Tylenol after flu shot

Contents

Influenza Virus Vaccine, Live

Influenza (commonly known as “the flu”) is a serious disease caused by a virus. Influenza virus can spread from one person to another through small droplets of saliva that are expelled into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can also be passed through contact with objects the infected person has touched, such as a door handle or other surfaces.

Influenza virus nasal vaccine is for use in children and adults, between the ages of 2 and 49 years old, to prevent infection caused by influenza virus. The vaccine is redeveloped each year to contain specific strains of activated (live) flu virus that are recommended by public health officials for that year.

The influenza virus nasal vaccine is a “live virus” vaccine. Influenza virus vaccine is also available in an injectable form, which is a “killed virus” vaccine.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the influenza virus, which helps your body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Becoming infected with influenza is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. Influenza causes thousands of deaths each year, and hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Like any vaccine, influenza virus nasal vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person. This vaccine will not prevent illness caused by avian flu (“bird flu”).

You may not be able to receive this vaccine if you are allergic to eggs, if you or someone in your household has a weak immune system, if you are under 18 years old and have recently taken aspirin, or if you have a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome or severe allergic reaction to a flu vaccine.

You should not receive a booster dose of this vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first dose.

You may not be able to receive an influenza virus nasal vaccine if you are allergic to eggs, or if you have:

  • a history of severe allergic reaction to a flu vaccine;
  • a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome (within 6 weeks after receiving a flu vaccine);
  • a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments;
  • if someone in your household has a weak immune system; or
  • if you are under 18 years old and have recently taken aspirin.

To make sure influenza virus nasal vaccine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have (or the child receiving this vaccine has):

  • asthma, wheezing, or other breathing disorder;
  • a history of seizures;
  • a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine); or
  • used a flu medication such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) or zanamivir (Relenza) within the past 48 hours.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Nasal spray influenza vaccine is not recommended for use in pregnant women. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that pregnant women get a flu shot during any trimester of pregnancy to protect themselves and their newborn babies from flu.

It is not known whether influenza virus nasal vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

This vaccine is not approved for anyone younger than 2 or older than 49 years of age.

7 Insider Tips For A Pain-Free Flu Shot

Sep 22, 2014 · 3 min read

By Gail Ingram

Nurse Gail Ingram is a graduate student and has been a practicing RN since 2005. She is NYU Local’s health columnist.

I have given over ten thousand flu shots in my nursing career. No exaggeration. And I believe that what I’ve learned along the way could help you. Here is some insider information for a pain-free flu shot.

1. The person giving your shot might not have a lot of experience.

I started giving flu shots at campus mobile clinics while still a nursing student. I’m a quick learner, but believe me, that’s not the case for everyone. Feel free to request the most experienced nurse or chose one based on item #2.

2. If there are a few nurses giving shots, pick the one using the “dart” technique.

While you’re standing in line, watch the nurses and how they give shots. The faster the needle punctures the skin, the less it hurts. Some nurses slowly push on the skin until the needle pokes a hole in it and this can cause unnecessary pain.

3. Decide which arm to get your shot in ahead of time.

If you get the shot in your dominant arm (the one you write with) you are going to notice the soreness more frequently as you use your arm more often. However, with the extra movement, you will be working the vaccine into the muscle more quickly so the pain (if there is any) will go away faster. It is good to be prepared and the choice is yours.

4. Make sure the alcohol is dry before the nurse sticks you with the needle.

There are a couple of reasons for this. First, it stings! Have you ever rubbed alcohol in a paper cut? The same thing happens when the alcohol gets pushed through your skin along with the needle. Second, alcohol pads work in two ways. The rubbing action breaks open bacteria’s cell membranes while the evaporation process dries out and kills the bacteria’s insides. You can prevent irritation and infection at the injection site by supervising the cleaning process and waiting for the alcohol to dry. If the nurse is rushing, you can always say that you need a minute to collect yourself or catch your breath before she injects you.

5. Relax the muscles in your arm.

When muscles are tense, fibers bunch up and become a tightly enmeshed matrix. This creates a situation where the needle must tear through the compact mass. On the contrary, when muscles are relaxed, a needle will glide between the fibers with ease. So the trick is to relax your shoulder blade which, in turn, relaxes your upper arm. The easiest way to do this is by putting your hand on your hip like a model at a photo shoot. It’s kind of the only glamorous part of getting a flu shot.

6. Drink extra water.

Make sure you are well hydrated before you get the shot and keep drinking extra water following the vaccination. This will help for many reasons. A hydrated muscle will recover from the injection and take up the innoculant more efficiently than a dehydrated muscle. Also, water is a buffer while your body is in high-gear building antibodies to the vaccine. The more water you drink, the better you will feel.

7. Tylenol has benefits.

Tylenol (acetaminophen) is the gold standard for lowering fevers. It’s used more frequently than Motrin (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen), or aspirin and can be taken before you get your flu shot as a preventative measure. Not everyone, but some people, experience a low-grade fever due to increased metabolism while the body processes the vaccine. Just be sure to follow the directions on the bottle and obviously don’t take it if you are allergic or your doctor has specifically advised against it. Tylenol (and water!) will help with body aches, too. Personally, I take Tylenol when I get the shot, before I go to bed, and again the next day with a few extra glasses of water.

Flu shots are free for students. See the Student Health website for more information on when and where to get one.

Nurse Gail and NYU Local provide opinions, not medical advice. Always consult your physician.

If you have a suggestion for a health column, please send it to [email protected]

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Generic Name: influenza virus vaccine (injection)

  • What is influenza virus vaccine?
  • What are the possible side effects of influenza virus injectable vaccine?
  • What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine?
  • How is this vaccine given?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid before or after receiving this vaccine?
  • What other drugs will affect influenza virus injectable vaccine?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is influenza virus vaccine?

Influenza virus (commonly known as “the flu”) is a serious disease caused by a virus. Influenza virus can spread from one person to another through small droplets of saliva that are expelled into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can also be passed through contact with objects the infected person has touched, such as a door handle or other surfaces.

Influenza virus vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by influenza virus. The vaccine is redeveloped each year to contain specific strains of inactivated (killed) flu virus that are recommended by public health officials for that year.

The injectable influenza virus vaccine (flu shot) is a “killed virus” vaccine. Influenza virus vaccine is also available in a nasal spray form, which is a “live virus” vaccine.

Influenza virus vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the virus, which helps your body to develop immunity to the disease. Influenza virus vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Influenza virus vaccine is for use in adults and children who are at least 6 months old.

Becoming infected with influenza is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. Influenza causes thousands of deaths each year, and hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Like any vaccine, influenza virus vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person. This vaccine will not prevent illness caused by avian flu (“bird flu”).

What are the possible side effects of influenza virus injectable vaccine?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive influenza virus vaccine in the future, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Influenza virus injectable (killed virus) vaccine will not cause you to become ill with the flu virus that it contains. However, you may have flu-like symptoms at any time during flu season that may be caused by other strains of influenza virus.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • severe weakness or unusual feeling in your arms and legs (may occur 2 to 4 weeks after you receive the vaccine);
  • high fever;
  • seizure (convulsions); or
  • unusual bleeding.

Common side effects may include:

  • low fever, chills;
  • mild fussiness or crying;
  • redness, bruising, pain, swelling, or a lump where the vaccine was injected;
  • headache, tired feeling; or
  • joint or muscle pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

The injectable influenza virus vaccine (flu shot) is a “killed virus” vaccine. Influenza virus vaccine is also available in a nasal spray form, which is a “live virus” vaccine. This medication guide addresses only the injectable form of this vaccine.

Becoming infected with influenza is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Common Pain Relievers May Dilute Power Of Flu Shots

Richard P. Phipps, Ph.D., professor of Environmental Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, and of Pediatrics, has been studying this issue for years and recently presented his latest findings to an international conference on inflammatory diseases.

“What we’ve been saying all along, and continue to stress, is that it’s probably not a good idea to take common, over-the-counter pain relievers for minor discomfort associated with vaccination,” Phipps said. “We have studied this question using virus particles, live virus, and different kinds of pain relievers, in human blood samples and in mice — and all of our research shows that pain relievers interfere with the effect of the vaccine.”

A study by researchers in the Czech Republic reported similar findings in the Oct. 17, 2009, edition of The Lancet. They found that giving acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, to infants weakens the immune response to vaccines.

Phipps’ research has tested whether production of antibodies using a cell culture system was blunted by over-the-counter pain relievers. He found that a variety of pain relievers — even though Tylenol and Advil have different ingredients — seemed to dilute the production of necessary antibodies to protect against illness.

Many of the pain relievers in question are classified as NSAIDs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which act in part by blocking the cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2) enzyme. Blocking the cox-2 enzyme is not a good idea in the context of vaccination, however, because the cox-2 enzyme is necessary for the optimal production of B-lymphocytes.

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Therefore, when a person takes a medication to reduce pain and fever, he or she might also inadvertently reduce the ability of B cells to make antibodies.

Phipps and colleagues also demonstrated that timing of the administration of pain relievers is important as well, according to the study published earlier this year in the journal Cellular Immunology

They exposed human cells and mice to ibuprofen, Tylenol, aspirin and naproxen (Aleve) in amounts comparable to doses commonly used by millions of Americans every day to prevent or treat pain and fever, or arthritis, or to prevent heart attack and stroke.

Treatment during the earliest stages of inflammation — or when the first signs of pain, swelling, redness or fever would occur — had the most detrimental effects on the immune system, the study noted.

The connection between NSAIDs and antibody production is still being actively pursued. Phipps said researchers believe ibuprofen, in particular, affects lymphocytes’ ability to produce antibodies.

Meanwhile, until a full clinical trial provides a clearer picture, Phipps urges regular users of NSAIDs to be aware of the risks.

“NSAIDs are one of the most commonly used drugs; they are recommended for all age categories, are prescribed for relieving transient pain or in cases of serious inflammatory diseases,” Phipps said. “By decreasing antibody synthesis, NSAIDs also have the ability to weaken the immune system which can have serious consequences for children, the elderly and the immune-compromised patients.”

The U.S. Public Health Service has funded Phipps’ studies.

URMC co-investigators on the study in Cellular Immunology include: David Topham, Ph.D., an expert in the immune response to influenza and a principal investigator in the David H. Smith Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology, and Simona Bancos and Matthew P. Bernard, of the Department of Environmental Medicine, Lung Biology and Disease Program.

Plus, minor side effects are nothing compared to how dangerous the flu actually can be. During last year’s season, up to 61,200 people died due to flu complications between October 2018 and early May 2019, according to preliminary estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

That’s why it’s so important to get vaccinated every year. “The flu” isn’t a single virus. Each season, a new vaccine is developed to match circulating strains. Getting a flu vaccine can protect you against the same or related viruses in the vaccine, but it won’t cover every possible strain that a person might encounter, the CDC explains. This year’s vaccine will target the following strains:

  • A/Brisbane/02/2018 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • A/Kansas/14/2017 (H3N2)-like virus
  • B/Colorado/06/2017-like (Victoria lineage) virus

Even though it is not 100 percent effective, getting a flu shot is the best way to protect yourself from getting sick, and can significantly lower your chances of winding up in the hospital. It is important to get vaccinated before October, so your body has time to build up immunity.

Once you do get the shot, you may be one of the rare few that feels a bit crummy afterward, but it shouldn’t last very long. Here are the flu shot side effects to know, when you should and shouldn’t worry, and how to feel better once side effects hit.

Flu shot side effects to know

Whether you get a flu shot or the spray-mist type, side effects are generally no big deal. You may experience the following:

Soreness or aching in your arm

Your arm might be sore or uncomfortable after getting the shot, but this is a good thing: It means your immune system is responding to the vaccine and creating antibodies, says Dr. Kemmerly. Plus, it’s usually “one day of discomfort,” Dr. Vicetti adds, “and not everybody gets that .”

Redness, pain, or swelling at the injection site

This is another good sign that your immune system is raring to go and responding to the vaccine properly, Dr. Kemmerly says. Plus, any time something breaks the skin barrier (like a needle), it may get red and swollen as your body reacts to it as a foreign object. This side effects is common and should only last a few days.

Low-grade fever

Experiencing a low-grade fever (below 101 degrees) after the flu shot is possible, but it’s not very common. If it’s any higher than that, you may already be sick with another virus that commonly circulates during flu season. A person might catch a cold, for example, or RSV (respiratory syncytial virus, a common childhood illness).

Oftentimes, people delay getting a flu shot until flu season is in full swing, Dr. Kemmerly points out. They were already “incubating” the flu virus and “then, lo and behold, they got the flu—but totally unrelated to the flu shot,” she says.

Nausea, headaches, or fatigue

These are all totally normal reactions as your body responds to the flu vaccine, the CDC says.

Dizziness or fainting

Like any other vaccine, some people may experience dizziness or fainting after getting a flu shot, but this has much more to do with the process—getting a needle poked into your arm—than the vaccine itself, the CDC says. The organization emphasizes that nearly all vaccines receive reports of people fainting afterward, so it’s not unique to the flu shot alone.

Coughing or sneezing

The nasal flu vaccine, the type your child might get if he or she doesn’t have asthma or a recent history of wheezing, can cause some of the same side effects as the flu shot—minus the sore arm—plus some additional ones. “There can be some coughing and sneezing,” Dr. Kemmerly notes, “but for the most part people feel pretty good.”

Guillan-Barré syndrome

There are people who do develop serious side effects after getting the flu vaccine, including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a neurologic condition that attacks your body’s nerve cells, in turn causing muscle weakness or paralysis in severe cases. (These people fall on the list of people who should not get a flu shot.) Before you freak out, know that this condition is extremely rare. In fact, for every 1 million flu shots given, only one or two of those people will develop GBS, the CDC states.

Allergic reactions

There are people who may experience an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine or its components, such as gelatin, antibiotics, or other ingredients. The CDC says that signs of a severe allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, wheezing, swelling around the eyes or lips, hives, high fever, and a fast heartbeat.

Life-threatening reactions to the flu shot are extremely rare. “I’ve been practicing for 30 years. I’ve never seen an anaphylactic reaction to the flu shot,” says Dr. Kemmerly. Still, talk to your doctor if your side effects persist. If someone has signs of an allergic reaction after getting a flu vaccine, treat it as a medical emergency and seek help ASAP. I

⚠️ If you’ve had a life-threatening allergic reaction to the flu shot in the past, you should not get the vaccine.

If you have an egg allergy, you can still get vaccinated, the CDC says, but it should be done in a controlled setting where you can be monitored. In this case, talk to your doctor about your egg allergy so you can both make an informed decision about your vaccine.

How to treat flu shot side effects

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Usually, any side effects you might get from the flu vaccine go away on their own within a day or two—but you don’t have to tough it out if you really feel run down. Try these self-care measures to feel better ASAP:

For muscle aches, headache, or flu-like symptoms, take a pain reliever, such as Tylenol or ibuprofen.

For arm pain after the flu shot, apply a cool compress.

The same goes for side effects of the nasal flu vaccine. Treatment is based on a person’s symptoms, Dr. Kemmerly says. All in all, minor aches are a small price to pay for the vast protection the flu vaccine provides for both you and those around you.

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Why Does My Arm Hurt After a Flu Shot?

Getting a shot at the doctor’s office might not be the most enjoyable experience—with the needle and the doctor and that pesky arm pain that can come after for some—but vaccination is necessary to help your body defend itself against dangerous diseases, including seasonal influenza (flu). There’s a reason CDC recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get a flu shot each year: Anyone can get the flu and it can hit hard. Last flu season (2017-2018) was particularly nasty: Around 80,000 Americans lost their lives due to influenza and 900,000 people were hospitalized.

The flu shot is safe, and you cannot get the flu from the flu shot. Most people have little or no reaction to the flu shot and the most common side effect is some discomfort in your arm hours after receiving the vaccination, including soreness, redness and/or swelling. A sore arm is much better than catching the actual influenza virus—which can knock you out for days or weeks with high fever, cough and muscle aches—but why do some people experience this particular side effect of the flu shot?

Antigens

When you receive a flu vaccination, your body is being introduced to antigens. Our bodies begin producing antibodies that provide protection against infection with the virus strains in the vaccine. The influenza vaccine contains an inactivated virus, which is a “dead” virus designed to look like the actual influenza virus. Even though these viruses cannot make you sick, your immune system detects the virus as a threat and begins to fight it. “The reason why your arm specifically is sore is that your immune system is giving you a robust response to the flu vaccination,” says Dr. Juanita Mora, American Lung Association volunteer spokesperson and allergist/immunologist.

How can I alleviate my arm pain?

Swelling, redness and soreness are common after the flu shot and can last 24-48 hours. “If you always experience soreness or swelling after a flu vaccination, take an ibuprofen about 2 hours prior to vaccination,” suggests Dr. Mora. “You can also try icing the injection site to reduce redness and swelling and taking another dose of ibuprofen to ease any soreness or swelling.”

Get vaccinated in your non-dominant arm

Dr. Mora recommends getting the flu shot in the arm you use the least. “That way if you are writing or doing day-to-day activities, you’re not aggravating the muscle even more,” she says.
Some other ways to reduce pain include trying not to tense your arm while you’re being vaccinated and moving your arm after vaccination (or exercising) to increase blood flow and help disperse the vaccine throughout the area.

Call your doctor if you experience serious side effects

The flu vaccine will not give you the flu. However, some people do experience side effects. While redness, swelling, muscle aches and sometimes low-grade fevers (temperatures under 101 degrees F) are typical side effects after receiving an influenza vaccination, there can be some rare and serious side effects including difficulty breathing and swelling around the eyes or lips. If you are experiencing dizziness, a racing heart or a high fever (greater than 101) seek medical attention right away.

“If you develop full body hives, you are having an allergic reaction to the vaccine,” says Dr. Mora. The most common allergic reaction is found in people allergic to eggs. This is because egg proteins are one of the products in the flu vaccine. However, if you have an egg allergy, you can still get the flu shot. Talk to your doctor about the best way to get vaccinated.

A little bit of arm pain is necessary each year.

Even if you received a flu shot in a previous year, you should still protect yourself with a new vaccination this year. This is because the vaccine is developed based on the specific flu strains scientists expect to be the most dangerous this year. Doctors recommend getting vaccinated in fall, but it is never too late to get the flu shot. Getting it late is better than not at all.

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Related Topic: Health & Wellness

Flu vaccine side effects

After the flu vaccination, you may get a mild fever and slight muscle aches for a day or so.

Some people may have a sore arm after vaccination. For example, if you’re aged 65 or over and having the adjuvanted flu vaccine.

Try these tips to ease the discomfort:

  • continue to move your arm regularly – do not let it get stiff and sore
  • take a painkiller, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen – pregnant women should not take ibuprofen unless a doctor recommends and prescribes it

Do not give aspirin to children under 16.

You cannot catch flu from the flu vaccine

The injected flu vaccine cannot cause flu because there are no active viruses in the vaccine.

If you have what you think is flu after vaccination, it may be that you have caught a flu-like virus that’s not really flu, or you may have caught flu before your flu vaccination had taken effect.

Find out more about what the flu vaccine contains

Allergic reactions to the flu vaccine

It’s rare for anyone to have a serious allergic reaction to a vaccination. If this does happen, it usually happens within minutes.

The person who vaccinates you or your child will be trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

With prompt treatment, you or your child will make a good recovery.

Contact a pharmacist or GP if you experience severe side effects that do not improve over time.

Find out how to report a vaccine side effect

Let’s face it—shots can hurt. And when your child gets vaccinated, her discomfort might well last longer than that brief needle stick. The immune response triggered by many vaccines can cause irritability, soreness, fatigue, loss of appetite, fever, or, in rare cases, febrile seizures, which are often harmless.

All of that is why, for many years, children were given Tylenol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen during or shortly after a vaccination. But recent studies suggest that parents should give their children such pain reducers only if they exhibit symptoms.

Studies show that painkillers may make vaccines less effective

Vaccines are designed to trigger a child’s immune system response so that his body can fight off and “remember” specific germs. If these germs ever invade again, his immune system can effectively attack those germs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains. The usual symptoms that children experience after vaccination are a normal part of the body’s efforts to fight infection. For example, a low-grade fever may help the immune system produce its best response, but more research is needed to confirm and fully understand the role of fever.

Two studies described in 2009 raised concerns about alleviating infants’ symptoms by giving them painkillers after vaccinations because the medications lowered the immune system response to vaccines. They showed that, as expected, babies who received a pain reliever like Tylenol were significantly less likely to develop a fever than those who didn’t. But those who got the painkiller also had a diminished immune system response to the vaccine itself. Specifically, this group showed lower rates of protective antibody levels from several vaccines. CDC physicians wrote that the 2009 studies made “a compelling case against” routine use of pain-reducing medication after vaccination.

A later review of studies found a smaller effect of fever reducers on the immune system response of infants and children, especially after they received booster shots. The study populations included children up to the age of 6. However, an expert on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Infectious Diseases still noted in 2016 that evidence doesn’t support the routine use of painkillers before or at the time of vaccination because of the possibility of lower vaccine effectiveness.

Some of the evidence is contradictory or incomplete. Researchers acknowledge that more work needs to be done to understand exactly how and under what circumstances pain-relieving and fever-reducing medications may reduce the effectiveness of vaccines. But it’s currently considered best to err on the side of caution and not give the medications unless they are truly needed.

Other steps parents can take to ease the pain of vaccinations

Parents can do several things to ease a child’s discomfort during and after they get their shots:

  • Breastfeed. Several studies have shown that breastfeeding is effective for pain relief. You could try asking your health care provider to administer shots while you are breastfeeding your child, or you can breastfeed immediately afterward.

  • Touch and soothe. A study of infants receiving their 2-month and 4-month vaccinations suggests that one popular approach, the “5S’s,” may help reduce the pain response during shots. That method consists of swaddling, side/stomach positioning, shushing, swinging, and sucking. 

  • Distract and stimulate. Cuddling, singing, or talking softly with your baby during vaccination may help, the CDC recommends. Smile and make eye contact to let her know that everything is ok. Bring something that you use regularly to comfort her, like a favorite toy, book, or blanket, with you to the visit. When possible, hold your child firmly on your lap during the shots, the CDC recommends.
  • Apply a cool, wet cloth. If your child experiences discomfort at the injection site after vaccination, putting a cool, wet cloth on the spot can help reduce tenderness and swelling.
  • Give your child lots of liquid. It’s normal for some children to eat less during the 24 hours after getting vaccines, the CDC notes.

Observe your child for a few days after the vaccination. If he develops symptoms that concern you like a persistent fever or rash, call his doctor. If a fever develops, you may consider giving a non-aspirin medicine, but talk with your doctor about the appropriate dose before you do so. The dosage should be based on your child’s weight rather than his age.

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