts more than 7 days, fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, redness or swelling is present, new symptoms occur, cough comes back or occurs with rash or headache that lasts. These could be signs of a serious condition. If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health professional before use. Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away. Quick medical attention is critical for adults as well as for children even if you do not notice any signs or symptoms.

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