Side effects of hyoscyamine

What is Hyoscyamine?

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

    For anisotropine

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—50 milligrams (mg) three times per day. Your doctor may adjust the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For atropine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers, intestine problems, or urinary problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—300 to 1200 micrograms (mcg) every 4 to 6 hours.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 10 mcg per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 4 to 6 hours. However, the dose will not be more than 400 mcg every 4 to 6 hours.
  • For injectable dosage form:
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—400 to 600 micrograms (mcg) injected into a muscle, vein, or under the skin every 4 to 6 hours.
      • Children—The dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 10 mcg per kilogram (kg) of body weight injected under the skin every 4 to 6 hours. However, the dose will not be more than 400 mcg every 4 to 6 hours.
    • To treat heart problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—400 to 1000 micrograms (mcg) injected into a vein every 1 to 2 hours as needed. The total dose will not be more than 2 milligrams (mg).
      • Children—The dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 10 to 30 mcg per kilogram (kg) of body weight injected into a vein.

    For belladonna

  • For oral dosage form (oral solution):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—180 to 300 micrograms (mcg) three or four times a day. The dose should be taken 30 to 60 minutes before meals and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—The dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 9 mcg per kilogram (kg) (4 mcg per pound) of body weight three or four times a day.

    For clidinium

  • For oral dosage form (capsules):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—2.5 to 5 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day. The dose should be taken before meals and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For dicyclomine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, syrup, tablets):
    • To treat intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—20 milligrams (mg) four times per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 160 mg per day.
      • Children and infants—Use is not recommended.
      • Infants younger than 6 months of age—Avoid use; use is contraindicated.
  • For injectable dosage form (intramuscular only):
    • To treat intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—10 to 20 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle four times per day.
      • Children and infants—Use is not recommended.
      • Infants younger than 6 months of age—Avoid use; use is contraindicated.

    For glycopyrrolate

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—To start, 1 to 2 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day. Some people may also take 2 mg at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed. However, your dose will not be more than 8 mg a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injectable dosage form:
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—100 to 200 micrograms (mcg) injected into a muscle or vein. The dose may be repeated every four hours up to four times a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For homatropine

  • For oral dosage form:
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—5 to 10 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For hyoscyamine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, elixir, oral solution, tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers, intestine problems, or urinary problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—125 to 500 micrograms (mcg) four to six times a day. Some people may take 375 mcg two times a day. The tablets should be taken 30 to 60 minutes before meals. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 12.5 to 187 mcg every four hours if needed.
  • For injectable dosage form:
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—250 to 500 mcg injected into a muscle, vein, or under the skin every four to six hours.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For mepenzolate

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—25 to 50 milligrams (mg) four times a day, with meals and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For methantheline

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat intestine or stomach ulcers, intestine problems, or urinary problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—50 to 100 milligrams (mg) every six hours. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children 1 year of age and older—12.5 to 50 mg four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children 1 month to 1 year of age—12.5 mg four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children up to 1 month of age—12.5 mg two times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.

    For methscopolamine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—2.5 to 5 milligrams (mg) four times a day, one-half hour before meals and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 200 micrograms (mcg) per kilogram (kg) (90.9 mcg per pound) of body weight four times a day. The dose should be taken before meals and at bedtime.

    For pirenzepine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—50 milligrams (mg) two times a day, in the morning and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

    For propantheline

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat duodenal or stomach ulcers:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—7.5 to 15 milligrams (mg) three times a day, one-half hour before meals, and 30 mg at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 375 micrograms (mcg) per kilogram (kg) (170 mcg per pound) of body weight four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.

    For scopolamine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • To treat urinary problems or intestine problems or painful menstruation:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—10 to 20 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injectable dosage form:
    • To treat urinary problems or intestine problems:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—10 to 20 mg three or four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For rectal dosage form (suppository):
    • To treat urinary problems or intestine problems or painful menstruation:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—Insert one 10 mg suppository rectally three or four times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For transdermal dosage form (patch):
    • To treat motion sickness:
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—Apply one patch behind the ear at least 4 hours before the antinausea effect is needed.
      • Children—Use is not recommended.
    • To treat nausea and vomiting after surgery
      • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—Apply one patch behind the ear the evening before surgery to prevent nausea and vomiting after surgery.
      • Children—Use is not recommended.

Hyoscyamine

Levsin is the brand name of the prescription drug hyoscyamine, which treats symptoms of disorders in your stomach and intestines (known as the gastrointestinal tract).

The medication is also used for bladder spasms, peptic-ulcer disease, diverticulitis, colic, certain heart conditions, Parkinson’s disease, runny nose, excess saliva production, irritable bowel syndrome, cystitis, and pancreatitis.

Hyoscyamine reduces the unwanted side effects of some drugs as well.

Hyoscyamine works by decreasing acid production in the stomach, slowing down the gut’s movements, and relaxing muscles in other organs, such as the bladder, gallbladder, and kidney. It also decreases secretions of sweat and saliva.

Hyoscyamine belongs to a class of drugs known as anticholinergics/antispasmodics.

Hyoscyamine Warnings

Hyoscyamine may increase your risk of heatstroke because it decreases sweating. You should avoid becoming overheated in hot weather or while performing strenuous activities.

Before taking hyoscyamine, you should tell your doctor if you have or have ever had:

  • Glaucoma
  • Heart, lung, or liver disease
  • A urinary tract or intestinal obstruction
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • An enlarged prostate
  • Myasthenia gravis

You should tell your healthcare provider you are taking hyoscyamine before having any type of surgery, including dental surgery.

Hyoscyamine is typically not recommended for older adults because it is not as effective or safe as other medications that can be used to treat the same conditions.

You should talk to your doctor if you are 65 or older before taking this drug.

If you wear contact lenses, you may need to use wetting eye drops, because this medication can cause dry eyes.

Pregnancy and Hyoscyamine

Hyoscyamine could harm an unborn baby. You should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Hyoscyamine is secreted in breast milk. You should talk to your doctor before breastfeeding while taking the drug.

Hyoscyamine ‘High’ and Abuse

There are some anecdotal reports that high doses of hyoscyamine can cause hallucinations and may cause a feeling of giddiness or a “high” in some people.

But taking too much of this medication or abusing the drug to create a high can be extremely dangerous. An overdose of hyoscyamine can result in headache, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, dizziness, and other side effects.

Levsin

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 2/26/2019

Levsin (hyoscyamine) is one of the principal anticholinergic/antispasmodic components of belladonna alkaloids used to treat different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. Levsin is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Levsin is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, and is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating. Levsin is available in generic form. Common side effects of Levsin include:

  • dizziness,
  • drowsiness,
  • nervousness,
  • blurred vision,
  • dry mouth,
  • vision problems,
  • headache,
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia),
  • constipation,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • bloating,
  • heartburn,
  • changes in taste,
  • problems with urination,
  • impotence,
  • loss of interest in sex,
  • trouble having an orgasm,
  • flushing,
  • dry skin, and
  • decreased sweating.

Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects of Levsin including:

  • mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, unusual excitement),
  • fast/irregular heartbeat,
  • loss of coordination, or
  • slurred speech.

Dosage of Levsin for adults and children 12 years of age and older: 1 to 2 tablets every four hours or as needed. Do not exceed 12 tablets in 24 hours. Pediatric patients 2 to under 12 years of age: ½ to 1 tablet every four hours or as needed. Do not exceed 6 tablets in 24 hours. Levsin may interact with amantadine, haloperidol, MAO inhibitors, phenothiazines, or antidepressants. Tell your doctor all medications you use. Levsin should be used only when prescribed during pregnancy. This drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Levsin (hyoscyamine) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Anaspaz; Ed-Spaz; Hyosyne; Levbid; Levsin; Levsin/SL; NuLev; Oscimin; Oscimin SR; Symax Duotab; Symax-SL; Symax-SR

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to slow the speed in the stomach and GI (gastrointestinal) tract.
  • It is used to treat infant belly pain.
  • It is used to treat diarrhea.
  • It is used to treat GI (gastrointestinal) ulcers.
  • It is used to treat irritable bowel syndrome.
  • It is used to treat muscle spasms of the GI (gastrointestinal) tract, gallbladder system, or urinary system.
  • It is used to treat a runny nose.
  • It is used to treat Parkinson’s disease.
  • It is used to prevent irritation of the pancreas.
  • It is used during surgery.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take this drug?

  • If you have an allergy to hyoscyamine or any other part of this drug.
  • If you are allergic to this drug; any part of this drug; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Bowel block, bleeding problems, diarrhea, enlarged colon, glaucoma, heart problems, myasthenia gravis, slow-moving GI (gastrointestinal) tract, a swallowing tube (esophagus) that is not normal, ulcerative colitis, or trouble passing urine.
  • If you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this drug with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take this drug?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this drug. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert or have clear eyesight until you see how this drug affects you.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol or use other drugs and natural products that slow your actions.
  • Be careful in hot weather or while being active. Drink lots of fluids to stop fluid loss.
  • Good mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help with dry mouth. See a dentist often.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this drug with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Different brands of this drug may be for use in different ages of children. Talk with the doctor before giving this drug to a child.
  • Use with care in children. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this drug while you are pregnant.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Very bad dizziness or passing out.
  • Severe diarrhea.
  • Feeling confused.
  • Mood changes.
  • Change in how you act.
  • Hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there).
  • Memory problems or loss.
  • Not able to sleep.
  • Change in speech.
  • Change in balance.
  • Change in eyesight, eye pain, or very bad eye irritation.
  • Very nervous and excitable.
  • Trouble passing urine.
  • Not sweating during activities or in warm temperatures.
  • Fever.
  • Flushing.
  • A fast heartbeat.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Not able to get or keep an erection.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Dizziness.
  • Blurred eyesight.
  • Constipation.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Dry eyes.
  • Headache.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Stomach pain.
  • Change in taste.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Feeling full.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best taken?

Use this drug as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

All oral products:

  • Take 30 to 60 minutes before meals.
  • Do not take antacids at the same time as this drug. Ask your doctor if you have a question about how to take antacids with this drug.

All liquid products:

  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring device that comes with this drug. If there is none, ask the pharmacist for a device to measure this drug.

Extended-release tablets:

  • Swallow whole. Do not chew, break, or crush.

Oral-disintegrating tablet:

  • Place on the tongue and let dissolve.
  • Some tablets may also be chewed. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about how to take this drug.
  • Do not swallow it whole.

Under the tongue (sublingual) tablet:

  • Place tablet under the tongue and let dissolve.
  • Some tablets may also be chewed or swallowed whole. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about how to take this drug.

Injection:

  • It is given as a shot into a muscle, vein, or into the fatty part of the skin.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

All oral products:

  • If you take this drug on a regular basis, take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.
  • Many times this drug is used on an as needed basis. Do not use more often than told by the doctor.

Injection:

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

All oral products:

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Protect from light.

Injection:

  • If you need to store this drug at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

All products:

  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

General drug facts

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Last Reviewed Date

Copyright

Before taking hyoscyamine,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to hyoscyamine, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in hyoscyamine tablets, capsules, or liquid. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking pr plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: amantadine (Symadine, Symmetrel), amitriptyline (Elavil), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), fluphenazine (Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), medications containing belladonna (Donnatal), mesoridazine (Serentil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), perphenazine (Trilafon), phenelzine (Nardil), prochlorperazine (Compazine), promazine (Sparine), promethazine (Phenergan), protriptyline (Vivactil), thioridazine (Mellaril), tranylcypromine (Parnate), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), triflupromazine (Vesprin), trimeprazine (Temaril), and trimipramine (Surmontil). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • be aware that antacids may interfere with hyoscyamine, making it less effective. Take hyoscyamine 1 hour before or 2 hours after antacids.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had glaucoma; heart, lung, liver, or kidney disease; a urinary tract or intestinal obstruction; an enlarged prostate; ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in the lining of the colon and rectum); or myasthenia gravis.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking hyoscyamine, call your doctor.
  • talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking hyoscyamine if you are 65 years of age or older. Older adults should not usually take hyoscyamine because it is not as safe and may not be as effective as other medications that can be used to treat the same condition.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you take hyoscyamine.
  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how hyoscyamine affects you.
  • ask your doctor about the safe use of alcohol during your treatment with hyoscyamine. Alcohol can make the side effects of this medication worse.

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