What are the side effects of claritin d?

Contents

Claritin-D 24 Hour Side Effects

Generic Name: loratadine / pseudoephedrine

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on May 24, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • Reviews
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about loratadine / pseudoephedrine. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Claritin-D 24 Hour.

In Summary

Common side effects of Claritin-D 24 Hour include: headache, insomnia, and xerostomia. Other side effects include: fatigue, and nervousness. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to loratadine / pseudoephedrine: oral tablet extended release 12 hour, oral tablet extended release 24 hour

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Dizziness.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Not able to sleep.
  • Feeling sleepy.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to loratadine/pseudoephedrine: oral tablet extended release

General

The manufacturer has not provided adverse event information.

1. “Product Information. Claritin-D 12 Hour (loratadine-pseudoephedrine).” Schering-Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Claritin-D 24 Hour (loratadine / pseudoephedrine)

  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 7 Reviews
  • Drug class: upper respiratory combinations

Consumer resources

  • Claritin-D 24 Hour
  • Claritin-D 24 Hour Allergy & Congestion

Other brands: Loratadine-D 24 Hour, Loratadine-D 12 Hour, Alavert D-12 Hour Allergy and Sinus, Leader Allergy Relief D-24

Professional resources

  • Claritin
  • … +5 more

Related treatment guides

  • Nasal Congestion
  • Allergic Rhinitis

This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Brand Names: Canada

Chlor-Tripolon ND; Claritin Extra; Claritin Liberator

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to treat nose stuffiness.
  • It is used to ease allergy signs.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take this drug?

  • If you have an allergy to loratadine, pseudoephedrine, or any other part of this drug.
  • If you are allergic to this drug; any part of this drug; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have taken certain drugs for depression or Parkinson’s disease in the last 14 days. This includes isocarboxazid, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, selegiline, or rasagiline. Very high blood pressure may happen.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this drug with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take this drug?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this drug. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Do not take more than what your doctor told you to take. Taking more than you are told may raise your chance of very bad side effects.
  • Do not take this drug for longer than you were told by your doctor.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how this drug affects you.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Talk with your doctor before you use other drugs and natural products that slow your actions.
  • Use with care in children. Talk with the doctor.
  • Do not give this drug to a child younger than 12 years old without first checking with the doctor.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this drug with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this drug while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Dizziness.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Not able to sleep.
  • Feeling sleepy.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best taken?

Use this drug as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take with or without food. Take with food if it causes an upset stomach.
  • Take with a full glass of water.
  • Swallow whole. Do not chew, break, or crush.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • If you take this drug on a regular basis, take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.
  • Many times this drug is taken on an as needed basis. Do not take more often than told by the doctor.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

General drug facts

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Last Reviewed Date

Copyright

Health Library

Schedule Your Next Appointment Online with MyWellSpan

Use your MyWellSpan patient portal any time to view available appointments, and pick the date and time that best suits your schedule.

Go to MyWellSpan

New to this practice?

If you don’t have a WellSpan primary care provider and would like to schedule a new patient appointment with a provider who is accepting patients, just log into your MyWellSpan account, and go to the Appointment Center section. As you progress through the scheduling process, you will be able to see the offices that are accepting new patients in relation to your zip code. If you are not enrolled in MyWellSpan, go to https://my.wellspan.org, call 1-866-638-1842 or speak with a member of the staff at a participating facility to sign up. New patient scheduling not available at all practices/programs.

Already a patient at this practice?

If you already have a relationship with a WellSpan practice, simply log into your account, and go to the Appointment Center section. As you progress through the scheduling process, you will be able to schedule an appointment with any provider or practice that already counts you as a patient. Online scheduling varies by practice/program.

×

Claritin-D

Generic Name: loratadine and pseudoephedrine (lor AT a deen and SOO doe ee FED rin)
Brand Names: Claritin-D 12 Hour, Claritin-D 24 Hour

Medically reviewed by P. Thornton, DipPharm Last updated on Jun 24, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • Reviews
  • More

What is Claritin-D?

Claritin-D contains a combination of loratadine and pseudoephedrine. Loratadine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

The pseudoephedrine in Claritin-D is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

Claritin-D is used to treat sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, hives, skin rash, itching, and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Important Information

Do not use Claritin-D if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, or sleep medicine. Antihistamines and decongestants are contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of a certain drug. Check the label to see if a medicine contains an antihistamine or decongestant. Claritin-D may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Claritin-D.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use Claritin-D if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if Claritin-D is safe to use if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;

  • diabetes;

  • thyroid disorder; or

  • an enlarged prostate and urination problems.

Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are pregnant.

You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

How should I take Claritin-D?

Use Claritin-D exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Cold or allergy medicine is only for short-term use until your symptoms clear up.

Always follow directions on the medicine label about giving Claritin-D to a child. Do not use the medicine only to make a child sleepy. Death can occur from the misuse of cold or allergy medicines in very young children.

Swallow the tablet whole and do not crush, chew, or break it.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the surgeon or doctor ahead of time if you have taken a cold or allergy medicine within the past few days.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Claritin-D dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

1 tablet (5 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day
-or-
1 tablet (10 mg-240 mg) orally once daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Nasal Congestion:

1 tablet (5 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day
-or-
1 tablet (10 mg-240 mg) orally once daily.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

over 12 years:
1 tablet (5 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day
-or-
1 tablet (10 mg-240 mg) orally once daily.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nasal Congestion:

over 12 years:
1 tablet (5 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day
-or-
1 tablet (10 mg-240 mg) orally once daily.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Claritin-D is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. Skip any missed dose if it’s almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

An overdose can cause severe drowsiness.

What should I avoid while taking Claritin-D?

This medicine may cause blurred vision and may impair your reactions. Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of this medication.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using other cough or cold medicines that may contain similar ingredients.

Claritin-D side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Claritin-D: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest; or

  • severe dizziness, nervousness, or restless feeling.

Common Claritin-D side effects may include:

  • dry mouth, nose, or throat;

  • mild dizziness; or

  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Claritin-D?

Using Claritin-D with other drugs that make you drowsy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Other drugs may interact with loratadine and pseudoephedrine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Claritin-D only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 11.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Claritin-D (loratadine / pseudoephedrine)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • 57 Reviews
  • Drug class: upper respiratory combinations

Other brands: Loratadine-D 24 Hour, Loratadine-D 12 Hour, Alavert D-12 Hour Allergy and Sinus

  • Claritin
  • … +5 more
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Nasal Congestion

Claritin D

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

The following information is based upon studies of loratadine alone or pseudoephedrine alone, except as indicated.

Loratadine is a long-acting tricyclic antihistamine with selective peripheral histamine H1-receptor antagonistic activity.

Human histamine skin wheal studies following single and repeated oral doses of loratadine have shown that the drug exhibits an antihistaminic effect beginning within 1 to 3 hours, reaching a maximum at 8 to 12 hours, and lasting in excess of 24 hours. There was no evidence of tolerance to this effect developing after 28 days of dosing with loratadine.

Pharmacokinetic studies following single and multiple oral doses of loratadine in 115 volunteers showed that loratadine is rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized to an active metabolite (descarboethoxyloratadine). Approximately 80% of the total dose administered can be found equally distributed between urine and feces in the form of metabolic products after 10 days. The mean elimination half-lives found in studies in normal adult subjects (n = 54) were 8.4 hours (range = 3 to 20 hours) for loratadine and 28 hours (range = 8.8 to 92 hours) for the major active metabolite (descarboethoxyloratadine). In nearly all patients, exposure (AUC) to the metabolite is greater than exposure to parent loratadine. Loratadine and descarboethoxyloratadine reached steady-state in most patients by approximately the fifth dosing day. The pharmacokinetics of loratadine and descarboethoxyloratadine are dose independent over the dose range of 10 to 40 mg and are not significantly altered by the duration of treatment.

In vitro studies with human liver microsomes indicate that loratadine is metabolized to descarboethoxyloratadine predominantly by P450 CYP3A4 and, to a lesser extent, by P450 CYP2D6. In the presence of a CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole, loratadine is metabolized to descarboethoxyloratadine predominantly by CYP2D6. Concurrent administration of loratadine with either ketoconazole, erythromycin (both CYP3A4 inhibitors), or cimetidine (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibitor) to healthy volunteers was associated with significantly increased plasma concentrations of loratadine (see DRUG INTERACTIONS).

In a study involving 12 healthy geriatric subjects (66 to 78 years old), the AUC and peak plasma levels (Cmax) of both loratadine and descarboethoxyloratadine were significantly higher (approximately 50% increased) than in studies of younger subjects. The mean elimination half-lives for the elderly subjects were 18.2 hours (range = 6.7 to 37 hours) for loratadine and 17.5 hours (range = 11 to 38 hours) for the active metabolite.

Loratadine; Pseudoephedrine Sulfate 12 hour Extended Release Tablets Only: In the clinical efficacy studies, loratadine was administered before meals. In a single-dose study, food increased the AUC of loratadine by approximately 40% and of descarboethoxyloratadine by approximately 15%. The time of peak plasma concentration (Tmax) of loratadine and descarboethoxyloratadine was delayed by 1 hour with a meal.

In patients with chronic renal impairment (creatinine clearance £30 ml/min) both the AUC and peak plasma levels (Cmax) increased on average by approximately 73% for loratadine; and approximately by 120% for descarboethoxyloratadine, compared to individuals with normal renal function. The mean elimination half-lives of loratadine (7.6 hours) and descarboethoxyloratadine (23.9 hours) were not significantly different from that observed in normal subjects. Hemodialysis does not have an effect on the pharmacokinetics of loratadine or its active metabolite (descarboethoxyloratadine) in subjects with chronic renal impairment.

In patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease the AUC and peak plasma levels (Cmax) of loratadine were double while the pharmacokinetic profile of the active metabolite (descarboethoxyloratadine) was not significantly changed from that in normals. The elimination half-lives for loratadine and descarboethoxyloratadine were 24 hours and 37 hours, respectively, and increased with increasing severity of liver disease.

There was considerable variability in the pharmacokinetic data in all studies of loratadine, probably due to the extensive first-pass metabolism. Individual histograms of area under the curve, clearance, and volume of distribution showed a log normal distribution with a 25-fold range in distribution in healthy subjects.

Loratadine is about 97% bound to plasma proteins at the expected plasma concentrations (2.5 to 100 ng/ml) after a therapeutic dose. Loratadine does not affect the plasma protein binding of warfarin and digoxin. The metabolite descarboethoxyloratadine is 73% to 77% bound to plasma proteins (at 0.5 to 100 ng/ml).

Whole body autoradiographic studies in rats and monkeys, radiolabeled tissue distribution studies in mice and rats, and in vivo radioligand studies in mice have shown that neither loratadine nor its metabolites readily cross the blood-brain barrier. Radioligand binding studies with guinea pig pulmonary and brain H1-receptors indicate that there was preferential binding to peripheral versus central nervous system H1-receptors.

In a study in which loratadine alone was administered at four times the clinical dose for 90 days, no clinically significant increase in the QTc was seen on ECGs.

In a single-rising dose study of loratadine alone in which doses up to 160 mg (16 times the clinical dose) were administered, no clinically significnt changes on the QTc interval in the ECGs were observed.

Pseudoephedrine sulfate (d-isoephedrine sulfate) is an orally active sympathomimetic amine which exerts a decongestant action on the nasal mucosa. It is recognized as an effective agent for the relief of nasal congestion due to allergic rhinitis. Pseudoephedrine produces peripheral effects similar to those of ephedrine and central effects similar to, but less intense than, amphetamines. It has the potential for excitatory side effects.

The bioavailability of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate from loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets is similar to that achieved with separate administration of the components. Coadministration of loratadine and pseudoephedrine does not significantly affect the bioavailability of either component.

In a single-dose study, food increased the AUC of loratadine by approximately 125% and Cmax by approximately 80%. However, food did not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of pseudoephedrine sulfate or descarboethoxyloratadine.

Loratadine; Pseudoephedrine Sulfate 12 hour Extended Release Tablets Only: The pseudoephedrine component of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets was absorbed at a similar rate and was equally available from the combination tablet as from a pseudoephedrine sulfate repetabs 120 mg tablet. Mean (%CV) steady-state peak plasma concentration of 464 ng/mL (22) was attained at 3.9 hours (50). The terminal half-life of pseudoephedrine from the combination tablet administered twice daily was 6.3 hours (23). The ingestion of food was found not to affect the absorption of pseudoephedrine from loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine sulfate do not influence the pharmacokinetics of each other when administered concomitantly.

CLINICAL STUDIES

12 Hour Extended Release Tablets

Clinical trials of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets in seasonal allergic rhinitis involved approximately 3700 patients who received either the combination product, a comparative treatment, or placebo, in double-blind, randomized controlled studies. Four of the largest studies involved approximately 1600 patients in comparisons of the combination product, loratadine (5 mg bid), pseudoephedrine sulfate (120 mg bid), and placebo. Improvement in symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis for patients receiving loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets was significantly greater than the improvement in those patients who received the individual components or placebo. The combination reduced the intensity of sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal pruritus, and eye tearing more than pseudoephedrine and reduced the intensity of nasal congestion more than loratadine, demonstrating a contribution of each of the components. The onset of antihistamine and nasal decongestant actions occurred after the first dose of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets. Loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets were well tolerated, with a frequency of sedation similar to that seen with placebo, and an adverse event profile clinically similar to that of pseudoephedrine.

24 Hour Extended Release Tablets

Clinical trials of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets involved a total of approximately 2000 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. One study involved 879 patients, who received either the combination product (loratadine 10 mg and pseudoephedrine sulfate 240 mg), loratadine (10 mg once daily) or pseudoephedrine sulfate (120 mg twice daily) alone, or placebo, in a double-blind randomized design. Improvement in nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis including nasal congestion in patients receiving loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets was significantly greater than in placebo recipients, and generally greater than that achieved with loratadine or pseudoephedrine sulfate alone. In this study, loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets were well tolerated, with a frequency of sedation similar to that seen with placebo, and a frequency of nervousness and insomnia similar to that seen with pseudoephedrine sulfate given alone.

In another study of 469 patients, once-daily administration of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets provided effects similar to those achieved with twice-daily administration of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 hour extended release tablets, a combination product containing 5 mg loratadine plus 120 mg pseudoephedrine sulfate, extended release.

The end of dosing interval efficacy of the pseudoephedrine component of loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets on the symptom of nasal stuffiness was evaluated in a study of 695 patients who were randomized to receive loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets, loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate tablets, or placebo. Patients who received loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 24 hour extended release tablets had significantly more improvement in nasal stuffiness scores at the end of the dosing interval than those patients receiving loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate tablets or placebo throughout the course of the trial.

12 and 24 Hour Extended Release Tablets

In a 6-week, placebo-controlled study of 193 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and concomitant mild to moderate asthma, loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 and 24 hour extended release tablets twice daily improved seasonal allergic rhinitis signs and symptoms with no decrease in pulmonary function or adverse effect on asthma symptoms. This supports the safety of administering loratadine; pseudoephedrine sulfate 12 and 24 hour extended release tablets to seasonal allergic rhinitis patients with asthma.

General Information

Claritin-D 24 Hour Extended Release Tablets (10 mg loratadine, 240 mg pseudoephedrine sulfate), a new once-daily formulation of the widely prescribed nonsedating antihistamine/decongestant combination Claritin-D (5 mg loratadine, 120 mg pseudoephedrine sulfate), has been approved for marketing.

Available by prescription, Claritin-D 24 Hour provides relief of nasal symptoms and congestion for a full 24-hour period with one daily dose.

Claritin-D 24 Hour is indicated for the relief of seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) wit nasal congestion, a common symptom among many allergy sufferers.

Claritin-D 24 Hour, which will be available nationwide by prescription in early September, can be administered to adults and children 12 years of age and older. The recommended dose is one tablet, once daily.

Clinical Results

In clinical trials, improvement in nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis including nasal congestion in subjects receiving Claritin-D 24 Hour tablets was significantly greater than in placebo recipients, and was generally greater than with loratadine or pseudoephedrine sulfate alone

Side Effects

Insomnia is a common side effect of many drugs containing pseudoephedrine. However, Claritin-D 24 Hour has a low incidence of insomnia, occurring in only 5% of subjects. Other commonly reported side effects using the recommended dose of Claritin-D 24 Hour occurred as a rate similar to placebo and included sedation (6%) and nervousness (3%). Dry mouth occurred in 8% of subjects.

Additional Information

It is estimated that 16 million of the 42 million Americans who suffer from seasonal allergic rhinitis also experience nasal congestion.

H-E-B Allergy Relief-D 24 Hour Loratadine 10 mg/Pseudoephedrine Sulfate 240 mg Extended Release Tablets, 10 CT

Other Information: Sodium: contains 10 mg/tablet. Calcium: contains 25 mg/tablet. Tamper Evident: Do not use if blister units are torn, broken or show any signs of tampering. Store between 68 to 77 degrees F (20 to 25 degrees C). Protect from light and store in a dry place. Misc: Loratadine, USP 10 mg/antihistamine. Pseudoephedrine sulfate, USP 240 mg/nasal decongestant. Indoor and outdoor allergies. Non-drowsy (When taken as directed. See Drug Facts Panel). Allergy and congestion. Original prescription strength. Relief of: Nasal and sinus congestion due to colds or allergies. Sneezing; runny nose; itchy, watery eyes; itchy throat or nose due to allergies. Compare to Claritin-D 24 Hour active ingredients (The product is not manufactured or distributed by Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc. Claritin-D 24 Hour is a registered trademark of Schering Corporation.). Antihistamine, in Each Tablet. Nasal decongestant, in Each Tablet. Uses: Temporarily relieves these symptoms due to hay fever or other upper respiratory allergies: sneezing; itchy, watery eyes; runny nose; itching of the nose or throat. Reduces swelling of nasal passages. Temporarily relieves sinus congestion and pressure. Temporarily relieves nasal congestion due to the common cold, hay fever or other upper respiratory allergies. Temporarily restores freer breathing through the nose.

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *