Side effects of iron

Multivitamin With Iron

Use this medicine as directed on the label, or as your doctor has prescribed. Do not use the medicine in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of multivitamins with iron. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamins with iron. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

You may take the medicine with food if it upsets your stomach.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in the mouth before swallowing.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Liquid or powder multivitamin may sometimes be mixed with water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Follow the mixing directions on the medicine label.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release capsule or tablet. Swallow it whole.

It is important to take multivitamins with iron regularly to get the most benefit.

Store in the original container at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid to freeze.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc.

Latest Update: 11/9/2018, Version: 3.07

Interactions


Antibiotics

Mixing medicines

Some of the medicines you may need to avoid, or seek advice on, while taking an antibiotic include:

It’s usually recommended that you avoid taking penicillin at the same time as methotrexate, which is used to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and some forms of cancer. This is because combining the 2 medications can cause a range of unpleasant and sometimes serious side effects.

However, some forms of penicillin, such as amoxicillin, can be used in combination with methotrexate.

You may experience a skin rash if you take penicillin and allopurinol, which is used to treat gout.

Cephalosporins may increase the chance of bleeding if you’re taking blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants) such as heparin and warfarin.

If you need treatment with cephalosporins, you may need to have your dose of anticoagulants changed or additional blood monitoring.

The risk of damage to your kidneys and hearing is increased if you’re taking 1 or more of the following medications:

  • antifungals – used to treat fungal infections
  • cyclosporin – used to treat autoimmune conditions such as Crohn’s disease and given to people who have had an organ transplant
  • diuretics – used to remove water from the body
  • muscle relaxants

The risk of kidney and hearing damage has to be balanced against the benefits of using aminoglycosides to treat life-threatening conditions such as septicaemia.

In hospital, blood levels are carefully monitored to ensure there’s a safe amount of the antibiotic in the blood.

These side effects do not happen with aminoglycoside creams and eardrops if they’re used properly.

Tetracyclines

Check with your GP or pharmacist before taking a tetracycline if you’re currently taking:

  • vitamin A supplements
  • retinoids – such as acitretin, isotretinoin and tretinoin, which are used to treat severe acne
  • blood-thinning medication
  • diuretics
  • kaolin-pectin and bismuth subsalicylate – used to treat diarrhoea
  • medicines to treat diabetes – such as insulin
  • atovaquone – used to treat pneumonia
  • antacids – used to treat indigestion and heartburn
  • sucralfate – used to treat ulcers
  • lithium – used to treat bipolar disorder and severe depression
  • digoxin – used to treat heart rhythm disorders
  • methotrexate
  • strontium ranelate – used to treat osteoporosis
  • colestipol or colestyramine – used to treat high cholesterol
  • ergotamine and methysergide – used to treat migraines

Do not take a macrolide antibiotic with any of the following medications unless directly instructed to by your GP, as the combination could cause heart problems:

  • terfenadine, astemizole and mizolastine – these are all antihistamines used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever
  • amisulpride – used to treat episodes of psychosis
  • tolterodine – used to treat urinary incontinence
  • statins – used to treat high cholesterol

Check with your GP or pharmacist before taking a fluoroquinolone if you’re currently taking:

  • theophylline – used to treat asthma; also found in some cough and cold medicines
  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) painkillers – such as ibuprofen
  • ciclosporin
  • probenecid – used to treat gout
  • clozapine – used to treat schizophrenia
  • ropinirole – used to treat Parkinson’s disease
  • tizanadine – used to treat muscle spasms
  • glibenclamide – used to treat diabetes
  • cisapride – used to treat indigestion, heartburn, vomiting or nausea
  • tricyclic antidepressants – such as amitriptyline
  • steroids (corticosteroids) – such as prednisolone)

Some fluoroquinolones can intensify the effects of caffeine (a stimulant found in coffee, tea and cola), which can make you feel irritable, restless and cause problems falling asleep (insomnia).

You may need to avoid taking medication that contains high levels of minerals or iron, as this can block the beneficial effects of fluoroquinolones. This includes:

  • antacids
  • zinc supplements
  • some types of multivitamin supplements

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When you take prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, do you take also a vitamin, mineral, or other dietary supplements? Have you considered whether there is any danger in mixing medications and dietary supplements?

There could be, says Robert Mozersky, a medical officer at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “Some dietary supplements may increase the effect of your medication, and other dietary supplements may decrease it,” he says.

Certain dietary supplements can change absorption, metabolism, or excretion of a medication and therefore affect its potency. “You may be getting either too much or too little of a medication you need,” Mozersky warns.

Consequently, combining dietary supplements and medications could have dangerous and even life-threatening effects. For example, drugs for HIV/AIDS, heart disease, depression, treatments for organ transplants, and birth control pills are less effective when taken with St. John’s Wort, an herbal supplement. Depending on the medication involved, the results can be serious.

In addition, warfarin (a prescription blood thinner), ginkgo biloba (an herbal supplement), aspirin and vitamin E (a supplement) can each thin the blood. Taking any of these products together may increase the potential for internal bleeding or stroke.

Dietary supplements are widely used and include vitamins, minerals, and other less familiar substances—such as herbals, botanicals, amino acids, and enzymes. The 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 34% of participants—representing some 72 million people in the United States—were taking some kind of dietary supplement along with a prescription medication. While many people take supplements to ensure an adequate intake of essential nutrients, dietary supplements should not be used as a substitute for eating the variety of foods that makes up a healthy diet.

Some consumers may believe that a so-called “natural” product, such as an herbal supplement or fish oil, can’t hurt them. Mozersky disagrees. “Natural does not always mean safe,” he says. For example, many weight loss products claim to be “all-natural” or “herbal,” but their ingredients may interact with medications or may be dangerous for people with certain medical conditions.

Children, in particular, could be harmed by taking both supplements and medicines. “Parents should know that children’s metabolisms are so unique, that at different ages they metabolize substances at different rates. For kids, ingesting dietary supplements together with other medications make adverse events a real possibility,” Mozersky says.

If you’re planning a surgery, be aware that some dietary supplements can interact in a harmful way with medications you need to take before, after, or during that surgery. Your health care professional may ask you to stop taking dietary supplements two or three weeks before the procedure to avoid potentially dangerous changes in heart rate, blood pressure, or bleeding risk.

And if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, you’ll want to discuss any dietary supplements with your health care professional.

What is FDA’s Role?

Although FDA has oversight of the dietary supplement industry, it is the supplement manufacturers and distributors that are responsible for making sure their products are safe before they’re marketed. Manufacturers are required to produce dietary supplements that meet minimum quality standards, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled.

FDA does not review supplements for effectiveness (as it does for prescription and OTC medications) before they enter the market. If the dietary supplement contains a new dietary ingredient, the manufacturer must submit for FDA’s review data on that ingredient’s safety—but not its effectiveness.

FDA takes enforcement actions against manufacturers if their products are found to be unsafe, adulterated and/or misbranded (for example, if their labeling is false or misleading) or if products marketed as dietary supplements are making claims to diagnose, mitigate, treat, cure, or prevent a disease.

Tips to Keep in Mind

Thinking about taking dietary supplements?

“The bottom line is, before you take any dietary supplement or medication—over-the-counter or prescription—discuss it with your health care professional,” Mozersky says. Remember these tips:

  • Every time you visit a health care professional’s office, bring a list of all the dietary supplements and medications you are currently taking. Include the dosages and how many times a day you take them. Some people find it easiest to throw all their dietary supplements and medications in a bag to bring to the medical visit.
  • If you’re thinking of adding a dietary supplement to your daily routine, call your health care professional first, and let him or her know what other supplements and medications you’re taking.
  • Also tell your health care professional if your health status has changed, particularly if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or have had any recent illnesses or surgery.

Mixing Vitamin C With Antibiotics Is Surprisingly Effective at Killing Off Cancer Stem Cells

Scientists have developed an unusual new way to fight cancer stem cells (CSCs) – combining antibiotics with vitamin C. Not only could the compound help treat tumours, it could also reduce the chance of the cancer returning.

Therapies mixing doxycycline and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) were up to 100 times more effective at killing off CSCs in the lab when compared with another anti-cancer agent being tested, 2-Deoxy-D-glucose.

The new study actually builds on previous work by the same team from the University of Salford in the UK, which looked at how vitamin C could be used to kill off CSCs by stopping cell mitochondria (the cell’s main engine rooms) from producing energy.

First the antibiotic stops the cancerous cells from switching between different types of energy source to stay alive, forcing them to rely solely on glucose. In technical terms, it makes the cells metabolically inflexible, and it’s enough to kill some cancer cells on its own.

It doesn’t take all of them though, and scientists think this is why certain tumours become drug-resistant – they switch to an alternative source of nutrients to keep growing in the body.

With that restriction in place, the vitamin C then comes in and acts as a “second punch”, removing the source of that glucose and effectively starving the CSCs to death.

“In this scenario, vitamin C behaves as an inhibitor of glycolysis, which fuels energy production in mitochondria, the ‘powerhouse’ of the cell,” says one of the team, Federica Sotgia.

As both doxycycline and vitamin C are non-toxic, the hope is that treatments can be developed with minimal side effects.

Though it’s important to note this research only uses laboratory tests, and we’ve yet to see it work in animals or humans, so definitely don’t attempt to recreate this at home.

The study also focusses exclusively on breast cancer cells, so we don’t yet know how it would work with other types of the disease.

Still, this is promising stuff, especially as it involves cancer stem cells – these types of cells are thought to be the main agents behind tumours growing and returning, and could also play a role in blocking traditional drug treatments.

Our regular stem cells can turn into any other cell type in the body, helping to sustain our natural growth and biological functions, and the current hypothesis is that maybe CSCs do the same for tumours. If we can knock out those CSCs, we can strike at the heart of cancer.

The next step in finding out is going to be trials on cancer cells in animals and humans.

“This is further evidence that vitamin C and other non-toxic compounds may have a role to play in the fight against cancer,” explains one of the team, Michael Lisanti.

“Our results indicate it is a promising agent for clinical trials, and as an add-on to more conventional therapies, to prevent tumour recurrence, further disease progression and metastasis.”

The findings have been published in Oncotarget.

There is relief for side effects of iron supplements

The Medicine Cabinet – Ask the Harvard Experts

By Howard LeWine, M.D.

Q: I have anemia and need to take an iron supplement, but it’s making me very constipated. Any suggestions?

A: Iron is hard on the digestive tract. Constipation is the most common side effect, but iron supplements can also cause nausea, indigestion, gas and bloating. The cause of the constipation is the iron itself, not any added ingredient.

If you have constipation from iron, one excellent solution is to ask your doctor for a liquid form of iron supplement, such as the brand Feosol. You can then experiment by gradually lowering your dose until you get to a level that does not cause you constipation.

You can also vary the amount of iron in your pill dose by changing the type of iron salt you’re taking. Iron is paired up as a salt with a variety of other ingredients. If you take 300 milligrams (mg) of ferrous sulfate, you’ll get 60 mg of iron within each dose. If you take 300 mg of ferrous gluconate, you’ll only have 34 mg of iron in each dose. The ferrous gluconate dose is less constipating for many people. The trade-off is that it replaces your iron more slowly.

You may notice that you have less constipation if you take your iron supplement with food. This is generally not recommended, though, because you won’t absorb as much of your iron dose if you take it with your meal.

Slow-release forms of iron may be less constipating, but they have their downside. The very first part of your intestine (the duodenum and the first part of your jejunum) is where iron is absorbed best. A slowly releasing iron pill can travel past this area before releasing iron, so that you don’t ever have a chance to absorb it.

To avoid constipation, drink plenty of fluids and try to be more physically active. If you need fiber, go with dietary changes before supplements. Eat more whole grain foods and vegetables such as carrots, cucumbers, zucchini and celery. Take it slow, since these foods often increase intestinal gas.

Fiber supplements are safe; generic brands can save you some money. Start with low doses, since these products also increase gas.

If you’re already very constipated, adding more fiber may temporarily make things worse. Best to call your doctor’s office for advice.

(Howard LeWine, M.D., is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.)

(For additional consumer health information, please visit www.health.harvard.edu.)

Propan Side Effects

1. Bernstein E, Diskant BM “Phenylpropanolamine: a potentially hazardous drug.” Ann Emerg Med 11 (1982): 311-5

2. O’Connell MB, Gross CR “The effect of multiple doses of phenylpropanolamine on the blood pressure of patients whose hypertension was controlled with beta blockers.” Pharmacotherapy 11 (1991): 376-81

4. O’Connell MB, Gross CR “The effect of single-dose phenylpropanolamine on blood pressure in patients with hypertension controlled by beta blockers.” Pharmacotherapy 10 (1990): 85-91

5. Howrie DL, Wolfson JH “Phenylpropanolamine-induced hypertensive seizures.” J Pediatr 102 (1983): 143-5

7. Lake CR, Zaloga G, Bray J, Rosenberg D, Chernow B “Transient hypertension after two phenylpropanolamine diet aids and the effects of caffeine: a placebo-controlled follow-up study.” Am J Med 86 (1989): 427-32

8. Horowitz JD, Lang WJ, Howes LG, Fennessy MR, Christophidis N, Rand MJ, Louis WJ “Hypertensive responses induced by phenylpropanolamine in anorectic and decongestant preparations.” Lancet 1 (1980): 60-1

9. Chin C, Choy M “Cardiomyopathy induced by phenylpropanolamine.” J Pediatr 123 (1993): 825-7

10. Clark JE, Simon WA “Cardiac arrhythmias after phenylpropanolamine ingestion.” Drug Intell Clin Pharm 17 (1983): 737-8

11. Noble R “A controlled clinical trial of the cardiovascular and psychological effects of phenylpropanolamine and caffeine.” Drug Intell Clin Pharm 22 (1988): 296-9

13. Kroenke K, Omori DM, Simmons JO, Wood DR, Meier NJ “The safety of phenylpropanolamine in patients with stable hypertension.” Ann Intern Med 111 (1989): 1043-4

14. Mueller SM “Neurologic complications of phenylpropanolamine use.” Neurology 33 (1983): 650-2

15. Pentel PR, Mikell FL, Zavoral JH “Myocardial injury after phenylpropanolamine ingestion.” Br Heart J 47 (1982): 51-4

17. Maher LM, Peterson PL, Dela-Cruz C “Postpartum intracranial hemorrhage and phenylpropanolamine use” Neurology 37 (1987): 1686

18. Grieger TA, Clayton AH, Goyer PF “Affective disorder following use of phenylpropanolamine” Am J Psychiatry 147 (1990): 367-8

20. Elliott CF, Whyte JC “Phenylpropanolamine and hypertension.” Med J Aust 1 (1981): 715

21. Kizer KW “Intracranial hemorrhage associated with overdose of decongestant containing phenylpropanolamine” Am J Emerg Med 2 (1984): 180-1

22. Achor MB, Extein I “Diet aids, mania, and affective illness” Am J Psychiatry 138 (1981): 392

23. Johnson DA, Etter HS, Reeves DM “Stroke and phenylpropanolamine use” Lancet 2 (1983): 970

24. Dietz AJ, Jr “Amphetamine-like reactions to phenylpropanolamine.” JAMA 245 (1981): 601-2

25. Norvenius G, Widerlov E, Lonnerholm G “Phenylpropanolamine and mental disturbances” Lancet 2 (1979): 1367-8

26. Schaffer CB, Pauli MW “Psychotic reaction caused by proprietary oral diet agents.” Am J Psychiatry 137 (1980): 1256-7

28. Lake CR, Tenglin R, Chernow B, Holloway HC “Psychomotor stimulant-induced mania in a genetically predisposed patient: a review of the literature and report of a case.” J Clin Psychopharmacol 3 (1983): 97-100

29. Kikta DG, Devereaux MW, Chandar K “Intracranial hemorrhages due to phenylpropanolamine.” Stroke 16 (1985): 510-2

31. Marshall RD, Douglas CJ “Phenylpropanolamine-induced psychosis: potential predisposing factors.” Gen Hosp Psychiatry 16 (1994): 358-60

32. Stroe AE, Hall J, Amin F “Psychotic episode related to phenylpropanolamine and amantadine in a healthy female.” Gen Hosp Psychiatry 17 (1995): 457-8

33. Speer F, Carrasco LC, Kimura CC “Allergy to phenylpropanolamine.” Ann Allergy 40 (1978): 32-4

34. Neveus T, Tuvemo T, Lackgren G, Stenberg A “Bladder capacity and renal concentrating ability in enuresis: Pathogenic implications.” J Urol 165 (2001): 2022-5

35. Singer DR, Simpson JG, Catto GR, Johnston AW “Drug hypersensitivity causing granulomatous interstitial nephritis.” Am J Kidney Dis 11 (1988): 357-9

36. Swenson RD, Golper TA, Bennett WM “Acute renal failure and rhabdomyolysis after ingestion of phenylpropanolamine-containing diet pills.” JAMA 248 (1982): 1216

Centrum® Liquid

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

◊ Statistical information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

+ Not a replacement for cholesterol-lowering drugs.

++ Based on number of nutrients compared to prior formulation.

†† Supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease

† Applies to all Centrum products except Flavor Burst and Centrum Liquid.

** Refers to Vitamins C, E, and Beta-Carotene.

ϵ Antioxidants including Beta-Carotene, Vitamins C & E, Selenium, Zinc and Manganese help fight free radicals*

2 Based upon doctor recommendations and sales.

§ B-Vitamins help support heart health.*

° Zinc and B-Vitamins help support normal brain function.*

‡ Vitamins A, C, and E, and Lutein help support healthy eyes. This product is not intended to provide daily intake of Lutein. Take with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

¥ B-Vitamins support daily energy needs.*

^ Vitamins C and E support normal immune function.*

v Vitamin C, Zinc, Selenium and Copper

± B-vitamins aid in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins.*

µ Based on number of nutrients; Among leading Women / Men 50+ multivitamin brands.

” Among leading gummy multivitamins.

∇∆ Refers to Copper, Manganese and Zinc.

> Biotin, Vitamins A, C, and E help maintain healthy appearance.*

< Vitamins D and B6 help support muscle function.*

♦ A combination of Vitamin D and calcium helps maintain strong bones*

• B-Vitamins help support heart health, brain health, energy and metabolism. Vitamins A, C, E and zinc help support normal immune function and healthy eyes. Calcium and vitamin D help support bone health.* Adequate calcium and vitamin D are necessary for bone health. Centrum® MultiGummies® and Centrum® VitaMints® do not contain calcium. Take with a calcium-rich diet.

~ Non-GMO applies to Centrum® and Centrum® Silver® tablets only. To learn more about our non-GMO standard, click here.

∞ Includes 11 nutrients to support whole body health including B-vitamins to support heart health, zinc and B-vitamins to support normal brain function, and Vitamins A, C, and E to support healthy eyes.* Not a replacement for cholesterol-lowering drugs.

∆ A combination of 12 nutrients helps support whole body health including Biotin, Vitamins A, C and E to help maintain healthy appearance.*

0 Based on women 50 years of age and older and/or based on men 50 years of age and older.

τ BB-12® is a trademark of Chr. Hansen A/S

ϒ If you have chronic digestive issues or other medical conditions please consult with your doctor to determine the best regimen for you

Multivitamin with iron

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Jan 16, 2020 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is multivitamins with iron?

Multivitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Iron is normally found in foods like red meat. In the body, iron becomes a part of your hemoglobin (HEEM o glo bin) and myoglobin (MY o glo bin). Hemoglobin carries oxygen through your blood to tissues and organs. Myoglobin helps your muscle cells store oxygen.

Multivitamins with iron are used to provide vitamins and iron that are not taken in through the diet. They are also used to treat iron or vitamin deficiencies caused by illness, pregnancy, poor nutrition, digestive disorders, and many other conditions.

Multivitamin and iron may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamins with iron.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of multivitamin with iron. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms if you take too much.

Before taking this medicine

Iron and certain vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medicine than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take a multivitamins with iron if you have other medical conditions.

Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are pregnant. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women.

Your dose needs may also be different while you are nursing. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking multivitamins with iron?

Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamins with iron. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid taking an antibiotic medicine within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamins with iron. This is especially important if you are taking an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin norfloxacin, doxycycline, minocycline, tetracycline, and others.

Certain foods can also make it harder for your body to absorb iron. Avoid taking this multivitamin within 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating fish, meat, liver, and whole grain or “fortified” breads or cereals.

Do not take multivitamin with iron with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin.

Multivitamins with iron side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, multivitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects.

Call your doctor if you have:

  • bright red blood in your stools; or

  • pain in your chest or throat when swallowing a tablet.

Common side effects may include:

  • constipation, diarrhea;

  • nausea, vomiting, heartburn;

  • stomach pain, upset stomach;

  • black or dark-colored stools or urine;

  • temporary staining of the teeth;

  • headache; or

  • unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Multivitamin with iron dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Anemia:

Tablets or capsules:
1 tablet orally once daily or as indicated by individual product directions.
Oral liquid:
5 to 15 mL orally once daily or as indicated by individual product directions.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anemia:

Tablets:
1 tablet orally once daily or as indicated by the individual product directions.
Drops:
0.5 to 1 mL orally once daily or as indicated by the individual product directions.
Oral liquid (100 mg elemental iron):
>= 12 yrs:
5 to 10 mL orally once daily or as indicated by the individual product directions.

What other drugs will affect multivitamins with iron?

Other drugs may interact with multivitamins with iron, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.07.

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More about multivitamin with iron

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  • Drug class: iron products

Consumer resources

  • Cyanocobalamin, Folic Acid, Iron, and Vitamin C
  • Cyanocobalamin/Folic Acid/Iron
  • Ferrous Fumarate, Polysaccharide Iron Complex, Vitamin C, and Vitamin B3
  • Iron, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, and Vitamin B3
  • Iron, Succinic Acid, Vitamin C, Folic Acid, and Vitamin B12
  • … +12 more

Other brands: Integra, Iron-150, Ferocon, Poly-Vi-Sol with Iron, … +21 more

Professional resources

  • Polysaccharide-Iron Complex, Vitamin B12, and Folic Acid (Wolters Kluwer)

Related treatment guides

  • Anemia
  • Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency

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