Top crohn’s disease doctors

Dr. Feagan named a worldwide expert for Crohn’s disease

Dr. Brian Feagan has been named by Expertscape as one of the five foremost experts in the world for Crohn’s disease. Dr. Feagan is a professor in the Departments of Medicine, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the director of Robarts Clinical Trials at Robarts Research Institute.
Expertscape conducted a quantitative analysis of publications in the PubMed database to come up with its list of the top physicians worldwide. to view Expertscape’s comprehensive results for Crohn’s disease. The resource company defines an expert as someone who has published peer-reviewed research in the science, therapies and complications for a specific medical topic.
Top Experts – Crohn’s Disease

  1. Dr. William Sandborn – University of California San Diego
  2. Dr. Paul Rutgeerts – University Hospital Leuven
  3. Dr. Jean-Frédéric Colombel – Mount Sinai Medical Center
  4. Dr. Severine Vermeire – Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
  5. Dr. Brian Feagan – Western University
  6. Dr. Laurent Peyrin-Biroulet – Universite de Lorraine
  7. Dr. Stephen Hanauer – Northwestern University
  8. Dr. Stefan Schreiber – Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel
  9. Dr. Edward Loftus – Mayo Clinic Rochester
  10. Dr. Gert van Assche – Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Top Doctors 2018: Gastroenterology

This article appears in print in the April 2018 issue, as part of the Top Doctors cover story. .

These doctors diagnose and treat disorders of the stomach, intestines, bowels and other organs, such as the liver, gallbladder and pancreas, as well as the esophagus.

Diane Y. Bai, M.D., capsule endoscopy, inflammatory bowel disease, colon and gastrointestinal cancer; Franciscan Digestive Care Associates, 1112 Sixth Ave., Suite 200, Tacoma, 253.272.8664; St. Joseph Medical Center; University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, 2000

Raj Butani, M.D., endoscopy and colonoscopy, inflammatory bowel disease/Crohn’s, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); Washington Gastroenterology, 1135 116th Ave. NE, Suite 560, Bellevue, 425.467.0150; Overlake Hospital Medical Center; Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1996

Sujoy K. Ghorai, M.D., gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), colonoscopy/polypectomy/PillCam, liver disease; Western Washington Medical Group, Gastroenterology, 4225 Hoyt Ave., Suite A, Everett, 425.259.3122; Providence Regional Medical Center Everett; Medical College of Virginia, 1996

Michael Gluck, M.D., pancreatic/biliary endoscopy (ERCP), inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatic and biliary disease; Virginia Mason, Gastroenterology, 1100 Ninth Ave., Seattle, 206.223.2319; Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, 1981

Peggy D. Headstrom, M.D., upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis; The Polyclinic, Gastroenterology, 1145 Broadway, Seattle, 206.860.4544; Swedish Medical Center–First Hill; University of Washington School of Medicine, 1999

10 Years Michael B. Kimmey, M.D., pancreatic/biliary endoscopy (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound, inflammatory bowel disease; CHI Franciscan Digestive Care Associates, 4700 Point Fosdick Drive NW, Suite 308, Gig Harbor, 253.858.5433; St. Joseph Medical Center; Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, 1979

16 Years Richard A. Kozarek, M.D., pancreatic disease, pancreatic/biliary endoscopy (ERCP), inflammatory bowel disease; Virginia Mason, Gastroenterology, 1100 Ninth Ave., Seattle, 206.223.2319; Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1973

Alexander Kuo, M.D., liver transplant medicine, liver failure, hepatitis B and C; Virginia Mason, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 1100 Ninth Ave., Seattle, 206.223.2319; Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, 2001

Scott D. Lee, M.D., inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis/Crohn’s, endoscopy; Digestive Health Center at University of Washington Medical Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Seattle, 206.598.4377; University of Washington Medical Center; Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, 1994

James Z. Mu, M.D., gastrointestinal and liver disorders, gastrointestinal endoscopy; Western Washington Medical Group, Gastroenterology, 4225 Hoyt Ave., Suite A, Everett, 425.259.3122; Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, EvergreenHealth-Monroe; West China University of Medical Sciences, 1984

Alexandra E. Read, M.D., liver transplant medicine, colon cancer screening; Seattle Gastroenterology Associates, 11027 Meridian Ave. N, Suite 100, Seattle, 206.365.4492; Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Swedish Medical Center; Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 1983

Michael D. Saunders, M.D., pancreatic/biliary endoscopy (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound, pancreatic disease; Digestive Health Center at University of Washington Medical Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Seattle, 206.598.4377; University of Washington Medical Center; Medical College of Wisconsin, 1993

Drew B. Schembre, M.D., endoscopic mucosal resection, biliary disease, endoscopic ultrasound and pancreatic/biliary endoscopy (ERCP); Swedish Gastroenterology, Arnold Pavilion, 1221 Madison St., Suite 1220, Seattle, 206.215.4250; Swedish Medical Center–First Hill; University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 1988

When to Switch GI Doctors: Find the Best Crohn’s Doctor for You

Ask yourself, “How long does it take for the GI clinic to return calls?” and “How far ahead do I have to schedule a GI visit?” If the answer makes you feel hopeless, start researching a new doctor (tips for finding a doctor below).

Am I being given all the options?
IBD research is still an evolving field and important new discoveries are made every year in the latest Crohn’s research. There is no reason why you should feel confined to one course of treatment when there are dozens of available Crohn’s treatment options.

Listen to your intuition. If you’ve heard success stories from peers about a new Crohn’s treatment, you should be able to comfortably bring this up with your doctor to get their expert insight. If doing so makes you feel uncomfortable, or if they brush aside the question by mentioning that they don’t specialize in those types of Crohn’s treatments, these are red flags. It’s time to switch healthcare providers.

Is my doctor staying relevant in the field?
Many people with IBD probably ask themselves, “How do I know if my GI is staying relevant in their field?”

There are ways to check. First, visit pubmed.com, where you can see if your GI has published or contributed to new Crohn’s research or the evaluation of new Crohn’s treatments. Likewise, GIs who are actively leading or contributing to clinical trials for new Crohn’s medications will be experts on the latest findings in these treatments and their alternatives.

Second, read as much about your gastroenterologist as you can. Doctors specializing in Crohn’s disease who are up-to-date in their field will likely mention any number of these words in their bio, with reference to their speciality or ongoing research: “precision medicine”, “clinical research”, “preclinical human IBD mechanisms”, and “IBD novel technologies” and “IBD environmental triggers”. These are 5 areas of focus that have been deemed high in priority by the National Scientific Advisory Committee of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. If your doctor is publishing work on these topics or serving on an advisory board that addresses these areas of research, they are likely staying involved with the latest developments in Crohn’s disease.

Visit Trustedtherapies.com for more info about Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

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