Trulicity weight loss results

How you may feel

Common side effects of Trulicity

Some people may experience nausea after starting on Trulicity. In studies, 8%-29% using Trulicity experienced some nausea, which typically occurred during the first 2-3 days after they took their first dose. Nausea generally subsides after the first 2 weeks, but some people experienced nausea with Trulicity beyond their second week of treatment. Less than 2% needed to stop taking Trulicity because of nausea.

The most common gastrointestinal side effects with Trulicity may include: nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and decreased appetite.*

If you experience nausea, talk to your doctor. In the meantime,
you may find the following tips helpful:

  • Eat smaller meals — try splitting your three daily meals into four or more smaller ones
  • Stop eating when you feel full
  • Avoid fried or fatty foods
  • Try eating bland foods like toast, crackers, or rice

*In studies, GI side effects were more common in people taking Trulicity than people taking placebo, and people taking Trulicity were more likely to stop treatment because of these side effects. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may cause a loss of fluids (dehydration), which could cause existing kidney problems to get worse (including kidney failure). Trulicity may cause severe stomach problems.

Can a Diabetes Drug Help Obese People Lose Weight?

A pharmaceutical drug initially used to treat people with type 2 diabetes is now showing promise in helping obese people without diabetes lose weight.

Novo Nordisk’s semaglutide compound, under the brand name Ozempic, is designed to act in the body similarly to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1).

Traditionally taken once a week via injection, this GLP-1 hormone receptor agonist works in the body by regulating insulin secretion and suppressing appetite.

The research was presented at the Endocrine Society’s 100th annual meeting. It has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“This randomized study of weight loss induced with semaglutide in people with obesity but without diabetes has shown the highest weight reductions yet seen for any pharmaceutical intervention,” explained Patrick M. O’Neil, PhD, director of the Weight Management Center and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina.

For many people with type 2 diabetes, their bodies actually struggle to produce enough of this crucial hormone, making it difficult to manage blood sugar levels, control appetite, and most importantly, lose weight.

What the study revealed

There were 957 participants in the study. None of them had diabetes. All of them had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher.

Some received varying doses of daily injections of semaglutide. Others received a placebo or liraglutide (another GLP-1 receptor agonist). All of the patients received monthly guidance on diet and exercise.

“After one year,” explained the report, “all participants receiving semaglutide had lost significantly more weight than those receiving placebo.”

About 65 percent of participants taking semaglutide lost at least 10 percent of their body weight, compared to only 10 percent from the placebo group and 34 percent in the liraglutide group.

There are currently many GLP-1 receptor agonist drugs on the market that help people lose weight, but the majority are only approved for use in people with type 2 diabetes.

Ozempic’s biggest competition when it comes to weight loss drugs is Novo Nordisk’s own liraglutide drug marketed by the name Saxenda for weight loss and Victoza for people with type 2 diabetes.

“Ozempic is essentially the same product as Lilly’s dulaglutide, Trulicity, and other GLP-1s,” explained Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, founder and clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services and author of “Think Like a Pancreas.” “But it had to be studied specifically for weight loss and safety in order for the FDA to allow it and to be marketed as such.”

Scheiner cautions against believing the drug can do all the work for you.

“In patients with diabetes, it helps to ‘even the playing field’ because many produce insufficient GLP-1 hormones and are hungrier than usual as a result, so it’s fair to prescribe a drug like this,” Scheiner told Healthline.

“I happen to love GLP-1 medications for my diabetic patients,” said Colette Nelson, MS, RD, CDE, a diabetes education nurse in New York. “They are very helpful in the weight loss journey. I also think a GLP-1 medication should always be considered for patients before pursuing bariatric surgery because it helps reduce appetite, makes it difficult to overeat, and helps to change long-term behavior.”

Details about Ozempic

Like most medications, there are side effects with Ozempic. The most notable are nausea and mild digestion discomfort issues.

It’s also crucial to start with a low dose and increase gradually as instructed by a healthcare professional.

Compared to many older GLP-1 agonist receptor medications, the delivery system for Ozempic has proven to be one of the most comfortable for Nelson’s patients.

“They used to leave bruises and welts. Those compounds were thicker and required a larger needle. Ozempic, on the other hand, can be delivered with a very small needle and causes very little discomfort,” Nelson told Healthline.

Before making any grand conclusions, Nelson emphasized that while Ozempic may be looking like the leader in weight loss for GLP-1 drugs, more patient data in people without diabetes is still necessary.

“What I’ve heard from my patients with diabetes? They are very pleased with it,” she said. “They find it more effective with appetite suppression than Trulicity. Everyone responds differently to medications, so we still have to see how the majority responds.”

Some cautionary words

For medical professionals considering prescribing Ozempic to patients without diabetes, there may be more skepticism and caution considering it isn’t a life-saving necessity.

“The number one barrier to using weight loss meds is the cost,” Dr. Eric Sodicoff, author of the Phoenixville Nutrition Guide, told Healthline. “Most of these meds must be paid for out of pocket and Ozempic is an eye-popping $700 per pen.”

In Sodicoff’s experience with treating people without diabetes struggling with weight loss, many patients stop taking the medication after a month or two.

“They are not considered life-sustaining the way diabetes and blood pressure medications are,” explained Sodicoff.

He’s also learned to be cautious when there’s a great deal of hype around a new medication.

“I’m never an early adopter of medications. I’ve prescribed newly introduced meds that soon were discovered to be dangerous enough to be withdrawn from the market, like Vioxx and Avandia,” warned Sodicoff.

“The animal studies indicate a risk for thyroid carcinoma. Hopefully that won’t become a human problem, too. I’ll wait some time until post-marketing data rolls in,” he added.

Before turning to prescribing medications, Sodicoff believes in teaching his obese patients without diabetes to focus on lifestyle changes first.

“High-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diets can perform amazingly well in most patients,” said Sodicoff. “It’s always the first approach to which medications are then occasionally added.”

Ginger Vieira is an expert patient living with type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and fibromyalgia. Find her diabetes books on Amazon.com and connect with her on Twitter and YouTube.

Trulicity is the trade name of dulaglutide, a type 2 diabetes medication made by Eli Lilly.

Trulicity is part of a class of drugs called GLP-1 receptor agonists Other GLP-1 receptor agonists include:

  • Bydureon (Exenatide)
  • Byetta (Exenatide)
  • Lyxumia (Lixisenatide) and
  • Victoza (Liraglutide)

Unlike most other GLP-1 receptor agonists, Trulicity is injected only once per week.

What is Trulicity?

Trulicity is a GLP-1 receptor agonist for people with type 2 diabetes. It is not prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes Trulicity was approved for use in the United Kingdom in January 2015.

Trulicity is prescribed when diet and exercise have failed to bring blood glucose levels under control. It may also be prescribed instead of metformin, if metformin is unsuitable for you. Trulicity comes in dosages of 1.5mg and 0.75mg.

How does Trulicity work?

Like other GLP-1 receptors agonists, Trulicity works by stimulating the body’s natural production of insulin It also inhibits the release of glucagon and slows digestion.
Trulicity also aids weight loss.

Again, this is similar to other GLP-1 receptor agonists. Trulicity is prescribed primarily to people who need to lower their blood glucose levels; the weight loss is an added benefit.

How do I take Trulicity?

Trulicity is taken in the form of injection These injections are taken once per week. Your doctor or healthcare professional will show you how to inject Trulicity.

Don’t inject Trulicity unless you know how.

Trulicity is usually packaged as pre-filled syringes.

Each syringe is to be used only once, for one injection. Do not re-use a Trulicity syringe over more than one week. Throw the syringe away after use, even if there is some left over.

Trulicity should be injected on the same day of each week. If you can, try to inject it at roughly the same time of day, too. If you realise that you’ve missed an injectio, think how long there is until your next one. If there’s less than three days until your next injectio, leave it. If there’s more than three days, inject as soon as you realise.

You should never inject Trulicity twice within a three-day period.

Side effects of Trulicity

Common side effects of Trulicity include stomach pain, indigestio, diarrhoea and loss of appetite. If you experience hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling, you may be allergic to Trulicity. You should seek emergency medical help immediately.
If you feel any severe pain in your upper stomach, vomiting, or quickened heart rate, this could be a sign of pancreatitis Speak to your doctor about this as soon as possible.

Other signs of serious aversion to Trulicity include swelling or a lump on your neck, low blood sugar – the symptoms of which are explained here – or signs of a kidney problem, such as painful urination and swelling in your feet or ankles. If you experience any of these, speak to your doctor as soon as possible.

Rest assured that serious aversions to Trulicity are rare. They are listed here only on the off-chance that they affect you. There’s no need to worry about them unduly.

Is Trulicity safe for pregnant women?

Trulicity is a relatively new drug, so little is known about its effects on pregnancy It’s unknown whether an unborn baby can be harmed if the mother takes Trulicity. Animal studies indicate that Trulicity can be harmful to babies, but no such studies have been conducted on humans. Until the research is conducted, pregnant women are advised not to take Trulicity.

It’s also not known if Trulicity passes into breast milk. Until it is proven to be safe, mothers taking Trulicity are advised not to breast feed Speak to your doctor if you are planning to get pregnant while taking Trulicity.

Diabetes Drug Can Now Be Used to Treat Obesity

More than one-third of the United States’ population qualifies as “obese.”

That means the pursuit for a pharmaceutical weight loss drug has only become more intense.

And there’s some encouraging news on this front.

A recently published study from the Mayo Clinic reports that a pharmaceutical weight loss drug already exists and has proven to be effective, even in those who are obese.

Liraglutide is a prescription medication that is self-administered via injection once per day.

It was originally created to treat type 2 diabetes under the brand name Victoza, manufactured by Novo Nordisk.

“Our paper shows that liraglutide, administered for 3 months at the approved dose of 3 milligrams per day, was associated with an average weight loss of 12 pounds compared to an average 6.6-pound weight loss for patients receiving a placebo,” explained Dr. Michael Camilleri, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic and a senior author of the study.

In order to prescribe this medication specifically for weight loss, healthcare providers encountered an obstacle.

Insurance companies would only cover Victoza for people with an indication of diabetes or prediabetes.

Being obese does not necessarily mean a person has diabetes, so there’s a hurdle to jump in order to prescribe the drug for weight loss.

Consequently, Novo Nordisk rebranded liraglutide as Saxenda and categorized it as a weight loss drug, resulting in the same drug with two different names and with two primary purposes.

And for many patients, it works.

“Liraglutide appears to be very effective in inducing weight loss over three months of treatment,” Camilleri told Healthline.

How drug helps you lose weight

Essentially, liraglutide works like the hormone GLP-1, which is released from the small intestine during and after meals.

However, these other medications have not yet proven in research to aid in weight loss as effectively as liraglutide.

For patients on the drug for its original purpose — improving blood sugar levels —liraglutide works in three specific ways:

  • It slows down the rate at which food leaves your stomach and empties into your small intestine for further digestion, which helps to prevent blood sugar spikes after eating.
  • It helps to prevent your liver from producing and releasing too much sugar (glycogen).
  • It helps your pancreas produce more insulin.

The aspect of the stomach emptying more slowly is what leads to weight loss in people who do not have diabetes.

“In clinical practice,” explained Camilleri, “measurement of stomach emptying at five weeks may serve as a biomarker to determine which patients should continue on the treatment and which patients might be better candidates for other weight loss treatments.”

The most notable side effect reported by patients is nausea, but this is also what helps people lose weight due to the nausea’s reducing effect on appetite.

“It is essential to titrate the dose up slowly, over five weeks,” said Camilleri, “and to ‘pause’ for patients to become less nauseated with treatment dose before escalating by 0.6 milligrams every week.”

Camilleri adds that taking liraglutide if you don’t have diabetes doesn’t seem to result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Besides their names, the only true difference between Saxenda and Victoza is in the dosages — both of which are delivered via injection with Novo Nordisk’s Flexpen device.

For patients prescribed the drug under the name Victoza for diabetes management, doses in a Flexpen can be adjusted gradually up to as high as 1.8 milligrams per day. When prescribed specifically for weight loss, Saxenda can be adjusted up 3 milligrams per day.

Some insurance coverage may require a note from the doctor, says Camilleri, explaining that all other weight loss approaches to achieve “clinically meaningful weight loss” have failed, especially when other obesity-related comorbidities are present.

Can drug help non-obese patients?

“We use Victoza a lot,” explained Marcey Robinson MS, RD, CSSD, BC-ADM, co-founder of Achieve Health & Performance in Colorado.

The company’s clients include patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.

“I’ve been using liraglutide with my patients since 2005,” Robinson told Healthline. “In terms of the GLP-1 drugs, it’s become the ‘go-to’ for weight loss.”

In her practice, Robinson says she sees success when using liraglutide in patients with prediabetes who need to lose a little weight, reduce their HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin test), and in a sense, “re-set themselves.”

“It’s not a miracle drug, but it does make it easier for people to lose weight because they aren’t as hungry between meals. And they feel full more quickly, to the point that if they do overeat they will feel sick,” explains Robinson.

If a patient is experiencing strong symptoms of nausea, Robinson continues their current dose for at least two weeks, giving their body time to adjust to the medication before making another increase.

Another important part of preventing nausea is simply eating less. Robinson instructs all her patients to begin by putting two to three fewer tablespoons of food on their plate in order to avoid any gastrointestinal distress.

“For weight loss, it works,” said Robinson.

But that weight loss comes not without effort.

Both Robinson and Camilleri emphasize that liraglutide should be used in conjunction with behavioral changes around nutrition and exercise.

Due to how expensive liraglutide is, whether prescribed as Saxenda or Victoza, many insurance providers will not cover the drug unless the patient is enrolled in a weight loss program.

Certain people, particularly men, seem to be able to eat through that “fullness” feeling, preventing them from successfully losing weight.

Robinson recalls a male patient who only lost three or four pounds on the drug and eventually gained it back.

“But I see other patients where it completely changes their metabolism, and they’re able to eat less, cut their calories, and lose weight,” she said. “I had a patient who was diagnosed with prediabetes; then she was diagnosed with type 2. She was drinking a half or full bottle of wine nearly every night, eating a lot of junk food, a very unhealthy lifestyle. When she started taking Victoza, she stopped drinking, changed her diet, started exercising. She lost 40 pounds in 6 months.”

Unfortunately, for those who just want to “drop a few pounds,” getting insurance coverage may be nearly impossible.

“Some insurance policies will require that you have an indication for weight loss with a BMI greater than 30 to be prescribed Saxenda, or greater than 28 with comorbidity diagnoses,” explained Robinson.

This insurance obstacle means a percentage of the U.S. population will have to rely on good old-fashioned willpower, nutritional changes, and exercise in order to slim down.

Editor’s note: Ginger Vieira is an expert patient living with type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and fibromyalgia. Find her diabetes books on Amazon.com and connect with her on Twitter and YouTube.

Weight Loss Drug Slashes Prediabetes Risk

A higher-dose version of the diabetes drug liraglutide helped obese people with prediabetes lose three times more weight and slash their odds for progressing to type 2 diabetes by 79% in a new, three-year study. The catch? Volunteers had to give themselves daily injections and must continue indefinitely to maintain the benefits. And the retail price of the drug (without insurance or a discount card) tops $1,000 per month.

Liraglutide (Saxenda) was approved by the FDA for weight loss in late 2014. It’s a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist — a newer class of drugs better known for their ability to improve blood-sugar control. The new study, funded by drug maker Novo Nordisk and presented at the Endocrine Society’s 2016 annual meeting in April, tracked 2,254 overweight and obese people who used liraglutide or a placebo for three years while following a weight-loss diet and getting regular exercise. The liraglutide group lost an average of 15 pounds and kept it off, while the placebo group shed about 4 pounds.

“The liraglutide group had an average loss of 6% of their body weight, enough to significantly reduce their risk for progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes,” lead researcher Ken Fujioka, MD, Director of the Center for Weight Management at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, CA, told EndocrineWeb.com. “After three years, 66% no longer had prediabetes compared to 33% in the placebo group.”

Volunteers also had high blood pressure and/or, high cholesterol levels at the start of the study. By the end, those in the drug group saw their systolic blood pressure (the top number in a bp reading) decrease nearly 3 points. Their total cholesterol was 2% lower, triglycerides fell 6% and c-reactive protein levels (a measure of body-wide inflammation) fell 29%. The liraglutide group also lost an inch more from their waist lines than the placebo group – a sign that they likely lost more visceral fat, the deep abdominal fat that increases inflammation and contributes to diabetes risk.

“As a weight loss medication, liraglutide is unusual,” Dr. Fujioka says. “It’s a hormone that helps people feel fuller while eating smaller meals. And it keeps people feeling full longer – they can go longer before wanting to eat their next meal. That really helps with sticking with a weight loss plan for the long term.”

The brain is one target of liraglutide’s actions, another new study presented at the same conference suggests. Brain scans of 18 people with type 2 showed that the drug decreased activity in reward centers of the brain when volunteers viewed pictures of tempting food like cake, pastries and fried foods – but not when they looked at images of healthy stuff like fruit and vegetables. “This decreased activation means that individuals on liraglutide find highly desirable foods less attention-grabbing and less rewarding than they typically would without liraglutide,” co-investigator Olivia Farr, PhD, an Instructor in Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, said in a release from the Endocrine Society. “Thus, this medication may prove to be better for weight loss for people who tend to eat more high-fat food as a reward, such as when they are stressed.”

GLP-1 agonists like liraglutide also improve the body’s ability to process blood sugar in a healthier way by nudging the pancreas to release more insulin and by reducing levels of glucagon, a hormone that increases blood sugar levels.1 While Saxenda is not FDA-approved for diabetes, other GLP-1 agonists are. These include a lower-dose version of liraglutide, Victoza, also made by Novo Nordisk. The daily dose for Saxenda is 3.0 milligrams,2 compared to 1.8 mg for Victoza.3 Other GLP-1 agonists on the market include albiglutide (Tanzeum), dulaglutide (Trulicity) and exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta).

The drugs carry warnings about increased risk for tumors of the thyroid gland, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC; a type of thyroid cancer). “People have a history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or who has inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 should not take it,” Dr. Fujioka says. Other warnings listed by the manufacturer for users of Saxenda include the risk of acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic; acute gallbladder disease and renal impairment.

Liraglutide comes in a pen for daily injections. Dr. Fujioka says about one in ten people who are candidates for Saxenda shy away from the daily shots. “Most don’t mind,” he says. But Saxenda’s price can be a bigger hurdle. “More and more insurance companies are covering it. But without insurance, the monthly cost can be $1,000 or more,” he says. A prescription savings card from the drug maker can cut the cost to $30 for those whose insurance covers the drug and can reduce the price by $200 for those without coverage.4

Dr. Fujioka, who prescribes the medication to some of his own patients, says the weight-loss version of liraglutide can be a particularly good choice for people with obesity who also have obesity-related health issues. “The patients you want to concentrate on for obesity are those with risk factors such as prediabetes. It’s a pretty big deal that two-thirds no longer had prediabetes in this study. “

Last updated on 05/14/2019 Continue Reading Liraglutide for Type 1 Diabetes? Study Shows Benefits View Sources

1. Fujioka K et al: Liraglutide 3.0 Mg Reduces Body Weight and Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Obesity or Overweight and Prediabetes: The Scale Obesity and Prediabetes Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 3-Year Trial. Presented at ENDO 16, April 2016.

2. Endocrine Society: Liraglutide May Make High-Fat Foods Less Desirable to the Brain’s Reward Centers. Published April 2, 2016. Accessed April 21, 2016.

Sources:

2, Saxenda prescribing information. Accessed April 21, 2016. https://www.saxenda.com/

3. MedlinePlus: Liraglutide Injection. Accessed April 21, 2016

Trulicity

SIDE EFFECTS

The following serious reactions are described below or elsewhere in the prescribing information:

  • Risk of Thyroid C-cell Tumors
  • Pancreatitis
  • Hypoglycemia with Concomitant Use of Insulin Secretagogues or Insulin
  • Hypersensitivity Reactions
  • Acute Kidney Injury
  • Severe Gastrointestinal Disease

Clinical Studies Experience

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Pool Of Placebo-Controlled Trials

The data in Table 1 are derived from placebo-controlled trials .

These data reflect exposure of 1670 patients to TRULICITY and a mean duration of exposure to TRULICITY of 23.8 weeks. Across the treatment arms, the mean age of patients was 56 years, 1% were 75 years or older and 53% were male. The population in these studies was 69% White, 7% Black or African American, 13% Asian; 30% were of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. At baseline, the population had diabetes for an average of 8.0 years and had a mean HbA1c of 8.0%. At baseline, 2.5% of the population reported retinopathy. Baseline estimated renal function was normal or mildly impaired (eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 96.0% of the pooled study populations.

Table 1 shows common adverse reactions, excluding hypoglycemia, associated with the use of TRULICITY in a pool of placebo-controlled trials. These adverse reactions were not present at baseline, occurred more commonly on TRULICITY than on placebo, and occurred in at least 5% of patients treated with TRULICITY.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions in Placebo-Controlled Trials Reported in ≥5% of TRULICITY-Treated Patients

Adverse Reaction Placebo
(N=568)
%
TRULICITY 0.75 mg
(N=836)
%
TRULICITY 1.5 mg
(N=834)
%
Nausea 5.3 12.4 21.1
Diarrheaa 6.7 8.9 12.6
Vomitingb 2.3 6.0 12.7
Abdominal Painc 4.9 6.5 9.4
Decreased Appetite 1.6 4.9 8.6
Dyspepsia 2.3 4.1 5.8
Fatigued 2.6 4.2 5.6
a Includes diarrhea, fecal volume increased, frequent bowel movements.
b Includes retching, vomiting, vomiting projectile.
cIncludes abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain, abdominal pain lower, abdominal pain upper, abdominal tenderness, gastrointestinal pain.
d Includes fatigue, asthenia, malaise.
Note: Percentages reflect the number of patients that reported at least 1 treatment-emergent occurrence of the adverse reaction.

Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions

In the pool of placebo-controlled trials, gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurred more frequently among patients receiving TRULICITY than placebo (placebo 21.3%, 0.75 mg 31.6%, 1.5 mg 41.0%). More patients receiving TRULICITY 0.75 mg (1.3%) and TRULICITY 1.5 mg (3.5%) discontinued treatment due to gastrointestinal adverse reactions than patients receiving placebo (0.2%). Investigators graded the severity of gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurring on 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg of TRULICITY as “mild” in 58% and 48% of cases, respectively, “moderate” in 35% and 42% of cases, respectively, or “severe” in 7% and 11% of cases, respectively.

Pool Of Placebo-And Active-Controlled Trials

The occurrence of adverse reactions was also evaluated in a larger pool of patients with type 2 diabetes participating in 6 placebo-and active-controlled trials evaluating the use of TRULICITY as monotherapy and add-on therapy to oral medications or insulin . In this pool, a total of 3342 patients with type 2 diabetes were treated with TRULICITY for a mean duration of 52 weeks. The mean age of patients was 56 years, 2% were 75 years or older and 51% were male. The population in these studies was 71% White, 7% Black or African American, 11% Asian; 32% were of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. At baseline, the population had diabetes for an average of 8.2 years and had a mean HbA1c of 7.6-8.5%. At baseline, 5.2% of the population reported retinopathy. Baseline estimated renal function was normal or mildly impaired (eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 95.7% of the TRULICITY population.

In the pool of placebo-and active-controlled trials, the types and frequency of common adverse reactions, excluding hypoglycemia, were similar to those listed in Table 1.

Other Adverse Reactions

Hypoglycemia

Table 2 summarizes the incidence of hypoglycemia in the placebo-controlled clinical studies: episodes with a glucose level <54 mg/dL with or without symptoms, and severe hypoglycemia, defined as an episode requiring the assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrate, glucagon, or other resuscitative actions.

Table 2: Incidence (%) of Hypoglycemia in Placebo-Controlled Trials

Placebo TRULICITY
0.75 mg
TRULICITY
1.5 mg
Add-on to Metformin
(26 weeks) N=177 N=302 N=304
Hypoglycemia with a glucose level <54 mg/dL 0 0.3 0.7
Severe hypoglycemia 0 0 0
Add-on to Metformin + Pioglitazone
(26 weeks) N=141 N=280 N=279
Hypoglycemia with a glucose level <54 mg/dL 1.4 2.1 0
Severe hypoglycemia 0 0 0
Add-on to Glimepiride
(24 weeks) N=60 N=239
Hypoglycemia with a glucose level <54 mg/dL 0 3.3
Severe hypoglycemia 0 0
In Combination with Insulin Glargine ± Metformin
(28 weeks) N=150 N=150
Hypoglycemia with a glucose level <54 mg/dL 9.3 14.7
Severe hypoglycemia 0 0.7
Add-on to SGLT2i ± Metformin
(24 weeks) N=140 N=141 N=142
Hypoglycemia with a glucose level <54 mg/dL 0.7 0.7 0.7
Severe hypoglycemia 0 0.7 0

Hypoglycemia was more frequent when TRULICITY was used in combination with a sulfonylurea or insulin than when used with non-secretagogues . In a 78-week clinical trial, hypoglycemia (glucose level <54 mg/dL) occurred in 20% and 21% of patients when TRULICITY 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg, respectively, were co-administered with a sulfonylurea. Severe hypoglycemia occurred in 0% and 0.7% of patients when TRULICITY 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg, respectively, were co-administered with a sulfonylurea. In a 52-week clinical trial, hypoglycemia (glucose level <54 mg/dL) occurred in 77% and 69% of patients when TRULICITY 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg, respectively, were co-administered with prandial insulin. Severe hypoglycemia occurred in 2.7% and 3.4% of patients when TRULICITY 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg, respectively, were co-administered with prandial insulin. Refer to Table 2 for the incidence of hypoglycemia in patients treated in combination with basal insulin glargine.

Heart Rate Increase and Tachycardia-Related Adverse Reactions

TRULICITY 0.75 mg and 1.5 mg resulted in a mean increase in heart rate (HR) of 2-4 beats per minute (bpm). The long-term clinical effects of the increase in HR have not been established .

Adverse reactions of sinus tachycardia were reported more frequently in patients exposed to TRULICITY. Sinus tachycardia was reported in 3.0%, 2.8%, and 5.6% of patients treated with placebo, TRULICITY 0.75 mg and TRULICITY 1.5 mg, respectively. Persistence of sinus tachycardia (reported at more than 2 visits) was reported in 0.2%, 0.4% and 1.6% of patients treated with placebo, TRULICITY 0.75 mg and TRULICITY 1.5 mg, respectively. Episodes of sinus tachycardia, associated with a concomitant increase from baseline in heart rate of ≥15 beats per minute, were reported in 0.7%, 1.3% and 2.2% of patients treated with placebo, TRULICITY 0.75 mg and TRULICITY 1.5 mg, respectively.

Hypersensitivity

Systemic hypersensitivity adverse reactions, sometimes severe (e.g., severe urticaria, systemic rash, facial edema, lip swelling), occurred in 0.5% of patients on TRULICITY in the four Phase 2 and five Phase 3 studies.

Injection-site Reactions
PR Interval Prolongation and Adverse Reactions of First-Degree Atrioventricular (AV) Block

A mean increase from baseline in PR interval of 2-3 milliseconds was observed in TRULICITY-treated patients in contrast to a mean decrease of 0.9 milliseconds in placebo-treated patients. The adverse reaction of first-degree AV block occurred more frequently in patients treated with TRULICITY than placebo (0.9%, 1.7% and 2.3% for placebo, TRULICITY 0.75 mg and TRULICITY 1.5 mg, respectively). On electrocardiograms, a PR interval increase to at least 220 milliseconds was observed in 0.7%, 2.5% and 3.2% of patients treated with placebo, TRULICITY 0.75 mg and TRULICITY 1.5 mg, respectively.

Amylase and Lipase Increase

Patients exposed to TRULICITY had mean increases from baseline in lipase and/or pancreatic amylase of 14% to 20%, while placebo-treated patients had mean increases of up to 3%.

Immunogenicity

Of the 64 dulaglutide-treated patients that developed dulaglutide ADAs, 34 patients (0.9% of the overall population) had dulaglutide-neutralizing antibodies, and 36 patients (0.9% of the overall population) developed antibodies against native GLP-1.

The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, the incidence of antibodies to dulaglutide cannot be directly compared with the incidence of antibodies of other products.

Postmarketing Experience

The following additional adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval use of TRULICITY. Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is generally not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

  • Anaphylactic reactions, angioedema .
  • Acute renal failure or worsening of chronic renal failure, sometimes requiring hemodialysis .

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Trulicity (Dulaglutide Injection, for Subcutaneous Use)

If you’ve been harmed by Trulicity (dulaglutide), you may feel like you’ll never get your old life back. While this drug is designed to help patients cope with the symptoms of diabetes, many people who use Trulicity end up contracting even worse conditions than those they had before. If you learn more about Trulicity, however, you may be able to find ways to turn the tables on your unfortunate situation, and you’ll be able to arm yourself with knowledge that will help you steer others away from this potentially lethal drug.

What Is Trulicity?

Trulicity is a brand name for the drug dulaglutide, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This drug is manufactured by Eli Lilly, which is a global pharmaceutical company headquartered in Indiana. Trulicity purportedly lowers your blood sugar, and since heightened blood sugar is the hallmark of diabetes, the intended function of this drug is to reduce the comorbid conditions associated with diabetes such as heart attack, kidney damage, tissue death, and issues with your nervous system.

Trulicity is a prescription drug, which means that patients can only acquire it with a doctor’s permission. This drug has been approved by the FDA, which indicates that it has been deemed reasonably safe for consumer use. The FDA approved this drug because the results of a 52-week double-blind study indicated that Trulicity was safe for human consumption and that it reduced the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. It’s important to point out, however, that Trulicity is only described as being effective when it is paired with other efforts such as proper exercise and diet, and hundreds of Trulicity users around the country have noted that this drug has serious side effects.

When you buy Trulicity at a pharmacy, it comes in a hypodermic needle. You use this needle to inject Trulicity under your skin, and the recommended initial dose is 0.75 mg per week. Once your body has adapted to Trulicity, it’s possible to up the dosage to 1.5 mg per week. This drug can be administered at any time of day with or without food, and experts recommend that you inject Trulicity in the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh.

Trulicity’s Intended Effects

Dulaglutide drugs, such as Trulicity, mimic the effects of incretin, which is a hormone that is naturally secreted by the human body. Incretin releases insulin when your body notes an increase in blood sugar, and it also decreases the amount of sugar produced by your liver. Since diabetes patients do their best to avoid the blood sugar spikes that occur after meals, incretin mimickers such as Trulicity are often seen as valid pharmaceutical solutions to the detrimental effects of type 2 diabetes.

Trulicity and A1c Reduction

One of the claims that Eli Lilly makes regarding Trulicity is that it lowers the results of your A1c tests. These types of tests measure your blood sugar over the course of months, which corrects for any momentary spikes or drop-offs in blood sugar that may happen throughout a given day. If the results of your A1c tests become lower than they were before, it may mean that you are recovering from your diabetes symptoms, which makes A1clevels indicative of whether or not a diabetes drug is working.

A1c tests measure the amount of hemoglobin in your blood that has glucose attached to it. Glucose is one of the most common forms of sugar, and it is the form of sugar that is referred to as “blood sugar.” When glucose attaches to hemoglobin, this process is called glycating, and a normal person’s blood has about 5 percent glycated cells. If your glycated cell count, or A1c level, exceeds about 5.5 percent, it’s likely that you have diabetes.

Hemoglobin lives for about three months, which is why the A1c test covers a similar timeframe. This test keeps track as your blood goes through an entire hemoglobin cycle, and it checks to determine whether or not your glycated blood cell count goes down during this period. If you’re using Trulicity and your A1c test notes lower blood sugar, this is seen as a sign that the medication is working.

Trulicity Drug Interactions

If you use any drugs that affect your blood sugar, you may experience negative drug interactions when you start using Trulicity. Before you start using Trulicity, always consult with your doctor regarding any interactions that could occur, and also determine whether not there’s any possibility that you’re allergic to this drug. After you start using Trulicity, continue to check your blood sugar regularly, and if you note that your blood sugar is too low or too high, stop using Trulicity and consult with your doctor immediately.

Trulicity Warnings

If you have any other drug allergies, it’s possible that you may be allergic to Trulicity as well. Before you use Trulicity, make sure to tell your doctor if you have any history of kidney disease, pancreatitis, or gastrointestinal disorders. Trulicity may cause a resurgence of these conditions, orit may make them worse if you currently suffer from them. It is recommended that you avoid drinking alcohol while you use Trulicity since alcoholic beverages can lower your blood sugar, and it’s also important to inform your doctor that you’re using Trulicity before you undergo any type of surgery. Pregnant women should avoid the use of Trulicity; even though pregnancy can make diabetes worse, the side effects of Trulicity could damage the fetus. Similarly, since the effects of Trulicity on breastfeeding children are unknown, so this drug should not be used while breastfeeding.

Trulicity Manufacturer’s Warnings

In addition to the above general warnings regarding Trulicity, Eli Lilly has also produced their own set of warnings for this drug. First, Eli Lilly is careful to point out that Trulicity is not meant to be used as first-line therapy for patients who are either unwilling or incapable of committing to the dietary and exercise changes necessary to bring out the true potential of this drug. The medical results stated for Trulicity are based on a treatment regimen that also includes diet and exercise, and the same results that are reported in this drug’s marketing literature won’t apply if you only use Trulicity without making other efforts to improve your health.

Eli Lilly goes on to state that patients who have a history of pancreatitis should use a different medication. This statement is telling regarding the potential cancer dangers that are associated with this drug. Also, Trulicity is only designed for use with patients who have type 2 diabetes; it will not work for patients who have type 1 diabetes. If patients have pre-existing severe gastrointestinal disease, Eli Lilly recommends that a different drug be used.

This pharmaceutical company also has a section on Trulicity contraindications. While indications are reasons why a person should use a drug, contraindications are reasons why a person shouldn’t use a drug. In this section, Eli Lilly points out that patients who have a family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia shouldn’t use this drug. They go on to say that anyone who has had a “prior serious hypersensitivity reaction” to Trulicity shouldn’t use this drug.

In the rest of their warnings document, Eli Lilly echoes many of the warnings that we covered above, but they go on to say that this drug can cause acute kidney injury and severe gastrointestinal disease. Based on all of the warning information collected, it appears that using this drug may reduce your blood sugar, but it also might cause serious organ damage that could kill you.

Reported Side Effects of Trulicity

Since the initial introduction of Trulicity to the consumer market, stories of this drug’s side effects have been rampant. Many, if not the majority, of consumers who have used this drug, have reported experiencing at least mild side effects, and some diabetes patients have even incurred side effects that are significantly worse than the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The most commonly reported side effect of Trulicty appears to be gastrointestinal distress, and gut issues associated with this drug come in many forms. Some examples of the gastrointestinal problems associated with Trulicty include:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Indigestion
  • Frequent bowel movements
  • Constipation
  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Excessive belching
  • Abdominal pain
  • Decreased appetite

Almost everyone who uses Trulicity and similar drugs report at least some degree of gastrointestinal discomfort, and type 2 diabetes patients who only experience these symptoms are the lucky ones. If you continue to use Trulicity after you start to notice the onset of side effects, you could contract even more side effects such as:

  • Fatigue: This drug can cause patients to have unreasonably low energy levels throughout the day. Fatigue is a condition of constant tiredness that sleep doesn’t completely alleviate or doesn’t alleviate at all.
  • Muscular weakness: Trulicity can also cause muscle weakness to the point that lifting even moderately heavy objects or going for a walk can become hard. Since drugs like Trulicity are only effective when they are paired with a rigorous exercise regimen, this side effect can significantly reduce the efficacy of this drug.
  • Malaise: In some cases, the side effects that patients encounter when they use Trulicity are more nondescript. The umbrella term “malaise” is used to refer to any symptoms that make a person feel generally unwell without affecting a certain part of the body. If malaise is intense enough, it can make it impossible for a person to work or even get out of bed.

In addition to all of these side effects, it’s also worth noting that drugs like Trulicity can overcompensate for high blood pressure and cause hypoglycemia. While hyperglycemia is when you have too much sugar in your blood, hypoglycemia is when your blood sugar is too low, and symptoms of hypoglycemia include extreme hunger, exhaustion, and light-headedness. In some cases, hypoglycemia can even make you lose consciousness.

This list of side effects in no way covers all of the symptoms that can be caused by taking Trulicity. Many other types of detrimental effects can manifest when you take this drug, and many people have even developed cancer from using Trulicity to treat their diabetes.

Trulicity and Cancer

While the other side effects of Trulicity may seem severe, they pale in comparison with the potential of this drug to cause cancer. Since the inception of incretin mimickers, it has been found that these drugs have a tendency to cause pancreatic cancer and other conditions associated with the pancreas such as pancreatitis. The exact mechanism that causes pancreatic cancer in Trulicity patients remains unknown, but enough people who have used this drug have developed pancreatic cancer to merit serious consideration that this drug may be a carcinogen.

Where Trulicity differs from other types of incretin mimickers, however, is that it also causes thyroid cancer. Medical research has found that dulaglutide, which is the active ingredient in Trulicity, causes thyroid C-cell tumors in rats. While some of these tumors may be benign, it’s also been found that this drug causes medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which is an insidious form of cancer that can destroy a person’s thyroid.

If you want to stay in good health, your thyroid needs to be in perfect working order. This gland is located in the neck just below the Adam’s apple, and its main purpose is to regulate the body’s energy use. When the thyroid produces too many hormones, you’ll experience the symptoms of hyperactivity, and it may be hard to maintain a healthy body weight because your metabolism will speed up. If the thyroid doesn’t produce as many hormones, however, you’ll become lethargic, and a common comorbid condition of hypothyroidism is depression.

People who try Trulicity to treat their diabetes run the risk of losing their thyroids. People who develop MTCs are lucky if they only lose partial thyroid functionality, but it’s often necessary to surgically remove the thyroid if an MTC is found. You can live without your thyroid, but only if you take daily medication. If you ever lose access to your thyroid replacement medication, you won’t survive.

In extreme cases, however, MTCs can metastasize and expand throughout your body. There’s also the possibility that you could develop pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer simultaneously. Since the pancreas produces insulin, pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers that a person with diabetes can develop, and a combination of pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer is practically a death sentence unless these cancers can be beaten with conventional or alternative treatment methods.

Given these risks, it’s best to avoid using Trulicity under any and all circumstances. As research continues to be done into incretin mimickers, there may be a medical breakthrough that makes these drugs safe. At this point, however, it appears that the human body rejects attempts to boost incretin levels with synthetic mimickers, and while it’s possible to treat diabetes with dietary and lifestyle changes, the side effects associated with Trulicity can be fatal.

The Trulicity Controversy

Over the years, diabetes drugs like Trulicity have gotten a bad rap. While these drugs appear to reduce the symptoms of diabetes, they may do more harm than good; thousands upon thousands of people across the United States and the rest of the developed world have experienced serious physical harm at the hands of drugs like Trulicity, and many of them have died from the conditions associated with these types of drugs.

While Trulicity has largely skated past the legal turmoil surrounding diabetes drugs so far, plenty of other similar drugs have been targeted by consumer advocacy groups. For instance, a class action lawsuit against Januvia, Byetta, and Victoza is in the concluding phases in California federal court. Like Trulicity, these drugs mimic the effects of blood sugar-reducing hormones in the human body, and they have had disastrous effects.

Given the legal history of these drugs, it’s interesting that Trulicity has earned so little ire among consumer advocacy groups to this date. Januvia, Byetta, Victoza, and a number of other similar drugs all mimic incretin in the same way that Trulicity does. Supposedly, Trulicity mimics incretin in a way that is less harmful to the human body than these other drugs, but the thousands of people who have been harmed by Trulicity would beg to differ.

In 2013, the FDA released a letter calling into question the safety of Januvia and a number of other incretin mimickers. This letter informed the public that the agency had begun investigating the link between these drugs and pancreatic cancer, and hundreds of lawsuits were subsequently filed against the manufacturers of these drugs. These cases were consolidated into multidistrict litigation (MDL) No. 2452, which is titled Re: Incretin Mimetics ProductsLiability Litigation.

Due to powerful pushback from the pharmaceutical companies responsible for these patient injuries, this mass case was dismissed in 2015. However, after a successful appeal, the case was reinstated in 2015. While it appears that this mass lawsuit will conclude in favor of the plaintiffs, there are over 948 cases pending, and more are being added every month.

Here are some examples of the cases that were filed against the makers of these incretin mimickers:

  • Regina Kelley: The estate of this victim filed a suit against Amylin, Merck, and Eli Lilly. Regina had died of pancreatic cancer that was caused by Januvia and Byetta. Before she died, she was severely injured by these drugs.
  • Linda Jean Howard: This plaintiff developed pancreatitis after she started using Byetta and Victoza. She alleges that both she and her doctor were unaware that these drugs could cause pancreatitis and that if they had known about this danger, she wouldn’t have used these drugs.
  • Guy Riley: Guy sued on behalf of his deceased wife, Kathleen, who died after being prescribed Byetta and Januvia. Kathleen started using these drugs in 2005, she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2009, and she died in 2012.

Since Trulicity was approved by the FDA in 2014, which was after this federal agency released its warning about incretin mimickers, it stands to reason that Eli Lilly made a stringent case that their drug is different from other pharmaceuticals in its class. However, it’s clear that Trulicity also cause pancreatic cancer, and it also causes other types of cancer, such as thyroid cancer, that wasn’t caused by any of Trulicity’s predecessors. It appears that a truly novel approach to incretin mimicking is called for, but the evidence amassed so far seems to indicate that any further attempts to mimic this substance with synthetic chemicals are likely to produce similar results.

While Trulicity hasn’t been included in any of the mass lawsuits that have been filed against manufacturers of incretin mimickers yet, it’s only a matter of time until this dangerous drug receives the legal attention that it deserves.

Legal Action Against Trulicity

At this point, there are no class action lawsuits regarding Trulicity. The FDA has ordered Eli Lilly to carry out a number of post-marketing studies to determine the relationship between Trulicity and heart disease, but since the link between this drug and various diseases hasn’t yet been fully established in a legal setting, there aren’t currently any options for group legal action.

If you have been harmed by Trulicity, however, you can work with a lawyer who will litigate against Eli Lilly directly. Pancreatic cancer and other side effects of this drug can be debilitating or even lethal, which means that you generally have a good case if you are seeking compensation for the harm caused by this drug.

As more and more people become aware of their legal recourse when it comes to harm caused by Trulicity, the opportunity for a mass tort lawsuit may arise. A tort is a type of wrong done by one person that affects another person. When many people have been harmed by the same entity, such as Eli Lilly, these people can come together to sue the responsible entity en masse. When you talk to your lawyer, ask about the prospects of a Trulicity mass tort that may be on the horizon.

Find a Trulicity Lawsuit Expert Near Me

To learn more about your legal recourse when it comes to compensation for the side effects of Trulicity, reach out to Consumer Alert Now today. Serving all areas of the United States, Consumer Alert Now provides information and support to people who have been harmed by drugs like Trulicity, and you can schedule a free consultation today. To get started, call Consumer Alert Now at (800) 511-0747

Bydureon (exenatide)

You may wonder how Bydureon compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below are comparisons between Bydureon and several medications.

Bydureon vs. Trulicity

Bydureon and Trulicity (dulaglutide) are both in the same class of medications, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) agonists. This means they work in the same way to improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Bydureon and Trulicity are both FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Bydureon is self-injected under the skin (subcutaneous) once weekly. It comes as a liquid suspension that’s available in a syringe or a pen.

Trulicity is also self-injected under the skin once weekly. It comes as a liquid solution that’s available in a pen.

Side effects and risks

Bydureon and Trulicity have similar effects in the body and therefore cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Bydureon and Trulicity Bydureon Trulicity
More common side effects
  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • upset stomach
  • decreased appetite
  • fatigue
  • injection site reactions such as redness, itchiness, or a lump under the skin
  • constipation
  • headache
  • stomach pain
Serious side effects
  • thyroid cancer*
  • low blood sugar
  • kidney damage
  • pancreatitis
  • severe allergic reaction
  • severe injection site reactions
(few unique serious side effects)

* Bydureon and Trulicity both have a boxed warning from the FDA for thyroid cancer. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

Bydureon and Trulicity haven’t been compared in clinical studies, but both are effective for treating type 2 diabetes. Both medications can also cause beneficial weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes.

In clinical studies, Bydureon reduced hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by about 0.88 to 1.6 percent after 24 to 28 weeks of treatment. People using Bydureon also lost about 4.4 pounds over 26 weeks of treatment.

In clinical studies of Trulicity, HbA1c was reduced by about 0.7 to 1.6 percent after 24 to 28 weeks of treatment. Weight loss of up to about 5 pounds also occurred.

Costs

Bydureon and Trulicity are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name drugs.

Bydureon may cost slightly more than Trulicity. The exact amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Bydureon vs. Bydureon BCise

Bydureon and Bydureon BCise contain the same drug, extended-release exenatide. The main difference between the two medications is how you inject them.

Uses

Bydureon and Bydureon BCise are both FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Bydureon comes as a liquid suspension that’s given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). It’s available in a self-injected syringe or pen injector. The medication is taken once weekly with both forms.

Bydureon BCise comes as a liquid solution that’s also given once weekly by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). It’s available in an autoinjector. You push this device against your skin, and it injects automatically. Because of this device, Bydureon BCise may be easier to use than Bydureon.

Side effects and risks

Bydureon and Bydureon BCise contain the same medication and have similar effects in the body. Therefore, they cause very similar side effects. However, there may be slight differences in how often certain side effects occur with each medication. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

More common side effects that can occur with both Bydureon and Bydureon BCise include:

  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • upset stomach
  • decreased appetite
  • injection site reactions such as redness, itchiness, or a lump under the skin

This chart shows several of the common side effects that occurred in clinical studies of Bydureon and Bydureon BCise and the percentage of people who experienced them:

Bydureon Bydureon BCise
injection-site reactions (lumps, redness, itchiness) 17.1 percent 23.9 percent
nausea 11.3 percent 8.2 percent
diarrhea 10.9 percent 4 percent
constipation 8.5 percent 2.1 percent
headache 8.1 percent 4.4 percent

Serious side effects

Serious side effects that can occur with both Bydureon and Bydureon BCise include:

  • thyroid cancer
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • kidney damage
  • pancreatitis
  • severe allergic reaction
  • severe injection site reactions

Effectiveness

Bydureon and Bydureon BCise haven’t been compared in clinical studies, but both are effective for treating type 2 diabetes. Both medications can also cause beneficial weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes.

In clinical studies, Bydureon reduced hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by about 0.88 to 1.6 percent after 24 to 28 weeks of treatment. People taking Bydureon lost about 4.4 pounds over 26 weeks of treatment.

In clinical studies of Bydureon BCise, HbA1c was reduced by about 1.07 to 1.39 percent after 28 weeks of treatment. Weight loss of about 3 pounds also occurred over 28 weeks of treatment.

One difference between the two medications is how long they take to start working.

When you’re first starting to take Bydureon or Bydureon BCise, the effects take several weeks to build up in your body. For Bydureon, it may take six to seven weeks after your first injection. For Bydureon BCise, it can take up to 10 weeks.

Costs

Bydureon and Bydureon BCise are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name drugs.

Bydureon BCise usually costs more than Bydureon. The exact amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Bydureon vs. Byetta

Bydureon and Byetta contain the same medication, exenatide. However, Bydureon contains extended-release exenatide while Byetta contains regular-release exenatide.

Uses

Bydureon and Byetta are both FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Bydureon comes as a liquid suspension that’s given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). It’s available in a self-injected syringe or pen injector. With both forms, you take the medication once weekly.

Byetta is also self-injected under the skin, but must be taken twice daily. It’s available in a self-injected pen injector.

Side effects and risks

Bydureon and Byetta contain the same medication and have similar effects in the body. Therefore, they cause very similar side effects. However, there may be differences in how often certain side effects happen with each medication.

More common side effects

More common side effects that can occur with both Bydureon and Byetta include:

  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • upset stomach
  • decreased appetite

This chart shows several of the common side effects that occurred in clinical studies of these two drugs and the percentage of people who experienced them:

Bydureon Byetta
injection-site reactions (lumps, redness, itchiness) 17.1 percent 12.7 percent
nausea 11.3 percent 8 percent
upset stomach 7.3 percent 3 percent

Serious side effects

Serious side effects that can occur with both Bydureon and Byetta include:

  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • kidney damage
  • pancreatitis
  • severe allergic reaction
  • severe injection site reactions

Bydureon has a boxed warning from the FDA about the risk of a certain type of thyroid cancer. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Bydureon and Byetta are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of these drugs in treating this condition hasn’t been directly compared in clinical studies.

However, it has been indirectly compared in an analysis of clinical studies. According to this analysis, Bydureon may lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) slightly more than Byetta does.

Both Bydureon and Byetta can cause beneficial weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, people using Bydureon lost about 4.4 pounds over 26 weeks of treatment. In Byetta studies, weight loss up to about 6.4 pounds occurred over 24 weeks of treatment.

Costs

Bydureon and Byetta are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Byetta usually costs more than Bydureon. The exact amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Bydureon vs. Victoza

Bydureon and Victoza (liraglutide) both belong to the same class of medications, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) agonists. This means they work in the same way to improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Bydureon and Victoza are both FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Victoza is also FDA-approved to reduce the risk of heart problems such as heart attack and stroke in people who have type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Drug forms and administration

Bydureon comes as a liquid suspension that’s given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). It’s available in a self-injected syringe or pen injector. Both forms are taken once weekly.

Victoza is also self-injected under the skin but must be taken once daily. It’s available in a pen injector.

Side effects and risks

Bydureon and Victoza have similar effects in the body and therefore cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Bydureon and Victoza Bydureon Victoza
More common side effects
  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • headache
  • upset stomach
  • decreased appetite
  • injection site reactions such as redness, itchiness, or a lump under the skin
fatigue
  • respiratory infections such as the common cold
  • back pain
Serious side effects
  • thyroid cancer*
  • pancreatitis
  • low blood sugar
  • kidney damage
  • severe allergic reaction
  • severe injection site reactions
  • gallbladder disease

* Bydureon and Victoza both have a boxed warning from the FDA for thyroid cancer. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

Bydureon and Victoza haven’t been compared in clinical studies, but both are effective for treating type 2 diabetes. Both medications can also cause beneficial weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes.

In clinical studies, Bydureon reduced hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by about 0.88 to 1.6 percent after 24 to 28 weeks of treatment. People using Bydureon also lost about 4.4 pounds over 26 weeks of treatment.

In clinical studies, of Victoza, HbA1c was reduced by about 0.8 to 1.5 over 26 to 52 weeks of treatment. Those taking Victoza also lost about 5.5 pounds.

In people with heart disease and type 2 diabetes, Victoza can also reduce the risk of heart problems such as heart attack or stroke by about 13 percent. In another study, Bydureon wasn’t shown to have an effect on heart problems.

Costs

Bydureon and Victoza are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Victoza usually costs more than Bydureon. The exact amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Bydureon vs. Ozempic

Bydureon and Ozempic (semaglutide) are both in the same class of medications, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) agonists. This means they work in the same way to improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Uses

Bydureon and Ozempic are both FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Bydureon comes as a liquid suspension that’s given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). It’s available in a self-injected syringe or pen injector. Both forms are taken once weekly.

Ozempic is also self-injected under the skin once weekly. It’s available in a pen injector.

Side effects and risks

Bydureon and Ozempic have similar effects in the body and therefore cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Bydureon and Ozempic Bydureon Ozempic
More common side effects
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • upset stomach
  • injection site reactions such as redness, itchiness, or a lump under the skin**
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • decreased appetite
  • stomach pain
Serious side effects
  • thyroid cancer*
  • low blood sugar
  • pancreatitis
  • kidney damage
  • severe allergic reaction
  • severe injection site reactions
  • diabetes-related eye problems (diabetic retinopathy)

* Bydureon and Ozempic both have a boxed warning from the FDA for thyroid cancer. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

** Both Bydureon and Ozempic can cause injection-site reactions, but this side effect is much more common with Bydureon than with Ozempic.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Bydureon and Ozempic are used to treat is type 2 diabetes. In a clinical study comparing these medications, Ozempic reduced hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) more than Bydureon did after 56 weeks of treatment. Ozempic also reduced body weight more than Bydureon did.

Costs

Bydureon and Ozempic are brand-name medications. They’re not available in generic forms, which typically cost less than brand-name forms.

Ozempic usually costs more than Bydureon. The exact amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

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