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Dilaudid

Generic Name: hydromorphone (oral) (HYE droe MOR fone)
Brand Names: Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydrostat IR

Medically reviewed by Philip Thornton, DipPharm Last updated on Nov 28, 2019.

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What is Dilaudid?

Dilaudid (hydromorphone) is an opioid pain medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.

Dilaudid is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

Dilaudid may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not take Dilaudid if you have severe breathing problems, or a blockage in your stomach or intestines.

Dilaudid can slow or stop your breathing, especially when you start using this medicine or whenever your dose is changed. Never use Dilaudid in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Do not crush, break, or open an extended-release pill. Swallow it whole to avoid exposure to a potentially fatal dose.

Dilaudid may be habit-forming, even at regular doses. Take this medicine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Never share the medicine with another person. MISUSE OF NARCOTIC PAIN MEDICATION CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. Dilaudid may cause life-threatening addiction and withdrawal symptoms in a newborn if the mother has taken this medicine during pregnancy.

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur when alcohol is combined with hydromorphone.

Before using Dilaudid

You should not take Dilaudid if you have ever had an allergic reaction to hydromorphone or other narcotic medicines, or if you have:

  • breathing problems, sleep apnea;

  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines; or

  • a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.

Do not use Dilaudid if you have used a MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Some medicines can interact with hydromorphone and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome. Be sure your doctor knows if you also take medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. Ask your doctor before making any changes in how or when you take your medications.

You may not be able to take Dilaudid if you are NOT already being treated with a similar opioid (narcotic) pain medicine and are tolerant to it. Talk with your doctor if you are not sure you are opioid-tolerant.

Dilaudid may be habit-forming. Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away hydromorphone to any other person is against the law.

To make sure hydromorphone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • noisy breathing, sighing, shallow breathing, breathing that stops during sleep;

  • a history of head injury, brain tumor, or seizures;

  • a history of drug abuse, alcohol addiction, or mental illness;

  • urination problems;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • sulfite allergy;

  • Addison’s disease or other adrenal gland disorders;

  • problems with your gallbladder, pancreas, or thyroid; or

  • if you use a sedative like Valium – diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, Xanax, Klonopin, Versed, and others;

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. If you use hydromorphone while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on the drug. This can cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the baby after it is born. Babies born dependent on habit-forming medicine may need medical treatment for several weeks. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Hydromorphone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using Dilaudid.

How should I use Dilaudid?

Take Dilaudid exactly as prescribed. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Dilaudid can slow or stop your breathing, especially when you start using this medicine or whenever your dose is changed. Never use Dilaudid in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

Dilaudid may be habit-forming, even at regular doses. Take this medicine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. MISUSE OF NARCOTIC PAIN MEDICATION CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH.

Measure the liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not stop using Dilaudid suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Never crush or break a tablet to inhale the powder or mix it into a liquid to inject the drug into your vein. This practice has resulted in death with the misuse of hydromorphone and similar prescription drugs.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Throw away any unused liquid after 90 days.

Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Hydromorphone is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription.

Do not keep leftover Dilaudid tablets or liquid. Ask your pharmacist where to locate a drug take-back disposal program. If there is no take-back program, flush any unused tablets or liquid down the toilet. Disposal of medicines by flushing is recommended to reduce the danger of accidental overdose causing death. This advice applies to a very small number of medicines only. The FDA, working with the manufacturer, has determined this method to be the most appropriate route of disposal and presents the least risk to human safety.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Dilaudid is used for pain, you are not likely to miss a dose. Skip any missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. A hydromorphone overdose can be fatal, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription. Overdose symptoms may include slow breathing and heart rate, severe drowsiness, muscle weakness, cold and clammy skin, pinpoint pupils, and fainting.

What should I avoid?

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with hydromorphone.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Avoid driving or operating machinery until you know how Dilaudid will affect you. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls or other accidents.

Dilaudid side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any signs of an allergic reaction to Dilaudid: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Like other narcotic medicines, hydromorphone can slow your breathing. Death may occur if breathing becomes too weak.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • noisy breathing, sighing, shallow breathing, breathing that stops during sleep;

  • confusion, feelings of extreme happiness or sadness;

  • severe weakness or drowsiness;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • infertility, missed menstrual periods;

  • impotence, sexual problems, loss of interest in sex; or

  • low cortisol levels – nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, dizziness, worsening tiredness or weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Hydromorphone is more likely to cause breathing problems in older adults and people who are severely ill, malnourished, or otherwise debilitated.

Common Dilaudid side effects may include:

  • constipation, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

  • dizziness, drowsiness;

  • headache, tired feeling;

  • feelings of extreme happiness or sadness;

  • sweating, mild itching;

  • dry mouth; or

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Dilaudid?

Hydromorphone can interact with many other drugs and cause dangerous side effects or death. Be sure your doctor knows if you also use:

  • other narcotic medications – opioid pain medicine or prescription cough medicine;

  • a sedative like Valium – diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, Xanax, Klonopin, Versed, and others;

  • drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing – a sleeping pill, muscle relaxer, medicine to treat mood disorders or mental illness; or

  • drugs that affect serotonin levels in your body – a stimulant, or medicine for depression, Parkinson’s disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or nausea and vomiting.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect hydromorphone, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Dilaudid only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.03.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Dilaudid (hydromorphone)

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Other brands: Exalgo, Dilaudid-HP, Palladone

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How Long Does Dilaudid Withdrawal Last?

Dilaudid (hydromorphone hydrochloride) is a full opioid agonist that operates similarly to heroin and morphine, but it is many times more potent than those drugs.

All opiate drugs readily attach to the receptor sites in the brain that are specialized for neurotransmitters, such as endorphins, that are naturally involved in the control of pain, exertion, and stress. Opiate drugs are primarily designed to treat postoperative pain and pain associated with injury or some other chronic condition.

Dilaudid can be given in a tablet form, taken orally in a liquid form, and administered via intravenous injection following surgery. The drug’s very powerful effects and potential for physical dependence in those who use it for lengthy periods of time have resulted in its classification by the DEA as a Schedule II controlled substance. This puts it in a classification along with other very potent drugs like morphine and cocaine.

Dilaudid is most often used for postoperative pain because it has a quick onset of action and a rather short half-life. Thus, it works quickly and does not remain in the system very long.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), of the many individuals who report misusing or abusing prescription central nervous system depressants, only a very small proportion (about 261,000) reported misusing or abusing products that contain hydromorphone, the active opiate substance in Dilaudid. Nonetheless, use of the drug has serious potential consequences. Due to its potency, the drug has been approved for use in lethal injections in federal executions. Thus, anyone abusing hydrocodone products is abusing a seriously dangerous substance.

Physical Dependence on Dilaudid

The syndrome of physical dependence consists of both the symptoms of tolerance and withdrawal. One of the most common uses of Dilaudid is for the control of postoperative pain. These cases commonly only require Dilaudid injections for a short time, and patients are very unlikely to develop physical dependence on the drug.

Individuals are typically prescribed some other pain-relieving medication upon discharge from the hospital. Therefore, individuals who are receiving the drug for medicinal reasons often do not use it frequently enough to develop the symptoms of physical dependence. Thus, in medical practice, the development of physical dependence on Dilaudid is most likely relatively infrequent due to the acute uses of the drug.

In some cases, the drug may be prescribed for longer use. Those who use the drug under the supervision of a physician, and according to the instructions on their prescription, who develop physical dependence on it would not be considered for a diagnosis of a substance use disorder. However, because the drug is most often used for the acute control of pain, it can be hypothesized that a good proportion of individuals who display physical dependence on Dilaudid have most likely been abusing the drug. Thus, many individuals who develop tolerance and withdrawal symptoms as a result of use of Dilaudid would be suspected of having an opiate use disorder.Because the withdrawal symptoms that occur as a result of physical dependence on opiates like Dilaudid can be very discomforting, once an individual has developed physical dependence, the withdrawal symptoms become motivating factors for them to continue their drug abuse. When an individual begins to experience the onset of withdrawal symptoms, the easiest way for them to control the symptoms is simply to take more of the drug. This situation results in a downward spiral of continued drug abuse, short periods of abstinence followed by the onset of withdrawal symptoms, and continued use to avoid the full-blown withdrawal syndrome. The process of repeating a behavior to avoid undesirable consequences is referred to as negative reinforcement, and it is a very powerful mechanism that can prolong substance abuse issues.

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The Timeline for Withdrawal from Dilaudid

There will be quite a bit of individual variability in the specific symptoms and timeline associated with any single case of withdrawal from Dilaudid. A number of different interacting variables can affect this process, including how much of the drug an individual typically took, how long they took it, the manner in which they took it (drugs that are

injected or snorted typically produce more severe and longer withdrawal symptoms), individual differences in metabolism, and numerous other factors.

In general, the timeline for withdrawal from Dilaudid has the following course:

  • Because of the drug’s relatively brief half-life, individuals with severe opiate use disorders as a result of abusing Dilaudid may begin to experience mild nausea, restlessness, irritability, anxiety, fever, sweating, and cravings for the drug within 4-8 hours after they have discontinued use.
  • Withdrawal symptoms will continue to intensify. For most individuals, they will peak within 12-48 hours, although many cases may still have seriously distressing symptoms for up to three days. The primary symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, profuse sweating, fever, chills, headaches, muscle spasms, aches and pains, insomnia, decreased appetite, anxiety, depression, and severe cravings to use the drug. Some individuals may become extremely confused, depressed, and suicidal. When the symptoms are at their peak, individuals are prone to relapse and making poor decisions. Individuals may display numerous cognitive issues as a result of their physical symptoms, such as issues with attention, problem-solving, and memory.
  • The symptoms will begin to become less intense after 48-72 hours, and individuals may find that they become more focused on trying to get through the withdrawal syndrome. Nonetheless, they may still have issues with nausea, anxiety, irritability, appetite loss, depression, and cravings.
  • In most cases, the withdrawal syndrome will be resolved within 5-7 days after they have discontinued the drug. However, many people continue to experience emotional issues for weeks and even months. These issues include anxiety, depression, apathy, just feeling down, and having intermittent cravings, especially when one is exposed to reminders of one’s drug use or to stressful situations.

Relapse potential during the withdrawal process is high during all stages, and it is particularly high as the withdrawal symptoms become more intense. Unfortunately, most individuals who have abused drugs must deal with a number of “triggers” that elicit cravings for the drug. Triggers to engage in drug use can consist of virtually any situation, including stressful situations, meeting old friends, having memories, feeling tired or hungry, etc. Many times, individuals who relapse get the feeling that the relapse just “came out of nowhere” because they have not been able to define all of the potential situations that may spark use of drugs or alcohol. Understanding one’s personal triggers and how substance use fits one’s personal needs is extremely important in avoiding issues with relapse.

Even though the withdrawal symptoms from opioid drugs like Dilaudid are not generally considered to be potentially fatal or even serious physical consequences, there are several issues that can occur during withdrawal that can result in serious ramifications. For example, an individual who is vomiting or has significant diarrhea may become dehydrated, and this can be a serious condition. Individuals who become extremely emotionally distraught during the withdrawal process are at risk for poor decision-making and may overdose during a relapse attempt, or they may be involved in accidents or be the victims of crimes.

Individuals who become extremely distraught during withdrawal could also become suicidal.

Getting Assistance

The termwithdrawal managementis the preferred term to describe an organized process utilized by medical personnel to assist an individual in going through the withdrawal process from any substance of abuse. A physician-assisted withdrawal management program is the recommended method to address any withdrawal syndrome.

During this process, individuals who have developed opiate use disorders are often administered an opioid replacement medication by an addiction medicine physician. Medications like methadone or Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) are often preferred. The addiction medicine physician will establish an initial dosage of the drug that is sufficient to result in the recovering individual not experiencing any significant withdrawal symptoms. Over time, the physician will slowly taper the dosage of the drug and allow the individual to wean off it at a pace where they will not experience any significant withdrawal symptoms.

During withdrawal, if there are complications or other symptoms that surface, the physician can address them with other medicines or interventions. This includes addressing any co-occurring mental health disorders or medical conditions that also need treatment.

The withdrawal management process often lasts significantly longer than cold-turkey withdrawal; however, the potential for relapse and serious complications is drastically reduced.

Eventually, the opioid replacement medication can be totally discontinued.

Whether one chooses to withdraw from Dilaudid without assistance or to become involved in a physician-assisted withdrawal management program, simply going through the process of withdrawal is not a sufficient approach to recovery. Individuals who do not become involved in some form of long-term treatment program will relapse at rates that approach 100 percent even if they successfully complete the withdrawal process without relapsing.

About Drug and Alcohol Detox

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SIDE EFFECTS

The following serious adverse reactions are described, or described in greater detail, in other sections:

  • Addiction, Abuse, and Misuse
  • Life-Threatening Respiratory Depression
  • Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome
  • Interactions with Benzodiazepines or Other CNS Depressants
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Severe Hypotension
  • Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions
  • Seizures
  • Withdrawal

Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.

Serious adverse reactions associated with DILAUDID include respiratory depression and apnea and, to a lesser degree, circulatory depression, respiratory arrest, shock, and cardiac arrest.

The most common adverse effects are lightheadedness, dizziness, sedation, nausea, vomiting, sweating, flushing, dysphoria, euphoria, dry mouth, and pruritus. These effects seem to be more prominent in ambulatory patients and in those not experiencing severe pain.

Less Frequently Observed Adverse Reactions

Cardiac disorders: tachycardia, bradycardia, palpitations

Eye disorders: vision blurred, diplopia, miosis, visual impairment

Gastrointestinal disorders: constipation, ileus, diarrhea, abdominal pain

General disorders and administration site conditions: weakness, feeling abnormal, chills

Hepatobiliary disorders: biliary colic

Metabolism and nutrition disorders: decreased appetite

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: muscle rigidity

Nervous system disorders: headache, tremor, paraesthesia, nystagmus, increased intracranial pressure, syncope, taste alteration, involuntary muscle contractions, presyncope

Psychiatric disorders: agitation, mood altered, nervousness, anxiety, depression, hallucination, disorientation, insomnia, abnormal dreams

Renal and urinary disorders: urinary retention, urinary hesitation, antidiuretic effects

Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders: bronchospasm, laryngospasm

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: urticaria, rash, hyperhidrosis

Vascular disorders: flushing, hypotension, hypertension

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of hydromorphone. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Confusional state, convulsions, drowsiness, dyskinesia, dyspnea, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, hepatic enzymes increased, hyperalgesia, hypersensitivity reaction, lethargy, myoclonus, oropharyngeal swelling, peripheral edema, and somnolence.

Serotonin Syndrome

Cases of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition, have been reported during concomitant use of opioids with serotonergic drugs.

Adrenal Insufficiency

Cases of adrenal insufficiency have been reported with opioid use, more often following greater than one month of use.

Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis has been reported with ingredients contained in DILAUDID Oral Solution or DILAUDID Tablets.

Androgen Deficiency

Cases of androgen deficiency have occurred with chronic use of opioids .

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Dilaudid (Hydromorphone Hydrochloride)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using hydromorphone?

You should not take this medicine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to hydromorphone or other narcotic medicines, or if you have:

  • severe asthma or breathing problems;
  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines; or
  • a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.

Do not use hydromorphone if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • a head injury, brain tumor, or seizures;
  • alcoholism, drug addiction, or mental illness;
  • urination problems;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a sulfite allergy; or
  • problems with your gallbladder, pancreas, or thyroid.

If you use opioid medicine while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on the drug. This can cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the baby after it is born. Babies born dependent on opioids may need medical treatment for several weeks.

Do not breast-feed. Hydromorphone can pass into breast milk and may cause drowsiness or breathing problems in a nursing baby.

How should I use hydromorphone?

Follow the directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides. Never use hydromorphone in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Tell your doctor if you feel an increased urge to take more of this medicine.

Never share opioid medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. MISUSE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away opioid medicine is against the law.

Stop taking all other around-the-clock narcotic pain medications when you start taking hydromorphone.

Swallow the capsule or tablet whole to avoid exposure to a potentially fatal overdose. Do not crush, chew, break, open, or dissolve.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Do not stop using hydromorphone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using hydromorphone.

Never crush or break a hydromorphone pill to inhale the powder or mix it into a liquid to inject the drug into your vein. This can cause in death.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Throw away any unused liquid after 90 days.

Keep track of your medicine. You should be aware if anyone is using it improperly or without a prescription.

Do not keep leftover opioid medication. Just one dose can cause death in someone using this medicine accidentally or improperly. Ask your pharmacist where to locate a drug take-back disposal program. If there is no take-back program, flush the unused medicine down the toilet.

The Risks of Snorting Dilaudid

Dilaudid is a prescription narcotic drug that is used to treat severe levels of pain, such as post-surgical pain or kidney stones. Also known by its generic name hydromorphone, this potent drug is commonly abused. There were 3.9 million prescriptions filled for hydromorphone in 2012, per the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Methods of Abuse

Dilaudid can be injected as a liquid or consumed orally via a tablet or capsule; however, the liquid form of the drug is somewhat more difficult to attain on the street. For this reason, people who aim to inject this drug will often dissolve the powder from crushed tablets or capsules into a liquid solution to prepare it for injecting. Others abuse this drug by crushing the oral forms of it and snorting the resulting powder substance.

Is Dilaudid Addictive?

Dilaudid is as addictive as it is effective. Tolerance to the drug can happen within a matter of days if it is used habitually. In addition, the effects it has on the mind and body should not be underestimated. Dilaudid is strong enough to cause severe damage to the brain and other organ systems. Habitual use may lead to the death of dopamine receptors located in the brain. When an individual doesn’t have enough dopamine receptors, they cannot properly pick up on the presence of the chemical in their body. Thus, no matter how much dopamine they make, they won’t be able to fully experience the impact of the feel-good chemical. This leaves many who abuse Dilaudid with lasting bouts of depression.

Furthermore, chemical operations that are required for opioid receptors to do their job often begin to fail when the drug is no longer being used. In many cases, this condition is a side effect of post-acute withdrawal syndrome, which causes withdrawal symptoms and mood ability to persist for months or years after cessation of use. This is just one of many forms of depression that co-occur in people who engage in substance abuse.

The Dangers of Snorting

Snorting this drug often produces telltale signs like bloodshot eyes and nosebleeds. The risk of overdose is heightened when snorting Dilaudid, because there is no way to control for how much of a substance is snorted or absorbed through the mucosal lining of the nasal cavity. Typically, a small amount of it is absorbed, and the rest is swallowed. It may sit in the stomach for some time, especially if the individual has recently eaten, before it is absorbed into the bloodstream. Thus, there is the potential for overdose after the initial high from the amount that was absorbed through the nasal cavity wears off if someone uses again before the body has eliminated the Dilaudid that is in the stomach.

In 2010, there were 38,329 overdose-related deaths in America, and opioid pain relievers like Dilaudid accounted for 44 percent of them, per NPR.

When Help Is Needed

When a loved one is deep in the trenches of an addiction to Dilaudid, it can be difficult to reason with them or get them to truly understand the concern their friends and family bear. Sometimes, talking to them won’t lead to any productive movement on the issue. In these cases, interventionists can be employed to assist family members in getting their loved ones into treatment.

Signs of Dilaudid addiction include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Bailing on family obligations or leisure time with friends to stay home and get high
  • Constipation
  • Poor appetite
  • Legal problems stemming from drug abuse
  • Depression or anxiety
  • Paranoid behavior
  • Poor grooming
  • Irritable mood
  • Needing to borrow money to pay bills
  • Lying about how much Dilaudid they’re using if they have a prescription
  • Engaging in dangerous activities while under the influence
  • Complaining that a prescribed amount of Dilaudid isn’t working to treat their pain

Choosing Treatment

A common treatment for an addiction to Dilaudid involves opioid maintenance therapies using medications that allow users to slowly wean off opiates over the course of a year or longer.Individuals who use these treatment programs for shorter periods of time do have a better shot at success than those who use nothing, but the longer people are in opioid maintenance therapy plans, the longer they appear to stay clean.

Medication should always be used in conjunction with comprehensive addiction therapy. Individual and group therapy will address the underlying reasons that led to substance abuse and help clients to device coping mechanisms so they don’t succumb to temptation and triggers to use in the future.

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