Vitamin d for anxiety

How soon before I will feel well from vitamin D deficiency

It depends upon a lot of things…
by: Kerri Knox, RN- The Immune Queen!
That’s a really tough question and and it really depends upon a lot of factors like:
* Whether you are on a high enough dose to correct deficiency. You say you are taking ‘megadoses’, but your ‘megadose’ may not be what I consider a megadose and may not actually correct deficiency at all. So, you might want to clarify how much you are taking.
* Whether Vitamin D deficiency is your only problem or you have multiple problems. Vitamin D deficiency does not usually exist by itself and most people have various other nutritional deficiencies and imbalances that are contributing to their problems.
Vitamin D is NOT a magic bullet that makes everyone feel 100% again when their levels are corrected. While it CAN and HAS done that, that is the exception and not the rule.
So, make sure that you get another Vitamin D Level in a few more weeks and see what it is. If it is between 50 to 80 ng/ml and you are still feeling bad, then it’s time to start considering other factors that may be contributing to your problems, such as:
Vitamin B12 Deficiency
Gluten Sensitivity
H Pylori Infection
Intestinal Candida Infection
and much, much more. So, let us know what your level is and if it’s in the ‘optimal range’ and you’re not feeling better, then we’ll try to brainstorm to see if we can’t figure it out.

Kerri Knox, RN- The Immune Health Queen
Functional Medicine Practitioner
Easy Immune Health.com

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Vitamins and minerals – How long does it take to Feel the difference?

You’re taking supplements to experience beneficial effects, and you want to experience these effects as soon as possible. The world of nutrition is complex, which can make it difficult to find out what kind of timeline you can expect.

Our new Feel Multivitamin is packed with even more health-boosting nutrients than ever before, and now’s the time to find out just how soon this epic multivitamin will start unloading its benefits. Here are some quick facts to get you started:

  • Nutrients work faster or slower depending on your level of deficiency
  • Not all supplement types absorb at the same rate
  • Water-soluble nutrients work faster than fat-soluble nutrients
  • Vitamins, minerals and other nutrients work together in your body
  • Some nutrients are much more effective when paired with others

Different supplements absorb differently

There’s nothing simple or straightforward about how the human body works on the inside. Minerals like boron, for instance, mainly serve to boost the effects of other nutrients, and you need both iron and vitamin B12 to prevent anemia. Nature was never intended to be picked apart by science, so as we unveil the mysteries of nutrition, we have to proceed carefully.

The human body is miraculously complex

Human nutrition is anything but mechanistic; individual nutrients work with each other in synergy to manifest a holistic health boost throughout your whole body. Taking a specific nutrient on its own won’t do you much good, and certain nutrients only work well if they’re paired with other substances. Turmeric is 2000% more bioavailable when paired with piperine, for instance, and your body has trouble digesting calcium without vitamin D.

Supplement effects timeline

Supplements affect everyone differently. If you’re seriously deficient in a particular essential vitamin or mineral, it could take weeks or months to fully cure your deficiency. Not all supplements are made equal, either. Lots of different forms of calcium are used in multivitamins, but only a handful are safe. There’s a golden rule you should remember going forward:

Water-soluble nutrients absorb much faster than fat-soluble nutrients

Some of the nutrients you consume bind to water and absorb into your tissues rapidly. Other nutrients, however, bind to fat, which takes much longer and usually results in longer tissue retention times.

After – 1 day

Twenty-four hours after your first Feel capsule, you might start to notice the effects of the B vitamins and some of the other highly-soluble ingredients in your multivitamin. These results, however, will disappear unless you keep taking a Feel capsule every day.

  • Mild energy boost
  • Better sleep
  • Improved digestion

After – 1 week

After a week has passed, you might start noticing an overall boost to your energy, digestion, and mood. Some of the less-bioavailable nutrients in your daily Feel capsule are starting to set in, and this glow you’re feeling will only get stronger if you keep providing your body with the nutrients it needs.

  • Reduced inflammation
  • Healthy biological cycles settling in

After – 2 weeks

Two weeks into your daily Feel regimen, some of the systemic effects of your nutrition-boosting choices will start becoming apparent. You might notice a reduction in your aches and pains, and your skin might seem healthier and more radiant. Your supplementation routine is really starting to pay off, but the truly profound effects are still yet to come.

  • Healthier skin and nails
  • Better energy processing leads to reduced anemia and other deficiency-related conditions

After – 1 month

By the time you’ve been taking the vitamins and minerals your body needs for a month, you’ll have gone through a major cycle of your biological clock, and your body will get used to the nutrients you’re feeding it.

Remember that Feel Multivitamin contains much more than just the essential vitamins and minerals that have already been named. From turmeric to reishi mushrooms to spirulina, our one-of-a-kind multivitamin formula also contains the hottest ingredients that are trending in natural medicine today.

  • Nutrient synergies start working together to balance your body
  • Greater alertness, health, and well-being
  • Most deficiencies cured

After – 3 months

After three months of daily supplementation, your body will be in a nutrient-rich groove that will carry you effortlessly through life. Nutrients have fully deployed through your system, and you’ve reduced your risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease.

  • Fat-soluble vitamins and minerals have fully absorbed into your tissues
  • Your bones are stored up on calcium, and your cells have all the compounds they need to grow

After – 1 year

You’ve now completed 12 whole months of nutritional improvement with WeAreFeel. Your overall risk of disease has dramatically decreased, you have more energy, and your psychological well-being has improved immensely. Overall, your perspective on life has changed substantially, and you’re more open to the experiences life brings. Professionally, you’re right on track, and you haven’t had this much energy in years.

  • Your body has entered a harmonious nutrient schedule thanks to repeated supplementation with your daily Feel capsule
  • As long as you continue giving your body what it needs, your improved health will lead to greater happiness throughout life

Vitamin and Mineral Timeline FAQ

How long does it take for vitamin B12 to work?

Since vitamin B12 is water-soluble, this nutrient absorbs into your tissues rapidly. However, vitamin B12 only works at peak efficiency when it’s paired with the other B vitamins; each vitamin in the B complex serves a vital role, and together, these nutrients work together in synergy.

How long does it take vitamin C to work?

Vitamin C is a water-soluble nutrient, so it absorbs rapidly. If you want to reduce the intensity of a cold, you should start to notice the effects of your vitamin C supplements within about 24 hours.

How long does it take for vitamin D3 to work?

Vitamin D is fat-soluble, which means it takes a while for this nutrient to absorb. You should expect to notice the effects of your vitamin D supplements within about a week, and all the beneficial effects of this nutrient generally set in within around a month.

Experience the nutrition revolution with WeAreFeel

Every nutrient absorbs differently, so if you go about supplementation with a piecemeal approach, you’ll confuse your body. Our Feel Multivitamin is different because it bundles all the nutrients your body needs into one package. Some of these nutrients will kick in right away, and others might take weeks; all you need to do is keep taking a Feel capsule every day, and together with your body’s untapped resources, our unique multivitamin formulation will do the rest. While taking Feel, you shouldn’t however forget to keep your diet clean and healthy too. Taking supplement

With every ingredient in our new Feel Multivitamin, we sought out the most bioavailable, vegan-friendly, and safest nutrients available. Our daily supplement capsule contains all the nutrients that science has recognised as essential, and it also contains some of the most revolutionary ingredients that are currently taking the world of nutrition by storm. As nutritional science evolves, we’ll evolve with it, and that month’s supply of Feel will continue to arrive at your doorstep like clockwork.

Does Vitamin D Reduce Anxiety?

Like air, food, and water, the sun is something most people take for granted. However, a lack of exposure to sunlight can not only make you cold – it can also cause you psychological distress due to your body’s need for an essential vitamin that the sun is usually responsible for providing. That vitamin is vitamin D.

Vitamin D deficiency, usually caused by a lack of exposure to sunlight, is thought to play an essential part in a person’s mental health and has been linked to disorders like seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. This article will discuss why vitamin D is so vital for our psychological well-being, and how you can ensure that you both get enough vitamin D and lower your anxiety.

Vitamin D and History

Vitamin D is not believed to affect anxiety directly. Though it may be correlated with higher anxiety levels, there are likely reasons beyond the vitamin itself – reasons that will be discussed later in this article.

Historically, seeing the sun was often a cause for celebration and happiness. Sun meant food could grow, and that warmer weather was coming. Conversely, not seeing the sun often meant food was becoming scarcer and that important members of your village, tribe, or family, not to mention yourself, were at risk of dying from the cold. People became less active, and some cultures even took to hibernating like bears during the colder seasons. It is no wonder that cultures across the world, from the ancient Egyptians to the Mayans to the Greeks, once worshipped the sun as a god.

Today, it is believed that ancestral memory – which is, in some ways, short-term evolution – may play a role in why vitamin D and spending time outdoors makes people feel better. Just as humans feel an instinctive revulsion towards bitter flavors due to our ancestral association of bitterness with poisonous foods, the human body may have an instinctive awareness of its need for sunlight.

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Anxiety – Is There a Link?

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), once considered its unique disorder, has been renamed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a type of depression. It is now referred to as a specification only, i.e., depression with seasonal pattern.

People who experience seasonally patterned depression are known to show symptoms that include feelings of anxiety, and other symptoms that are reminiscent of those related to anxiety, such as irritability, antisocial behavior, insomnia, reduced sex drive, decreased appetite and weight loss. Some of these symptoms, like insomnia, may also contribute to the development of anxiety.

Your anxiety, therefore, can depend on how much sun you are exposed to if you are an individual who is particularly strongly affected by seasonal shifts.

Other Reasons That Low Vitamin D and Anxiety Are Linked

The other reasons that low levels of vitamin D may relate to anxiety have nothing to do with the vitamin at all. Instead, they have to do with lifestyles. There is a considerable amount of evidence that those that don’t exercise are more likely to develop anxiety. A lot of exercise takes place outdoors, so those that aren’t exercising will also show low vitamin D levels. It’s not the vitamin D that’s causing it – rather, it’s the failure of the individual to adequately stay active.

Similarly, spending time with friends in a relaxing environment also affects anxiety. Many people with anxiety either don’t spend time with their friends or stay indoors only and fail to get many new experiences. This may also contribute to both anxiety and vitamin d deficiency independently.

Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis

Finally, some people worry about vitamin D because there is some evidence that low vitamin D may be related to the development of multiple sclerosis. Some people then take vitamin D supplements and experience a reduction in their anxiety.

It may cause people to feel that perhaps vitamin D was necessary to reduce anxiety when in reality it was simply that you were less worried about MS. Vitamin D may be related to MS, but anxiety also causes MS fears and MS-like symptoms, and a few vitamin D supplements are unlikely to affect either.

How to Increase Vitamin D and Decrease Anxiety

While vitamin D itself is unlikely to be causing your anxiety, that doesn’t mean it can’t, and the activities that you do to help increase vitamin D are valuable for your anxiety anyway. Getting outside will help you get what vitamin D you can, although there are also nutritional supplements available. Getting more sunlight by going outside more often can reduce the symptom of anxiety associated with SAD (a.k.a. seasonally patterned depression), and it can also give you a chance to reduce your anxiety by way of activities such as the following:

  • Exercising Exercising outdoors rather than in a stuffy gym is a great way to reduce your anxiety. Not only does it give you a chance to breathe fresh air and enjoy the beauty of the world around you, but it also helps your body to get in shape and feel better when done on a regular basis. It decreases the strain that anxiety puts on your body, and also increases levels of endorphins, the chemical that appears in the body when it is feeling relaxed and positive. Teaching your brain to expect to process chemicals related to relaxation and positivity can cause it to create more receptors for such compounds, making you happier and less stressed out in general.
  • Spending Time in Nature Spending time in nature can help you to distress by reminding you of the scale of reality. When you spend time in nature, your problems will often seem to shrink in comparison to how much else there is to life. Take some time to contemplate a tree a living being that’s been around likely at least twice as long as you have or the beauty of a sunrise, to help you gain some perspective on the issues that are causing you anxiety.
  • Taking Time To Yourself Many people underestimate the importance of simply taking some time to be alone with your thoughts. In a world where anyone who knows you can demand your attention with the touch of a button at any time of the day or night, giving yourself a chance to stop and reflect on your thoughts and feelings is more important than ever. Oftentimes anxiety makes you feel like you are under too much pressure to actually solve your problems. Being out in the world on your own allows you to concentrate on no-one but yourself for a change, and actually figure out how to address the issues that are bothering you.

  • Exposure Therapy Exposure therapy is recommended by some therapists as a way of overcoming your anxiety. If you have social phobia and are nervous around other people, for example, casually taking a walk outside in a park or at a zoo is a great way to exposure yourself to your fears in a safe and controlled environment, thereby teaching your brain over time that excessive fear responses in these situations are unnecessary.
  • Creating a Routine Making going outside into a comforting routine helps to relieve anxiety by providing yourself with a positive event in your day that is reliable, predictable and stable. Anxiety can make you feel like your life or your surroundings are out of your control. You can impose control on your life in a positive way by setting a time for yourself to head out the door for 30 minutes or more and walking around the block, which can be something you do in evening or in the mornings, or going on regular walks or hikes on weekends.

Each of the above activities will help you to take in some extra vitamin D and thereby ease your ancestrally-inherited anxieties. Also, they are proactive ways of addressing multiple other potential reasons behind your anxiety, from physical stress to a perceived lack of control, and improving important areas of your life and your tan, as well.

Is a Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Your Depression?

Limited sun exposure, lifestyle, and age can contribute to low vitamin D levels. Keep reading to learn more about the risk factors for vitamin D deficiency.

Sun exposure

Sunlight exposure is the primary source of vitamin D for most people. If you stay out of the sun or use too much sunblock you limit your exposure. That can lead to vitamin D deficiency.

The amount of sun exposure you need will depend on your climate, the time of day, and the time of year. People with lighter skin tend to absorb vitamin D more quickly. You may need anywhere from 15 minutes to 2 hours of exposure per day to get enough vitamin D from sun exposure alone.

Diet

Few foods are naturally rich in vitamin D. Eat more of these great natural sources of vitamin D to increase your intake:

  • salmon
  • mackerel
  • other fatty fish
  • fish liver oils
  • animal fats
  • vitamin D fortified food products, like orange juice and cereal

If you adhere to a vegan or vegetarian diet, there’s a chance you’re not getting enough vitamin D.

Darker skin tone

People who have darker skin have greater amounts of melanin. Melanin reduces vitamin D production in the skin.

A 2006 study found that in the United States, vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent among African-Americans than other American populations. It’s unclear if lower vitamin D levels in people with darker skin have serious health implications.

If you are concerned about your vitamin D production from sun exposure, talk with your doctor about what you can do and try adding more foods rich in vitamin D to your diet.

Higher latitudes

Studies published in The Journal of Nutrition and the International Journal of Circumpolar Health both found that people living in northern latitudes, such as the northern half of the United States might have lower vitamin D levels.

If the area where you live gets less sun, you may need to spend more time outside to increase your sun exposure.

Obesity

A link exists between vitamin D deficiency and people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher. People who are obese may need to absorb more vitamin D than people of average weight in order to reach recommended nutrient levels.

If your BMI is 30 or higher, work with your doctor to come up with a manageable weight loss plan.

Age

Age can contribute to vitamin D deficiency. As you get older, your skin becomes less efficient at synthesizing vitamin D. Older adults also tend to limit time in the sun and may eat diets with insufficient amounts of vitamin D.

Anyone who experiences anxiety regularly—whether in the form of sudden panic attacks or a constant, apprehensive state—knows how isolating it can feel. But lately, more people are coming forward and sharing their personal struggles.

Recently, Lo Bosworth joined the growing list of celebrities including Ellie Goulding, Kendall Jenner, and Kristen Stewart in opening up about her experience. On her website, she shares that on the outside, it looked like she had it all—including an awesome new feminine wellness company. She was killing it at work and in her personal life. No one would suspect that she was privately struggling with insomnia, a racing mind, and impulsive behavior.

“I mean, can you imagine having a 60-day-long panic attack? I can now—I lived it.”

“That all developed into a feeling of anxiety that lasted for almost two months without any relief,” Bosworth explains. “I mean, can you imagine having a 60-day-long panic attack? I can now—I lived it.”

She started therapy and medication, but showed no progress even after eight months. And then a blood test revealed the problem: she was deficient in vitamin B12 and vitamin D. Bosworth was shocked. She was young and ate healthy. How could this happen? It turned out her genes had a mutation.

Armed with this new knowledge, she upped her supplement intake and started taking probiotics. In addition to more vitamin D and B12, she started taking magnesium, turmeric, vitamin D3, serenol (for PMS), and omega-3s.

Ready for the happy part? Six months later, she was 100 percent back to her happy self.

Bosworth’s wellness journey shows that even if you live a healthy life, your body could be missing something—and that can affect your happiness in major ways. And while popping a supplement might not be your quick fix, since vitamin D and B12 are linked to lowering anxiety, it’s worth a shot and is something everyone can benefit from.

If you are anxiety-prone, here are some ways to feel better au naturel—AKA without medication—and these 10 ways to be more calm may help, too.

Depression Linked to Low Vitamin D

Exactly how vitamin D and depression may be linked is unclear. Vitamin D deficiency may result in depression, or depression may increase risk for low vitamin D levels.

For example, depressed people may spend more time indoors, and are less likely to eat a healthy diet and take care of themselves, all of which could affect vitamin D levels. On the other hand, there are vitamin D receptors everywhere in the body, including the brain. These receptors need vitamin D to do their job.

The new findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The new findings “add depression to the spectrum of medical illnesses associated with low vitamin D, and people with depression probably should consider a blood test to see if their vitamin D is low and whether supplements may be needed,” says researcher E. Sherwood Brown, MD, PhD, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Other studies on the link between low vitamin D and depression have yielded mixed results, but most have pointed toward a connection. The new study is among the largest to date, and shows that the two may indeed be linked.

Vitamin D3 treatment differentially affects anxiety-like behavior in the old ovariectomized female rats and old ovariectomized female rats treated with low dose of 17β-estradiol

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These 8 Nutrients Help Ease Anxiety Symptoms

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Magnesium and calcium

Magnesium is a calming mineral that nourishes the nervous system and helps prevent anxiety, fear, nervousness, restlessness and irritability. Also, magnesium is also very protective of the heart and arteries. Again, this is important if you suffer from anxiety or panic attack

A typical supplemental amount is 400 to 600 mg of magnesium per day, usually with 800 to 1,200 mg of calcium, as it’s typically best to get about twice as much calcium as magnesium. However, taking magnesium alone can be helpful for anxiety, and you may actually need more than the typical dose, perhaps as much as 1,000 mg of magnesium per day. Experiment with different amounts and decide what’s right for you based on how you feel, and cut back if you get loose stools.

Taking magnesium and calcium at bedtime can also help promote restful sleep. A very pleasant and easy way to increase your intake of magnesium is to add about a cup of Epsom salts to a warm bath. You’ll absorb the magnesium through your skin. Add some lavender essential oil and have a wonderful calming soak before bed, and you’ll sleep better too.

Get the nutrients naturally

Dark-green, leafy vegetables, like spinach, kale and chard, contain plenty of calming magnesium as well as good amounts of the B vitamins. Whole, unrefined grains like oats, buckwheat, millet and quinoa also contain both magnesium and B vitamins.

Many high-magnesium foods are also a good source of calcium, especially spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, green beans and sea vegetables. Other sources of calcium include dairy products, sardines, sesame seeds, broccoli and celery. The herbs basil, thyme, rosemary, oregano, dill and peppermint are also good sources of calcium, as is cinnamon.

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