Side effects of estrogen

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning section.Nausea/vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, breast tenderness, headache, or weight changes may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: mental/mood changes (such as depression, memory loss), breast lumps, unusual vaginal bleeding (such as spotting, breakthrough bleeding, prolonged/recurrent bleeding), increased or new vaginal irritation/itching/odor/discharge, severe stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine, swelling hands/ankles/feet, increased thirst/urination.This medication may rarely cause serious problems from blood clots (such as heart attacks, strokes, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism). Get medical help right away if you have any serious side effects, including: chest/jaw/left arm pain, unusual sweating, sudden/severe headache, weakness on one side of the body, confusion, slurred speech, sudden vision changes (such as partial/complete blindness), pain/redness/swelling of legs, tingling/weakness/numbness in the arms/legs, trouble breathing, coughing up blood, sudden dizziness/fainting.A very serious allergic reaction to this product is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

PRECAUTIONS: Before using estradiol, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: vaginal bleeding of unknown cause, certain cancers (such as breast cancer, cancer of the uterus/ovaries), blood clots, stroke, heart disease (such as heart attack), liver disease, kidney disease, family medical history (especially breast lumps, cancer, blood clots, angioedema), blood clotting disorders (such as protein C or protein S deficiency), high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol/triglyceride levels, obesity, lupus, underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), mineral imbalance (low or high level of calcium in the blood), a certain hormone problem (hypoparathyroidism), uterus problems (such as fibroids, endometriosis), gallbladder disease, asthma, seizures, migraine headaches, mental/mood disorders (such as dementia, depression), a certain blood disorder (porphyria).Do not smoke or use tobacco. Estrogens combined with smoking further increases your risk of stroke, blood clots, high blood pressure, and heart attack, especially in women older than 35.Tell your doctor if you just had or will be having surgery, or if you will be confined to a chair or bed for a long time (such as a long plane flight). These conditions increase your risk of getting blood clots, especially if you are using an estrogen product. You may need to stop this medication for a time or take special precautions.This drug may cause blotchy, dark areas of the skin on the face (melasma). Sunlight may worsen this effect. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunlamps. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors.If you are nearsighted or wear contact lenses, you may develop vision problems or trouble wearing your contact lenses. Contact your eye doctor if these problems occur.This medication must not be used during pregnancy. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, tell your doctor immediately.This medication passes into breast milk. It may reduce the quality and amount of breast milk produced. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

QUESTION

If menopause occurs in a woman younger than ___ years, it is considered to be premature. See Answer

Estradiol

Estradiol is a form of estrogen, a female sex hormone that’s produced by the ovaries.

Estradiol comes in an oral form, a transdermal skin patch, a vaginal ring, or as a topical gel, spray, or emulsion.

Estradiol is used to treat and prevent hot flushes in women experiencing menopause. Estradiol gel is also used to treat vaginal dryness, itching, and burning in menopausal women.

Estradiol is also commonly combined with progestins in various doses in oral contraceptive pills that prevent pregnancy by preventing ovulation.

The medicine may also be used to prevent osteoporosis, replace estrogen in women with ovarian failure, or as part of a cancer treatment regimen.

Estradiol is in a class of drugs called estrogen hormones. It works by replacing the estrogen that the body normally produces.

Estradiol Warnings

Estradiol can increase the risk that you will develop endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus). If you have not had a hysterectomy, you should take progestin along with estradiol to decrease this risk.

However, before taking these two medicines together, talk with your doctor about your risk for other health problems.

In one study, women who took estrogens (such as estradiol) by mouth with progestin had a higher risk of heart attacks, stroke, blood clots, breast cancer, and dementia.

Women who use topical estradiol alone or with progestin may also have a higher risk of developing these conditions.

Using topical estradiol may increase your risk of developing ovarian cancer and gallbladder disease. You should talk to your doctor about these risks.

Before taking estradiol, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had:

  • A heart attack or stroke
  • Heart disease
  • Blood clots
  • Any type of cancer
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Gallbladder disease
  • A thyroid disorder
  • Epilepsy or another seizure disorder
  • Liver disease
  • Lupus
  • Breast lumps or abnormal mammogram results
  • Uterine fibroids
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice)
  • Migraine headaches
  • Endometriosis (a condition where the type of tissue that lines the uterus grows in other areas of the body, usually the abdomen or pelvis)
  • Low levels of calcium in your blood
  • Porphyria (a condition where abnormal substances build up in the blood)

Also, tell your doctor if you smoke or use tobacco products.

You should use the lowest dose of estradiol for the shortest time possible to control your symptoms.

Talk with your doctor every three to six months to determine if you should lower your dose or stop using this medicine.

You should conduct a breast self-exam every month and have a mammogram and clinical breast exam (a breast exam by a health professional) every year to help detect breast cancer.

Tell your doctor if you are having surgery or will be on bed rest while taking estradiol. Your doctor may tell you to stop taking the medication to decrease the risk of blood clots.

The topical medicine may harm other people who touch your skin. You should not let anyone else touch the skin where you applied estradiol for one hour after application.

If someone does touch the area, he or she should wash his or her hands with soap and water immediately.

Pregnancy and Estradiol

Estradiol can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. You should not use this medication while pregnant.

Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant or might become pregnant while taking this drug.

Since estradiol can also pass into breast milk, talk to your doctor before breastfeeding while taking the drug.

Estradiol Coupons and Prices

Looking to save money on a prescription for Estradiol? SingleCare, a leading online service for prescription, dental, and vision discounts, has partnered with most major pharmacies around the country to help you save up to 80 percent off prescription costs. Click on “Free Coupon” below and sign up to get your free SingleCare pharmacy savings card. You’ll receive a coupon by email or text to get the best price at a local participating pharmacy near you.

Estradiol Side Effects

1. “Product Information. Estradiol Vaginal Insert (estradiol topical).” Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, North Wales, PA.

2. Julian TM “Pseudoincontinence secondary to unopposed estrogen replacement in the surgically castrate premenopausal female.” Obstet Gynecol 70 (1987): 382-3

3. Nash HA, AlvarezSanchez F, Mishell DR, Fraser IS, Maruo T, Harmon TM “Estradiol-delivering vaginal rings for hormone replacement therapy.” Am J Obstet Gynecol 181 (1999): 1400-6

4. “Product Information. Climara (estradiol).” Berlex, Richmond, CA.

5. “Product Information. Estrace (estradiol).” Warner Chilcott Laboratories, Rockaway, NJ.

6. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

7. Auerbach R, Mittal K, Schwartz PE “Estrogen and progestin receptors in an ovarian ependymoma.” Obstet Gynecol 71 (1988): 1043-5

8. “Product Information. Yuvafem (estradiol topical).” AvKare Inc, Pulaski, TN.

9. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveilance Program “Surgically confirmed gallbladder disease, venous thromboembolism, and breast tumors in relation to postmenopausal estrogen therapy.” N Engl J Med 290 (1974): 15-9

10. Jick H, Dinan B, Rothman KJ “Noncontraceptive estrogens and nonfatal myocardial infarction.” JAMA 239 (1978): 1407-8

11. Barrett-Connor E, Wingard DL, Criqui MH “Postmenopausal estrogen use and heart disease risk factors in the 1980s. Rancho Bernardo, Calif, revisited.” JAMA 261 (1989): 1095-2100

12. Bui MN, Arai AE, Hathaway L, Waclawiw MA, Csako G, Cannon RO 3rd “Effect of hormone replacement therapy on carotid arterial compliance in healthy postmenopausal women.” Am J Cardiol 90 (2002): 82-5

13. Belchetz PE “Hormonal treatment of postmenopausal women.” N Engl J Med 330 (1994): 1062-71

14. Rosenberg L, Slone D, Shapiro S, Kaufman D, Stolley PD, Miettinen OS “Noncontraceptive estrogens and myocardial infarction in young women.” JAMA 244 (1980): 339-42

15. Collins P, Beale CM, Rosano GMC “Oestrogen as a calcium channel blocker.” Eur Heart J 17 ( Suppl (1996): 27-31

17. Crane MG, Harris JJ “Estrogens and hypertension: effect of discontinuing estrogens on blood pressure, exchangeable sodium, and the renin-aldosterone system.” Am J Med Sci 276 (1978): 33-55

18. Barrett-Connor E, Bush TL “Estrogen and coronary heart disease in women.” JAMA 265 (1991): 1861-7

19. Schwartz J, Freeman R, Frishman W “Clinical pharmacology of estrogens: cardiovascular actions and cardioprotective benefits of replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.” J Clin Pharmacol 35 (1995): 1-16

22. The Writing Group for the PEPI Trial “Effects of estrogen or estrogen/progestin regimens on heart disease risk factors in postmenopausal women: the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions (PEPI) Trial.” JAMA 273 (1995): 199-208

23. Wren BG, Routledge DA “Blood pressure changes: oestrogens in climacteric women.” Med J Aust 2 (1981): 528-31

24. Cohen L, Coxwell WL, Melchione T, Koltun W, Gibson E, Gupta N, Roberts M “Low-dose 17-beta estradiol matrix transdermal system in the treatment of moderate-to-severe hot flushes in postmenopausal women.” Curr Ther Res Clin Exp 60 (1999): 534-47

25. Steiger MJ, Quinn NP “Hormone replacement therapy induced chorea.” BMJ 302 (1991): 762

26. Palmer JR, Rosenberg L, Clarke EA, Miller DR, Shapiro S “Breast cancer risk after estrogen replacement therapy: results from the Toronto Breast Cancer Study.” Am J Epidemiol 134 (1991): 1386-95

27. Colditz GA, Hankinson SE, Hunter DJ, et al. “The use of estrogens and progestins and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.” N Engl J Med 332 (1995): 1589-93

28. Obrink A, Bunne G, Collen J, Tjernberg B “Endometrial cancer and exogenous estrogens.” Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 58 (1979): 123

29. Kaufman DW, Palmer JR, de Mouzon J, Rosenberg L, Stolley PD, Warshauer ME, Zauber AG, Shapiro S “Estrogen replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer: results from the case-control surveillance study.” Am J Epidemiol 134 (1991): 1375-85

30. Gapstur SM, Morrow M, Sellers TA “Hormone replacement therapy and risk of breast cancer with a favorable histology: results of the Iowa women’s health study.” JAMA 281 (1999): 2091-7

32. Gordon J, Reagan JW, Finkle WD, Ziel HK “Estrogen and endometrial carcinoma. An independent pathology review supporting original risk estimate.” N Engl J Med 297 (1977): 570-1

34. The Writing Group for the PEPI Trial “Effects of hormone replacement therapy on endometrial histology in postmenopausal women.” JAMA 275 (1996): 370-5

35. Gray LA Sr, Christopherson WM, Hoover RN “Estrogens and endometrial carcinoma.” Obstet Gynecol 49 (1977): 385-9

36. Thomas DB, Persing JP, Hutchinson WB “Exogenous estrogens and other risk factors for breast cancer in women with benign breast diseases.” J Natl Cancer Inst 69 (1982): 1017-25

37. Spengler RF, Clarke EA, Woolever CA, Newman AM, Osborn RW “Exogenous estrogens and endometrial cancer: a case-control study and assessment of potential biases.” Am J Epidemiol 114 (1981): 497-506

38. Oppenheim G “A case of rapid mood cycling with estrogen: implications for therapy.” J Clin Psychiatry 45 (1984): 34-5

39. Conter RL, Longmire WP Jr “Recurrent hepatic hemangiomas. Possible association with estrogen therapy.” Ann Surg 207 (1988): 115-9

40. Aldinger K, Ben-Menachem Y, Whalen G “Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver associated with high-dosage estrogens.” Arch Intern Med 137 (1977): 357-9

41. Molitch ME, Oill P, Odell WD “Massive hyperlipemia during estrogen therapy.” JAMA 227 (1974): 522-5

Menopause (sometimes called “the change of life”) is a normal time in a woman’s life when her period stops. During menopause, a woman’s body makes less of the hormones estrogen and progesterone. Lower hormone levels may lead to symptoms like night sweats, hot flashes, and vaginal dryness along with thin bones.

Some women choose to treat their menopause symptoms with hormone medicines sometimes called Hormone Therapy. The following lists some basic information about the FDA-approved hormone medicines for menopause. Use this information to help you talk to your healthcare provider about whether hormone medicines are right for you.

Do not take hormone therapy if you:

  • have problems with vaginal bleeding
  • have or have had certain cancers such as breast cancer or uterine cancer
  • have or have had a blood clot, stroke or heart attack
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have liver disease
  • have allergic reactions to hormone medicine

Menopause Hormone Therapy

There are different types of hormone medicines used during and after menopause:

  • Estrogen-Only Medicines
  • Progestin-Only Medicines
  • Combination Estrogen and Progestin Medicines
  • Combination Estrogen and Other Medicines

Information about non-hormone medicines for menopause is not included. Ask your healthcare provider about the FDA-approved non-hormone medicine for menopause called Brisdelle (paroxetine).

Side Effects

Hormone medicines have side effects. Serious health problems can happen in women who take menopause hormone therapy.

  • For some women, hormone medicines may raise their chances of blood clots, heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer.
  • For some women who are 65 years old or older, hormone medicines may raise their chances of dementia.
  • For women who still have their uterus, taking estrogen-only medicines raises their chance of getting cancer of the lining of the uterus or endometrial cancer. These women need to take progestin to prevent endometrial cancer.

All side effects and warnings for each hormone medicine are not listed. Ask your healthcare provider about all the risks of taking hormone medicines.

Estrogen-Only Medicines

Brand Name Generic Name Product Type
Alora estradiol Patch
Cenestin synthetic conjugated estrogens Pill
Climara estradiol Patch
Delestrogen estradiol valerate Injection (Shot)
Divigel estradiol Gel
Elestrin estradiol Gel
Enjuvia synthetic conjugated estrogens Pill
Esclim estradiol Patch
Estrace estradiol Pill
Vaginal Cream
Estraderm estradiol Patch
Estrasorb estradiol Skin Cream
(Emulsion)
Estring estradiol Vaginal Insert
EstroGel estradiol Gel
Evamist estradiol Skin Spray (Transdermal)
Femring estradiol acetate Vaginal Ring
Femtrace estradiol acetate Pill
Menest esterified estrogen Pill
Menostar
(only used to prevent osteoporosis)
estradiol Patch
Minivelle estradiol Patch
Ogen estropipate Pill
Vaginal Cream
Ortho-Est estropipate Pill
Osphena (not estrogen only) ospemifene Pill
Premarin conjugated estrogens Pill
Vaginal Cream
Injection (Shot)
Vagifem estradiol Vaginal Tablet
Vivelle estradiol Patch
Vivelle-Dot estradiol Patch

Estrogen-Only Medicines

Do not use if you:

  • have unusual vaginal bleeding
  • have or have had certain cancers such as breast cancer or uterine cancer
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs or lungs
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have had a stroke or heart attack
  • have liver problems
  • have serious reactions to estrogen medicines
  • think you are pregnant

Serious Side Effects

  • Stroke or blood clots
  • Endometrial Cancer in women who still have their uterus and who do not use progestin with estrogen-only medicines
  • Dementia in women 65 years and older
  • Gallbladder disease or high triglyceride (cholesterol) levels that could lead to problems with your pancreas
  • Vision loss caused by a blood clot in the eye
  • Liver Problems
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Severe allergic reactions

Less Serious, Common Side Effects

  • Headaches
  • Painful or tender breasts
  • Vaginal spotting
  • Stomach cramps/ Bloating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hair loss
  • Fluid retention
  • Vaginal yeast infection

For more information about the risks and side effects for each drug, check [email protected]

Progestin-Only Medicines

Brand Name Generic Name Product Type
Prometrium micronized progesterone Pill
Provera medroxyprogesterone acetate Pill

Progestin-Only Medicines

Estrogen-only medicines are usually taken with progestin-only medicines to lower the chance of getting endometrial cancer in women who still have their uterus.

The side effects listed below are for women who take a progestin-only medicine and an estrogen-only medicine.

Do not use if you:

  • have unusual vaginal bleeding
  • have or have had certain cancers such as breast cancer or uterine cancer
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs or lungs
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have had a stroke or heart attack
  • have liver problems
  • have serious reactions to estrogen medicines
  • think you are pregnant

Serious Side Effects

  • Heart attack or stroke
  • Blood clots
  • Breast cancer
  • Dementia in women 65 years and older
  • Gallbladder disease or high triglyceride (cholesterol) levels that could lead to problems with your pancreas
  • Vision loss caused by a blood clot in the eye
  • Liver problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Severe allergic reactions

Less Serious, Common Side Effects

  • Headaches
  • Painful or tender breasts
  • Vaginal spotting
  • Stomach cramps/bloating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hair loss
  • Fluid retention
  • Vaginal yeast infection

For more information about the risks and side effects for each drug, check [email protected]

Combination Estrogen and Progestin Medicines

Brand Name Generic Name Product Type
Activella estradiol/
norethindrone acetate
Pill
Angeliq estradiol/ drospirenone Pill
Climara Pro estradiol/
levonorgestrel
Patch
Combipatch estradiol/
norethindrone acetate
Patch
Femhrt norethindrone acetate/
ethinyl estradiol
Pill
Prefest estradiol/
norgestimate
Pill
Prempro conjugated estrogen/
medroxyprogesterone
Pill

Combination Estrogen and Progestin Medicines

Do not use if you:

  • have unusual vaginal bleeding
  • have or have had certain cancers such as breast cancer or uterine cancer
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs or lungs
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have had a stroke or heart attack
  • have liver problems
  • have serious reactions to estrogen medicines
  • think you are pregnant

Serious Side Effects

  • Heart attack or stroke
  • Blood clots
  • Breast Cancer
  • Dementia in women 65 years and older
  • Gallbladder disease or high triglyceride (cholesterol) levels that could lead to problems with your pancreas
  • Vision loss caused by a blood clot in the eye
  • Liver problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Severe allergic reactions

Less Serious, Common Side Effects

  • Headaches
  • Painful or tender breasts
  • Vaginal spotting
  • Stomach cramps/bloating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hair loss
  • Fluid retention
  • Vaginal yeast infection

For the most recent information about each drug, check [email protected]

Combination Estrogen and Hormone Medicines

Brand Name Generic Name Product Type
Duavee conjugated estrogen/bazedoxifene Pill

You should not use Duavee if you are taking medicines that have estrogen, progestin or both hormones.

Do not use if you:

  • have unusual vaginal bleeding
  • have or have had certain cancers such as breast cancer or uterine cancer
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs or lungs
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have or have had a stroke or heart attack
  • have liver problems
  • have had a serious allergic reaction to estrogen medicines
  • think you are pregnant or may become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding (nursing)

Serious Side Effects

  • Stroke or blood clots
  • Dementia in women 65 years and older
  • Gallbladder disease or high triglyceride (cholesterol) levels that could lead to problems with your pancreas
  • Vision loss caused by a blood clot in the eye
  • Liver problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Severe allergic reaction

Less Serious, Common Side Effects

  • Muscle spasms
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Upset stomach/stomach pain
  • Throat pain
  • Dizziness
  • Neck Pain

For more information about the risks and side effects for each drug, check [email protected]

Important Questions to Ask about Menopause Hormone Medicines

  • Are hormones right for me? Why?
  • What are the benefits?
  • What are the serious risks and common side effects?
  • How long should I use hormone therapy?
  • What is the lowest dose that will work for me?
  • Are there any non-hormone medicines that I can take?

Want more information about menopause? Check the FDA website at: www.fda.gov/menopause

The drug and risk information in this booklet may change. Check [email protected] for the latest facts on each product listed in this booklet.

Resources For You

  • Menopause
  • Menopause & Hormones – Common Questions fact sheet (PDF, 2051 KB)
  • About the Office of Women’s Health
  • Take Time To Care Program
  • Get Other FDA Publications for Women
  • For Women Homepage

Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD Last updated on Mar 1, 2019.

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What is estradiol?

Estradiol is a form of estrogen, a female sex hormone that regulates many processes in the body. It is available as an oral tablet, a topical gel or patch, vaginal cream, or as an injection.

Estradiol is used to treat menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and vaginal changes, and to prevent osteoporosis (bone loss) in menopausal women. Estradiol is also used to treat low estrogen levels in women with ovarian failure. It is also indicated to treat certain types of breast cancer and prostate cancer.

Estradiol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use estradiol if you have: undiagnosed vaginal bleeding, liver disease, a bleeding disorder, or if you have ever had a heart attack, a stroke, a blood clot, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing uterine cancer. Report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away.

Using this medicine can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack, or cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia.

Have regular physical exams and mammograms, and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using this medicine.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to estradiol, or if you have:

  • unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor;

  • liver disease;

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

  • an increased risk of having blood clots due to a heart problem or a hereditary blood disorder; or

  • a history of hormone-related cancer, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

Using this medicine can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack. You are even more at risk if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, if you are overweight, or if you smoke.

Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease;

  • liver problems, or prior jaundice caused by pregnancy or taking hormones;

  • kidney disease;

  • cancer;

  • gallbladder disease;

  • asthma;

  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

  • migraines;

  • lupus;

  • endometriosis or uterine fibroid tumors;

  • hereditary angioedema;

  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system);

  • a thyroid disorder; or

  • high levels of calcium in your blood.

Using estradiol may increase your risk of cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Talk with your doctor about this risk.

Estradiol lowers the hormone needed to produce breast milk and can slow breast milk production. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How should I take estradiol?

Take estradiol exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing uterine cancer. To help lower this risk, your doctor may also want you to take a progestin. Report any unusual vaginal bleeding to your doctor immediately.

Your doctor should check your progress on a regular basis (every 3 to 6 months) to determine whether you should continue this treatment. Self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis and have a mammogram every year while using estradiol.

If you need major surgery or will be on long-term bed rest, you may need to stop using this medicine for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

If you are taking injectable estrogen, dispose of any needles and syringes in an appropriate sharps container per your state laws. Do not throw away used needles into the garbage.

If you are using estradiol spray, avoid fire, flame, or smoking until the spray has dried. Do not apply lotion or sunscreen over the area for at least one hour.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose can result in nausea, vomiting and vaginal bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking estradiol?

Avoid smoking. It can greatly increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack while using this medicine.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with estradiol and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

Estradiol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to estradiol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • heart attack symptoms – chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;

  • signs of a stroke – sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;

  • signs of a blood clot – sudden vision loss, stabbing chest pain, feeling short of breath, coughing up blood, pain or warmth in one or both legs;

  • swelling or tenderness in your stomach;

  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • memory problems, confusion, unusual behavior;

  • unusual vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain;

  • a lump in your breast; or

  • nausea, vomiting, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle weakness, bone pain, lack of energy.

Common estradiol side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps;

  • mood changes, sleep problems (insomnia);

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, sore throat;

  • weight gain;

  • headache, back pain, dizziness;

  • breast pain;

  • darkening of the skin or skin rash;

  • thinning scalp hair; or

  • vaginal itching or discharge, changes in your menstrual periods, breakthrough bleeding.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect estradiol?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Many drugs can interact with estradiol. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use estradiol only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 12.05.

Medical Disclaimer

More about estradiol

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  • Drug class: estrogens
  • FDA Alerts (2)

Consumer resources

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  • Estradiol Gel (Divigel)
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  • Estradiol Gel (EstroGel)
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Other brands: Estrace, Climara, Vivelle-Dot, Estrogel, … +16 more

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  • Atrophic Urethritis
  • Atrophic Vaginitis
  • Breast Cancer, Palliative
  • Gender Dysphoria
  • … +6 more

Estradiol Drug Interactions

A total of 286 drugs are known to interact with estradiol.

  • 7 major drug interactions
  • 259 moderate drug interactions
  • 20 minor drug interactions

Show all medications in the database that may interact with estradiol.

Check for interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interactions with estradiol.

Most frequently checked interactions

View interaction reports for estradiol and the medicines listed below.

  • Ambien (zolpidem)
  • Aspirin Low Strength (aspirin)
  • cephalexin
  • Clomid (clomiphene)
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine)
  • DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone)
  • Estroven (multivitamin)
  • Fish Oil (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids)
  • Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine)
  • ibuprofen
  • Klonopin (clonazepam)
  • Lexapro (escitalopram)
  • Lyrica (pregabalin)
  • medroxyprogesterone
  • melatonin
  • Mirena (levonorgestrel)
  • Nexium (esomeprazole)
  • Nexplanon (etonogestrel)
  • Norco (acetaminophen / hydrocodone)
  • norethindrone
  • Osphena (ospemifene)
  • phentermine
  • prednisone
  • progesterone
  • Singulair (montelukast)
  • Synthroid (levothyroxine)
  • tamoxifen
  • testosterone
  • Topamax (topiramate)
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen)
  • Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin)
  • Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
  • Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol)
  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol)
  • Xanax (alprazolam)
  • Zoloft (sertraline)
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine)

Estradiol alcohol/food interactions

There are 3 alcohol/food interactions with estradiol

Estradiol disease interactions

There are 17 disease interactions with estradiol which include:

  • abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • carcinomas (estrogenic)
  • hypercalcemia in breast cancer
  • hypertension
  • thromboembolism/cardiovascular
  • hepatic neoplasms
  • angioedema
  • gallbladder disease
  • hypercalcemia
  • hyperlipidemia
  • liver disease
  • melasma
  • depression
  • fluid retention
  • glucose intolerance
  • retinal thrombosis
  • thyroid function tests

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major

Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.

Moderate

Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.

Minor

Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Unknown

No interaction information available.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

PMC

4. Discussion

The main goal of this experiment was to determine if estradiol treatment could increase the intake of a palatable diet in female rats as has been previously reported . Ovariectomized rats received a nearly physiological (5.0 µg) or supraphysiological (20.0 µg) regimen of estradiol or vehicle treatment, and food intake and meal patterns during the 72-hour period following the first EB or oil injection were analyzed. In support of the hypothesis that estradiol exerts an inhibitory effect on food intake and meal size, both doses of EB significantly decreased food intake, meal size, and body weight gain when animals were presented with either the standard chow diet or the chocolate/fat diet. These findings indicate that a cyclic pattern of estradiol replacement does not enhance the intake of a palatable diet in ovariectomized rats, and that this failure of estradiol to do so was not overcome by treating the animals with a larger dose of EB.

In the present study, the chocolate/fat diet, a formula that is sweeter and higher in fat than the standard chow diet, did lead to an increase in food intake in oil- treated ovariectomized rats. This enhancement of food intake by the chocolate/fat diet was mediated by an increase in meal size. In comparison to the data obtained during treatment with the oil vehicle, both doses of estradiol significantly decreased food intake and meal size when animals were presented with the chocolate/fat diet. The present findings are in agreement with a number of prior experiments demonstrating that peripheral treatment with estradiol decreases food intake in ovariectomized rats and guinea pigs . The fact that a 2-day period of EB treatment significantly reduced body weight gain is also consistent with previous reports showing that estradiol replacement decreases body weight in ovariectomized rats .

The fact that the inhibitory effect of estradiol on the intake of both diets used in this experiment was mediated by a decrease in meal size is consistent with several previous studies examining the effects of ovarian hormones on meal patterns in ovariectomized and gonadally intact female rats . This effect of estradiol on food intake and meal size has been shown to result from an interaction with cholecystokinin (CCK) satiety systems . According to this model, estradiol lowers food intake and meal size by augmenting a CCK-induced neural message that occurs during the consumption of meal . Consistent with this hypothesis, pretreatment with the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide attenuates the effects of estradiol on food intake in intact and ovariectomized rats , and direct placement of estradiol in hypothalamic and hindbrain sites enhances the effects of CCK on feeding and c-Fos expression. The ability of estradiol to suppress intake of the chocolate/fat diet in the present study suggests that the effects of estradiol on feeding are not limited to the standard chow diet used in the experiments described above, and that estradiol can also decrease meal size for a sweeter, higher fat food. This finding is in agreement with previous work showing that estradiol treatment decreases fat intake in ovariectomized rats during a feeding protocol that models binge eating .

It is unlikely that the failure of estradiol to increase intake of the chocolate/fat diet was the result of neophobia or malaise following the initial exposure to estradiol, as has been previously suggested . First, animals were exposed to each diet for two weeks before the onset of estradiol treatment, thus allowing for the diminishment of a neophobic response that can occur when rats are presented with a novel food. Secondly, previous research has shown that estradiol can decrease food intake in female rats without producing a conditioned taste aversion (and presumably malaise) to that diet . The fact that we analyzed the data collected 3 days after initial exposure to estradiol also makes it unlikely that the inhibitory effect of EB on the intake of the familiar, chocolate/fat diet was the result of persistent malaise. In addition, the findings that the acute effects of estradiol on food intake can be attenuated by administering a CCK1 receptor antagonist does not support the hypothesis that the estrogenic suppression of food intake stems from malaise. It is quite likely that several procedural differences between the present experiment and the study by Boswell et al. accounted for the discrepant findings. For example, Boswell et al. treated gonadally intact female rats with a supraphysiological dose of estradiol valerate (1500 µg/kg) and measured intake of the chocolate cake mixture for an 8-day period beginning 11 days after the estradiol or vehicle injection. In the present experiment, ovariectomized animals received EB replacement to avoid the potential confound of the disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that can occur when intact females are treated with exogenous estradiol. We also analyzed food intake and body weight data collected 3 days after initial treatment with EB or oil, whereas Boswell et al. analyzed data collected over an 8 day period beginning 11 days after the EV or vehicle injection. In the absence of estrous cycle data, there is no way to know whether animals in the study by Boswell et al. were displaying regular ovarian cycles during the period between the EV injection and data collection. It is quite likely that treating intact female rats with a pharmacological dose of EV led to a disruption of ovarian cycles and a concomitant increase in food intake and body weight similar to what is seen in female rats when ovarian cycles cease during pseudopregnancy or following ovariectomy . Thus, the fact that EV treated females consumed more of the chocolate cake mixture than vehicle treated animals during the 19 day period following the injection may simply reflect the fact that EV antagonized the effects of endogenous estradiol normally secreted during the ovarian cycle. In that sense, estradiol did not “enhance” the intake of the chocolate cake mixture relative to vehicle treated animals, but instead the feeding behavior of the EV-treated females resembled the behavior of female rats during pseudopregnancy or after ovariectomy when ovarian cycles cease and food intake increases.

In summary, the results of the present experiment provide evidence that a cyclic regimen of both nearly physiological and supraphysiological doses of estradiol decrease food intake and meal size of a palatable diet in ovariectomized rats. These findings do not support the hypothesis that estradiol enhances the intake of palatable foods that has been previously reported , and suggest that the effects of estradiol on feeding in that experiment stemmed from a disruption of ovarian cyclicity when intact females were treated with a pharmacological dose of estradiol valerate. We conclude that a cyclic regimen of treatment with close-to-physiological, or supraphysiological doses of estradiol decrease rather than increase intake of a sweet, high fat food just as estradiol decreases intake of regular chow. Whether or not chronic, long-term exposure to estradiol can enhance the intake of a palatable diet in ovariectomized females remains to be investigated.

Let’s talk about the top foods to avoid that are highest in estrogen. High-estrogen foods to avoid could be quietyly destroying your hormone balance. A lot of foods with too much estrogen can lead to health issues like hypothyroidism, immune dysfunction, male infertility, chronic fatigue and even certain cancers. (1, 2)

Estrogen dominance is a bodily imbalance that occurs when estrogen levels are too high and progesterone levels are too low. This promotes the growth of fibroids, cysts, cervical dysplasia and tumors. And it’s estimated that half of American women over the age of 35 are estrogen dominant. (3)

So what’s happening? Xenoestrogens — synthetic or natural substances that mimic estrogen — are all around us in ways never before experienced in human civilization. These “environmental estrogens” can even interfere with certain cancer treatments, rendering them less effective. (More on that later).

6 High-Estrogen Foods to Avoid

1. Wheat & Other Grains

In 2018, Scripps Research Institute scientists published a study showing that two common estrogen-mimicking compounds in foods may actually shut down the benefits of a popular drug combination used to treat metastatic, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

The study, published in Cell Chemical Biology, found that zearalenone, estrogen-like fungi that colonize on corn, barley, wheat and other grains, reduce the anti-estrogen effectiveness of the palbociclib/letrozole drug combo. “Breast cancer patients taking palbociclib/letrozole should consider limiting their exposure to foods that contain xenoestrogens,” says Gary Siuzdak, PhD, senior study author and senior director of Scripps Center for Metabolomicsk.

Interestingly, zearalenone is also blamed for abnormal sexual development and birth defects in grain-fed farm animals, along with a breakout of early breast development in girls. (4)

2. Soy

Phytoestrogens can be tricky to ID as healthy or unhealthy because many offer health benefits and threats. Aside from that, we also know that not all soy is created equally. When people ask me if “is soy bad for you?” the answer is often yes. But it’s complicated. As researchers from North Carolina State University and the National Institutes of Health point out: “The answer is undoubtedly complex and may ultimately depend on age, health status, level of consumption and even the composition of an individual’s intestinal microflora.” (5)

Here’s an example suggesting soy creates an overload of estrogen in the body. That same Scripps study referenced above also found genistein in soy almost completely reverses the anti-estrogen benefits of the popular breast cancer drug combo.

Perhaps most alarming is that xenoestrogens can throw off hormonal harmony even in tiny, real-life doses. This includes amounts we may eat or absorb.

The study researchers stress that other xenoestrogens could also impact cancer treatments and our health in general, noting that it’s an understudied issue that needs more attention. (6)

Some soy facts to consider:

  • The United Kingdom, Australian and New Zealand advise against the indiscriminate use of soy infant formula; other countries require a prescription. (7)
  • Most soy grown in the U.S. is genetically engineered to endure herbicide applications that would normally kill the plant.
  • Norwegian researchers found “extreme” levels of glyphosate in U.S. soy. (8)
  • Glyphosate causes estrogenic activity that fuels certain hormone-dependent breast cancers. (9)
  • Glyphosate is also commonly used on nonorganic corn, canola and cotton. Farmers also use it to “burn down” wheat prior to harvest, meaning it remains in the finished food product. (10)

3. Food Additives

In 2009, Italian researchers screened hundreds of food additives to uncover ones with estrogen-like effects. Turns out, 4-hexylresorcinol, an additive used to prevent discoloration and increase the shelf life of shrimp and other shellfish, possesses estrogenic effects. (That’s just one of the reasons shrimp is on my list of fish you should never eat.) (11)

Propyl gallate is another common preservative that acts like estrogen. It’s often used to keep fats and oils from going rancid. (12, 13)

Propyl gallate is on the Center for Science in the Public Interest’s “Do Not Eat” list. It most commonly hides on in the following places:

  • Vegetable oil
  • Meat products
  • Potato sticks
  • Chicken soup base
  • Chewing gum

Studies indicate it may be not only an endocrine disruptor but a carcinogen, too. Government funded studies found low doses caused cancer in rates at higher rates compared to zero or high exposures. (14)

4. Conventional Meat & Dairy

The average U.S. citizen consumed 647 pounds of dairy. (15) And anywhere from 60 to 80 percent of estrogens in the typical Western diet comes from milk and other dairy products. (16) This is linked to a higher rate of testicular and prostate cancers. (17)

Hormones and antibiotics used in the meat and dairy industry are well publicized, but what about naturally occurring steroid hormones that act like estrogen?

Iranian researchers published a review study pointing out that virtually all food from animals contains 17β-estradiol and its metabolites, to some extent. So exposures to estrogens are unavoidable in a non-vegetarian human diet. The scientists point out some important facts:

  • Naturally occurring hormones in dairy milk pass the blood-milk barrier.
  • Soybean use is commonplace in dairy and meat animal production.
  • Soy is and other legumes are phytoestrogen-rich and “converted by intestinal bacteria to hormone-like compounds with estrogenic activity.”
  • Phytoestrogens do seem to transfer and have been identified in both cow’s milk and breast milk.
  • 17-β-oestradiol is also found in the meat of pigs, cows and chickens. (18)

5. Alcohol

While it is true that low-to-moderate alcohol consumption may lower the risk of heart disease, it’s a little more complicated when it comes to cancer risk. Common plants to used to create alcohol contain estrogen-like substances. In fact, researchers discovered “symptoms of feminization” and testicular failure in men who drink heavily. Beer, wine and bourbon consumption led to heightened estrogen activity in both animal and human studies. (19)

We know that alcohol changes the metabolization of estrogen in the female body. Alcohol triggers estrogen levels to increase. Higher estrogen levels can fuel breast cancer risk.

Some other important facts:

  • Looking at 53 studies, researchers discovered that each drink a day increases breast cancer risk by 7 percent.
  • Drinking two to three alcoholic drinks daily result in a 20 percent higher breast cancer risk compared to non-drinking women. (20)

6. Tap & Bottled Water

While it may be tempting to reach for bottled water, just know what’s inside may be actually worse than tap water. Bottled water risks include exposure to estrogenic compounds. Let’s take a look at the data:

  • 61 percent of bottled water samples induce “significant estrogenic response” when tested on a human cancer cell line.
  • Estrogen activity is three times higher when the water is packaged in PET plastic bottles compared to glass. (21)
  • The largest source of xenoestrogens in the environment may come from animal manure (up to 90 percent); if 1 percent of estrogens from farm animal waste reached waterways, it would add up to 15 percent of all estrogens found in global water supplies. (22)

5 Other Estrogenic Exposures to Avoid

1. BPA

Animal studies show evidence that “environmental estrogens” can act in unpredictable and even more potent ways when they are mixed together. That’s pretty alarming, considering the mix of chemicals we inhale, absorb and ingest on a daily basis. How is that all playing out in our bodies? (23)

Two common household chemicals with estrogen-like effects include plasticizers like BPA and BPA-free relatives like BPS, have the ability to act like estrogen in the body. BPA toxic effects include an estrogen overload that can turn breast cells into cancerous ones. (24) It’s also linked to prostate cancer, vitamin D deficiency and other ills.

BPA hiding spots:

  • Cash register receipts
  • Canned foods and drinks
  • Keg liners
  • Polycarbonate water bottles

And don’t trust “BPA-free” labels, either. Many contain estrogenic cousins of BPA, like BPS. A 2013 found even less than one part per trillion of BPS disrupts normal estrogenic receptor cell function, potentially triggering obesity and type 2 diabetes, asthma, birth defects or even cancer. (25)

2. Phthalates

Phthalates are linked to all sorts of health issues, but one I’d like to point out is prostate cancer. In an animal study, scientists found phthalates may interfere with healthy “crosstalk” between estrogen receptors and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways. (26)

These plasticizing chemicals also lurk in:

  • Synthetic scents, including candles and personal care products
  • Makeup (to keep lotions and makeup to stick to your face longer)
  • Vinyl shower curtains, flooring and other products
  • Laundry products
  • Nail polish
  • #3 plastic cling wrap

3. Oil & Gas Chemicals

Health dangers of fracking are expansive. And one of the main areas of concern in oil and gas development involves not only the endocrine-disrupting chemicals used, but how they interact with each other to become even more dangerous. Fracking involves the use of about 1,000 different chemicals throughout the process, including at least 100 identified as hormone disruptors.

Twelve chemicals used in oil and gas production harbor estrogen and androgen receptor effects; these chemicals are detected in local water sources near fracking sites. (27, 28)

Although natural gas burns cleaner than coal, when scientists tabulated the “cradle to grave” impacts, hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” promotes climate change as much or more than burning coal. (29)

4. Birth Control Pills

Birth control pills contain high levels of estrogen. And while that works to prevent pregnancy, ethinyl estradiol winds up in wastewater after women flush the toilet. The results are worrisome, as estrogen-like compounds wind up in surface water.

Ethinyl estradiol causes a biological effect even at really low levels, which is why we’re starting to see the feminization of fish and amphibians in tainted waterbodies. It can demasculinize males and lead to intersex fish. (These males-turned-intersex fish produce eggs in their testes. Not normal!) (30)

5. Certain Essential Oils

Not all essential oils are appropriate for everyone, thanks to their ability to impact hormones. In 2007, researchers published a study showing weak estrogenic activity in tea tree and lavender oils seemed to spur breast growth in pre-pubescent boys. (31) Some can even accelerate contractions during pregnancy, so aren’t appropriate when a woman is carrying a child. Some essential oils with estrogenic effects include:

  • Jasmine oil
  • Clary sage oil
  • Geranium oil (32)
  • Lavender oil
  • Tea tree oil (33)

This is why, when seeking to buy essential oils, you look for Certified USDA Organic, 100 percent “pure,” indigenously sourced and therapeutic grade.

How to Avoid High-Estrogen Foods and Other Xenoestrogens

The good news is there are powerful ways to drastically reduce the amount of estrogen-like compounds you eat and absorb. To start to balance hormones naturally, here are some of my most important tips to reduce xenoestrogen exposure:

  • According to KeepaBreast.org, diiodolylmethane, or DIM, improves healthy estrogen metabolism and is present in Brassica or cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, mustard greens and Brussels sprouts. Calcium D-Glucarate reduces total estrogen levels and is found in brassica veggies, citrus fruits and cucurbitacease vegetables that like cucumbers, pumpkins, cantaloupe and squashes.
  • Milk thistle and dandelion supplements are great to support your body in the detox from estrogen.
  • Exercise and avoid processed foods and sugars to lower your body fat to a healthy level. Excess visceral fat manufactures more estrogen in your body.
  • Choose filtered water over bottled water. Environmental Working Group’s Water Filter Guide is a great place to start.
  • Avoid plastic use as much as possible. Particularly estrogenic plastics are #3, #6 and some #7s.
  • Choose a food-grade stainless or glass water bottle.
  • Avoid nonstick cookware and use the best nontoxic cookware. It’s what I use in my home!
  • Avoid heating reusable plastics that come into contact with food in the dishwasher or microwave.
  • Avoid vinyl whenever possible. Choose hemp or natural material shower curtains and avoid vinyl flooring.
  • Choose fresh or frozen foods versus canned foods and drinks.
  • Say no to trivial cash register receipts. Choose email receipts whenever possible. And don’t store receipts in the bottom of your purse or bag.
  • Opt for organic or non-GMO foods as often as possible, especially when it comes to corn- and soy-containing foods.
  • Say no to fragranced products, including air fresheners, plug-ins, wax melts, personal care products and dryer sheets.
  • Instead of scented laundry products, use a quarter cup of white vinegar in the rinse cycle for natural fabric softening.
  • Use coconut, olive or avocado oil instead of vegetable oil. Vegetable oils often contain high-estrogen food additives.
  • Choose fatty fish like Pacific sardines or wild-caught Alaskan tuna instead of shellfish.
  • Avoid dairy or use organic, grass-fed, cultured dairy. I prefer goat milk.
  • If you live near fracking sites, get independent water testing; many fracking chemicals act like estrogen in the body and can cause health problems. Promote clean energy like solar or wind instead of chemically-intensive oil or gas.
  • Consider using a combination of natural birth control methods.

Final Thoughts on High Estrogen Foods and Household Exposures

  • I know avoiding high-estrogen foods and other everyday exposures may seem frustrating. Why is in our hands? It’s a sign that our food safety and chemical laws in this country are outdated and ineffective. We need laws that keep harmful products off of store shelves before entire generations are exposed. Why should we be the guinea pigs while industry profits while making us sick?
  • Xenoestrogens are “environmental estrogens” that may be natural or synthetic. They tinker with our bodies’ natural estrogen levels, promoting certain health problems.
  • Phytoestrogens naturally occurring in some foods and drinks have been shown to be harmful and helpful in certain situations.
  • Avoiding fake fragrances, bottled water and conventional meat and dairy is a huge way to reduce xenoestrogen exposure.
  • Instead of buying bottled water, look at your local municipal/city water testing and choose a filter that best removes most contaminates. If you live on well water, get a test and filter accordingly rather than relying on bottled water. (I know some people contaminated by fracking practices may have no other choice than move or use bottled water. That is an exception and we need to hold these polluting corporations accountable.)

Read Next: The Dirty Dozen List: Are You Eating the Most Pesticide-Laden Produce?

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