Toujeo and heart failure

Toujeo (insulin glargine)

You may wonder how Toujeo compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below are comparisons between Toujeo and several medications.

Toujeo vs. Tresiba

Toujeo and Tresiba are both long-acting insulin products, but they contain different forms of insulin. Toujeo contains insulin glargine, and Tresiba contains insulin degludec.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Tresiba is FDA-approved to control blood sugar in adults and children 1 year of age and older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Toujeo and Tresiba are both available as a prefilled pen that’s used to deliver insulin using an injection under the skin (subcutaneous).

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Tresiba both contain a long-acting insulin ingredient. Therefore, the side effects that they cause are very similar.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Tresiba include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, and bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Tresiba include headache and diarrhea.

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Tresiba may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Although both Toujeo and Tresiba can cause hypoglycemia, Toujeo may have a lower risk of this condition. In one study, Toujeo had a lower risk of hypoglycemia than Tresiba when these medications were first started and dosages were being increased.

In another study, low blood sugar levels at night were less common in people taking Toujeo compared to Tresiba. And in yet another study, the risk of severe low blood sugar and nighttime low blood sugar was lower in people taking Toujeo compared to those taking Tresiba.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Tresiba have been directly compared in several clinical studies. Overall, they were found to be very similar in effectiveness.

In a 2018 study in people with type 2 diabetes, Toujeo and Tresiba worked about equally well for decreasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) after 24 weeks of treatment. Another 2018 study in people with type 2 diabetes also found that Toujeo and Tresiba worked about equally well for lowering blood sugar levels. And there were similar results in yet another 2018 study.

One study evaluated switching people with type 2 diabetes from a long-acting insulin such as Lantus or Levemir, to Toujeo or Tresiba. In this study, making the switch improved HbA1c about equally well in people who switched to Toujeo as people who switched to Tresiba.

Some research did find a difference between the performance of the two drugs. A 2018 analysis of studies found that Toujeo may cause more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day as compared to Tresiba.

Costs

Toujeo and Tresiba are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Tresiba. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Basaglar

Toujeo and Basaglar are both brand-name drugs that contain a long-acting insulin. In fact, they contain the same ingredient, insulin glargine. The main difference between them is that Toujeo is more concentrated than Basaglar.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Basaglar is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with type 1 diabetes, and in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Basaglar are delivered using an injection that’s given under the skin (subcutaneous). They’re also both usually given once daily.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Basaglar contain the same long-acting insulin ingredient, insulin glargine. Therefore, both medications can cause similar common and serious side effects.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Basaglar include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, or itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Basaglar include:

  • joint pain
  • headache
  • high blood pressure
  • diarrhea
  • depression

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Basaglar may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Other differences in side effects

Although these medications can cause mostly similar side effects, there may be some differences.

In one study, people with type 2 diabetes were switched from Lantus to either Basaglar or Toujeo. After the switch, people taking Toujeo had a lower risk of low blood sugar levels compared to Basaglar or Lantus.

This is similar to studies comparing Toujeo and Lantus, which is biologically similar to Basaglar. In one study, Toujeo was less likely to cause hypoglycemia than Lantus.

Researchers in one study found that people taking Toujeo had less weight gain than people taking Lantus. However, in another study, there was no difference in weight gain between the two drugs.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Basaglar have been directly compared in one study. In this study, people with type 2 diabetes were switched from Lantus to either Basaglar or Toujeo. After the switch, both Toujeo and Basaglar worked about equally well for maintaining blood sugar control.

Toujeo has also been directly compared to Lantus, which is biologically similar to Basaglar. (Lantus and Basaglar are expected to have the same effects.) These studies show that Toujeo and Lantus work about equally well for decreasing fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

One difference is that Toujeo may work longer than Lantus or Basaglar. Toujeo lasts up to 36 hours, while Lantus and Basaglar last for 20 to 24 hours. Toujeo may also cause more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day, with fewer low or high blood sugar events.

Costs

Toujeo and Basaglar are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Basaglar may cost slightly less than Toujeo. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Levemir

Toujeo and Levemir are both long-acting insulin products, but they contain different forms of insulin. Toujeo contains insulin glargine, and Levemir contains insulin detemir.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Levemir is FDA-approved to control blood sugar in adults and children 2 years of age and older with type 1 diabetes or adults with type 2 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Levemir are given by an injection under the skin (subcutaneous). They’re also both usually given once daily.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Levemir both contain a long-acting insulin ingredient. Therefore, the side effects that they can cause are very similar.

More common side effects of Toujeo and Levemir include:

  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites

Other common side effects that have been reported in people using Levemir include:

  • headache
  • back pain
  • fever
  • diarrhea
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain

Serious side effects that can occur in people using Toujeo or Levemir may include:

  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • severe allergic reaction

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Levemir haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, an indirect comparison found that Toujeo and Levemir may work about equally well for decreasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).

Costs

Toujeo and Levemir are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Levemir. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo vs. Trulicity

Toujeo is a long-acting insulin product that contains insulin glargine. Trulicity, which contains the drug dulaglutide, is classified as a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

Uses

Toujeo is FDA-approved to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Trulicity is FDA-approved to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. It’s not used for people with type 1 diabetes.

Drug forms and administration

Both Toujeo and Trulicity are given by injection under the skin (subcutaneous). Toujeo is given once daily. Trulicity is given once weekly.

Side effects and risks

Toujeo and Trulicity have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

Toujeo and Trulicity Toujeo Trulicity
More common side effects
  • pain, rash, swelling, and itchiness at the injection sites
  • respiratory infections such as the common cold, flu, or bronchitis
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • fluid retention with swelling of the arms or legs
  • weight gain
  • skin thickening or pits at the injection sites
  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • decreased appetite
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
Serious side effects
  • severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • severe allergic reaction
  • low potassium levels (hypokalemia)
  • heart arrhythmia
  • pancreatitis
  • kidney damage
  • thyroid cancer*

* Trulicity has a boxed warning from the FDA about this side effect. This is the strongest warning the FDA requires. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Some people wonder how diabetes medications will affect their weight. In studies of Toujeo, some people gained weight. In studies of Trulicity, some people lost weight, ranging from about 3 pounds to 5 pounds over 26 weeks.

Effectiveness

Toujeo and Trulicity haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. This is likely because they’re meant for people with different treatment needs.

According to treatment guidelines, Trulicity is considered a first-choice treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes who can’t take metformin. And long-acting insulin, such as Toujeo, is recommended when one or more other drugs, such as Trulicity or metformin, don’t lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) enough.

Costs

Toujeo and Trulicity are brand-name medications. Neither drug is available in a generic form.

Toujeo may cost less than Trulicity. The actual amount you pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan.

Toujeo and Afrezza: New and Improved Insulins, Limited by FDA Labeling Constraints

Existing treatments are effective enough to control diabetes in most patients, but drug makers spend huge sums to keep developing new products and improving old ones.
Indeed, Sanofi just rolled out 2 novel versions of the very oldest diabetes treatment, an insulin glargine formulation called Toujeo and an inhalable form of human insulin called Afrezza.
Sanofi officials say both products will benefit large numbers of insulin users with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mel-litus (T1DM, T2DM). Outsiders express a wide range of opinions.
Trial data indicate that Toujeo controls glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels about as well as Lantus, an insulin glargine formulation approved in the year 2000 that has just lost patent protection after years of blockbuster sales. Toujeo lasts longer than Lantus, however.1 It also provides the body a steadier stream of insulin1 and is associated with a significantly lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia.1
Afrezza performed similarly in a phase 3 trial. It roughly matched an existing competitor, insulin aspart (Novolog), in A1C reduction, and slightly outperformed it in several secondary ways. Afrezza use was associated with less hypoglycemia, lower fasting blood glucose, and slight weight loss rather than slight weight gain. It also reached peak levels very quickly, in just 12 to 14 minutes on average.2
That said, Afrezza’s medical importance will likely hinge on something that no trial can measure: how the change from injection to inhalation affects patient behavior. If the delivery method inspires patients to medicate themselves more consistently, Afrezza could produce huge health benefits. If patients use Afrezza like they use insulin aspart (a fast-acting insulin analogue), the new product could prove to be an expensive convenience.
Financial analysts mostly predict solid but unspectacular sales for both drugs, in part because federal regulations for-bid Sanofi from touting the comparative advantages of either drug. (The FDA did not allow language about less hypoglycemia in the label it approved, and therefore Sanofi cannot mention it in language it uses to promote the drug.)
Consensus estimates reported by Bloomberg predict annual Toujeo sales will reach about $1.3 billion by 20203 far below the $7.1 billion that Lantus generated in 2014. As for Afrezza, annual projections range from a paltry $182 million up to $2 billion, with the median in the $600 million range. The treatment’s unexpectedly poor performance during its first month on the market led Goldman Sachs to cut its annual sales projections by $1 billion.4
In other respects, however, both medications have gotten a good reception.
“The response to Afrezza on social media has been tremendous,” Rachele Berria, MD, PhD, who heads the Diabetes Medical Unit for Sanofi US, told Evidence-Based Diabetes Management in an interview. “Healthcare providers don’t seem to anticipate that patients will see much of a need to move away from injections, but actual patients see this as a valuable feature.”
Berria says the company will study real-life Afrezza use to see if patient enthusiasm translates into patient compliance, and that it will follow real-world Toujeo users to measure the practical effect of its longer, steadier flow of medication. “The goal in treating diabetes is to avoid peaks and valleys in both insulin and sugar, and Toujeo does that to a degree that once seemed impossible,” she said. “There’s no insulin spike when each new injection gets absorbed, and there’s no loss of efficacy in the final few hours. It’s a big stride forward from Lantus.”
Physicians have been using insulin to treat diabetes since 1922, when Frederick Banting and Charles Best injected the hormone into a diabetic teenager at a hospital in Toronto. Eli Lilly began producing it commercially within the year, and diabetes was transformed, virtually overnight, from a speedy death sentence to a chronic condition.5
Intermediate acting Neutral Prot-amine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin arrived about a quarter century later, in 1950. Long-acting insulin, on the other hand, didn’t reach patients until 2000, when Lantus went on sale in the United States and Europe.
The new drug reduced A1C levels about as much as NPH insulin, but trials demonstrated that it produced a greater reduction in fasting plasma glucose and fasting blood glucose as well as a far lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia.6
The other big advantage of Lantus was the convenience of longer action. Patients who had spent years toting around basal insulin and setting alarms for midday injections suddenly had nothing to carry and nothing to remember except a single injection before bed. By then, of course, insulin was not the only effective treatment for T2DM. The FDA had approved metformin in 1994, and its huge success spurred drug companies to develop the other oral treatments that now crowd the market.
Many of these treatments are quite effective, especially when used in combination. Indeed, if used properly, their excellent disease control could greatly reduce diabetic complications and the need for new drugs.
Yet pharmaceutical companies continue developing treatments like Toujeo and Afrezza because a huge percentage of diabetics fail to control their condition with current options. A recent study that examined records from more than 43,000 patients found that less than 55% of all Americans who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and prescribed medication to control blood sugar, actually man-age to keep their A1C level under 7%.7
The main cause of this problem seems to be patient behavior. Studies have found that patient adherence to oral treatment protocols can range from more than 90% down to just over 50%. Strict adherence to guidelines concerning injectable medications and proper diet tends to be lower, while strict adherence to guidelines concerning mod-erate, regular exercise and blood sugar checks is downright rare.8 The chance that any patient will adhere perfectly to a complex regimen is low, and studies of people with all types of chronic disease have typically found that only about half of them will make a serious effort to manage their condition.8
The consequences of this behavior are dire.
Diabetes is the nation’s seventh-lead-ing cause of death. It increases the risk of stroke (by 50%), heart attack (by 80%), and death from cardiovascular disease (by 70%). It is also the leading cause of kidney failure and non-traumatic lower limb amputation. The American Diabetes Association estimates that the di-rect medical cost of treating diabetes reached $176 billion in 2012, and indi-rect costs such as lost productivity add-ed another $69 billion to the tally.9

Studies have demonstrated that in-creased adherence to a treatment regi-men can reduce A1C levels,10 and many other studies have shown that A1C reductions prevent complications. A 1% reduction in A1C is associated with a 14% reduction in the risk of heart attack and a 40% reduction in the risk of eye, kidney, and nerve disease.11 (Logic says that better adherence would also slash healthcare costs, but the findings from research on that topic are mixed.10)
A number of experiments have tested different strategies for improving ad-herence to existing treatment regimens. Many have failed, but many others have produced significant gains, at least over the study period, with simple ap-proaches such as asking pharmacists to provide patients a little extra information.12 While some researchers continue to study ideas for motivating patients, others work to improve treatments.
Some people, for example, respond poorly to existing medications, so even if patients used existing options perfectly, there would still be a need for more effec-tive options. The biggest need, however, appears to be medications that promote compliance by making treatment regimens less arduous and more tolerable. Only real-world use will show if Toujeo and Afrezza meet that second need, but there are several reasons for hope.
For one, the reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with using Toujeo rather than Lantus is reasonably large. A meta-analysis of 3 of the drug’s phase 3 trials found a 31% reduction in such reactions among 2476 patients (risk ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.84; P = .0002).13
While the biggest original selling point for Lantus may have been the relatively low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia, low blood sugar remains a serious problem. Hypoglycemia is the primary cause of roughly 282,000 emergency department visits each year,9 and many patients fear it enough to risk high blood sugar by taking less insulin than their doctors prescribe.14
Thus, the lower nocturnal hypoglycemia incidence associated with Toujeo could produce 2 distinct benefits for patients who switch from Lantus:

Page: 12 Next Page (2) >>

Lantus is one of the most commonly used insulin products for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It’s a long-acting insulin, so you usually only need to inject it once a day. You may have heard about a different form of Lantus known as Toujeo, and might be wondering how the 2 medications differ. Let’s have a look at them.

How do Toujeo and Lantus work?

Lantus and Toujeo have the same active ingredient: insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is a long-acting (or “basal”) insulin (other basal insulins include Levemir and Basaglar). Insulin glargine helps keep your blood glucose (sugar) levels controlled for up to 24 hours or longer. But you may need other types of insulin in addition to glargine to help control your blood sugar throughout the day.

Is Toujeo or Lantus better for managing diabetes?

Toujeo and Lantus both contain insulin glargine and are about equally effective for helping you manage your diabetes. However, the right one for you will depend on how much insulin you need.

Toujeo is the most concentrated of all the long-acting insulins. For people who need more insulin than average, this could be seen as an advantage. With Toujeo, you’ll only ever need 1 dose per day, whereas with less concentrated insulins (i.e., Lantus, Levemir, Basaglar), you may need 2 doses per day, either at the same time or split up depending on how your blood sugar levels respond.

Do Toujeo and Lantus differ in how you take them?

Lantus and Toujeo are both injected into the body (generally around the stomach subcutaneously) and slowly absorbed.

One of the biggest differences between Toujeo and Lantus, however, is in their dispensers. Lantus comes in either a pen (Lantus SoloStar) or a vial. To use the pen, you simply put a needle on the pen and inject it. To use the vial, you use a syringe to withdraw the amount you need and then inject. Some patients prefer the pen over the vial because it has fewer steps and can be injected faster, but the pen may be more expensive.

Toujeo, on the other hand, is only available as a pen, but there are 2 kinds: the Toujeo SoloStar and the Toujeo SoloStar Max. The SoloStar holds 450 units of insulin per pen, and the SoloStar Max holds 900 units of insulin per pen.

Toujeo and Lantus also differ in their concentration of insulin glargine. Insulin is often supplied in vials or insulin pens to be injected. For most insulins, including Lantus, 1 milliliter (mL) has 100 units (U) of insulin in it. But Toujeo is a much more concentrated form, with 300 units of insulin glargine per milliliter.

If you switch from Lantus to Toujeo, pay attention to how much insulin you inject. Since Toujeo is much more concentrated, you can inject too much insulin if you are not careful when first using it.

Don’t miss out on savings! Get the best ways to save on your prescriptions delivered to your inbox. By signing up, I agree to GoodRx’s terms of service and privacy policy.

What are the side effects of Toujeo and Lantus?

The main side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo and Lantus, is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Symptoms of hypoglycemia include:

  • Sweating or chills
  • Nervousness, anxiousness, or irritability
  • Fast heart rate
  • Confusion
  • Hunger
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness

The best way to prevent hypoglycemia is to monitor your blood sugar levels at home. Usually, you can do this with a self-monitoring blood sugar device, and your healthcare provider may prescribe a device alongside lancets and testing strips. Talk to your provider about how often to check your sugar levels and what your goal numbers are. They can also give you tips for what to do when your sugar levels are too low.

Other side effects of Toujeo and Lantus may include the following:

  • Injection site reactions
  • Hardening of the skin around the site of injection
  • Itchiness
  • Rash
  • Weight gain

Do Toujeo and Lantus interact with any other drugs?

Many drugs can interact with Toujeo and Lantus and increase your risk of hypoglycemia, high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), or other side effects. The following are some drugs to watch out for, but this is not an all-inclusive list:

  • Beta-blockers like metoprolol and propranolol can hide the symptoms of hypoglycemia, which is why you should monitor your blood sugar at home while you are taking Toujeo or Lantus.
  • Taking other forms of insulin or other diabetes medications (e.g., sulfonylureas, SGLT2 inhibitors) with Toujeo or Lantus can increase your risk of low blood sugar.
  • Some birth control, antiviral, and antipsychotic medications can make Toujeo or Lantus less effective and lead to unexpected blood glucose levels.

It’s also important to note that drinking alcohol while you are taking Toujeo or Lantus can cause your blood sugar to unexpectedly change.

How much do Toujeo and Lantus cost?

Both Toujeo and Lantus are very expensive, though Lantus appears to be slightly more expensive than Toujeo. The average retail price for 3 prefilled 1.5 mL pens of 300 units of insulin per mL of Toujeo (the most frequently filled prescription according to GoodRx data) is about $477. The average retail price for 5 SoloStar pens of 3 mL of Lantus (the most frequently filled prescription according to GoodRx data) is $505.

Even though the costs of these drugs are high, there are ways to bring their prices down. For example, both of these drugs are covered by some Medicare and private insurance plans. You can also look into pharmacy coupons, manufacturer copay cards, or patient assistance programs. Copay cards and patient assistance programs can reduce the cost of your medications, but you may need to meet certain eligibility requirements.

To find insulin savings programs and prices at pharmacies in your area, search for your prescription on goodrx.com or the GoodRx mobile app.

The bottom line

Toujeo and Lantus are long-acting insulins that can help keep your blood sugar controlled for 24 hours or longer. Toujeo is more concentrated than Lantus and may be a good option for people who need higher amounts of insulin. Both medications can be expensive, but you may be able to use insurance, pharmacy coupons, copay cards, and patient assistance programs to reduce the cost.

Put drug prices & coupons in your pocket! We’ll text you a link to download our free Android or iPhone app Get GoodRx Mobile App Your link is on the way!

We’ve sent a link to download the GoodRx mobile app to your phone.

Something went wrong

We were unable to send a link to your phone.

  • Toujeo

    Toujeo is a brand name for the medicine insulin glargine, available in a prefilled injectable pen (SoloStar).

    It’s used to treat people with type 1 diabetes (the body doesn’t produce the hormone insulin) and type 2 diabetes (the body doesn’t make or use insulin normally).

    Toujeo is a long-acting form of insulin that works by helping your body use sugar properly.

    For people with type 1 diabetes, Toujeo must be used with another type of insulin known as a short-acting insulin. People with type 2 diabetes may use other types of insulin or oral drugs along with Toujeo.

    Taking this prescription medicine along with adopting a healthy lifestyle can decrease your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage from neuropathy, kidney problems, or eye issues.

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Toujeo in 2015. It’s marketed by Sanofi.

    Toujeo Warnings

    Toujeo shouldn’t be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated.

    Before using Toujeo, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had:

    • Diabetic neuropathy
    • Heart failure
    • Heart, liver, or kidney disease
    • Hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood)
    • A severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to any medicines, especially insulin products

    Toujeo shouldn’t be used in children, and it should be used with caution in elderly people.

    Be sure to let your physician know that you’re taking Toujeo before having any type of surgery, including a dental procedure.

    Your healthcare provider may recommend that you follow a specific diet and exercise plan while using Toujeo. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

    Illnesses, injuries, or unusual stress can affect your blood sugar levels. Talk to your physician if you experience any of these changes while taking this medicine.

    This drug may cause a low blood sugar episode (hypoglycemia). You should know the symptoms of low blood sugar, and what to do if you experience them.

    To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day, and don’t skip meals.

    Don’t use Toujeo if you’re having a low blood sugar episode.

    Your doctor will probably want to monitor your blood sugar levels often while you’re taking this medication. Keep all appointments with your healthcare provider and laboratory.

    Toujeo can help control blood sugar, but it doesn’t cure diabetes. Keep taking this medicine even if you feel well. Don’t stop using Toujeo or change your dose without first talking to your doctor.

    If you are using a thiazolidinedione — a class of diabetes drugs that includes Actos (pioglitazone) and Avandia (rosiglitazone) — you may have a higher risk of heart failure if you also use Toujeo.

    Talk with your doctor before using Toujeo if you have a history of heart failure.

    Always wear a diabetic ID bracelet to be sure you get proper treatment in case of an emergency.

    Pregnancy and Toujeo

    Tell your doctor if you become pregnant while using Toujeo. You’ll need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking this medicine during pregnancy.

    The drug is found in breast milk. Talk to your doctor before breastfeeding a baby while taking Toujeo.

    SIDE EFFECTS

    The following adverse reactions are discussed elsewhere:

    • Hypoglycemia
    • Medication Errors
    • Hypersensitivity and allergic reactions
    • Hypokalemia

    Clinical Trials Experience

    Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug, and may not reflect the rates actually observed in clinical practice.

    The data in Table 1 reflect the exposure of 304 patients with type 1 diabetes to TOUJEO with mean exposure duration of 23 weeks. The type 1 diabetes population had the following characteristics: Mean age was 46 years and mean duration of diabetes was 21 years. Fifty-five percent were male, 86% were Caucasian, 5% were Black or African American, and 5% were Hispanic. At baseline, the mean eGFR was 82 mL/min/1.73 m² and 35% of patients had eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m². The mean BMI was 28 kg/m². HbA1c at baseline was greater or equal to 8% in 58% of patients.

    The data in Table 2 reflect the exposure of 1242 patients with type 2 diabetes to TOUJEO with mean exposure duration of 25 weeks. The type 2 diabetes population had the following characteristics: Mean age was 59 years and mean duration of diabetes was 13 years. Fifty-three percent were male, 88% were Caucasian, 7% were Black or African American, and 17% were Hispanic. At baseline, mean eGFR was 79 mL/min/1.73 m² and 27% of patients had an eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m². The mean BMI was 35 kg/m². HbA1c at baseline was greater or equal to 8% in 66% of patients.

    Common adverse reactions were defined as reactions occurring in ≥5% of the population studied.

    Common adverse reactions occurring for TOUJEO-treated subjects during clinical trials in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus are listed in Table 1 and Table 2, respectively. Hypoglycemia is discussed in a dedicated subsection below.

    Table 1: Adverse Reactions in Two Pooled Clinical Trials of 26 Weeks and 16 Weeks Duration in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes (with incidence ≥5%)

    TOUJEO + Mealtime Insulin*, %
    (n=304)
    Nasopharyngitis 12.8
    Upper respiratory tract infection 9.5
    * “mealtime insulin” refers to insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, or insulin aspart.

    Table 2: Adverse Reactions in Three Pooled Clinical Trials of 26 Weeks Duration in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes (with incidence ≥5%)

    TOUJEO*, %
    (n=1242)
    Nasopharyngitis 7.1
    Upper respiratory tract infection 5.7
    * one of the trials in type 2 diabetes included mealtime insulin.

    Hypoglycemia

    Hypoglycemia is the most commonly observed adverse reaction in patients using insulin, including TOUJEO . In the TOUJEO program, severe hypoglycemia was defined as an event requiring assistance of another person to administer a resuscitative action and documented symptomatic hypoglycemia was defined as an event with typical symptoms of hypoglycemia accompanied by a self-monitored or plasma glucose value equal to or less than 54 mg/dL.

    The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes receiving TOUJEO as part of a multiple daily injection regimen was 6.6% at 26 weeks. The incidence of documented symptomatic hypoglycemia was 69% at 26 weeks. There were no clinically important differences in hypoglycemia between TOUJEO and LANTUS among type 1 diabetes patients.

    The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes was 5% at 26 weeks in patients receiving TOUJEO as part of a multiple daily injection regimen, and 1.0% and 0.9% respectively at 26 weeks in the two studies where patients received TOUJEO as part of a basal-insulin only regimen. The incidence of documented symptomatic hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving TOUJEO ranged from 8% to 37% at 26 weeks and the highest risk was again seen in patients receiving TOUJEO as part of a multiple daily injection regimen.

    Insulin Initiation And Intensification Of Glucose Control

    Intensification or rapid improvement in glucose control has been associated with a transitory, reversible ophthalmologic refraction disorder, worsening of diabetic retinopathy, and acute painful peripheral neuropathy. However, long-term glycemic control decreases the risk of diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy.

    Peripheral Edema

    Insulin, including TOUJEO, may cause sodium retention and edema, particularly if previously poor metabolic control is improved by intensified insulin therapy.

    Lipodystrophy

    Long-term use of insulin, including TOUJEO, can cause lipoatrophy (depression in the skin) or lipohypertrophy (enlargement or thickening of tissue) in some patients and may affect insulin absorption .

    Weight Gain

    Weight gain has occurred with some insulin therapies including TOUJEO and has been attributed to the anabolic effects of insulin and the decrease in glucosuria.

    Allergic Reactions

    Some patients taking insulin therapy, including TOUJEO have experienced erythema, local edema, and pruritus at the site of injection. These conditions were usually self-limiting.

    Severe cases of generalized allergy (anaphylaxis) have been reported .

    Cardiovascular Safety

    No clinical studies to establish the cardiovascular safety of TOUJEO have been conducted. A cardiovascular outcomes trial, ORIGIN, has been conducted with LANTUS. It is unknown whether the results of ORIGIN can be applied to TOUJEO.

    The Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention trial (i.e., ORIGIN) was an open-label, randomized, 12,537 patient study that compared LANTUS to standard care on the time to first occurrence of a major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE). MACE was defined as the composite of CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and nonfatal stroke. The incidence of MACE was similar between LANTUS and standard care in ORIGIN (Hazard Ratio for MACE; 1.02 ).

    Immunogenicity

    As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity.

    In a 6-month study of type 1 diabetes patients, 79% of patients who received TOUJEO once daily were positive for anti-insulin antibodies (AIA) at least once during the study, including 62% that were positive at baseline and 44% of patients who developed antidrug antibody (i.e., anti-insulin glargine antibody ) during the study. Eighty percent of the AIA-positive patients on TOUJEO with antibody test at baseline remained AIA positive at month 6.

    In two 6-month studies in type 2 diabetes patients, 25% of patients who received TOUJEO once daily were positive for AIA at least once during the study, including 42% who were positive at baseline and 20% of patients who developed ADA during the study. Ninety percent of the AIA-positive patients on TOUJEO with antibody test at baseline, remained AIA positive at month 6.

    The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay and may be influenced by several factors such as: assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medication, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to TOUJEO with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading.

    Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Toujeo (Insulin Glargine Injection for Subcutaneous Use)

    Toujeo SoloStar Side Effects

    Generic Name: insulin glargine

    Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 1, 2018.

    • Overview
    • Side Effects
    • Dosage
    • Professional
    • Interactions
    • More

    Note: This document contains side effect information about insulin glargine. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Toujeo SoloStar.

    For the Consumer

    Applies to insulin glargine: subcutaneous solution

    Along with its needed effects, insulin glargine (the active ingredient contained in Toujeo SoloStar) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking insulin glargine:

    More common

    • Anxiety
    • behavior change similar to being drunk
    • blurred vision
    • chills
    • cold sweats
    • confusion
    • convulsions (seizures)
    • cool, pale skin
    • difficulty with thinking
    • dizziness or lightheadedness
    • drowsiness
    • excessive hunger
    • fast heartbeat
    • headache
    • nausea
    • nervousness
    • nightmares
    • restless sleep
    • shakiness
    • slurred speech
    • tingling in the hands, feet, lips, or tongue
    • unusual tiredness or weakness

    Less common or rare

    • Fast pulse
    • skin rash or itching over the entire body
    • sweating
    • trouble breathing

    Incidence not known

    • Bloating or swelling of the face, hands, lower legs, or feet
    • cough
    • decreased urine
    • difficulty with swallowing
    • dry mouth
    • hives
    • increased thirst
    • irregular heartbeat
    • muscle pain or cramps
    • numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips
    • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
    • rapid weight gain
    • vomiting

    Some side effects of insulin glargine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

    More common

    • Fever
    • sore throat
    • stuffy or runny nose

    Less common or rare

    • Depression of the skin at the injection site
    • itching, pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site
    • thickening of the skin at injection site

    For Healthcare Professionals

    Applies to insulin glargine: subcutaneous solution

    General

    Adverse reactions associated with insulin glargine (the active ingredient contained in Toujeo SoloStar) include hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus, rash, edema, and weight gain.

    Metabolic

    The ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) trial, an open-labeled, randomized study comparing insulin glargine (the active ingredient contained in Toujeo SoloStar) to standard care in persons 50 years or older with abnormal glucose levels (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) or early type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular (CV) disease or CV risk factors, found over the course of the 6 year study, severe hypoglycemia occurred in 5.7% of patients receiving insulin glargine compared to 1.9% in the standard care group. The median HbA1c values in the insulin glargine group ranged from 5.9% to 6.4% while the HbA1c values in the standard care group ranged from 6.2% to 6.6%. The incidence for all hypoglycemia was 58% and 26% in the insulin glargine and standard groups, respectively.

    Weight gain has been reported with insulin therapy and has been attributed to the anabolic effects of insulin and the decrease in glucosuria. In the ORIGIN trial, the median change in body weight from baseline to the last treatment visit was 2.2 kg greater in the insulin glargine group (+1.4 kg vs -0.8 kg).

    Very common (10% or more): Hypoglycemia

    Frequency not reported: Weight gain

    Local

    Injection site reactions include redness, pain, itching, hives, swelling, or inflammation. In some cases, these reactions may be caused by other factors, such as irritants in skin cleansing agents. In clinical studies, there was a higher incidence of treatment-emergent injection site pain in insulin-glargine treated patients compared to NPH-treated patients (2.7% vs 0.7%).

    Common (1% to 10%): Injection site reactions, injection site pain

    Hypersensitivity

    Hypersensitivity side effects have included both local and systemic reactions. Anaphylaxis has been reported. Local reactions have presented as erythema, local edema, and pruritus at the injection site. Most minor reactions to insulin at the injection site resolve in a few days to a few weeks.

    Rare (less than 0.1%): Allergic reactions

    Cardiovascular

    Very common (10% or more): Hypertension (up to 19.6%)

    Common (1% to 10%): Peripheral edema

    Insulin may cause sodium retention and edema, especially as metabolic control is improving. The ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) trial, an open-labeled, randomized study in persons 50 years or older with abnormal glucose levels (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) or early type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular (CV) disease or CV risk factors, found the time to first occurrence of a major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) and the incidence of MACE to be similar between insulin glargine and standard care (n=12.537).

    Dermatologic

    Postmarketing reports indicate children and adolescents may experience more skin reactions such as rash and urticaria, than adults.

    Common (1% to 10%): Lipohypertrophy

    Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Lipoatrophy

    Postmarketing reports: Rash urticaria

    Oncologic

    Frequency not reported: Cancer occurrence

    The ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) trial, an open-labeled, randomized study in persons 50 years or older with abnormal glucose levels (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) or early type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular (CV) disease or CV risk factors, comparing insulin glargine to standard care found the overall incidence of all types of cancer combined or death from cancers was similar between treatment groups (n=12,537). In July 2009, The US FDA reported on an ongoing safety review evaluating a possible increased risk of cancer. In February 2011, the FDA in an updated communication reported the evidence was inconclusive and it is not possible to conclude that the use of this insulin increases the risk of cancer.

    Immunologic

    Frequency not reported: Antibody formation

    As with all therapeutic proteins, the potential for immunogenicity exits. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay and may be influenced by assay methodology, sample handling and collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. The presence of insulin antibodies may increase or decrease the efficacy of insulin and may require dose adjustment.

    Ocular

    Rare (less than 0.1%): Visual impairment, retinopathy

    Rapid improvement in glucose control has been associated with a transitory, reversible ophthalmologic refraction disorder and worsening of diabetic retinopathy. However, long-term glycemic control decreases the risk.

    Gastrointestinal

    Common (1% to 10%): Gastroenteritis

    Musculoskeletal

    Rare (less than 0.1%): Myalgia

    Nervous system

    Common (1% to 10%): Headache

    Very rare (less than 0.01%): Dysgeusia

    Frequency not reported: Peripheral neuropathy

    Rapid improvement in glucose control has been associated with a transitory, reversible acute painful peripheral neuropathy. However, long-term glycemic control decreases the risk.

    Respiratory

    Very common (10% or more): Upper respiratory infection (up to 22.4%)

    Common (1% to 10%): Pharyngitis, rhinitis, sinusitis

    1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

    2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

    3. “Product Information. Basaglar (insulin glargine).” Eli Lilly Canada Inc, Toronto, ON.

    4. “Product Information. Toujeo SoloStar (insulin glargine).” sanofi-aventis, Bridgewater, NJ.

    5. “Product Information. Lantus (insulin glargine)” Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Swiftwater, PA.

    Further information

    Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

    Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

    Related questions

    • What is the difference between Soliqua and Xultophy?
    • Toujeo vs Tresiba – What’s the difference between them?
    • Toujeo vs Lantus – What’s the difference between them?

    Medical Disclaimer

    More about Toujeo SoloStar (insulin glargine)

    • During Pregnancy
    • Dosage Information
    • Drug Interactions
    • Pricing & Coupons
    • En Español
    • 34 Reviews
    • Drug class: insulin
    • FDA Alerts (1)
    • FDA Approval History

    Consumer resources

    • Toujeo
    • Toujeo SoloStar

    Other brands: Lantus, Basaglar, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo Max SoloStar

    Professional resources

    • Toujeo (FDA)
    • … +1 more

    Related treatment guides

    • Diabetes, Type 1
    • Diabetes, Type 2

    Toujeo Solostar

    How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

    Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body’s requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels.

    There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 6 hours to get the full blood -glucose -lowering effect of a dose of this medication, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream.

    This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

    Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor.

    Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

    What form(s) does this medication come in?

    Each cartridge contains 450 units of insulin glargine (300 units per mL). Nonmedicinal ingredients: zinc chloride, m-cresol, glycerol, hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment, and water for injection.

    How should I use this medication?

    Your dose of insulin should be injected subcutaneously (under the skin) exactly as instructed by your doctor or diabetes educator. Do not inject insulin glargine into the vein and do not use insulin glargine in insulin infusion pumps. The dose of insulin is measured in international units (IU). Each 1 mL of insulin contains 300 IU. Insulin glargine is injected under the skin once daily.

    If you have been using 100 units per mL insulin glargine, you may need to adjust the dose of this medication. Your doctor or diabetes educator can help you with this. In addition to insulin glargine, doses of a fast-acting insulin are usually used to control the impact of food intake on blood sugar levels during the day. There are many variations of insulin dosing.

    Insulin glargine should be clear and colourless. Do not use the insulin if you notice anything unusual in the appearance of the solution, such as cloudiness, discoloration, or clumping. It is not necessary to shake or rotate the vial before use.

    It should not be mixed with other insulins.

    Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor.

    It is very important that you use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. The timing of insulin with respect to your meals is crucial for keeping blood glucose under control and preventing unwanted side effects. If you miss a dose, check your blood glucose more often, and if you become hyperglycemic, treat the hyperglycemia as you have been taught by your doctor or diabetes educator.

    Keep unopened bottles of insulin in the refrigerator until needed. They may be used until the expiry date on the label. Never allow insulin to freeze. An open, pre-filled pen may be kept at room temperature and must be discarded 42 days after it is first used. Do not expose insulin to extremely hot temperatures or to sunlight. Keep insulin out of the reach of children.

    Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

    Who should NOT take this medication?

    Do not use this medication if you:

    • are allergic to insulin or to any of the ingredients of the medication
    • have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

    What side effects are possible with this medication?

    Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

    The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

    The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

    Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

    • redness, itching, or swelling at the site of the injection

    Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

    Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

    • signs of high blood glucose:
      • confusion
      • signs of dehydration (e.g., decreased urine, dry skin, dry and sticky mouth, sleepiness, dizziness, headache, thirst, confusion)
      • drowsiness
      • flushed face
      • fruity breath odour
      • increased thirst
      • increased need to urinate
      • weight loss
    • signs of low blood glucose:
      • anxiety
      • blurred vision
      • confusion
      • difficulty concentrating
      • difficulty speaking
      • dizziness
      • drowsiness
      • fast heartbeat
      • headache
      • hunger
      • nausea
      • nervousness
      • numbness or tingling of the lips, fingers or tongue
      • sweating
      • tiredness
      • trembling
      • weakness
    • swelling around the ankles or calves (fluid build-up in the body)
    • vision changes

    Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

    • rash or blisters all over the body
    • seizures
    • symptoms of a serious allergic reaction (e.g., swelling of the face or throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, or itchy skin rash)
    • unconsciousness

    Some people may experience side effects other than those listed.Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

    Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

    Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

    Allergic reactions: If you notice signs of a serious allergic reaction (swelling of the face or throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, or itchy skin rash), stop using the medication and seek immediate medical attention.

    Appearance of insulin: The contents of the vial of insulin glargine should be clear and colourless. Do not use this medication if you notice anything unusual about its appearance, such as cloudiness, discoloration, or clumping.

    Blood glucose monitoring: It is important for anyone using insulin to monitor their blood glucose levels regularly, as recommended by their doctor or diabetes educator. It is especially important to test blood glucose more often when your insulin dose or schedule changes, or when you are ill or under stress. If blood tests consistently show high or low blood glucose levels, contact your doctor or diabetes educator.

    Changes at injection site: Fatty tissue under the skin at the injection site may shrink or thicken if you inject yourself too often at the same site. To help avoid this effect, change the site with each injection. Talk to your doctor or diabetes educator if you notice your skin pitting or thickening at the injection site.

    Changes in insulin requirements: Many things can affect blood glucose levels and insulin requirements. These include:

    • certain medical conditions (e.g., infections, thyroid conditions, or kidney or liver disease)
    • certain medications that increase or decrease blood glucose levels
    • diet
    • exercise
    • illness
    • injury
    • stress
    • surgery
    • travelling over time zones

    It is important your doctor know your current health situation and any changes that may affect the amount of insulin you need. Blood glucose should be monitored regularly as recommended by your doctor or diabetes educator.

    Diabetes identification: It is important to either wear a bracelet (or necklace) or carry a card indicating you have diabetes and are taking insulin.

    Family and friends: Educate your family and friends about the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). Keep a glucagon kit available and instruct them on its proper use in case you experience severe low blood glucose and you lose consciousness.

    High blood glucose (hyperglycemia): Hyperglycemia may occur if your insulin dose is too low or you miss a dose of insulin. Symptoms of hyperglycemia generally build up over hours or days. If you experience symptoms of hyperglycemia, such as increased need to urinate, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, dry mouth, flushed dry skin, loss of appetite, and a fruity odour to your breath, contact your doctor or diabetes educator.

    If hyperglycemia is allowed to continue, a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis may occur. In this condition, your body starts to use body fat as fuel, eventually leading to a large concentration of acid in the blood stream. This can result in unconsciousness, coma or death. To prevent this from occurring, you may need to have your insulin dose adjusted.

    Kidney function: Kidney disease or reduced kidney function may change the amount of insulin needed by the body. If you have kidney problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Your doctor may want to test your kidney function regularly with blood tests while you are taking this medication.

    Liver function: Liver disease or reduced liver function may change the amount of insulin needed by the body. If you have liver problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Your doctor may want to test your liver function regularly with blood tests while you are taking this medication.

    Low blood glucose (hypoglycemia): Hypoglycemia may occur if too much

    insulin is used, if meals are missed, or if you exercise more than usual. Symptoms of mild -to- moderate hypoglycemia may occur suddenly and can include cold sweat, nervousness or shakiness, fast heartbeat, headache, hunger, confusion, lightheadedness, weakness, and numbness or tingling (tongue, lips, or fingers). Mild -to -moderate hypoglycemia may be treated by eating foods or drinks that contain sugar. People taking insulin should always carry a quick source of sugar, such as hard candies, glucose tablets, juice, or regular soft drinks (not diet soft drinks).

    Signs of severe hypoglycemia can include disorientation, loss of consciousness, and seizures. People who are unable to take sugar by mouth or who are unconscious may require an injection of glucagon or treatment with intravenous (into the vein) glucose.

    Pregnancy: It is essential to maintain good blood glucose control throughout pregnancy. Insulin requirements usually decrease during the first trimester and increase during the second and third trimesters. Therefore, contact your doctor if you are pregnant or are thinking about pregnancy.

    Breast-feeding: It is not known if insulin glargine passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are using this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding. Breast-feeding mothers may require adjustments in insulin dose or diet.

    Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication has not been established in children under 18 years of age.

    What other drugs could interact with this medication?

    There may be an interaction between insulin glargine and any of the following:

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

    • stop taking one of the medications,
    • change one of the medications to another,
    • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    • leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Toujeo-Solostar

    Side Effects

    Injection site reactions (such as pain, redness, irritation) may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, irregular heartbeat). This medication can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This may occur if you do not consume enough calories from food or if you do unusually heavy exercise. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar. If you don’t have these reliable forms of glucose, rapidly raise your blood sugar by eating a quick source of sugar such as table sugar, honey, or candy, or drink fruit juice or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor right away about the reaction and the use of this product. To help prevent low blood sugar, eat meals on a regular schedule, and do not skip meals. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to find out what you should do if you miss a meal. Symptoms of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) include thirst, increased urination, confusion, drowsiness, flushing, rapid breathing, and fruity breath odor. If these symptoms occur, tell your doctor right away. Your dosage may need to be increased. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch. In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

    • hypoglycemic disorder
    • hypokalemia
    • hypotension
    • pharyngitis
    • Upper Respiratory Infection
    • Rhinitis
    • bronchospastic pulmonary disease
    • pruritus of skin
    • back pain
    • skin rash
    • edema
    • peripheral edema
    • weight gain
    • headache disorder
    • dyspnea
    • cough
    • diarrhea
    • Anaphylaxis
    • angioedema
    • Injection Site Sequelae
    • Lipodystrophy

    Drug Interactions

    Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval. A product that may interact with this drug is: rosiglitazone. Beta-blocker medications (such as metoprolol, propranolol, glaucoma eye drops such as timolol) may prevent the fast/pounding heartbeat you would usually feel when your blood sugar falls too low (hypoglycemia). Other symptoms of low blood sugar such as dizziness, hunger, or sweating are unaffected by these drugs. Many drugs can affect your blood sugar levels, making it more difficult to control your blood sugar. Before you start, stop, or change any medication, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about how the medication may affect your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor about the results and of any symptoms of high or low blood sugar. (See also Side Effects section.) Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *