What does rapaflo do

silodosin (Rapaflo)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking silodosin (Rapaflo)?

You should not take silodosin if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • severe liver disease; or
  • severe kidney disease.

Some medicines can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with silodosin. Your doctor may change your treatment plan if you also use:

  • imatinib;
  • isoniazid;
  • nefazodone;
  • an antibiotic–clarithromycin, telithromycin;
  • antifungal medicine–itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole;
  • heart medication–nicardipine, quinidine;
  • antiviral medicine to treat hepatitis C or HIV/AIDS–atazanavir, boceprevir, cobicistat, delavirdine, fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, telaprevir; or
  • medicines similar to silodosin–alfuzosin, doxazosin, prazosin, tamsulosin, or terazosin.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • low blood pressure;
  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • heart disease;
  • prostate cancer;
  • a condition for which you take a diuretic or “water pill”; or
  • if you are on a low-salt diet.

Silodosin can affect your pupils. If you have cataract surgery, tell your surgeon ahead of time that you use this medicine.

Silodosin is not for use in women, and the effects of this medicine during pregnancy or in breastfeeding women are unknown.

Silodosin is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take silodosin (Rapaflo)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Silodosin is usually taken once daily with a meal. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

If you cannot swallow a capsule whole, open it and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce. Swallow the mixture right away without chewing, then drink a full glass of water.

Silodosin lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it. You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

Your blood pressure and prostate will need to be checked often.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating. Call your doctor if you are sick with vomiting or diarrhea.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

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Rapaflo – Overview

Rapaflo is a medication used in the treatment of symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). People who are interested in getting a Rapaflo prescription can use Push Health to connect with a medical provider in the area who can prescribe Rapaflo when appropriate to do so.

What Is Rapaflo Used For?

Rapaflo is a medication that contains the active ingredient silodosin. Rapaflo, like alfuzosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin (Flomax), belongs to a class of medications known as alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonists. Specifically, Rapaflo seems to preferentially bind to the alpha-1A subtype receptor over alpha-1B and alpha-1D receptors. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors are found in the prostate gland itself and in surrounding anatomical structures, including the prostatic urethra, bladder neck and bladder base. These receptors help govern the extent to which smooth muscles relax and, when antagonized by Rapaflo, can help improve the flow of urine and otherwise diminish symptoms associated with BPH. As a result, Rapaflo is indicated for treating BPH symptoms. Rapaflo is not, however, indicated for use in treating high blood pressure.

Rapaflo – Dose, Cost and Coupon

Rapaflo is available as Rapaflo 4 mg capsules and Rapaflo 8 mg capsules. Many Rapaflo dosing regimens start at Rapaflo 4 mg daily although some medical providers may use Rapaflo 8 mg daily, depending on the needs of the patient and the judgement of the medical provider. Rapaflo should generally be taken with food. After administration, the elimination half-life of Rapaflo is generally under 20 hours. The branded version of Rapaflo is expensive, costing approximately $9 per Rapaflo 8 mg capsule at many pharmacies in the United States. To help reduce the out-of-pocket costs, Rapaflo coupons can sometimes be found online, through a savings card or copay card, or through the manufacturer. Some insurance plans may also help pay for the costs associated with a Rapaflo prescription.

Can I Buy Rapaflo Online?

Rapaflo requires a prescription to be dispensed by a pharmacy in the United States. Because of this, Rapaflo OTC in not available and one cannot just buy Rapaflo online. The first step to getting Rapaflo 4 mg or 8 mg capsules is consulting a medical provider. People who need a Rapaflo prescription can use Push Health to connect with a provider who, when appropriate, can prescribe Rapaflo capsules.

Rapaflo – Side Effects

Rapaflo can cause side effects. Side effects that can result from Rapaflo use include low libido, nausea, dizziness, lightheadedness, blurry vision and trouble sleeping. People with kidney problems often need Rapaflo dosing adjustments. People planning to have eye surgery in the near future should not use Rapaflo. Rapaflo should be used carefully when the patient is taking PDE5 inhibitors, other alpha blockers, or P-glycoprotein inhibitor medications. Rapaflo and alcohol should not be used together. People with a known hypersensitivity to Rapaflo or ingredients in the formulation should not use Rapaflo. Prior to using Rapaflo, it is important to discuss possible side effects with one’s medical provider and pharmacist.

More Rapaflo Information

Last updated November 22, 2019. Given the evolving nature of medicine and science, this information might not be accurate and should not be construed as medical advice or diagnosis / treatment recommendations. Please consult a licensed medical provider if you have additional questions.

Rapaflo

Generic Name: silodosin (SIL oh DOE sin)
Brand Names: Rapaflo

Medically reviewed by P. Thornton, DipPharm Last updated on Jun 24, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
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What is Rapaflo?

Rapaflo (silodosin) is an alpha-adrenergic (AL-fa ad-ren-ER-jik) blocker.

Rapaflo helps relax the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate.

Rapaflo is used to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Important information

You should not take Rapaflo if you have severe kidney or liver disease.

Do not take silodosin together with similar medicines such as alfuzosin, doxazosin, prazosin, tamsulosin, or terazosin.

Rapaflo may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

Rapaflo can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using Rapaflo. Do not stop using Rapaflo before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

There are many other drugs that can interact with silodosin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not take Rapaflo if you are allergic to silodosin, or if you have:

  • severe liver disease; or

  • severe kidney disease.

Some medicines can interact with silodosin and should not be used at the same time. Your doctor may need to change your treatment plan if you use any of the following drugs:

  • imatinib;

  • isoniazid;

  • nefazodone;

  • an antibiotic – clarithromycin, telithromycin;

  • antifungal medicine – itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole;

  • heart medication – nicardipine, quinidine;

  • antiviral medicine to treat hepatitis C or HIV/AIDS – atazanavir, boceprevir, cobicistat, delavirdine, fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, telaprevir; or

  • medicines similar to Rapaflo – alfuzosin, doxazosin, prazosin, tamsulosin, or terazosin.

To make sure Rapaflo is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • low blood pressure;

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

  • heart disease;

  • prostate cancer;

  • a condition for which you take a diuretic or “water pill”; or

  • if you are on a low-salt diet.

Rapaflo can affect your pupils. If you have cataract surgery, tell your surgeon ahead of time that you use this medicine.

Rapaflo is not for use in women, and the effects of this medicine during pregnancy or in breastfeeding women are unknown.

Rapaflo is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take Rapaflo?

Take Rapaflo exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Rapaflo is usually taken once daily with a meal. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

If you cannot swallow a capsule whole, open it and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce. Swallow the mixture right away without chewing, then drink a full glass of water.

Rapaflo lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it. You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

While using this medicine, your blood pressure and prostate will need to be checked often.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating. Call your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Rapaflo dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia:

8 mg orally once a day with a meal
Comments: Patients who have difficulty swallowing may open the capsule and sprinkle the powder on a tablespoonful of applesauce. The applesauce should not be hot, and should be soft enough to be swallowed within 5 minutes without chewing and followed with 8 ounces of cool water.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Rapaflo?

This medicine may impair your thinking or reactions. Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you.

Drinking alcohol with this medicine can cause side effects.

Rapaflo side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Rapaflo: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe dizziness, or if you feel like you might pass out.

Common Rapaflo side effects may include:

  • dizziness;

  • headache;

  • diarrhea;

  • abnormal ejaculation; or

  • stuffy nose, sinus pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Rapaflo?

Many drugs can interact with silodosin, and some drugs should not be used together. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with Rapaflo. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Rapaflo only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.01.

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More about Rapaflo (silodosin)

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Related treatment guides

  • Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Rapaflo Capsules

SIDE EFFECTS

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.

In U.S. clinical trials, 897 patients with BPH were exposed to 8 mg RAPAFLO daily. This includes 486 patients exposed for 6 months and 168 patients exposed for 1 year. The population was 44 to 87 years of age, and predominantly Caucasian. Of these patients, 42.8% were 65 years of age or older and 10.7% were 75 years of age or older.

In double-blind, placebo controlled, 12-week clinical trials, 466 patients were administered RAPAFLO and 457 patients were administered placebo. At least one treatment-emergent adverse reaction was reported by 55.2% of RAPAFLO treated patients (36.8% for placebo treated). The majority (72.1%) of adverse reactions for the RAPAFLO treated patients (59.8% for placebo treated) were qualified by the investigator as mild. A total of 6.4% of RAPAFLO treated patients (2.2% for placebo treated) discontinued therapy due to an adverse reaction (treatment-emergent), the most common reaction being retrograde ejaculation (2.8%) for RAPAFLO treated patients. Retrograde ejaculation is reversible upon discontinuation of treatment.

Adverse Reactions observed in at least 2% of patients:

The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse reactions listed in the following table were derived from two 12-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies of RAPAFLO 8 mg daily in BPH patients. Adverse reactions that occurred in at least 2% of patients treated with RAPAFLO and more frequently than with placebo are shown in Table 1.

Table 1 : Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 2% of Patients in 12-week, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

In the two 12-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials, the following adverse events were reported by between 1% and 2% of patients receiving RAPAFLO and occurred more frequently than with placebo: insomnia, PSA increased, sinusitis, abdominal pain, asthenia, and rhinorrhea. One case of syncope in a patient taking prazosin concomitantly and one case of priapism were reported in the RAPAFLO treatment group.

In a 9-month open-label safety study of RAPAFLO, one case of Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS) was reported.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of silodosin. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure:

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: toxic skin eruption, purpura, skin rash, pruritus and urticaria

Hepatobiliary disorders: jaundice, impaired hepatic function associated with increased transaminase values

Immune system disorders: allergic-type reactions, not limited to skin reactions including swollen tongue and pharyngeal edema resulting in serious outcomes.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Rapaflo Capsules (Silodosin Capsules)

  • P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors – Medications classified as P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors should also not be mixed with Rapaflo or any other medicines that contain silodosin.
    It has been found that the exposure to the silodosin chemical is significantly increased when co-administered with a P-Glycoprotein inhibitor. This may lead to worse adverse reactions.
    • Antihypertensives – The use of Rapaflo has been shown to reduce blood pressure levels possibly.
      Therefore, combining the drug with antihypertensives could yield a more significant drop in these levels. In turn, the patient may be at risk of experienced blood pressure levels that are too low, which can be dangerous at times.
      Orthostatic hypotension may also be worsened, and the patient may experience dizziness when the two drugs are combined.

    What side effects can this medication cause?

    Even when a patient follows the dosage instructions provided to them, there are still some adverse effects that may occur in some men.

    Male patients interested in using the drug to reduce lower urinary tract symptoms should first educate themselves about these side-effects, ensuring they know what to expect.

    The most common adverse reactions that are reported by men who take the drug include:

    • Abdominal pain.
    • Feeling weak.
    • Stuffy nose.
    • Runny nose.
    • Sore throat.
    • Diarrhea.
    • Dizziness and in rarer cases, fainting.
    • Headache.
    • Allergic reaction.
    • Reduced liver function.

    Some experience abnormalities with their ejaculation. Cases have been reported of retrograde ejaculation. Men may also find that the volume of semen during ejaculation is decreased.

    Rarer adverse effects have also been noted and are generally a call for concern. Patients who take Rapaflo and notice that they suddenly feel as if they are going to faint should consult with a doctor.

    If a patient experiences severe dizziness severe, they should seek medical assistance. It is also important not to drive, operate machinery, or perform any dangerous tasks until you know how it affects you.

    There have also been men who experienced a painful erection, with the penis remaining erect for more than four hours.

    In such a case, the patient should also be taken to a medical facility for appropriate treatment. This can cause damage to their penis if the issue is not addressed promptly.

    Best prostate health supplements

    The side-effects and risks that have been associated with the use of Rapaflo cause a lot of patients to turn to prostate health supplements. The market has been flooded with these supplements, however, and they will not all truly help to promote a healthier prostate.

    Understanding what works and how safe these alternative options are is important for the man with an enlarged prostate.

    What are the top prostate health vitamins?

    Various vitamins and minerals are often advised for men who are concerned about their risk of developing Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    This causes a lot of these people to buy multivitamins or supplements that contain specific nutrients, with the hope of improving existing BPH symptoms and prevent further issues.

    Zinc and vitamin C are some of the most often recommended vitamins. Unfortunately, at the moment, the research behind these nutrients are limited.

    One publication, however, explains that scientific evidence has suggested that the following might be supplemented worth trying by people with diagnosed Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia:

    • Beta-Sitosterol.
    • Pygeum.
    • Rye Grass.

    When should you start taking prostate health supplements?

    Determining when it would be appropriate for a man to take these supplements to depend on the intended goal.

    As a preventative strategy, the supplement should be taken at an appropriate time to help improve prostate health and possibly reduce the risk of BPH.

    The risk of an enlarged prostate significantly increases with age. Thus, men who are concerned about the condition might want to consider starting to use this type of supplement daily before the age of 50.

    Those who already have been diagnosed with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia can take supplements to help ease the present symptoms that they are experiencing possibly.

    Beta-Sitosterol is another option that leads to a reduction in inflammation. What makes this particular option unique, however, is the fact that researchers found the chemicals in the natural product binds to the patient’s prostate.

    On the other end, we have Pygeum, a natural extract that could actually reduce the size of the prostate in men with BPH, which is quite different from the mechanisms of action provided by other natural prostate health supplements.

    Men seeking relief from the symptoms of an enlarged prostate, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), now have another treatment option: the FDA approved silodosin (Rapaflo), a once-daily capsule, in October 2008.

    As men age, their prostate gland enlarges and presses against the urethra, impeding the flow of urine and making it difficult to eliminate from the body. BPH sufferers may also feel the need to urinate more frequently. By age 50, roughly half of all men suffer from BPH, according to the FDA. By age 80, that number jumps to 75%.

    Silodosin falls into a class of medications called alpha-1 blockers. These drugs help muscles in the prostate, bladder, and urethra to relax, allowing urine to flow more easily. Simply put, they deal with the “going” problem. Another class of drugs, called 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, deals with the “growing” problem by shrinking the prostate.

    Not everyone experiences relief with one drug or one type of drug. Men who haven’t responded to other medications may benefit from silodosin.

    The most common side effect of silodosin is a lack of semen during orgasm. This does not pose a health or safety problem, and it goes away if the drug is discontinued. Other possible side effects include dizziness, lightheadedness, diarrhea, a drop in blood pressure when standing, headache, and nasal congestion.

    For more information about silodosin, talk to your doctor.

    Originally published Jan. 1, 2009; Last reviewed April 18, 2011

    How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

    Silodosin belongs to a group of medications known as alpha 1A receptor antagonists. It is used to treat symptoms of enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia ).

    As the prostate gland enlarges, it can put pressure on the urethra, the tube that carries urine away from the bladder to be expelled. This causes a weak urine stream or a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely. Silodosin helps to relax the muscles in the prostate and the opening of the bladder. This helps the stream of urine to flow more freely and the bladder to be emptied completely.

    Silodosin does not shrink the prostate gland. Therefore, although symptoms are improved with treatment, prostate surgery may still be needed some time in the future if the prostate gland continues to enlarge.

    Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

    Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

    What form(s) does this medication come in?

    4 mg
    Each hard gelatin capsule, with the cap imprinted with “WATSON 151” and body imprinted with “4 mg” in gold contains silodosin 4 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D-mannitol, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized starch, and sodium lauryl sulfate. The size No. 3 hard gelatin capsules contain gelatin and titanium dioxide. The capsules are printed with edible ink containing yellow iron oxide.

    8 mg
    Each hard gelatin capsule, with the cap imprinted with “WATSON 152” and the body imprinted with “8 mg” in green, contains silodosin 8 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D-mannitol, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized starch, and sodium lauryl sulfate. The size No. 1 hard gelatin capsules contain gelatin and titanium dioxide. The capsules are printed with edible ink containing FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake and yellow iron oxide.

    How should I use this medication?

    The recommended dose of silodosin is 8 mg taken once daily, with a meal.

    Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

    If you have problems swallowing whole capsules, silodosin capsules may be carefully opened and the powder inside can be sprinkled on a spoonful of applesauce that is either cool or at room temperature. The powder and applesauce mixture should then be swallowed immediately without chewing.

    It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

    Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

    Who should NOT take this medication?

    Do not take this medication if you:

    • are allergic to silodosin or any ingredients of this medication
    • are taking any of the following medications
      • clarithromycin
      • itraconazole
      • ketoconazole
      • ritonavir
      • other alpha blockers (e.g., doxazosin, prazosin, terazosin)
    • have severely reduced kidney function
    • have severely reduced liver function

    This medication is not intended to be taken by women or by children under 18 years old.

    What side effects are possible with this medication?

    Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

    The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

    The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

    Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

    • diarrhea
    • dizziness
    • headache
    • nasal congestion (stuffy nose)
    • reduced or no semen during sexual intercourse
    • sore throat

    Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

    Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

    • cloudy urine
    • dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting when rising from a sitting or lying position
    • fast heartbeat
    • red or purple discoloration of the skin
    • signs of liver problems (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools)

    Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

    • symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (e.g., hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of the mouth, tongue, face, or throat)

    Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

    Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

    Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

    Cataracts: If you will be undergoing cataract surgery, you should tell your doctor you are taking a medication that contains silodosin. Your surgeon may advise you to temporarily stop taking the medication before the surgery.

    Drowsiness/dizziness: This medication may cause dizziness. Do not drive, operate machinery, or perform other hazardous tasks until you have determined how this medication affects you.

    Eye surgery: If you are having eye surgery (such as cataract surgery), inform your eye surgeon that you are taking this medication. This type of medication can cause an eye problem during surgery called Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS).

    Grapefruit and grapefruit juice: Regularly eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while taking silodosin may cause an increase in the amount of medication in the body, thereby causing an increase in side effects. You should avoid regularly eating or drinking grapefruit products while taking this medication.

    Kidney function: Kidney disease or reduced kidney function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects. If you have reduced kidney function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. If you have severely reduced kidney function you should not take this medication.

    Liver function: The effect of this medication on people with reduced liver function has not been studied. If you have liver disease or reduced liver function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. If you have severely reduced liver function you should not take this medication.

    Orthostatic hypotension: People taking silodosin may experience orthostatic hypotension, which is low blood pressure on rising from a lying or sitting position. If you experience dizziness or weakness, sit or lie down until the symptoms have disappeared. Fainting is the most severe symptom of orthostatic hypotension.

    If you experience fainting, contact your doctor as soon as possible. Do not drive or perform hazardous tasks until you are certain that this medication does not impair your ability to perform these tasks safely.

    Prostate cancer: Prostate cancer and BPH cause many of the same symptoms. These two diseases frequently coexist. An evaluation should be done to rule out prostate cancer before silodosin therapy is started. Silodosin is not intended to treat symptoms of prostate cancer.

    Pregnancy: This medication is not intended for use by women, including those who are or may be pregnant.

    Breast-feeding: Silodosin is not intended for use by women, including those who are breast-feeding.

    Children: This medication is not intended for use by children. The safety and effectiveness of silodosin have not been established for use by people in this age group.

    Seniors: It is likely that people over the age of 65 will experience more side effects such as dizziness, and should report any unusual effects to their doctor as soon as possible.

    What other drugs could interact with this medication?

    There may be an interaction between silodosin and any of the following:

    • alpha-1 blockers (e.g., doxazosin, phentolamine, prazosin, terazosin)
    • aprepitant
    • atorvastatin
    • “azole” antifungals (e.g., itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)
    • beta blockers (e.g., atenolol, carvedilol, metoprolol, propranolol)
    • bosentan
    • calcium channel blockers (e.g., diltiazem, verapamil)
    • conivaptan
    • cyclosporine
    • dabrafenib
    • dasatinib
    • deferasirox
    • delavirdine
    • dipyridamole
    • fosaprepitant
    • fusidic acid
    • grapefruit juice
    • imatinib
    • macrolide antibiotics (e.g., clarithromycin, erythromycin, telithromycin)
    • MAO inhibitors (e.g., phenelzine, tranylcypromine)
    • mefloquine
    • nicardipine
    • phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)
    • progesterone
    • protease inhibitors (e.g., darunavir, indinavir, lopinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir)
    • quinidine
    • quinine
    • sunitinib
    • St. John’s wort
    • tacrolimus
    • tamoxifen
    • tocilizumab
    • verapamil

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

    • stop taking one of the medications,
    • change one of the medications to another,
    • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    • leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Rapaflo

    Rapaflo is the brand name of the prescription drug silodosin, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    BPH is a condition that occurs when a man’s prostate becomes enlarged.

    It can cause symptoms such as frequent, painful, and difficult urination.

    Rapaflo (silodosin) belongs to a group of medicines known as alpha-blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles in the prostate and bladder.

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Rapaflo in 2008. The medicine is manufactured by Actavis Pharma.

    Rapaflo Warnings

    Tell your doctor if you have or have had any of the following medical conditions before taking Rapaflo:

    • Kidney or liver disease
    • Low blood pressure
    • Prostate cancer
    • Eye conditions such as cataracts or glaucoma

    Let your healthcare provider know you’re taking Rapaflo before having any type of surgery, especially eye surgery.

    This medicine is only intended for use in men. Women shouldn’t use Rapaflo.

    Safety and effectiveness of Rapaflo also hasn’t been established in children. Don’t give this drug to a child without consulting with a doctor.

    Rapaflo may lower your blood pressure and cause dizziness, especially when you first start taking it.

    You might feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Use caution when standing or sitting up from a lying position.

    Also, try to avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated.

    Your physician will probably want to check your blood pressure and prostate often. Keep all appointments with your healthcare provider while taking this medicine.

    Before taking Rapaflo, tell your doctor if you’re taking any of the following:

    • Antifungals such as Nizoral (ketoconazole) or Sporanox (itraconazole)
    • Biaxin, in Prevpac (clarithromycin)
    • HIV protease inhibitors such as Crixivan (indinavir), Fortovase (saquinavir), Norvir, in Kaletra (ritonavir), and Viracept (nelfinavir)
    • Ketek (telithromycin)
    • Serzone (nefazodone)

    This medicine helps control symptoms of BPH, but it won’t cure the condition.

    Continue to take Rapaflo even if you feel well. Don’t stop taking the drug without talking to your physician.

    Pregnancy and Rapaflo

    Rapaflo isn’t intended for use in women, but it isn’t expected to harm an unborn baby.

    Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding before taking this drug.

    Silodosin

    Before taking silodosin,

    • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to silodosin or any other medications.
    • tell your doctor if you are taking antifungals such as ketoconazole (Nizoral) and itraconazole (Sporanox); clarithromycin (Biaxin, in Prevpac); HIV protease inhibitors such as indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra), and saquinavir (Fortovase); nefazodone; telithromycin (Ketek). Your doctor will probably tell you not to take silodosin.
    • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); fluconazole (Diflucan); medications for high blood pressure;other alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax); and verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with silodosin, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.
    • tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take silodosin.
    • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had low blood pressure.
    • you should know that silodosin is only for use in men. Women should not take silodosin, especially if they are or could become pregnant or are breast-feeding. If a pregnant woman takes silodosin, she should call her doctor.
    • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking silodosin. If you need to have eye surgery at any time during or after your treatment, be sure to tell your doctor that you are taking or have taken silodosin.
    • you should know that silodosin may make you drowsy or dizzy, especially when you first start taking it. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
    • you should know that silodosin may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. This is more common when you first start taking silodosin. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up. If you experience these symptoms, sit or lie down. If these symptoms do not improve, call your doctor.

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