Side effects of lumigan

Lumigan

Lumigan is a brand name of the drug bimatoprost, which is used to treat conditions that cause increased pressure in the eye, such as glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

The medicine belongs to a class of drugs called prostaglandin analogs. It works by increasing the flow of natural fluids out of the eye, which lowers pressure.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Lumigan in 2001. It’s manufactured by Allergan, Inc.

Lumigan Warnings

Before starting on Lumigan, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had:

  • Eye surgery
  • Swelling, inflammation, infection, or injury of an eye
  • A lens replacement or missing eye lens
  • Any other eye conditions
  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Allergies to medications

Lumigan drops are for use in the eye only. Avoid getting the medicine in your mouth or nose.

This drug can make your eyes more sensitive to sunlight. You may want to wear sunglasses if you experience this symptom.

Lumigan may cause your iris (the colored part of your eye) to permanently turn brown. Talk to your doctor about this potential effect.

The medicine may also darken the whites of your eyes and your eyelids. It can also change the way your eyelashes grow (more, longer, or thicker lashes). These symptoms are usually temporary and should go away once you stop using Lumigan.

Be sure to tell your healthcare provider you’re using Lumigan before having any type of procedure, especially surgery on your eye.

Your doctor will probably want to perform frequent tests to monitor your condition while using Lumigan. Keep all appointments with your doctor’s office and laboratory.

This medicine should be used with extreme caution in children. Safety and effectiveness haven’t been confirmed in this age group.

Apply Lumigan drops at least five minutes before or after using any other topical eye medicines.

If you wear contact lenses, remove them before applying Lumigan, and then wait 15 minutes before putting them back in your eyes.

Continue to take Lumigan even if you feel well. Don’t stop using the medicine without first talking to your doctor.

Pregnancy and Lumigan

It’s not known whether Lumigan can harm an unborn baby.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant, or plan to become pregnant during your treatment. You’ll have to discuss the benefits and risks of using this medicine during pregnancy.

It’s also not known whether Lumigan passes into breast milk or could hurt a breastfeeding baby. Talk to your doctor before using this medicine if you’re breastfeeding.

Lumigan Side Effects

Generic Name: bimatoprost ophthalmic

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 15, 2018.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about bimatoprost ophthalmic. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Lumigan.

In Summary

Common side effects of Lumigan include: hypertrichosis of eyelid. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to bimatoprost ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

Along with its needed effects, bimatoprost ophthalmic (the active ingredient contained in Lumigan) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking bimatoprost ophthalmic:

Less common

  • Blindness
  • bloody eye
  • blurred or decreased vision
  • change in color vision
  • color changes in the skin around the eyes
  • difficulty seeing at night
  • disturbed color perception
  • double vision
  • dry eyes
  • eye color changes
  • fever or chills
  • halos around lights
  • lack or loss of strength
  • loss of vision
  • night blindness
  • overbright appearance of lights
  • redness, burning, dry, or itching eyes
  • redness, pain, swelling of the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
  • tunnel vision

Some side effects of bimatoprost ophthalmic may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Body aches or pain
  • cough
  • difficulty with breathing
  • ear congestion
  • headache
  • loss of voice
  • nasal congestion
  • redness of the white part of eyes or inside of the eyelids
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • sore throat
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Less common

  • Darkening of the eyelashes
  • eye discharge or excessive tearing
  • eye strain
  • feeling of having something in the eye
  • increase in hair growth
  • increased sensitivity of the eyes to sunlight

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to bimatoprost ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

General

The most frequently reported adverse reactions were eyelash growth, conjunctival hyperemia, and ocular pruritus.

Ocular

Very common (10% or more): Growth of eyelashes (up to 45%), conjunctival hyperemia (up to 44%), ocular pruritus (up to 15%)

Common (1% to 10%): Allergic conjunctivitis, asthenopia, blepharitis, blurred vision, cataract, conjunctival edema, conjunctival hemorrhage, corneal erosion, dry eye, eye discharge, eye irritation, eye pain, eye pruritus, eyelash darkening, eyelid pruritus, foreign body sensation, increased iris pigmentation, lacrimation increased, ocular burning, ocular dryness, ocular irritation, photophobia, punctate keratitis, superficial punctate keratitis, tearing, visual disturbance, worsening of visual acuity

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Corneal calcification

Frequency not reported: Blepharal pigmentation, cystoid macular edema, eye edema, eyelash changes, eyelid sulcus deepening, intraocular inflammation, macular edema, signs/symptoms of eye allergy

Postmarketing reports: Enophthalmos

Corneal calcification occurred in patients with significant corneal damage using formulations containing phosphate.

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Eyelid erythema, hirsutism, hypertrichosis, periocular skin hyperpigmentation, periorbital erythema, pigmentation of periocular skin, skin hyperpigmentation

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abnormal hair growth, dry skin, madarosis, pruritus

Frequency not reported: Lid changes, periorbital changes, pigmentation, signs/symptoms of allergic dermatitis

Immunologic

Common (1% to 10%): Colds, infections

Respiratory

Common (1% to 10%): Upper respiratory tract infections

Frequency not reported: Asthma, asthma exacerbation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation, dyspnea

Postmarketing reports: Asthma-like symptoms

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Headache

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dizziness, vertigo

Local

Common (1% to 10%): Instillation site irritation

Hepatic

Common (1% to 10%): Abnormal liver function tests

Other

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Asthenia

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Hypertension

Gastrointestinal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Nausea

Psychiatric

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Depression

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity reaction

1. “Product Information. Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic)” Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

3. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic)

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 15 Reviews
  • Drug class: ophthalmic glaucoma agents
  • FDA Alerts (1)

Consumer resources

  • Lumigan
  • Lumigan (Advanced Reading)

Professional resources

  • Lumigan (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Glaucoma, Open Angle
  • Intraocular Hypertension

bimatoprost ophthalmic (Lumigan)

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using bimatoprost ophthalmic (Lumigan)?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to bimatoprost.

To make sure bimatoprost ophthalmic is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • swelling or infection in your eye;
  • retinal detachment; or
  • eye surgery or injury affecting the lens of your eye.

Bimatoprost ophthalmic may cause a gradual change in the color of your eyes or eyelids and lashes, usually an increase in brown pigment. You may also notice increased growth or thickness of your eyelashes. These changes occur slowly and you may not notice them for months or years. Color changes may be permanent even after your treatment ends, and may occur only in the eye being treated. This could result in a cosmetic difference in eye or eyelash color from one eye to the other.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether bimatoprost ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could affect the nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

Bimatoprost ophthalmic is not approved for use by anyone younger than 16 years old.

How should I use bimatoprost ophthalmic (Lumigan)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The usual dose of this medicine is 1 drop into the affected eye every evening. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Do not use this medicine while wearing contact lenses. Bimatoprost ophthalmic may contain a preservative that can discolor soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using this medicine before putting in your contact lenses.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

To apply the eye drops:

  • Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye with the tip down. Look up and away from the dropper and squeeze out a drop.
  • Close your eyes for 2 or 3 minutes with your head tipped down, without blinking or squinting. Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye for about 1 minute, to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.
  • Wait at least 5 minutes before using any other eye drops your doctor has prescribed.

Do not touch the tip of the eye dropper or place it directly on your eye. A contaminated dropper can infect your eye, which could lead to serious vision problems.

Do not use the eye drops if the liquid has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Tell your doctor right away if you have an eye injury or eye infection, or if you plan to have eye surgery.

Store this medicine at cool room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

QUESTION

What causes dry eyes? See Answer

Generic Name: bimatoprost ophthalmic (bih MAT o prost)
Brand Names: Lumigan

Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD Last updated on Apr 30, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is Lumigan?

Lumigan (bimatoprost) lowers pressure in the eye by increasing the amount of fluid that drains from the eye.

Lumigan eye drops are used to treat certain types of glaucoma and other causes of high pressure inside the eye.

Lumigan may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Do not use Lumigan eye drops while wearing contact lenses. The eye drops may contain a preservative that can discolor soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using Lumigan before putting in your contact lenses.

Lumigan may cause a gradual change in the color of your eyes or eyelids and lashes, as well as increased growth or thickness of your eyelashes. These color changes, usually an increase in brown pigment, occur slowly and you may not notice them for months or years. Color changes may be permanent even after your treatment ends, and may occur only in the eye being treated. This could result in a cosmetic difference in eye or eyelash color from one eye to the other.

Do not allow the tip of the Lumigan eye dropper to touch any surface, including your eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

After using Lumigan, wait at least 5 minutes before using any other eye drops that your doctor has prescribed.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before using this medicine

You should not use Lumigan if you are allergic to bimatoprost.

To make sure Lumigan is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • swelling or infection in your eye;

  • retinal detachment; or

  • eye surgery or injury affecting the lens of your eye.

Lumigan may cause a gradual change in the color of your eyes. You may also notice increased growth or thickness of your eyelashes. These changes occur slowly and you may not notice them for months or years. Color changes may be permanent even after your treatment ends, and may occur only in the eye being treated. This could result in a cosmetic difference in eye or eyelash color from one eye to the other.

It is not known whether Lumigan will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether Lumigan passes into breast milk or if it could affect the nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

Lumigan is not approved for use by anyone younger than 16 years old.

How should I use Lumigan?

Use Lumigan eye drops exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The usual dose of Lumigan eye drops is 1 drop into the affected eye every evening. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Do not use this medicine while wearing contact lenses. Lumigan may contain a preservative that can discolor soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using this medicine before putting in your contact lenses.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

To apply the Lumigan eye drops:

  • Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye with the tip down. Look up and away from the dropper and squeeze out a drop.

  • Close your eyes for 2 or 3 minutes with your head tipped down, without blinking or squinting. Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye for about 1 minute, to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.

  • Wait at least 5 minutes before using any other eye drops your doctor has prescribed.

Do not touch the tip of the eye dropper or place it directly on your eye. A contaminated dropper can infect your eye, which could lead to serious vision problems.

Do not use Lumigan eye drops if the liquid has changed color or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Tell your doctor right away if you have an eye injury or eye infection, or if you plan to have eye surgery.

Store this medicine at cool room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose and use the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of Lumigan is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

What should I avoid while using Lumigan?

Avoid using too much of this medicine, which can actually make it less effective in lowering the pressure inside the eye.

Lumigan side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction ro Lumigan: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • eye swelling, redness, severe discomfort, crusting or drainage (may be signs of infection);

  • vision changes; or

  • red, swollen, or itchy eyelids.

Common Lumigan side effects may include:

  • eye redness or itching.

Lumigan may cause a gradual change in the color of your eyes. You may also notice increased growth or thickness of your eyelashes. These changes occur slowly and you may not notice them for months or years. Color changes may be permanent even after your treatment ends, and may occur only in the eye being treated. This could result in a cosmetic difference in eye or eyelash color from one eye to the other.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Lumigan?

It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on Lumigan used in the eyes. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Lumigan only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01.

Medical Disclaimer

Brand Name Drugs

A drug retains its “brand name” status while it is under patent protection, and has a name that is not the actual chemical compound, but rather a name that is usually easier to remember. However, once the patent protection expires, other manufacturers can make the medication as a generic and then it is sold under its chemical name.

While the “brand name” drug is still on the market, there may be two different names for the same medication. For example, Cosopt® is the brand name for a combination medication that contains two drugs to treat glaucoma: dorzolamide and timolol, which are the generic names.

To make things even more confusing, there also can be multiple brand names for a single class of drugs. For example, Xalatan®, Lumigan®, and Travatan-Z® are brand name glaucoma drugs that all belong in a drug class called prostaglandin analogues. In 2011, Xalatan’s patent expired, so drug manufacturers were able to produce latanoprost as a generic. Many patients who had difficulty with the expense of any of the brand name prostaglandin analogues switched to generic latanoprost.

Benefits of Generic Drugs

The number one benefit is cost; generics are less expensive. And if you are already taking multiple eye drops, the cost savings by using generics can add up. For example, a bottle of Xalatan, a brand name drug, costs on average of $185 in San Francisco, where I practice. In 2011, when the patent protection of Xalatan expired, generic latanoprost was introduced by multiple pharmaceutical companies and costs between $15 and $30. One way to identify a pharmacy near you with the best price for your prescription is GoodRx.com, which is where the prices above (with coupons) were found. Decreased cost of glaucoma drops has been shown to increase adherence, or compliance with taking a medication as prescribed.

Disadvantages of Generic Drugs

The primary concern is whether the generic is as effective as the brand name drug. So what are the current standards that the FDA requires for generic medications?

Since 1992, generic eye drops are required to have the same active and inactive ingredients as the brand name product, and all active and inactive ingredients are required to be listed on the package insert.

If they do not contain the same active and inactive ingredients, then a study showing “clinical bioequivalence” must be performed. Typically, for an oral medication, blood levels are measured to see that they are similar. However, it is not practical to measure how much medication is in the patient’s eye after eye drop administration, so other studies are then necessary.

There are some stringent requirements that generics must meet. Even if the active and inactive ingredients are the same, the FDA also requires the generic to be identical in strength, dosage form, and route of administration. The same requirements that the FDA has for brand name drugs from batch to batch (for example: strength, purity, quality) must be met by the generic.

The generic must also be manufactured using the same standards and good manufacturing practices required for brand name products. However, the FDA does not require a clinical trial demonstrating that the generic is just as effective as the brand name medication in patients. In summary, all of these requirements suggest that generics must meet fairly high standards set by the FDA.

However, despite the strict formulation and manufacturing guidelines required by the FDA for generics, there are other concerns pertaining to generic glaucoma drops. One problem is the different bottle design and the size of the bottle and eye dropper of generics. Some bottles are harder to squeeze than others, and patients whose vision is severely impaired may rely on the shape of the bottle to know which drop they are using.

For example, the brand name Xalatan comes in a small, flat, somewhat flexible bottle, whereas the generic versions may be contained in a more rigid, round bottle that is similar in size and shape to other glaucoma eye drops. The bottles may also vary in terms of the amount of drop that is released, so patients may experience a situation where they run out of the medication before they can refill it. One example of this is a generic formulation of timolol that did not have a hole in the tip when the package was opened. In order to administer the drop, the patient needed to use the bottle cap to poke a hole in the tip of the bottle. A patient did not realize this and instead took a pair of scissors to cut open the tip, resulting in a large amount of drop wastage and running out of the medication early.

Finally, some of my patients bring in drops from other countries, where glaucoma medications may be a lot less expensive. Unfortunately, it is difficult to know how strictly the generic drug adheres to the brand name formulation, and if there are differences in the inactive ingredients, for example. The inactive ingredients are very important for maintaining the drop’s consistency and pH (a measure of how acidic or alkaline a solution is), and different preservatives impact how well you tolerate the eye drop.

If you are concerned whether your generic has been FDA approved, you can check the “Orange Book” at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/ob/. Type in the generic name of the medication under the “Search by Active Ingredient” link.

Another potential concern with generic eye drops is that your pharmacy may dispense the same glaucoma drop made by different manufacturers from month to month. This is because the pharmacy will tend to purchase the medication from whichever generic manufacturer is offering the lowest bid. Indeed, this is partly why the “same” drug may be priced differently at various pharmacies in your area. To find out which generic manufacturer’s eye drop is being sold at any particular pharmacy, a call to that pharmacy may help.

Finally, for those who are sensitive to the preservatives used in eye drops, the preservative-free formulations of glaucoma drops (for example, ZioptanPF or CosoptPF) are not yet made by generic manufacturers. You should ask your ophthalmologist whether there are coupons or programs to assist in the cost of preservative-free medications.

Summary

So, how do you determine whether you should use a brand name or a generic? This is a conversation you should have with your eye doctor. It helps if you bring your eye drop bottles to every visit, and let your doctor know if the bottle for a particular medication changes in any given month. There are instances where brand name medications may be preferred and this may include issues with tolerability (often this is due to the preservative used in the generics vs. name brand) and effectiveness of the eye drop.

In my practice, it is uncommon to have a patient whose eye pressure control is lost after a switch to generic, but it does happen. If you cannot tolerate the generic or it is ineffective your eye doctor should be able to help you file paperwork with your insurance company to have them cover the brand name medication.

You are your own best advocate, and in partnership with your eye doctor, you can determine whether generic or brand name glaucoma medications are best for you.

Resources:

  • Glaucoma Toolkit (Information to Help You Understand and Manage Glaucoma)
  • Expert Information on Glaucoma (Articles)
  • National Glaucoma Research Report (Newsletters)
  • Glaucoma: Essential Facts (Publication)
  • GoodRx.com (Website)
  • Glaucoma Treatment and Drugs (Article)
  • Glaucoma: Treatment Options (Publication)
  • The Orange Book (Website)
  • 10 Tips for Using Glaucoma Eye Drops (Article)

Ask the doctor: Can eye drops for glaucoma affect the heart?

Ask the doctor

Can eye drops for glaucoma affect the heart?

Published: May, 2007

Q. I was recently diagnosed with glaucoma. My eye doctor prescribed eye drops called Timoptic to reduce the pressure inside my eyes. After just a short time I had to stop using them because they made me dizzy and my heartbeat felt strange. What’s the connection between eye drops and the heart? Is this common? What else can I do for my eyes?

A. The active ingredient in Timoptic is timolol, a beta blocker. It lowers pressure inside the eye by reducing the production of aqueous humor, the fluid that nourishes the lens and the cells lining the cornea. Some of the drug gets into the bloodstream through the nasolacrimal canal, the channel that makes your nose stuffy when you cry. As you have discovered, beta blocker eye drops can slow the heartbeat and alter blood pressure. These are the very reasons why oral beta blockers are prescribed for people with high blood pressure and some other forms of heart disease.

To continue reading this article, you must login.

Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School.

  • Research health conditions
  • Check your symptoms
  • Prepare for a doctor’s visit or test
  • Find the best treatments and procedures for you
  • Explore options for better nutrition and exercise

Learn more about the many benefits and features of joining Harvard Health Online “

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *