Side effect of diamox

Diamox

Generic Name: acetazolamide (a SEET a ZOLE a mide)
Brand Name: Diamox, Diamox Sequels

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Sep 26, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is Diamox?

Diamox reduces the activity of a protein in your body called carbonic anhydrase. Blocking this protein can help reduce the build-up of certain fluids in the body.

Diamox is used in people with certain types of glaucoma to reduce the amount of fluid in the eye, which decreases pressure inside the eye.

Diamox is also used as a diuretic (“water pill”) in people with congestive heart failure, to reduce the build-up of fluid in the body. This build-up is called edema.

Diamox is also used to treat certain types of seizures, and to treat or prevent altitude sickness.

Diamox may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use Diamox if you have cirrhosis, severe liver or kidney disease, an electrolyte imbalance, adrenal gland failure, or an allergy to Diamox or sulfa drugs.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Diamox if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • severe liver disease, or cirrhosis;

  • severe kidney disease;

  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as acidosis or low levels of potassium or sodium in your blood);

  • adrenal gland failure; or

  • an allergy to sulfa drugs.

To make sure Diamox is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • severe breathing problems;

  • angle closure glaucoma; or

  • if you also take aspirin in high doses.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Acetazolamide can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

Diamox is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take Diamox?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use Diamox in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your dose of this medicine will depend on the condition you are treating. If you take Diamox for congestive heart failure, your doctor may tell you to skip your medication for a day. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

While using Diamox, you may need frequent blood tests.

Diamox may be only part of a complete treatment program that may also include other medications. Follow your doctor’s instructions very closely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Diamox?

Diamox may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Diamox can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

Diamox side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blood in urine or stools;

  • a seizure (convulsions);

  • loss of movement in any part of your body;

  • a blood cell disorder–sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, mouth sores, pale skin, feeling tired or short of breath, rapid heart rate, nosebleeds, bleeding gums;

  • liver problems–nausea, upper stomach pain or swelling, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • signs of metabolic acidosis–confusion, vomiting, lack of energy, irregular heartbeats;

  • signs of a kidney stone–pain in your side or lower back, blood in your urine, painful or difficult urination; or

  • severe skin reaction–fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea;

  • numbness or tingling, especially in your arms and legs;

  • drowsiness, confusion;

  • hearing problems, ringing in your ears;

  • increased urination; or

  • altered sense of taste.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Diamox?

Other drugs may interact with acetazolamide, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Diamox (acetazolamide)

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  • Drug class: carbonic anhydrase inhibitor anticonvulsants

Professional resources

  • Diamox (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +1 more

Other Formulations

  • Diamox Sequels

Related treatment guides

  • Glaucoma
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Edema
  • Epilepsy
  • … +3 more

acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)

Brand Names: Diamox, Diamox Sequels

Generic Name: acetazolamide

  • What is acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What are the possible side effects of acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • How should I take acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What should I avoid while taking acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • What other drugs will affect acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?
  • Where can I get more information (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?

What is acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?

Acetazolamide reduces the activity of a protein in your body called carbonic anhydrase. Blocking this protein can help reduce the build-up of certain fluids in the body.

Acetazolamide is used in people with certain types of glaucoma to reduce the amount of fluid in the eye, which decreases pressure inside the eye.

Acetazolamide is also used as a diuretic (“water pill”) in people with congestive heart failure, to reduce the build-up of fluid in the body. This build-up is called edema.

Acetazolamide is also used to treat certain types of seizures, and to treat or prevent altitude sickness.

Acetazolamide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

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Diamox Sequels 500 mg

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What are the possible side effects of acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blood in urine or stools;
  • a seizure (convulsions);
  • loss of movement in any part of your body;
  • a blood cell disorder–sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, mouth sores, pale skin, feeling tired or short of breath, rapid heart rate, nosebleeds, bleeding gums;
  • liver problems–nausea, upper stomach pain or swelling, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • signs of metabolic acidosis–confusion, vomiting, lack of energy, irregular heartbeats;
  • signs of a kidney stone–pain in your side or lower back, blood in your urine, painful or difficult urination; or
  • severe skin reaction–fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea;
  • numbness or tingling, especially in your arms and legs;
  • drowsiness, confusion;
  • hearing problems, ringing in your ears;
  • increased urination; or
  • altered sense of taste.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about acetazolamide (Diamox, Diamox Sequels)?

You should not use this medicine if you have cirrhosis, severe liver or kidney disease, an electrolyte imbalance, adrenal gland failure, or an allergy to acetazolamide or sulfa drugs.

Starting Acetazolamide (Diamox)

Because this is a frequently asked question from patients we post here a reply:

Question:

My doctor wants to prescribe a medication called acetazolamide. Is that okay for someone with Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. When I look on the web it says this medication causes you to excrete potassium. How can that be good for me?

Answer:

The “starter pak” is Diamox (acetazolamide) plus a potassium supplement. While Diamox reduces (or stops) the number of attacks, it also causes you to excrete potassium in your urine, so you need to take some potassium to make up for what you lose.

Diamox can cause uncomfortable (but not dangerous) side effects if you begin with too large of a dose. The side effects are:

1) tingling in fingers, toes, cheeks, lips and end of the nose, especially if you go out in the cold,

2) headache

3) visual weirdness. Diamox was used originally to treat people with glaucoma, which causes too much pressure inside the eyeball. It reduces the pressure inside your eyeballs and changes the shape of your eyes slightly.

4) Diamox also can cause some stomach pain, nausea and loss of appetite. People often lose 10 pounds when they first go on it. It’s best to take it with a meal. The weight-loss effect doesn’t last or it would be sold as a weight-loss drug.

5) it makes carbonated beverages like coke, pepsi, etc. taste weird for about six months. This effect fades after a while.

Talk to your doctor about starting Diamox slowly. Most have no objections to a slow start to reduce chances of side effects. If at any point side effects are bothersome you can stay at that level until you adjust and then begin moving up again. After reports from hundreds of patients it seems the best way to start Diamox is to take 1/2 of a 250 mg tablet (that is 125 mg) with your breakfast, and no more, for an entire week. If you have no uncomfortable side effects, then in the second week you take 1/2 pill at breakfast and 1/2 pill with dinner. In the third week you take 1/2 pill with breakfast, lunch and dinner. In the fourth week you take 1/2 pill with each meal and 1/2 pill with a substantial snack before bed. By this point you may find you are taking enough to make you feel much much better. But you continue with this incremental regime until you reach the lowest dose which controls your symptoms.

If 1/2 of a pill (or 125 mg) causes very unpleasant side effects, drop back to 1/4 of a pill and follow the regime above, increasing only in 1/4 increments.

>What kind of potassium will he give me? I thought potassium was dangerous.

As far as potassium is concerned, individuals vary, there are dozens of different kinds on the market and your doctor may have a preference for the one he wants you to try. I find that one called “K-Lyte” is easiest on my stomach. It’s a big tablet like an alka-selzter. You drop it in water and it fizzes up to produce an orange-flavoured drink which doesn’t taste too bad. We vary as which kind of potassium works best for us and which bothers our stomach the least. But K-Lyte is a good place to start. You usually take one or two a day to replace the potassium Diamox makes you pee out.

Potassium is required by the body to function, and in your case the abnormal movement of potassium into your muscles is causing an imbalance between the level inside and outside the muscle cell. Taking some potassium helps to correct that imbalance and makes the muscle cells function more normally.

The weakness in your legs you describe is almost certainly what is called an “abortive attack”. That’s an attack where you are more or less weak for long periods of time. The amount of weakness may vary from day to day, or even hour to hour, but this is the kind of weakness which eventually becomes permanent. We think that taking Diamox and potassium (K+) can help reduce or even avoid the development of permanent weakness. The mantra is “Time is Muscle”.

Acetazolamide

SIDE EFFECTS: Dizziness, lightheadedness, and an increased amount of urine may occur, especially during the first few days as your body adjusts to the medication. Blurred vision, dry mouth, drowsiness, loss of appetite, stomach upset, headache and tiredness may also occur. If any of these symptoms persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these very unlikely but serious side effects occur: increased body hair, hearing loss, ringing in the ears, unusual tiredness, persistent nausea/vomiting, severe stomach/abdominal pain.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of these unlikely but very serious side effects occur: easy bleeding/bruising, fast/irregular heartbeat, signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, difficulty concentrating), severe muscle cramps/pain, tingling of the hands/feet, blood in the urine, dark urine, painful urination, yellowing of the eyes/skin.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: blisters/sores in the mouth, rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Acetazolamide (Acetazolamide Tablets)

It may be easy to assume that a diuretic to treat a common illness, such as altitude sickness, is safe to use if you’re an athlete. Especially if it’s prescribed by a physician. In sports with weight categories, like mixed martial arts, wrestling, and boxing, water pills might also be a cultural staple used to make weight during the weight cutting process.

However, it’s important for athletes to realize that diuretics like acetazolamide are prohibited in sport. Keep reading to learn more.

What is acetazolamide?

Acetazolamide is a type of diuretic, or water pill, that causes the body to excrete more water than usual. It is prescribed for various ailments that are caused or made worse by excess fluid build-up (edema), such as high blood pressure, glaucoma, kidney failure, congestive heart failure, or altitude sickness. In the U.S., acetazolamide is available by prescription only, but in some countries, it can be purchased over the counter.

Is acetazolamide prohibited?

Acetazolamide is prohibited at all times, both in and out-of-competition, under the category of Diuretics and Masking Agents on the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List. Diuretics like acetazolamide increase the rate at which the body gets rid of water (which dilutes the urine) and change how drugs are metabolized. Both actions affect anti-doping tests, which is why diuretics are prohibited. The use of any diuretic requires a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

Can athletes use acetazolamide if it’s prescribed for altitude sickness?

Altitude sickness occurs when the body cannot adapt quickly enough to the low air pressure and oxygen levels at high altitudes, leading to symptoms that may include breathlessness, fatigue, headache, and nausea. In more severe cases, it can also lead to fluid build-up in the brain and lungs.

USADA will not grant a TUE in advance for the use of acetazolamide or other diuretics to prevent altitude sickness, since athletes can usually avoid these situations through advanced planning and altitude acclimatization. Once an athlete is suffering from altitude sickness with no option to go to lower elevations, and a physician has prescribed acetazolamide for urgent treatment, then athletes should receive treatment and immediately apply for an Emergency TUE or request a Retroactive TUE after the fact depending on the specific circumstances.

For more information about TUEs, contact USADA’s Drug Reference Line at [email protected] or call (719) 785-2000, option 2.

Do athletes need to use acetazolamide for weight cutting?

Some athletes might misuse diuretics like acetazolamide for weight-cutting purposes to quickly make weight in sports with weight categories like mixed martial arts, wrestling, taekwondo, and boxing.

Not only is diuretic-induced dehydration for weight cutting prohibited in sport, it is also a dangerous practice that can lead to sudden drops in blood pressure, overheating, confusion, organ failure, and seizure.

Can athletes get a TUE for acetazolamide?

Yes, but it must be prescribed for a confirmed diagnosis of a medical condition that will cause significant impairment to an athlete’s health if the medication were withheld. Non-prohibited alternatives to acetazolamide that could address the medical condition must be thoroughly considered and the use of acetazolamide must not enhance the athlete’s performance beyond what would be considered a return to a normal state of health.

Need more information?

For questions about specific products, substances, and methods, contact USADA’s Drug Reference Line at [email protected] or call (719) 785-2000, option 2.

About acetazolamide

Type of medicine A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor
Used for Glaucoma
Also called Diamox®; Diamox® SR
Available as Tablets and modified-release capsules

An increase in pressure within your eye can lead to damage to the optic nerve at the back of your eye. When this occurs it is called glaucoma. Glaucoma can lead to a loss of vision if it is not treated. Treatment with acetazolamide helps to reduce eye pressure, and this helps to prevent further eye damage. You will also be given other medicines to help reduce the pressure in your eyes, commonly as eye drops.

Acetazolamide works by blocking the action of an enzyme called carbonic anhydrase. Blocking this enzyme reduces the amount of fluid (called aqueous humour) that you make in the front part of your eye, and this helps to lower the pressure within your eye.

Acetazolamide is sometimes prescribed for other conditions which are not covered by this leaflet. If you have been prescribed it to remove excess water from your body, to prevent altitude sickness or to help treat epilepsy, speak with your doctor if you need further advice.

Before taking acetazolamide

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking acetazolamide it is important that your doctor knows:

  • If you are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • If you have liver or kidney problems, or difficulty passing urine.
  • If you have diabetes mellitus, a condition which causes raised blood sugar levels.
  • If you have breathing problems.
  • If you have problems with your adrenal glands, such as Addison’s disease.
  • If you have been told you have low amounts of potassium or sodium, or high levels of chloride in your blood.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine. It is particularly important that you tell your doctor if you are allergic to sulfonamide antibiotics.

How to take acetazolamide

  • Before you start this treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside your pack. The manufacturer’s leaflet will give you more information about acetazolamide and a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Your doctor will prescribe you a dose that is suited to your condition, so take acetazolamide exactly as your doctor tells you to. If you are taking tablets, it will be between 1-4 tablets daily, taken in divided doses over the day. If you are taking capsules, it will be 1 or 2 capsules daily. Your dose will be printed on the label of your pack to remind you what your doctor said.
  • If you are taking capsules (brand Diamox® SR), they are specially formulated to release the medicine they contain slowly during the day to give a more even effect. Do not chew or open the capsules as this will stop them from working as intended.
  • Try to take your doses at the same times of day each day, as this will help you to remember to take acetazolamide regularly. You can take your doses either just before or just after meals.
  • If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember unless your next dose is due. If your next dose is due, then take the dose which is due but leave out the forgotten one. Do not take two doses together to make up for a missed dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Keep your regular appointments with your doctor so that your progress can be monitored.
  • Your doctor will tell you how long you will need to take acetazolamide for. It is not generally recommended for long-term use, so if you need to take it over an extended period of time, your doctor will want you to have some blood tests.
  • You should also let your doctor know if you develop an unusual skin rash while you are on acetazolamide.
  • If you buy any medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take alongside acetazolamide.
  • If you are having an operation or any medical treatment, remember to tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking or using.

Can acetazolamide cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with acetazolamide. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common acetazolamide side-effects What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sleepy, tired or dizzy Do not drive and do not use tools or machines until you feel better
Upset stomach, feeling sick (nausea), diarrhoea Stick to simple meals. Try taking the tablets after meals if you are not already doing so
Headache Drink plenty of water and ask your pharmacist to recommend a suitable painkiller. If the headaches continue, let your doctor know
A metallic taste, lack of appetite, looking flushed, feeling irritable, feeling thirsty, tingling feelings, passing urine more often If any of these become troublesome, speak with your doctor

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to this medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store acetazolamide

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Acetazolamide (Diamox) Prescribed Online

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Acetazolamide (Diamox) – Overview

Acetazolamide, marketed under the name Diamox, is a medication that is used in conditions such as altitude sickness, glaucoma, and heart failure. Push Health can connect people who need an acetazolamide prescription with a licensed medical provider who can prescribe Diamox when appropriate to do so.

Acetazolamide – Mechanism of Action

Acetazolamide (Diamox) belongs to a class of medications known as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme that is involved with the reabsorption of specific ions – an action that is blocked by acetazolamide. Through its action, acetazolamide causes the excretion of bicarbonate which causes the body to hyperventilate to compensate for acidification in the blood. Hyperventilation results lower levels of carbon dioxide and higher levels of oxygen – a state which can be beneficial in higher altitudes.

Acetazolamide – Dosage

Acetazolamide tablets are usually available as acetazolamide 125 mg, acetazolamide 250 mg and acetazolamide 500 mg tablets. For the prevention of mountain sickness, acetazolamide is often prescribed as acetazolamide 125 mg or acetazolamide 250 mg orally two to three times per day starting one to two days before ascent and continuing at least five days while at altitude. Acetazolamide can also be considered a diuretic medication.

Can I Buy Acetazolamide Online?

Acetazolamide and Diamox are prescription medications in the United States and are not available over-the-counter (OTC). Consequently, one cannot simply buy acetazolamide online. Acetazolamide is moderately affordable at under $1 per pill at most pharmacies and some of that cost might be covered by one’s insurance plan. Acetazolamide coupons might also be available online for people looking to reduce the cost even further.

Acetazolamide – Side Effects

Acetazolamide (Diamox), like other medications, can cause side effects. Side effects include loss of appetite, tinnitus, trouble sleeping, nausea, vomiting and numbness as well as electrolyte imbalances such as low sodium or potassium. Diamox (acetazolamide) should not be used by anyone who has had a hypersensitivity or allergic reaction to a sulfonamide or to the medication in the past. Acetazolamide should generally not be used by people with liver or kidney problems. Acetazolamide and alcohol use should be avoided. Before using acetazolamide, patients should discuss potential side effects and other concerns with their pharmacist and medical provider.

More Acetazolamide (Diamox) Information

Last updated April 25, 2019. Given the evolving nature of medicine and science, this information might not be accurate and should not be construed as medical advice or diagnosis / treatment recommendations. Please consult a licensed medical provider if you have additional questions.

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