Side effects of triamterene

Contents

Watch what you eat when taking medication

Medications interact with foods and nutrients in various ways, and a little study can help you avoid problems.

Some medications can decrease appetite or change the way a nutrient is absorbed, metabolized or excreted. Food you eat could make the medications you take work faster, slower, or even prevent them from working. Besides certain foods, some beverages, alcohol, caffeine, and even cigarettes can interact with medicines. This may make them less effective or may cause dangerous side effects or other problems.

Here is information about interactions that can occur between many common prescription and over-the-counter medications with food, alcohol and caffeine. This information should not replace the advice from your physician, pharmacist or other health care professional.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

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These medications can irritate the stomach; it is best to take them with food or milk.

Avoid or limit the use of alcohol because chronic use can increase your risk of liver damage or stomach bleeding.

Diuretics

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Sometimes called “water pills,” diuretics help eliminate water, sodium, and chloride from the body. Examples are furosemide (such as Lasix); triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide (Dyazide, Maxzide); hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril); and triamterene (Dyrenium).

Some diuretics cause loss of potassium, calcium and magnesium. Triamterene, on the other hand, is known as a “potassium-sparing” diuretic. It blocks the kidneys’ excretion of potassium, which can cause hyperkalemia (increased potassium). Excess potassium may result in irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations. When taking triamterene, avoid eating large amounts of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, oranges and green leafy vegetables, or salt substitutes that contain potassium.

Anticoagulants

These help prevent the formation of blood clots. An example is warfarin (Coumadin).

Vitamin K produces blood-clotting substances and may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants, so limit the amount of foods high in vitamin K (including broccoli, spinach, kale, turnip greens, cauliflower and brussels sprouts).

Cardiovascular drugs

Statins are used to lower cholesterol levels. Examples are atorvastatin (Lipitor); and simvastatin (Zocor).

Calcium channel blockers are common drugs that reduce high blood pressure. Examples are Adalat and Procardia.

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Avoid grapefruit juice. These drugs interact with grapefruit juice in a way that increases the blood concentration of the drug.

Ask the doctor: Blood pressure drugs and potassium

Published: March, 2014

Q. The June 2013 issue states on page 3 that “it’s important to increase potassium intake, particularly if you take a diuretic.” But on page 5, it says that if you take spironolactone (which I do), you should avoid high-potassium foods. I am confused—should I be eating bananas and other potassium-rich foods or not?

A. All diuretics reduce the amount of sodium and water in the body (the less fluid in the bloodstream, the lower the pressure on the walls of the arteries). But there are three major classes of diuretics, each with different side effects and precautions. And that’s where the confusion often arises.

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Triamterene Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 24, 2018.

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For the Consumer

Applies to triamterene: oral capsule

Warning

Oral route (Capsule)

May cause hyperkalemia, which if uncorrected, is potentially fatal. Hyperkalemia is more likely to occur in patients with renal impairment, diabetes mellitus (with or without recognized renal insufficiency), and in the elderly or severely ill. Monitor serum potassium levels carefully in any patient receiving triamterene.

Along with its needed effects, triamterene may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking triamterene:

Incidence not known

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • agitation
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • cloudy urine
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • cough
  • dark urine
  • decreased urine output
  • depression
  • difficulty breathing
  • difficulty swallowing
  • dizziness
  • dry mouth
  • fainting spells
  • fast or irregular heartbeats
  • fever
  • headache
  • hives
  • hostility
  • increased thirst
  • irritability
  • itching
  • joint pain
  • lethargy
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of consciousness
  • mood changes
  • muscle pain or cramps
  • muscle twitching
  • nausea or vomiting
  • nervousness
  • numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips
  • pain in the groin or genitals
  • pain in the lower back or side
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips or tongue
  • rapid or unusual weight gain
  • seizures
  • sharp back pain just below the ribs
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash
  • stupor
  • swelling of the face, ankles, feet, or hands
  • tightness in the chest
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting of blood
  • weakness or heaviness of the legs
  • wheezing
  • yellow eyes or skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking triamterene:

Symptoms of overdose

  • Blurred vision
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly
  • indigestion
  • pain or weakness in the hands or feet
  • passing of gas
  • stomach fullness or discomfort
  • sweating
  • trembling

Some side effects of triamterene may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known

  • Increased sensitivity of skin to sunlight
  • redness or other discoloration of the skin
  • severe sunburn

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to triamterene: compounding powder, oral capsule

Gastrointestinal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Rash

Rare (less than 0.1%): Photosensitivity reactions, pseudoporphyria

Cardiovascular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypovolemia

Genitourinary

Frequency not reported: Blue fluorescence of the urine under certain light conditions

Hematologic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Thrombocytopenia, megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia

Hepatic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Jaundice and/or liver enzyme abnormalities

Hypersensitivity

Rare (less than 0.1%): Anaphylaxis, photosensitivity

Metabolic

Very common (10% or more): Hyperkalemia

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hyperuricemia

Rare (less than 0.1%): Hypokalemia, metabolic acidosis

Nervous system

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Headache

Rare (less than 0.1%): Dizziness

Other

Rare (less than 0.1%): Weakness, fatigue, serum sickness

Renal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Elevation of serum creatinine, transient renal insufficiency

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Renal failure

1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

2. “Product Information. Dyrenium (triamterene).” SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

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About triamterene

Type of medicine A potassium-sparing diuretic
Used for Water retention (oedema)
Also called Combination tablets include Frusene® (triamterene with furosemide), Kalspare® (triamterene with chlortalidone) and Dyazide® which is co-triamterzide (triamterene with hydrochlorothiazide)
Available as Capsules

Triamterene belongs to the group of medicines known as potassium-sparing diuretics. A diuretic is a medicine which increases the amount of urine that you pass out from your kidneys. They are often referred to as ‘water’ tablets. Triamterene is called a potassium-sparing diuretic because, unlike some other diuretics, it does not cause your body to lose potassium. It is used to treat water retention (oedema), and it is also given alongside other diuretics to reduce the amount of potassium they cause your body to lose.

Oedema occurs when fluid leaks out of your blood vessels, causing swelling in the tissues of your lungs, feet or ankles. This makes you feel breathless and your legs feel puffy. It is commonly caused by heart failure or liver disease. Triamterene prevents the build-up of this fluid by increasing the amount of urine your kidneys produce.

Triamterene can be prescribed as a treatment on its own, or alongside other diuretics. When it is used with other diuretics, it can be prescribed as a combination tablet to help cut down on the number of tablets you need to take each day. Combination tablets include Frusene® (triamterene with furosemide), Kalspare® (triamterene with chlortalidone) and a combination called co-triamterzide (triamterene with hydrochlorothiazide), which has the brand name Dyazide®.

Before taking triamterene

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking triamterene it is important that your doctor knows:

  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • If you have problems with the way your kidneys work, or any difficulty passing urine.
  • If you have any problems with the way your liver works.
  • If you have diabetes.
  • If you have attacks of gout.
  • If you have been told by a doctor that you have high levels of potassium in your blood.
  • If you have a problem with your adrenal glands, called Addison’s disease.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.

How to take triamterene

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside your pack. It will give you more information about triamterene and will also provide you with a full list of side-effects which you could experience from taking it.
  • Take triamterene exactly as your doctor tells you to. It is usual, to begin with, to take 3-5 capsules a day divided into two doses, one dose with your breakfast and the other at lunchtime. After the first week or so, your doctor is likely to ask you to take the capsules on alternate days only. The directions for taking your doses will be printed on the label of the pack to remind you about what the doctor said to you.
  • Diuretics are best taken no later than mid-afternoon. This is because you will find you may need to go to the toilet a couple of times after taking it and this will disturb your sleep if you take it too late in the day.
  • Swallow the capsules with a drink of water. You can take triamterene either with or without food.
  • If you forget to take a dose of triamterene, take it when you remember if it is only a few hours late. If it is after mid-afternoon, leave out the forgotten dose completely and take your next dose when it is due. Do not take two doses at the same time to make up for a missed dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Try to keep your regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress. The balance of salts in your blood may be upset by triamterene so your doctor may want you to have a blood test from time to time to check for this.
  • Diuretics help you to lose water, so you can breathe and move more easily. If, however, you lose too much fluid, you may become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). This will make you feel thirsty and make your skin look and feel dry. Let your doctor know if this happens, as your dose may need to be adjusted.
  • Because triamterene is a potassium-sparing diuretic, you should try to avoid things with a high potassium content, such as ‘salt substitutes’. This is so the level of potassium in your body does not become too high.
  • Treatment with diuretics is usually long-term, so continue to take triamterene unless your doctor advises you otherwise.
  • If you buy any medicines ‘over the counter’, please check with a pharmacist that they are suitable for you to take alongside your prescribed medicines.
  • Triamterene can cause your urine to look slightly blue in some lights – this is harmless and nothing to be concerned about.

If you are also taking hydrochlorothiazide in combination with this medicine

  • Studies have suggested that taking higher doses of hydrochlorothiazide for long periods of time may increase the risk of certain skin cancers.
  • Tell your doctor if you have ever been treated for skin cancer before.
  • Tell your doctor about any new or changed moles or worrying marks on your skin.
  • Use a sunscreen in strong sunlight. Do not use sunbeds.

Can triamterene cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the common ones associated with triamterene. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common triamterene side-effects (these affect less than 1 in 10 people) What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting) Stick to simple foods – avoid fatty or spicy meals. Try taking the capsules after a meal or a snack
Diarrhoea Drink plenty of water to replace the lost fluids
Changes to the results of some blood tests Your doctor will check for this from time to time

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the capsules, please speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store triamterene

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

If you are due to have an operation or any dental treatment, please tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene

Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene

  • What is hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • What other drugs can affect hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?
  • Where can I get more information?

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention.

Triamterene is a potassium-sparing diuretic that also prevents your body from absorbing too much salt and keeps your potassium levels from getting too low.

Hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene is a combination medicine used to treat fluid retention (edema) and high blood pressure (hypertension).

This medicine is usually given to people in whom other diuretics have caused hypokalemia (low potassium levels in your blood).

Hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

000073650_PB

capsule, red/white, imprinted with DYAZIDE SB, DYAZIDE SB

003781352_PB

round, green, imprinted with TH 1, MYLAN

003781355_PB

round, yellow, imprinted with MYLAN, TH 2

003782537_PB

capsule, green/yellow, imprinted with MYLAN 2537, MYLAN 2537

005271632_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with LANNETT, 1632

005910348_PB

round, yellow, imprinted with WATSON 348

005910424_PB

round, green, imprinted with WATSON 424

007811008_PB

round, yellow, imprinted with GG 172

007811123_PB

round, green, imprinted with GG 165

007812074_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with GG 606, GG 606

422910841_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with LANNET, 1632

510790433_PB

round, yellow, imprinted with MYLAN, TH 2

510790935_PB

capsule, green/yellow, imprinted with MYLAN 2537, MYLAN 2537

605052656_PB

oval, green, imprinted with APO, 37 5 25

605052657_PB

oval, yellow, imprinted with APO, 75 50

675440102_PB

round, yellow, imprinted with MYLAN, TH 2

675440408_PB

round, green, imprinted with MYLAN, TH 1

Dyazide

capsule, red/white, imprinted with DYAZIDE SB, DYAZIDE SB

HCT-Triamterene 25 mg-37.5 mg Tab-BAR

rectangular, orange, imprinted with PLIVA 534

HCT-Triamterene 25 mg-37.5 mg Tab-GG

round, green, imprinted with GG 165

HCT-Triamterene 50 mg-75 mg Tab-GG

round, yellow, imprinted with GG 172

HCTZ-Tramterene 50 mg-25 mg-IVA

capsule, red, imprinted with Z 2950, Z 2950

HCTZ-Triam 37.5-25 mg-GG

capsule, white, imprinted with GG 606, GG 606

HCTZ-Triam 50-25-GG

capsule, red, imprinted with GG 580, GG 580

HCTZ-Triamterene 25 mg-37.5 mg Cap

white, imprinted with 488, DPI

HCTZ-Triamterene 25 mg-37.5 mg Tab

oval, green, imprinted with barr, 555 643

HCTZ-Triamterene 50 mg-75 mg

oval, yellow, imprinted with barr, 555 444

Maxzide

bowtie, yellow, imprinted with BM8, MAXZIDE

Maxzide-25

bowtie, green, imprinted with BM9, MAXZIDE

Triamterene-HCTZ 75-50 mg-WAT

round, yellow, imprinted with WATSON 348

What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • fast, slow, or uneven heart rate;
  • dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting;
  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;
  • high potassium–nausea, slow or unusual heart rate, numbness, tingling, muscle weakness, loss of movement in any part of your body;
  • low potassium–leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling;
  • other signs of an electrolyte imbalance–thirst, dry mouth, stomach pain, drowsiness, weakness, fast heart rate, muscle pain or weakness, feeling restless or light-headed;
  • kidney problems–little or no urination, painful or difficult urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath; or
  • lupus-like syndrome–joint pain or swelling with fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, chest pain, unusual thoughts or behavior, and patchy skin color.

Common side effects may include:

  • stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation;
  • dizziness, headache;
  • blurred vision; or
  • dry mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene?

You should not use this medicine if have kidney disease, urination problems, high levels of potassium in your blood, or if you are taking other diuretics similar to triamterene. Do not use potassium supplements, salt substitutes, or low-sodium milk unless your doctor has told you to.

This medicine can raise your blood potassium to dangerous levels, especially if you have kidney disease, diabetes, severe illness, or if you are an older adult. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of high potassium: nausea, slow or unusual heart rate, numbness, tingling, muscle weakness, or loss of movement in any part of your body.

Q. I am taking a generic form of Dyazide for my high blood pressure, but a side effect is hair loss. Can you recommend another brand of medication that will treat high blood pressure without hair loss?

–T.L., Riverdale

A. Dyazide is a combination of two drugs, triamterine and hydochlorothiazide. Though hydochlorothiazide is a diuretic, it is very effective at lowering blood pressure and often is used in combination with other drugs that lower blood pressure.

Before addressing your concerns about hair loss and finding another drug, it’s important to understand that you may not need to take a drug at all.

In about 5 percent of people with high blood pressure, an underlying cause can be found. For these people, treating the cause is the first and maybe the only step required.

The possible causes include kidney disease, pregnancy, the use of drugs such as estrogens and endocrine diseases such as hyperthyroidism and Cushing’s syndrome.

A common cause of high readings for blood pressure is obesity. In this condition, the blood pressure may be elevated, but the blood pressure reading also may be falsely elevated because of more fat tissue in the arms.

Some people are called “salt sensitive” because their blood pressure will be higher if they are eating a high, or even normal, amount of salt in their diet. The only way to find out is to go on salt restriction and see what happens. This may be particularly valuable for you, because triamterine works by causing the body to lose more sodium.

For many people, increased blood pressure is due to excessive use of alcohol, cigarette smoking or the use of some anti-inflammatory drugs. Again, the only way to find out would be to stop and track the difference.

Much has been written about stress and high blood pressure. Though stress–both psychological and physical–does increase blood pressure, it does not typically cause chronic increases in blood pressure.

Whether it’s finding and treating a disease or identifying and stopping a particular lifestyle, either approach to lowering blood pressure provides greater health benefits than taking medication.

Medical studies have shown that about one-fifth of all people who are taking medications for high blood pressure will have normal blood pressure when taken off the drugs. From time to time, it’s worth working with your doctor to test your need for continuing.

After assessing the benefits and risks of using an anti-hypertensive drug and deciding to use one, the choice can be confusing for patients and doctors. There are nine classes of these drugs and more than 50 different drugs used to treat high blood pressure.

Because the medical profession has had much longer experience with two classes of drugs–diuretics and beta-blockers–and because they are generally less expensive, many experts recommend them as the starting point.

But the type of drug you are taking, especially if you had been using it successfully without major side effects, may be the best one for you. Speaking of side effects, I could not find evidence that either of the two drugs that make up Dyazide have been reported to cause hair loss.

It’s financially smart to use generic drugs. They contain the same chemicals as the brand names. Although the pills may be formulated to deliver the chemical differently, most generic brands also are formulated the same, and the only difference to you is price.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about your concerns regarding side effects. And if you continue to be concerned, discuss what other drug or non-drug options you can consider.

Write to Allen Douma in care of Tribune Media Services, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611; or contact him at [email protected] This column is not intended to take the place of consultation with a health-care provider.

Triamterene (Dyrenium) – What You Should Know

Brand Name: Dyrenium

What is Triamterene (Dyrenium)?

The information about Triamterene (Dyrenium) contained herein is a compilation of materials available from drugs.com and simplified for the average consumer.

Triamterene also known by the brand name Dyrenium is a potassium sparing diuretic that helps rid your body of salt (sodium) and water but retains potassium in the blood.

Triamterene (Dyrenium) is used to diagnose or treat a condition in which your adrenal glands produce too much salt and water in your body.

Triamterene (Dyrenium) also treats fluid retention (edema) in people with congestive heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver, or a kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome.

There are drug free alternatives to lowering your blood pressure that may be effective for you. Read about them here.

How to use Triamterene (Dyrenium):

  • Use Triamterene (Dyrenium) as directed by your doctor. Check the medicine label for exact dosing instructions. Do not use more or less or for longer than recommended.
  • Take Triamterene (Dyrenium) by mouth with a full glass of water after a meal.
  • You may need frequent blood tests, kideny tests or liver tests while taking Triamterene (Dyrenium). Do not miss scheduled doctor visits.
  • Triamterene (Dyrenium) can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Triamterene (Dyrenium).
  • If you need surgery, tell your surgeon that you are taking Triamterene (Dyrenium).
  • If you miss a dose of Triamterene (Dyrenium), take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.
  • Store Triamterene (Dyrenium) at room temperature away from heat, light, and moisture.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Triamterene (Dyrenium).

What to know before using Triamterene (Dyrenium):

If any of the following apply to you, discuss with your doctor before taking Triamterene (Dyrenium). You may not be able to use Triamterene (Dyrenium), or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment:

  • diabetes
  • heart disease
  • liver disease
  • gout
  • a history of kidney stones
  • taking another diuretic.
  • pregnant
  • breast feeding

You should NOT use Triamterene (Dyrenium) if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • kidney disease
  • unable to urinate
  • severe liver disease
  • high potassium levels (hyperkalemia)
  • if you are taking potassium supplements, or another potassium-sparing diuretic such as Dyazide, Maxzide, amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), or spironolactone (Aldactone, Aldactazide).

When taking Triamterene (Dyrenium) avoid doing these things:

  • Drinking alcohol
  • Avoid using other medicines that make you light-headed (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety).
  • Using salt substitutes or low-sodium milk products that contain potassium.
  • Avoid a high-salt diet.
  • Driving or doing anything that requires you to be alert.
  • Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor’s instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Side effects of Triamterene (Dyrenium):

If any of the following symptoms of overdose or allergy occur while taking Triamterene (Dyrenium), get emergency help immediately:

Symptoms of Overdose:

  • hives
  • difficulty breathing
  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Blurred vision
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly
  • indigestion
  • pain or weakness in the hands or feet
  • passing of gas
  • stomach fullness or discomfort
  • sweating
  • trembling

Check with your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • agitation
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • cloudy urine
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • cough
  • dark urine
  • decreased urine output
  • depression
  • dizziness
  • dry mouth
  • fainting spells
  • fever
  • headache
  • hives
  • hostility
  • increased thirst
  • irritability
  • itching
  • joint pain
  • lethargy
  • restless
  • tremors
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of consciousness
  • mood changes
  • muscle pain or cramps
  • muscle twitching
  • nausea or vomiting
  • nervousness
  • numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips
  • pain in the groin or genitals
  • pain in the lower back or side
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips or tongue
  • rapid or unusual weight gain
  • seizures
  • sharp back pain just below the ribs
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash
  • stupor
  • swelling of the face, ankles, feet, or hands
  • tightness in the chest
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting of blood
  • weakness or heaviness of the legs
  • wheezing
  • yellow eyes or skin
  • slow, fast, or uneven heartbeat
  • feeling drowsy

If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

  • Increased sensitivity of skin to sunlight
  • redness or other discoloration of the skin
  • severe sunburn
  • mild nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea

The information about Triamterene (Dyrenium) comes from drugs.com

Triamterene (Dyrenium) Natural Alternatives:

If you are taking Triamterene (Dyrenium) or other diuretic medications, the various ingredients in Tikva have been proven through either clinical trials or other research to lower your blood pressure naturally by dilating (widening) the arteries. Tikva does not act as a diuretic.

Several of the ingredients in Tikva can also increase circulation, dissolve plaque that is already in the arteries and reduce new plaque from forming. In addition, there are ingredients in Tikva to help reduce stress that often increases blood pressure without all of the side effects.
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Various herbs, foods and beverages offer a natural diuretic effect; however, they should be used with caution, in the event of unknown medical conditions with fluid retention as a symptom, or due to side effects with other medications. Consult with your physician prior to using natural diuretics.

Cutting back on sodium and exercising more can also help reduce fluid buildup.

Eating more fruits and vegetables that act as diuretics, like watermelon, grapes, berries, celery, asparagus, onions, garlic, and bell peppers, may be another beneficial solution.

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The information provided on this page should not be used to decide whether or not to take Triamterene (Dyrenium) or any other medicine. Consult your doctor to decide which medicines are right for you. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition.

This information about Triamterene (Dyrenium) is a brief summary and does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to Triamterene (Dyrenium).

This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You must speak with your doctor for complete information about the risks and benefits of using Triamterene (Dyrenium).

When taking Triamterene (Dyrenium) avoid doing these things: Eating more fruits and vegetables that act as diuretics, like watermelon, grapes, berries, celery . Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid. Avoid eating grapefruit and drinking Avoid alcohol while taking and for 3 days after finishing the medication. Take with food to prevent upset stomach; take Dyrenium. (triamterene). Midamor (amiloride). Avoid potassium-based salt.

It is best to avoid taking this medication within 4 hours of your bedtime to avoid Do not increase the amount of potassium in your diet (e.g., bananas, orange Medication Uses – How To Use – Precautions – Drug Interactions. Avoid potassium-containing salt substitutes while you are taking this rarosyber.tk with your doctor about the amount of potassium-rich foods (e.g., bananas, prunes, raisins, and orange juice) that you may have in your diet. Do not use salt substitutes or low-sodium milk products that contain potassium. These products could cause your potassium levels to get too high while you are taking triamterene. What are the possible side – What should I discuss with – How should I take.

Alcohol and metronidazole together could cause nausea, stomach cramping, and vomiting. Thyroid drugs such as levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid). These high-fiber foods can prevent your body from absorbing the medications. If you eat a high-fiber diet, try taking your medications later in the evening. You don’t have to avoid these healthy foods if you’re on warfarin, but you do diuretics: spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium). Do you know what foods could interact with your medications. Also avoid mixing with certain diuretics, such as triamterene (Dyrenium), used to So people who take those drugs should avoid large amounts of food high in.

Let’s take a look at the top 8 foods you need to avoid while taking not be eaten while taking some diuretics, such as Dyrenium (triamterene). Medications interact with foods and nutrients in various ways, and a little study can help you avoid problems. How to Avoid Bad Medication and Food Combinations And avoid mixing with some diuretics, such as triamterene (Dyrenium), used to reduce.

Take this medicine after eating a meal. Taking a diuretic can make What should I avoid while taking Dyrenium? Dyrenium may impair your. Common brand names: Dyrenium. Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods. What Are Nutrient Interactions. Types of interactions: Beneficial. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved triamterene in It’s important to avoid taking medications that could make you.

Triamterene

Brand names of triamterene

  • Apo-Triazide
  • Dyazide
  • Dyrenium
  • Maxzide
  • Maxzide-25
  • Novo-Triamzide
  • Nu-Triazide

Triamterene is used as a diuretic to help prevent the body from absorbing excess salt but which allows the body to retain its potassium levels. Low levels of potassium can cause tiredness. Triamterene is used on patients with edema who are suffering from congestive heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver and for nephritic syndrome (kidney condition).

Aldosterone hormones regulate the water and salt balance in the body and are produced by the adrenal gland. When the levels of the hormone aldosterone increase in the body causing edema then triamterene helps to cure the condition.

Things you need to tell your physician before taking triamterene

Before you begin to take triamterene your doctor must be told about your allergies to medicines and to triamterene itself. If you are already taking any medicine that contains triamterene or medicines like amiloride and spironolactone then additional triamterene cannot be taken.

As always before you begin any new medication you will have to list out to your doctor and pharmacist the prescribed and non-prescribed drugs you may already be taking including herbal products, vitamins and also any kinds of nutritional supplements. Your doctor is also to told if you have been prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDS) like ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) and medicines for diabetes, blood pressure or any other diuretic and also if you are on potassium supplements. This is important as the doctor will then change the dose of your medications and will also have to monitor side-effects.

Besides telling the doctor about the medications you are already taking he must also know if you have at any time suffered from diabetes, kidney stones or any other kidney problem, heart or liver disease and gout.

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Remember that you can not breastfeed if you are on triamterene. In case you are pregnant and require taking triamterene let your doctor decide and if you get pregnant while on the dose, your doctor needs to immediately know.

Your dentist and also your surgeon need to know that you have been prescribed triamterene if you should require dental or medical surgery. Since triamterene can increase skin sensitivity it is best to avoid being in sunlight. If you do need to be in the sun for long periods of time it is advisable to wear sunscreen, sunglasses and other protective clothing.

Usage

Triamterene is used as a supplementary medication along with other diuretics to retain potassium but aids expulsion of water and salt in the body through urine production. It controls edema in patients with heart, liver and kidney disease when taken in conjunction with loop diuretics or thiazide. By reducing the volume of fluids in the body and also removing any extra water in the lungs a patient can breathe with greater ease. Swelling of the abdomen and arms or legs is also perceptively reduced with triamterene as extra water is released as urine by this ‘water pill’ which does not flush out potassium along with the water.

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Triamterene could increase the levels of potassium in the body. In case you are using products such as potassium chloride, other potassium or salt supplements consult your doctor about the advisability of using these products along with triamterene. Intakes of fruit like oranges and bananas, which increase potassium content in the body, need your doctor’s approval too. In case you are on medication then you must be regular in taking it for it to be beneficial.

How to use triamterene

Triamterene is a capsule that is taken by mouth, normally once in the morning after breakfast and sometimes twice a day after breakfast and lunch. Avoid taking the drug too late in the day as it might disturb your sleep at night because of needing to make trips to the bathroom. However triamterene should be taken at the same time everyday day. Also the directions on the prescription label need to be followed exactly so ask the pharmacist if you don’t understand anything. Also take neither more nor less than what the doctor prescribes.

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Do not stop the medication without first consulting the doctor as sometimes conditions become worse when the medicine is stopped suddenly. The dose needs to be reduced gradually. The doctor needs to also be consulted in case your condition does not alter or worsen and you have increased swelling or high blood pressure reading.

How triamterene works

Triamterene alters kidney enzymes which help to remove the additional and harmful sodium and fluid in the body through production of urine. Other diuretics, besides reducing salt and water, also cause loss of essential potassium needed by the body.

Side effects

Serious

  • hives
  • skin rash
  • unusual bleeding
  • lightheadedness

Common

  • stomach irritation
  • Dry mouth

Less common

  • dizziness
  • stomach cramps
  • headache
  • nausea, vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • increased sensitivity of skin to sunlight

Possible interactions

If you take herbal medicines you need to work with your doctor to decide if taking the herbal remedies along with triamterene is beneficial for you or not. Ginseng, hawthorn, licorice, goldenseal, ma huang, yohimbe and saw palmetto could increase blood pressure. Eleuthero root (Siberian ginseng) and ephedra also need to be shunned if you have hypertension. Calcium and garlic on the other hand lower blood pressure and so caution is required if taken along with triamterene.

Foods that contain rich amounts of potassium like bananas and citrus fruit could cause problems. Alcohol on the other hand along with triamterene may induce drowsiness and lower blood pressure more than desired. Since the medication may cause photosensitivity be careful of exposure to sun.

Discontinuation

If a high dose of triamterene is being administered to you over a long period of time and if for some reason the medication needs to be discontinued it is best to stop it gradually. A sudden withdrawal may cause potassium deficiency or could even lead to excessive potassium being removed on the rebound.

Storage instructions

The medication should be kept out of reach of children in the same container it came in. The lid should be tightly closed to prevent heat or moisture reaching it and so the bathroom is not a good place to store the medication in. Any medicine that has reached its expiry period should be disposed correctly in consultation with the pharmacist.

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