Side effects of nasonex

Nasonex

SIDE EFFECTS

Systemic and local corticosteroid use may result in the following:

  • Epistaxis, ulcerations, Candida albicans infection, impaired wound healing
  • Cataracts and glaucoma
  • Immunosuppression
  • Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis effects, including growth reduction

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Allergic Rhinitis

Adults And Adolescents 12 Years Of Age And Older

In controlled US and international clinical studies, a total of 3210 adult and adolescent patients 12 years and older with allergic rhinitis received treatment with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg at doses of 50 to 800 mcg/day. The majority of patients (n=2103) were treated with 200 mcg/day. A total of 350 adult and adolescent patients have been treated for one year or longer. Adverse events did not differ significantly based on age, sex, or race. Four percent or less of patients in clinical trials discontinued treatment because of adverse events and the discontinuation rate was similar for the vehicle and active comparators.

All adverse events (regardless of relationship to treatment) reported by 5% or more of adult and adolescent patients ages 12 years and older who received NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg, 200 mcg/day vs. placebo and that were more common with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg than placebo, are displayed in TABLE 1 below.

TABLE 1: ADULT AND ADOLESCENT PATIENTS 12 YEARS AND OLDER – ADVERSE EVENTS FROM CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN SEASONAL ALLERGIC AND PERENNIAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS (PERCENT OF PATIENTS REPORTING)

NASONEX
200 mcg
(n=2103)
VEHICLE
PLACEBO
(n=1671)
Headache 26 22
Viral Infection 14 11
Pharyngitis 12 10
Epistaxis/Blood-Tinged Mucus 11 6
Coughing 7 6
Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 6 2
Dysmenorrhea 5 3
Musculoskeletal Pain 5 3
Sinusitis 5 3

Other adverse events which occurred in less than 5% but greater than or equal to 2% of adult and adolescent patients (ages 12 years and older) treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg, 200- mcg/day (regardless of relationship to treatment), and more frequently than in the placebo group included: arthralgia, asthma, bronchitis, chest pain, conjunctivitis, diarrhea, dyspepsia, earache, flu-like symptoms, myalgia, nausea, and rhinitis.

Pediatric Patients <12 Years Of Age

In controlled US and international studies, a total of 990 pediatric patients (ages 3 to 11 years) with allergic rhinitis received treatment with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg, at doses of 25 to 200 mcg/day. The majority of pediatric patients (n=720) were treated with 100 mcg/day. A total of 163 pediatric patients have been treated for one year or longer. Two percent or less of patients in clinical trials who received NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg discontinued treatment because of adverse events and the discontinuation rate was similar for the placebo and active comparators.

Adverse events which occurred in ≥5% of pediatric patients (ages 3 to 11 years) treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg, 100 mcg/day vs. placebo (regardless of relationship to treatment) and more frequently than in the placebo group included upper respiratory tract infection (5% in NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg group vs. 4% in placebo) and vomiting (5% in NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg group vs. 4% in placebo).

Other adverse events which occurred in less than 5% but greater than or equal to 2% of pediatric patients (ages 3 to 11 years) treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg, 100 mcg/day vs. placebo (regardless of relationship to treatment) and more frequently than in the placebo group included: diarrhea, nasal irritation, otitis media, and wheezing.

The adverse event (regardless of relationship to treatment) reported by 5% of pediatric patients ages 2 to 5 years who received NASONEX Nasal Spray, 50 mcg, 100 mcg/day in a clinical trial vs. placebo including 56 subjects (28 each NASONEX Nasal Spray, 50 mcg and placebo) and that was more common with NASONEX Nasal Spray, 50 mcg than placebo, included: upper respiratory tract infection (7% vs. 0%, respectively). The other adverse event which occurred in less than 5% but greater than or equal to 2% of mometasone furoate pediatric patients ages 2 to 5 years treated with 100 mcg doses vs. placebo (regardless of relationship to treatment) and more frequently than in the placebo group included: skin trauma.

Nasal Polyps

Adults 18 Years Of Age And Older

In controlled clinical studies, the types of adverse events observed in patients with nasal polyps were similar to those observed for patients with allergic rhinitis. A total of 594 adult patients (ages 18 to 86 years) received NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg at doses of 200 mcg once or twice daily for up to 4 months for treatment of nasal polyps. The overall incidence of adverse events for patients treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg was comparable to patients with the placebo except for epistaxis, which was 9% for 200 mcg once daily, 13% for 200 mcg twice daily, and 5% for the placebo.

Nasal ulcers and nasal and oral candidiasis were also reported in patients treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg primarily in patients treated for longer than 4 weeks.

Nasal Congestion Associated With Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

A total of 1008 patients aged 12 years and older received NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg 200 mcg/day (n=506) or placebo (n=502) for 15 days. Adverse events that occurred more frequently in patients treated with NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg than in patients with the placebo included sinus headache (1.2% in NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg group vs. 0.2% in placebo) and epistaxis (1% in NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg group vs. 0.2% in placebo) and the overall adverse event profile was similar to that observed in the other allergic rhinitis trials.

Post-Marketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during the post-marketing period for NASONEX Nasal Spray 50 mcg: nasal burning and irritation, anaphylaxis and angioedema, disturbances in taste and smell and nasal septal perforation. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Nasonex (Mometasone Furoate (nasal spray))

Nasonex Side Effects

Generic Name: mometasone nasal

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 8, 2018.

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Note: This document contains side effect information about mometasone nasal. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Nasonex.

In Summary

Common side effects of Nasonex include: headache. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to mometasone nasal: nasal implant, nasal spray

Along with its needed effects, mometasone nasal (the active ingredient contained in Nasonex) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking mometasone nasal:

More common

  • Bloody mucus or unexplained nosebleeds
  • chills
  • cold
  • cough
  • fever
  • headache
  • hoarseness
  • increased abdominal or stomach pain and cramping during menstrual periods
  • muscle or bone pain
  • stuffy or runny nose

Less common

  • Chest pain
  • discharge or redness in the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
  • earache
  • tightness in the chest
  • troubled breathing

Rare

  • Sores inside the nose
  • white patches inside the nose or mouth

Incidence not known

  • Blurred vision
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • fast heartbeat
  • hives, skin rash
  • itching, puffiness, or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or genitals
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects of mometasone nasal may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Sore throat

Less common

  • Diarrhea
  • joint or muscle ache or pain
  • nasal burning or irritation
  • nausea
  • sneezing
  • stomach upset or discomfort following meals

Incidence not known

  • Bad, unusual, or unpleasant (after) taste or smell
  • change in taste or smell

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to mometasone nasal: nasal implant, nasal spray

General

The most commonly reported side effects were headache, viral infection, pharyngitis, epistaxis, and cough.

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Headache (26%)

Endocrine

Frequency not reported: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis effects including growth reduction

Gastrointestinal

Common (1% to 10%): Throat irritation, diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia

Frequency not reported: Disturbances of taste and smell

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Hypersensitivity (including anaphylactic reactions, angioedema, bronchospasm, dyspnea)

Immunologic

Very common (10% or more): Viral infection (14%)

Frequency not reported: Candida albicans infection, immunosuppression

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Earache, otitis media

Frequency not reported: Impaired wound healing

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Dysmenorrhea

Musculoskeletal

Common (1% to 10%): Musculoskeletal pain, arthralgia, myalgia

Ocular

Common (1% to 10%): Conjunctivitis

Frequency not reported: Glaucoma, increased intraocular pressure, cataract

Respiratory

Very common (10% or more): Epistaxis (up to 15%), pharyngitis (12%)

Frequency not reported: Nasal septum perforation

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Chest pain

1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

2. “Product Information. Nasonex nasal spray (mometasone topical).” Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.

3. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Related questions

  • Flonase vs Nasonex: What’s the difference?

Medical Disclaimer

More about Nasonex (mometasone nasal)

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  • Drug class: nasal steroids

Consumer resources

  • Nasonex
  • Nasonex (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Sinuva, Propel

Professional resources

  • Nasonex (FDA)
  • … +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Nasal Polyps
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Sinus Symptoms

Nasonex is the brand name for mometasone nasal spray, a medicine used to relieve allergy symptoms.

These symptoms can include stuffy or runny nose, itching, and sneezing.

Nasonex, which is administered through a nasal inhaler, may also be used to treat growths in your nose known as nasal polyps.

The medication is part of the corticosteroid family of drugs. They work by reducing swelling and inflammation in the nasal passages.

If you’re using Nasonex to treat seasonal allergies, it’s best to start taking it two to four weeks before allergy season starts.

Once you begin using it, it’s important that you do so regularly since its effectiveness is dependent on regular use. It usually takes one to two weeks to achieve the maximum effect.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1997, Nasonex is marketed by Merck & Co.

Nasonex Warnings

There’s no data proving that Nasonex is safe and effective when used to treat children under 2 years old with seasonal allergies, or to treat nasal polyps in people younger than 18 years old.

You should be aware that Nasonex might cause nosebleeds or nose and throat infections. It could also result in your wounds healing slowly.

If you have a sore in your nose, have surgery on your nose, or sustain an injury to your nose, you may need to wait to use Nasonex until it is healed.

It’s important that you have regular eye exams while on Nasonex, since it can lead to eye problems like glaucoma and cataracts.

Nasonex could also weaken your immune system, thereby increasing your risk of infection. As a result, you should avoid contact with people who have chickenpox or measles while using this medicine.

Let your doctor know right away if you notice any signs of infection such as fever, aches, pain, chills, nausea, tiredness, or vomiting.

While on Nasonex, you could develop Addison’s disease, a condition where your adrenal glands don’t make enough steroid hormones. Symptoms range from being tired or feeling weak to nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure.

On rare occasions, prolonged use of corticosteroid medications has been known to make it difficult for your body to respond to physical stress.

If you’re planning to undergo surgery (including dental) or any other treatment, or if you are suffering with a serious infection, you must mention that you use Nasonex as well as other products that you are taking.

In addition, it’s possible, but unlikely, that this medication could slow down your child’s growth if used for a long time.

Nasonex and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you might become pregnant or are pregnant, so that he/she can help you decide if you should be using Nasonex. The drug should only be used if it is really needed.

It’s also unknown if this drug will pass into your breast milk, so talk to your doctor before breastfeeding.

Generic Name: mometasone nasal (moe MET a sone)
Brand Names: Nasonex, Propel, Sinuva

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Feb 14, 2019.

  • Overview
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What is Nasonex?

Nasonex (mometasone) is a steroid. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Nasonex nasal spray is used to treat nasal symptoms of seasonal or year-round allergies, including congestion, sneezing, and runny nose. This medicine is approved for this use in adults and children who are at least 2 years old.

Nasonex is also used to prevent seasonal allergy symptoms in adults and children who are at least 12 years old.

Nasonex nasal spray is used to treat nasal polyps only in adults.

Important Information

Before using Nasonex, tell your doctor if you have been sick or had an infection of any kind. Also tell your doctor if you have glaucoma or cataracts, herpes simplex infection of your eyes, tuberculosis, sores or ulcers in your nose, or if you have recently had injury of or surgery on your nose.

It may take up to 2 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after a week of treatment.

Mometasone can lower the blood cells that help your body fight infections. Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using Nasonex.

Avoid getting Nasonex in your eyes. If this does happen, rinse with water and call your doctor

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Nasonex nasal spray if you are allergic to mometasone.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • an active or chronic infection;

  • glaucoma or cataracts;

  • herpes simplex virus of your eyes;

  • tuberculosis or any other infection or illness;

  • sores or ulcers inside your nose; or

  • nasal surgery or injury to your nose.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It may not be safe to breast-feed a baby while you are using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risks.

Nasonex nasal spray is not approved to treat allergy symptoms in anyone younger than 2 years old, or to prevent allergy symptoms in anyone younger than 12 years old.

How should I use Nasonex?

Use Nasonex nasal spray exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Do not take by mouth. Nasonex nasal spray is for use only in your nose.

Your doctor may recommend you start using Nasonex 2 to 4 weeks before the start of allergy season.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Shake the nasal spray well just before each use. Before your first use, prime the nasal spray pump by spraying the medicine into the air until a fine mist appears. If the nasal spray has not been used for longer than 1 week, prime it by spraying the medicine into the air until a fine mist appears.

To use the Nasonex nasal spray:

  • Blow your nose gently. Keep your head upright and insert the tip of the bottle into one nostril. Press your other nostril closed with your finger. Breathe in quickly and gently spray the medicine into your nose. Then use the spray in your other nostril.

  • Do not blow your nose for at least a few minutes after using the nasal spray.

  • Use only the number of sprays your doctor has prescribed.

  • If the spray gets in your eyes or mouth or on your skin, rinse with water.

  • If the nasal spray has not been used for longer than 1 week, prime it by spraying the medicine into the air until a fine mist appears.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

It may take up to 2 weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using Nasonex as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

While you are using Nasonex, your doctor may need to examine you to make sure the medicine is not harming your nose or sinuses.

It may take up to 2 weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medicine as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

Store Nasonex in an upright position at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Throw the medicine away after you have used 120 sprays, even if there is still medicine left in the bottle.

Nasonex dosing information

Usual Adult Dose of Nasonex for Allergic Rhinitis:

2 sprays in each nostril once a day.
When used for the prevention of allergic rhinitis, treatment should begin 2-4 weeks prior to pollen season.

Usual Adult Dose of Nasonex for Nasal Polyps:

2 sprays in each nostril twice daily. 2 sprays in each nostril once daily may be effective in some patients.

Usual Pediatric Dose of Nasonex for Allergic Rhinitis:

2 years to 11 years:
1 spray in each nostril once a day.
12 years or older:
2 sprays in each nostril once a day.
When used for the prevention of allergic rhinitis, treatment should begin 2 to 4 weeks prior to pollen season.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

An overdose of mometasone nasal spray is not expected to produce life threatening symptoms. Long term use of high doses can lead to thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), increased acne or facial hair, menstrual problems, impotence, or loss of interest in sex.

What should I avoid while using Nasonex?

Rinse with water if this medicine gets in your eyes.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chickenpox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medicine.

Nasonex side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Nasonex: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe bleeding or increased drainage from your nose;

  • nose pain or discomfort, headache;

  • white patches or sores in the nose that won’t heal;

  • wheezing, trouble breathing;

  • vision problems;

  • ear pain or full feeling, trouble hearing, drainage from the ear.

Steroid medicine can affect growth in children. Tell your doctor if your child is not growing at a normal rate while using Nasonex.

Although the risk of serious side effects is low when mometasone is used in the nose, side effects can occur if the medicine is absorbed into your bloodstream. Tell your doctor if you have possible signs of long-term steroid use:

  • weight gain (especially in your face or your upper back and torso);

  • slow wound healing, thinning skin, increased body hair;

  • irregular menstrual periods, changes in sexual function; or

  • muscle weakness, tired feeling, depression, anxiety, or feeling irritable.

Common Nasonex side effects may include:

  • nosebleeds;

  • headache;

  • stuffy nose, sore throat, cough; or

  • flu-like symptoms.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nasonex?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • an antibiotic;

  • antifungal medicine;

  • an antidepressant; or

  • antiviral medicine to treat HIV/AIDS.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with mometasone nasal, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Nasonex only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01.

  • Flonase vs Nasonex: What’s the difference?

Medical Disclaimer

Flonase vs Nasonex: Main Differences and Similarities

Flonase (fluticasone propionate) and Nasonex (mometasone furoate) are nasal spray medications that treat allergic rhinitis. Both medications work as corticosteroids to decrease inflammation in the nasal passages. By reducing inflammation, Flonase and Nasonex can help relieve itchy, runny nose and congestion related to allergies.

Flonase

Flonase is also known by its chemical name, fluticasone propionate. It is approved for over-the-counter use to treat allergy symptoms such as runny nose and itchy eyes. It can also treat non-allergic rhinitis.

Flonase is available as a nasal spray that delivers 50 micrograms per spray. It is usually dosed as 1 to 2 sprays in each nostril for those aged 4 years and older. The maximum recommended dose per day is 200 micrograms.

Nasonex is known by its chemical name, mometasone furoate. It is approved to treat nasal symptoms and congestion due to allergic rhinitis in those aged 2 years and older. It can also treat nasal polyps. Currently, Nasonex can only be obtained with a prescription.

Nasonex comes as a nasal spray that delivers 50 micrograms per spray. Like Flonase, 1 to 2 sprays are delivered in each nostril depending on the symptoms being treated. The maximum recommended dose per day is 200 micrograms.

Flonase vs Nasonex Side by Side Comparison

Flonase and Nasonex are similar medications that treat allergic rhinitis. Despite their similarities, they also have some differences in how they are used. Their features can be explored below.

Flonase Nasonex
Prescribed For
  • Allergic rhinitis
  • Allergic eye symptoms
  • Non-allergic rhinitis
  • Allergic rhinitis
  • Nasal polyps
Drug Classification
  • Corticosteroid
  • Corticosteroid
Manufacturer
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Merck
Common Side Effects
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Nose bleeds
  • Nose burning or itching
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Trouble breathing
  • Cough
  • Nasal congestion
  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Nose bleeds
  • Viral infection
  • Cough
  • Upper respiratory tract infection
  • Dysmenorrhea
  • Muscle pain
  • Sinus infection
Is there a generic?
  • Yes, fluticasone propionate
  • Yes, mometasone furoate
Is it covered by insurance?
  • Varies according to your provider
  • Varies according to your provider
Dosage Forms
  • Nasal spray
  • Nasal spray
Average Cash Price
  • $55 per 16 grams
  • $315 per 17 grams
SingleCare Discount Price
  • Flonase Price
  • Nasonex Price
Drug Interactions
CYP3A4 Inhibitors such as:

  • Ritonavir
  • Atazanavir
  • Clarithromycin
  • Indinavir
  • Itraconazole
  • Nefazodone
  • Nelfinavir
  • Saquinavir
  • Ketoconazole
  • Telithromycin
  • Conivaptan
  • Lopinavir
  • Nefazodone
  • Voriconazole
  • No significant drug interactions reported
Can I use while planning pregnancy, pregnant, or breastfeeding?
  • Flonase is in Pregnancy Category C. Teratogenic effects have been reported in animals. No studies have been performed in humans. Consult a physician regarding using Flonase while pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Nasonex is in Pregnancy Category C. Teratogenic effects have been reported in animals. No studies have been performed in humans. Consult a physician regarding using Nasonex while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Summary

Flonase (fluticasone propionate) and Nasonex (mometasone furoate) are similar nasal spray corticosteroids for allergic rhinitis. Both medications treat allergic symptoms like stuffy, runny nose and congestion. However, Flonase can also treat itchy eye symptoms from allergies as well as non-allergic rhinitis. Nasonex, on the other hand, can also treat nasal polyps in adults.

Both medications are administered in identical ways. Depending on the severity of symptoms, both medications may be dosed differently. As corticosteroids, they are not recommended for long-term use. This is because of an increased risk of potential adverse effects such as infections, raised blood sugar, and growth problems in children.

Flonase can be purchased over the counter while Nasonex needs a prescription. This can be an obstacle for some people and may require a doctor’s appointment to get Nasonex. While they both treat similar symptoms, it is important to consult your doctor to find out the best solution for your symptoms. This information is not to be taken as medical advice and is only meant for educational purposes.

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