Side effects of lasix

About furosemide

Type of medicine A loop diuretic
Used for Water retention (oedema); high blood pressure (hypertension)
Also called Diumide®-K Continus (contains furosemide in combination with potassium); Frumil® (contains furosemide in combination with amiloride; this combination is also called co-amilofruse); Frusene® (contains furosemide in combination with triamterene); Lasilactone® (contains furosemide in combination with spironolactone)
Available as Tablets and oral liquid medicine

Furosemide belongs to a group of medicines called loop diuretics. A diuretic is a medicine which increases the amount of urine that you pass out from your kidneys. They are often referred to as ‘water tablets’. Furosemide is used to clear excess fluid from your body in conditions where your body retains more than it needs. This extra fluid causes you to feel breathless and tired, and your feet and ankles to swell – it is called water retention (oedema), and it is commonly caused by heart failure.

Diuretics are also a common treatment for high blood pressure (hypertension). Furosemide is prescribed for high blood pressure when it cannot be sufficiently controlled by other diuretics.

Furosemide can be used on its own as a diuretic, or it can be prescribed as a combination tablet alongside other diuretics such as triamterene, amiloride or spironolactone. It is sometimes prescribed as a combination tablet with a mineral salt called potassium.

Before taking furosemide

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking furosemide it is important that your doctor knows:

  • If you are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • If you have any difficulties passing urine, or if you have prostate problems.
  • If you have gout or sugar diabetes. These conditions can be made worse by diuretics.
  • If you have been told you have very low sodium or potassium levels in your blood.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.

How to take furosemide

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about furosemide and it will also provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you could experience from taking it.
  • Take furosemide exactly as your doctor tells you to. It is usual to be prescribed one dose to take each day, and you will be asked to take it preferably in the morning. Some people could be asked to take two doses a day, in which case one dose should be taken in the morning and the other early-mid afternoon. Your doctor will tell you how many tablets (or how much liquid medicine) to take for each dose. You will find the directions for taking the doses printed on the label of the pack, to remind you about what the doctor said to you.
  • Although furosemide is preferably taken in the morning, you can take it at a time to suit your schedule. For example, if you want to go out in the morning and don’t want to have to find a toilet, you can delay taking your dose until later. However, it is best if you take it no later than mid-afternoon. This is because you will find you need to go to the toilet a couple of times within a few hours of taking it and this will disturb your sleep if you take it too late in the day.
  • Swallow the tablet with a drink of water. You can take furosemide either with or without food.
  • If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is after 4 pm in the afternoon, you should leave out the forgotten dose and continue as usual the next day. Do not take two doses together to make up for a missed dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Try to keep your regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress. The balance of salts in your blood may be upset by furosemide. Your doctor may want you to have a blood test from time to time to check for this.
  • Diuretics like furosemide help you to lose water. Occasionally you may lose too much and become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Let your doctor know if you feel constantly thirsty and tired, your mouth is dry, you have muscle cramps, or your skin looks and feels dry.
  • If you have been prescribed furosemide for high blood pressure, your treatment is likely to be long-term. Although many people with high blood pressure do not feel unwell, if left untreated, high blood pressure can harm your heart and damage your blood vessels. This damage may later result in a heart attack, stroke, or kidney problems, so it is important that you continue to take furosemide regularly to help reduce the risk of this. You may also be given some lifestyle or dietary advice by your doctor, such as stopping smoking, reducing the amount of salt in your diet and taking some regular exercise. Following this advice will also help to reduce the risk of damage to your heart and blood vessels.
  • Drinking alcohol while you are on furosemide could make you feel dizzy. Ask for your doctor’s advice about whether you should avoid alcohol.
  • If you buy any medicines ‘over the counter’, check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take with your prescribed medicines.
  • If you have diabetes, furosemide could affect your blood sugar levels. Test your blood sugar regularly and speak with your doctor if you notice any significant changes.
  • If you are due to have an operation or dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Can furosemide cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the more common ones associated with furosemide. The best place to find a full list of the side-effects which can be associated with your medicine, is from the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet supplied with the medicine. Alternatively, you can find an example of a manufacturer’s information leaflet in the reference section below. Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Furosemide side-effects What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sick, stomach upset This is usually mild, but it may help to take furosemide after food
Feeling dizzy, particularly when you stand up (due to low blood pressure) Getting up and moving more slowly should help. Do not drive and do not use tools or machines while affected
Dry mouth Try chewing sugar-free gum or sucking sugar-free sweets
Blurred vision, headache, feeling tired If any of these become troublesome, speak with your doctor
Changes to the levels of minerals in your body Your doctor will ask you to have blood tests to check for this

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store furosemide

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine, ask your pharmacist.

Lasix

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 8/17/2018

Lasix (furosemide) is an anthranilic acid derivative that is used as a strong diuretic in adults and children to treat excessive fluid accumulation (edema) caused by congestive heart failure, liver failure, renal failure, and nephritic syndrome. Lasix may be used with antihypertensive drugs to control high blood pressure (hypertension). Lasix is available as a generic. Side effects of Lasix include:

  • increased urination,
  • thirst,
  • muscle cramps,
  • itching or rash,
  • weakness,
  • dizziness,
  • spinning sensation,
  • diarrhea,
  • stomach pain, and
  • constipation.

Serious side effects of Lasix include:

  • dehydration,
  • dark urine,
  • clay-colored stools,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • fever,
  • jaundice (yellowing of skin or eyes),
  • electrolyte abnormalities,
  • loss of appetite, and
  • rapid weight loss.

Lasix is available in tablet (20 to 80 mg) and IV forms. Dosage is determined by the patient’s physician and varies according to how much fluid and how fast the fluid should be removed. Patients with poor renal function usually require higher doses; doses in children are weight-based. Lasix may interact with sucralfate, cisplatin, cyclosporine, ethacrynic acid, lithium, methotrexate, phenytoin, antibiotics, heart or blood pressure medications, laxatives, salicylates such as aspirin, or steroids. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Lasix; it is unknown if it will harm a fetus. Lasix passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Lasix may also slow breast milk production. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Lasix Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Furosemide belongs to the class of medications called diuretics. It is used to treat edema (fluid retention) that occurs with congestive heart failure and disorders of the liver, kidney, and lung. It is also used to control mild to moderate high blood pressure. It may be used in combination with other medications to treat more severe high blood pressure.

Furosemide works by increasing the amount of urine produced and excreted, and by removing excessive water (edema) from the body. The tablet form begins to work within an hour of being taken and usually lasts for 4 to 6 hours. The injectable form begins to work within ½ hour and lasts approximately 2 hours.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Oral Solution
Each mL of clear, slightly yellowish solution with an orange odour, contains furosemide 10 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, butylated hydroxyanisol, butylated hydroxytoluene, glycerin, methylparaben, natural orange, polysorbate 80 non-animal, potassium sorbate, purified water, sodium hydroxide, and sorbitol.

Tablets

500 mg
Each tablet is yellow, round, one side double-scored. On the scored side are debossed the letters “D”, “L”, “X”. The other side of the tablet is debossed with the Hoechst “Tower and Bridge” logo. Each tablet contains 500 mg furosemide. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cellulose, corn starch, colloidal silicon dioxide, D&C Yellow No. 10, FD&C Yellow No. 6, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, sodium starch glycolate, and talc.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended adult starting dose for treating edema is 40 mg to 80 mg. If a satisfactory result occurs within 6 hours, the dose may be decreased or kept the same. If edema continues longer than 6 hours, the dose may be increased by 20 mg to 40 mg.

The recommended adult daily dose of furosemide ranges from 20 mg to 200 mg. Once the effective single dose has been determined, it may be taken 1 to 3 times a day.

When treating hypertension (high blood pressure), the dose of furosemide starts at 20 mg to 40 mg twice a day. Doses of 40 mg twice a day are generally considered the maximum dose to treat high blood pressure. If blood pressure hasn’t been reduced enough with this dose, other medications may be added to further reduce blood pressure.

For children, the dose of furosemide used is based on body weight. The recommended dose is up to 2 mg per kilogram of body weight each day, divided into 2 to 4 equal doses.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones above, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take furosemide if you:

  • are allergic to furosemide or any ingredients of the medication
  • are allergic to sulfonamide medications
  • are an infant suffering from certain diseases (e.g., Rh incompatibility, familial non-hemolytic jaundice)
  • are breast-feeding
  • are jaundiced (have yellowing of the skin and eye pigments), especially newborn infants
  • are suffering from dehydration
  • have complete kidney shutdown
  • have extremely low blood levels of sodium or potassium
  • have hepatic coma or precoma
  • have low blood pressure

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • blurred vision
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position
  • increased sensitivity of skin to sunlight
  • loss of appetite
  • vomiting

Although most of these side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • difficulty concentrating
  • muscle spasms (particularly in small children)
  • painful or difficult urination
  • ringing or buzzing in ears or any loss of hearing
  • signs of dehydration (e.g., confusion, dry mouth, thirst, muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting)
  • signs of liver problems (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools)
  • skin rash or hives and itching
  • symptoms of high blood sugar (e.g., frequent urination, increased thirst, excessive eating, unexplained weight loss, poor wound healing, infections, fruity breath odour)
  • unusual infections (fever or chills, severe diarrhea, shortness of breath, prolonged dizziness, headache, stiff neck, weight loss, or listlessness)

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • signs of a blood clot in blood vessels, such as sudden vision change or dizziness, chest pain, pain and swelling in one leg muscle
  • signs of decreased kidney function (e.g., trouble breathing, swelling, fast or irregular heartbeat, confusion, decreased urination, decreased appetite)
  • signs of pancreatitis (e.g., abdominal pain on the upper left side, back pain, nausea, fever, chills, rapid heartbeat, swollen abdomen)
  • signs of a serious allergic reaction (i.e., abdominal cramps, difficulty breathing, nausea and vomiting, or swelling of the face and throat)
  • signs of a severe skin reaction (i.e., rash, blisters, or red splotches on skin, blisters in mouth, eyes, ears, nose, eye irritation, swelling of eyelids, and flu-like symptoms)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Dehydration: Furosemide is a potent diuretic (water pill) which, if given in excessive amounts, can lead to large amounts of urination resulting in dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration include dry mouth, thirst, decreased urination, reduced tearing, and reduced sweating. Make sure you are drinking an adequate amount of water to prevent these symptoms. You may wish to discuss with your doctor what an appropriate fluid intake is for you.

Dementia: Studies have shown that when furosemide is taken with risperidone by people who are over 61 years of age there is an increased rate of death. The combination of these two medications should be avoided.

Diabetes: Furosemide may reduce blood sugar control for people with diabetes. If you have diabetes or are at risk for developing diabetes, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. You may be advised to increase the number of blood glucose checks that you do each day.

Drowsiness/reduced alertness: When you first start taking furosemide, it may cause drowsiness or dizziness, affecting your ability to drive or operate machinery. Avoid these and other hazardous tasks until you have determined how this medication affects you.

Fluid and electrolyte balance: This medication can affect the levels of electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, magnesium, chloride, and calcium. Your doctor will periodically check to see if these are in balance. Warning signs or symptoms of fluid and electrolyte imbalance include:

  • confusion
  • drowsiness
  • dryness of mouth
  • lethargy
  • low blood pressure
  • muscle pains or cramps
  • muscular fatigue
  • nausea and vomiting
  • racing heartbeat
  • restlessness
  • seizures
  • thirst
  • weakness

During long-term treatment with furosemide, a high-potassium diet is recommended. You may also require potassium supplements. Your doctor will monitor your potassium levels through occasional blood tests.

Gout: An acute gout attack may occur in some patients taking furosemide. Symptoms of an acute gout attack include sudden pain, swelling, and stiffness in the affected joint, often the big toe. You may also experience a fever. If this is your first attack, seek medical attention as soon as possible. If you have had gout attacks before, follow your doctor’s instructions for dealing with the attack.

Kidney function: This medication works directly on the kidneys and may cause decreased kidney function over time. Kidney disease or reduced kidney function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects. If you have reduced kidney function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Liver function: If you have liver disease or reduced liver function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Sulfa medications: Furosemide is a sulfonamide derivative. Some people who are allergic to sulfonamides (such as sulpha antibiotics) also experience allergic reactions to furosemide. Before you take furosemide, inform your doctor about any previous adverse reactions you have had to medications, especially to other water pills or sulpha antibiotics. Contact your doctor at once if you experience signs of an allergic reaction, such as skin rash, itching, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face and throat.

Pregnancy: The effect of taking furosemide on the unborn baby during pregnancy is unknown. This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: Furosemide passes into breast milk and may also partially reduce the amount of breast milk produced. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking furosemide, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Seniors: Seniors may be more likely to experience increased side effects from furosemide.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between furosemide and any of the following:

  • angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., lisinopril, enalapril, fosinopril)
  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • alfuzosin
  • aliskiren
  • allopurinol
  • amifostine
  • aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin)
  • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine)
  • angiotensin II receptor antagonists (e.g., irbesartan, losartan)
  • antiseizure medication (e.g., carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topirimate)
  • beta2-agonists (e.g., formoterol, salbutamol, salmeterol)
  • chloral hydrate
  • cholestyramine
  • cisplatin
  • colestipol
  • corticosteroids (e.g., hydrocortisone, prednisone)
  • cyclosporine
  • diabetes medications (e.g., glyburide, rosiglitazone)
  • digoxin
  • inhaled corticosteroids (e.g., budesonide, fluticasone)
  • licorice
  • lithium
  • medications that reduce blood pressure
  • methotrexate
  • methylphenidate
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs; e.g., moclobemide, phenelzine, rasgiline, tranylcypromine)
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs; e.g., ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen)
  • pentoxifylline
  • phenytoin
  • phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)
  • probenecid
  • risperidone
  • rituximab
  • sucralfate
  • yohimbine

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than the ones listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications that you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Lasix

Lasix Side Effects

Generic Name: furosemide

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 31, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about furosemide. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Lasix.

For the Consumer

Applies to furosemide: oral solution, oral tablet

Other dosage forms:

  • injection solution

Warning

Oral route (Tablet)

Furosemide is a potent diuretic which, if given in excessive amounts, can lead to a profound diuresis with water and electrolyte depletion. Therefore, careful medical supervision is required and dose and dosage interval must be adjusted to the individual patient’s needs.

Along with its needed effects, furosemide (the active ingredient contained in Lasix) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking furosemide:

Rare

  • Chest pain
  • chills
  • cough or hoarseness
  • fever
  • general feeling of tiredness or weakness
  • headache
  • lower back or side pain
  • painful or difficult urination
  • shortness of breath
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • swollen or painful glands
  • tightness in the chest
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • wheezing

Incidence not known

  • Back or leg pains
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • bloating
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • blurred vision
  • burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings
  • changes in skin color, pain, tenderness, or swelling of the foot or leg
  • clay-colored stools
  • cloudy urine
  • cold sweats
  • confusion
  • constipation
  • continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
  • coughing up blood
  • cracks in the skin
  • darkened urine
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position
  • dry mouth
  • fast heartbeat
  • flushed, dry skin
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • greatly decreased frequency of urination or amount of urine
  • hearing loss
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • indigestion
  • itching
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea or vomiting
  • nosebleeds
  • pain in the joints or muscles
  • pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  • pale skin
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • red, irritated eyes
  • red, swollen skin
  • skin rash
  • spots on your skin resembling a blister or pimple
  • sweating
  • swelling of the feet or lower legs
  • trouble breathing with exertion
  • unusual weight loss
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes or skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking furosemide:

Symptoms of overdose

  • Decreased urination
  • drowsiness
  • increase in heart rate
  • irregular heartbeat
  • irritability
  • mood changes
  • muscle cramps
  • numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the hands, feet, or lips
  • rapid breathing
  • seizures
  • sunken eyes
  • thirst
  • trembling
  • weak pulse
  • weakness and heaviness of the legs
  • wrinkled skin

Some side effects of furosemide may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known

  • Feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
  • hives or welts
  • increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight
  • muscle spasm
  • redness or other discoloration of the skin
  • restlessness
  • sensation of spinning
  • severe sunburn
  • weakness

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to furosemide: compounding powder, injectable solution, intravenous solution, oral liquid, oral solution, oral tablet

Metabolic

Common (1% to 10%): Hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hypokalemia, blood cholesterol increased, blood uric acid increased, gout

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Thirst, glucose tolerance decreased

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Anorexia, serum triglycerides increased

Frequency not reported: Hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, hypovolemia, dehydration, tetany, serum potassium decreased, Pseudo-Bartter syndrome, electrolyte disturbances, serum calcium decreased

Hematologic

Common (1% to 10%): Hemoconcentration

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Thrombocytopenia

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Eosinophilia, leukopenia, bone marrow depression

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis

Frequency not reported: Anemia, thrombophilia

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Urine volume increased

Frequency not reported: Glycosuria, bladder spasm, urinary retention, urinary incontinence

Dermatologic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Lyell’s syndrome and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms

Frequency not reported: Toxic epidermal necrolysis, bullous pemphigoid, sweating

Gastrointestinal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dry mouth, nausea, bowel motility disturbances, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation

Rare (less than 0.1%): Gastric distress, acute pancreatitis

Frequency not reported: Pancreatitis, oral and gastric irritation, cramping

Renal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Blood creatinine increased, urea increased

Rare (less than 0.1%): Interstitial nephritis, acute renal failure

Frequency not reported: Nephrocalcinosis in premature infants, nephrolithiasis in premature infants, GFR decreased, tubulointerstitial nephritis

Other

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Deafness, fatigue

Rare (less than 0.1%): Sensation of pressure in the head, dysacusis, asthenia, fever, febrile conditions, malaise

Frequency not reported: Weakness, sudden death, hearing disorders, hearing loss, paradoxical swelling

Cardiovascular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Cardiac arrhythmia

Rare (less than 0.1%): Vasculitis

Frequency not reported: Systemic vasculitis, necrotizing angiitis, orthostatic hypotension, thrombophlebitis, acute hypotension, circulatory collapse, persistent patent ductus arteriosus during the first few weeks of life in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, blood pressure decreased, shock, hypotension, thrombosis, orthostatic blood pressure decreased

Ocular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Visual disturbance

Rare (less than 0.1%): Myopia aggravated, blurred vision

Frequency not reported: Blurred vision, xanthopsia

Nervous system

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Paresthesia, vertigo, dizziness, sleepiness, tinnitus, hyperosmolar coma

Frequency not reported: Hepatic encephalopathy, headache, fainting and loss of consciousness, drowsiness, lethargy, sweet taste

Musculoskeletal

Rare (less than 0.1%): Lupus erythematosus activation or exacerbation, leg muscle cramps, chronic arthritis

Frequency not reported: Muscle spasm, rhabdomyolysis

Immunologic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Severe anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions

Frequency not reported: Allergic reactions

Hepatic

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Jaundice, hepatic ischemia, liver enzymes increased

Frequency not reported: Abnormal hepatic function, cholestasis, bile flow increased, biliary tree distended

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Restlessness, psychiatric disorder, apathy

1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

3. “Product Information. Lasix (furosemide).” sanofi-aventis , Bridgewater, NJ.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

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Medical Disclaimer

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Furosemide

Before taking furosemide,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to furosemide, sulfonamide medications, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in furosemide tablets or solution. Ask your pharmacist or check the patient information for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: aminoglycoside antibiotics such as amikacin, gentamicin (Garamycin), or tobramycin (Bethkis, Tobi); angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Prinzide, in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc, in Uniretic), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril, in Accuretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARB) such as azilsartan (Edarbi, Edarbyclor), candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten, in Teveten HCT), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, Benicar HCT), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT), and valsartan (Diovan, in Diovan HCT, Exforge); aspirin and other salicylates; barbiturates such as phenobarbital and secobarbital (Seconal); corticosteroids such as betamethasone (Celestone), budesonide (Entocort), cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexpak, Dexasone, others), fludrocortisone (Floriner), hydrocortisone (Cortef, Hydrocortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol, Meprolone, others), prednisolone (Prelone, others), prednisone (Deltasone, Meticorten, Sterapred, others), and triamcinolone (Aristocort, Azmacort); cisplatin (Platinol); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (Lanoxin), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin); indomethacin (Indocin); laxatives; lithium (Lithobid); medications for diabetes, high blood pressure and pain; methotrexate (Trexall); probenecid (Probalan, Probenemid); and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • if you are taking sucralfate (Carafate), take it 2 hours before or after you take furosemide.
  • tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor may tell you not to take furosemide.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any condition that stops your bladder from emptying completely, diabetes, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a chronic inflammatory condition), or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Do not breast-feed while taking this medicine. If you become pregnant while taking furosemide, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, tell the doctor that you are using furosemide.
  • plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Furosemide may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.
  • you should know that furosemide may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. This is more common when you first start taking furosemide. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up. Alcohol can add to these side effects.

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