Prevacid otc vs prescription

Contents

Lansoprazole for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and ulcers

This leaflet is about the use of lansoprazole for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (sometimes called GORD). Lansoprazole is also used to help with the pain from stomach ulcers and for the treatment of an infection that is linked to the development of stomach ulcers.

This leaflet has been written for parents and carers about how to use this medicine in children. Our information sometimes differs from that provided by the manufacturers, because their information is usually aimed at adult patients. Please read this leaflet carefully. Keep it somewhere safe so that you can read it again.

Name of drug

Lansoprazole
Brand names: Zoton® FasTab®

Why is it important for my child to take this medicine?

In gastro-oesophageal reflux, the contents of the stomach come back up (reflux) into the food pipe (oesophagus), which is painful and can damage the food pipe. Too much acid in the stomach can also damage the lining of the stomach or the first part of the intestine (called the duodenum), which may cause an ulcer.

Lansoprazole reduces the amount of acid in the stomach. This reduces the symptoms of heartburn and reflux and also allows any damaged areas or ulcers in the stomach or duodenum to heal.

What is lansoprazole available as?

  • Zoton FasTabs: 15 mg and 30 mg; these contain lactose and aspartame (phenylalanine)
  • Capsules: 15 mg and 30 mg

When should I give lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole is usually given once each day, usually in the morning.

Give the medicine at about the same time each day so that this becomes part of your child’s daily routine, which will help you to remember.

How much should I give?

Your doctor will work out the amount of lansoprazole (the dose) that is right for your child. The dose will be shown on the medicine label.

It is important that you follow your doctor’s instructions about how much to give.

How should I give it?

Lansoprazole is best taken when the stomach is empty. This should be at least half an hour before eating.

Do not give at the same time as antacids (e.g. Gaviscon). Leave a gap of at least 2 hours between the different medicines.

Capsules should be swallowed whole with a glass of water, milk or juice. Your child should not chew the capsules.

FasTabs are designed to melt in the mouth. Place the tablet on your child’s tongue. It should stay there until it has melted (which usually takes about a minute), or your child can suck the tablet gently. Your child can then swallow the melted tablet. Your child can swallow these tablets whole with a glass of water but they should not chew them.

You can also melt the tablet into a small amount of water (it will melt quite slowly). Do not crush the tablet. Once the tablet has melted/dissolved, stir the mixture well and then give to your child using a spoon or oral syringe. They should take it all, straight away.

When should the medicine start working?

Lansoprazole starts working straight away and your child should start to have less discomfort and reflux. It may take several days for the stomach ulcer to heal and for your child’s stomach pain to feel better. It may take up to 4 weeks for lansoprazole to work fully so your child may have some symptoms during this time.

It is important that you continue to give lansoprazole during this time. If you are not sure whether the medicine is working contact your doctor.

What if my child is sick (vomits)?

  • If your child is sick less than 30 minutes after having a dose of lansoprazole, give them the same dose again.
  • If your child is sick more than 30 minutes after having a dose of lansoprazole, you do not need to give them another dose. Wait until the next normal dose.

If your child is sick again, seek advice from your GP, pharmacist or hospital. They will decide what to do based on your child’s condition and the specific medicine involved.

What if I forget to give it?

If you remember before bedtime, give your child the missed dose. If you remember after this time, do not give the missed dose. Give the next dose as usual in the morning.

What if I give too much?

It may be dangerous to give too much lansoprazole.

If you think you may have given your child too much lansoprazole, contact your doctor or local NHS services (111 in England and Scotland; 0845 4647 in Wales) or take your child to hospital.

Take the medicine container or packaging with you, even if it is empty. This will be useful to the doctor. Have the medicine or packaging with you if you telephone for advice.

Are there any possible side-effects?

We use medicines to make our children better, but sometimes they have other effects that we don’t want (side-effects). Lansoprazole rarely causes side-effects.

Side-effects you must do something about

If your child develops a rash, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat, or has difficulty breathing or swallowing, contact your doctor or take your child to hospital straight away. They may be allergic to lansoprazole.

If your child has stomach pain that seems to be getting worse, contact your doctor or take your child to hospital straight away. They may have inflammation of the liver or pancreas.

If your child develops blistering of the skin or other skin reactions, contact your doctor or take your child to hospital straight away. They could have an infection of the skin, which could get worse.

Other side-effects you need to know about

  • Your child may have stomach pain, feel sick or be sick (vomit) or they may get diarrhoea or constipation (difficulty doing a poo). These usually resolve once your child stops taking lansoprazole.
  • Your child may get headaches. Contact your doctor if you are worried or they are severe or prolonged.
  • Your child’s hair may get thinner. It should get thicker again when they stop taking lansoprazole. If you are worried about this, discuss it with your doctor at your next appointment.
  • Your child’s fingers and toes may swell and get itchy. Try applying a moisturising cream or anti-itch cream. This effect usually wears off. If still a problem after 2 weeks contact your doctor.
  • Some children feel sleepy, but some find it hard to get to sleep at night. If this is still a problem after about 2 weeks, contact your doctor.
  • Your child may rarely develop small bruises. Contact your doctor if this happens.
  • Rarely lansoprazole may cause dizziness, blurred vision, hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there) or confusion. Contact your doctor if this happens.

There may, sometimes, be other side-effects that are not listed above. If you notice anything unusual and are concerned, contact your doctor. You can report any suspected side-effects to a UK safety scheme at http://www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Can other medicines be given at the same time?

  • Do not give lansoprazole at the same time as antacids (e.g. Gaviscon). Leave a gap of at least 2 hours between different medicines.
  • You can give your child medicines that contain paracetamol or ibuprofen, unless your doctor has told you not to.
  • Lansoprazole should not be taken with some common drugs that you get on prescription. Tell your doctor and pharmacist about any other medicines your child is taking.
  • Check with your doctor or pharmacist before giving any other medicines to your child. This includes herbal or complementary medicines.

Is there anything else I need to know?

  • Lansoprazole may be used with other medicines to treat a stomach infection caused by Helicobacter pylori (also called H. pylori).

General advice about medicines

  • Try to give medicines at about the same times each day to help you remember.
  • Only give this medicine to your child. Never give it to anyone else, even if their condition appears to be the same, as this could do harm.
  • If you think someone else may have taken the medicine by accident, contact your doctor for advice.
  • Make sure that you always have enough medicine. Order a new prescription at least 2 weeks before you will run out.
  • Make sure that the medicine you have at home has not reached the ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ date on the packaging. Give old medicines to your pharmacist to dispose of.

Where should I keep this medicine?

  • Keep the medicine in a cupboard, away from heat and direct sunlight. It does not need to be kept in the fridge.
  • Make sure that children cannot see or reach the medicine.
  • Keep the medicine in the container it came in.

Who to contact for more information

Your doctor or pharmacist will be able to give you more information about lansoprazole and other medicines used to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and stomach ulcers.

What is lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole is a medicine that reduces the amount of acid that your stomach produces. It’s prescribed to treat and prevent stomach ulcers, as well as heartburn and indigestion associated with acid reflux.

Lansoprazole is only available on prescription in the UK. It comes as gastro-resistant capsules and tablets that dissolve on the tongue (orodispersible tablets). Both come in 15mg and 30mg strengths. The orodispersible tablets are also available under the brand name Zoton FasTabs.

What is lansoprazole used for?

Your doctor may prescribe lansoprazole for one of the following reasons:

  • Relieving indigestion and heartburn related to excess stomach acid.
  • Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (acid reflux).
  • Treating stomach and duodenal ulcers (peptic ulcers).
  • Eradicating the bacteria in the gut (Helicobacter pylori) that cause peptic ulcers (in combination with antibiotics).
  • Preventing and treating peptic ulcers associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac. Lansoprazole also relieves side effects such as indigestion that can be associated with these medicines.
  • Treating Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, where there is excessive secretion of stomach acid due to a tumour or enlargement of the pancreas.

Related Story

How does lansoprazole work?

Lansoprazole is a type of medicine called a proton pump inhibitor. Proton pumps are found on cells that line the stomach and are used by these cells to produce stomach acid. Lansoprazole works by stopping the proton pumps from working and this reduces the production of stomach acid.

By reducing stomach acid lansoprazole can help relieve indigestion symptoms, as well as painful heartburn symptoms caused by excess acid flowing back into the foodpipe (acid reflux). It also allows the foodpipe (oesophagus) to heal if it has been damaged by the acid.

By reducing the amount of acid in the stomach and duodenum, lansoprazole allows peptic ulcers to heal. It can be continued after they have healed to prevent them coming back.

Related Story

When taken with antibiotics to help eradicate H pylori bacteria from the stomach, lansoprazole helps create a less acidic environment in the gut in which the antibiotics can be more effective at killing the bacteria.

Lansoprazole helps protect your gut if you’re taking an anti-inflammatory painkiller like diclofenac. These painkillers stop your stomach from producing prostaglandins that normally protect your stomach lining from stomach acid. Lansoprazole helps to minimise the amount of stomach acid that can irritate your stomach while you’re taking these painkillers.

How long does lansoprazole take to work?

This depends on what condition is being treated. You should get some relief from heartburn and indigestion symptoms straight away, or at least in the first few days of taking lansoprazole.

However, you may need to keep taking lansoprazole for a few weeks, depending on why you are taking it. Some conditions may require you to take lansoprazole on a long-term basis, either to keep symptoms under control or to avoid the condition coming back.

More information about lansoprazole

  • What should I know before taking lansoprazole?
  • Who can and can’t take lansoprazole?
  • Can I take lansoprazole while pregnant or breastfeeding?
  • How do you take lansoprazole?
  • What are the side effects of lansoprazole?
  • Can I take other medicines with lansoprazole?

Last updated: 25.03.2019

Helen Marshall, BPharm, MRPharmS Helen Marshall, BPharm, MRPharmS A UK registered pharmacist with a background in hospital pharmacy.

Prevacid

Generic Name: lansoprazole (lan SOE pra zol)
Brand Names: FIRST Lansoprazole, Prevacid

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Apr 6, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

What is Prevacid?

Prevacid (lansoprazole) is a proton pump inhibitor. Lansoprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Prevacid is used to treat and prevent stomach and intestinal ulcers, erosive esophagitis (damage to the esophagus from stomach acid), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Prevacid OTC (over-the-counter) is used to treat frequent heartburn that happens 2 or more days per week.

Prevacid is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Important Information

Prevacid can cause kidney problems. Tell your doctor if you are urinating less than usual, or if you have blood in your urine.

Diarrhea may be a sign of a new infection. Call your doctor if you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it.

Prevacid may cause new or worsening symptoms of lupus. Tell your doctor if you have joint pain and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

You may be more likely to have a broken bone while taking this medicine long term or more than once per day.

If you also take sucralfate (Carafate), avoid taking it at the same time you take lansoprazole. Sucralfate can make it harder for your body to absorb lansoprazole. Wait at least 30 minutes after taking this medicine before you take sucralfate.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Prevacid if you are allergic to lansoprazole, or if you take any medicine that contains rilpivirine (Edurant, Complera, Odefsey).

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel anxious or light-headed.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease;

  • lupus;

  • low levels of magnesium in your blood; or

  • osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia).

Do not use over-the-counter Prevacid OTC without the advice of a doctor if you have:

  • trouble or pain with swallowing;

  • bloody or black stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;

  • heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;

  • frequent chest pain, heartburn with wheezing;

  • unexplained weight loss;

  • nausea or vomiting, stomach pain; or

  • an electrolyte imbalance or metabolic disorder.

Prevacid SoluTabs contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

You may be more likely to have a broken bone in your hip, wrist, or spine while taking a proton pump inhibitor long-term or more than once per day. Talk with your doctor about ways to keep your bones healthy.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor

Do not give lansoprazole to a child younger than 1 year old. Prevacid OTC is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I take Prevacid?

Use Prevacid exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor and read all medication guides or instruction sheets.

Prevacid is usually taken before eating. Prevacid OTC should be taken in the morning before you eat breakfast.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open a delayed-release capsule. Swallow the capsule whole.

If you are unable to swallow a delayed-release capsule whole:

  • Open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding, applesauce, yogurt, cottage cheese, or strained pears. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use.

  • You may also dissolve the medicine in 2 ounces (1/4 cup) of apple juice, orange juice, or tomato juice. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more juice to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

  • The delayed-release capsule contents may also be given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube. Open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into 40 milliliters of apple juice (do not use any other liquid). Inject all of this mixture through the NG tube and into the stomach. Then flush the tube with more apple juice to wash the contents down.

Do not break, chew, or cut an orally disintegrating tablet, and do not swallow it whole. Allow the tablet to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

If you are unable to dissolve the orally disintegrating tablet in your mouth:

  • Place a 15-milligram tablet into an oral syringe and draw 4 milliliters of water into the syringe. If using a 30-milligram tablet, draw 10 milliliters of water into the syringe.

  • Shake the syringe gently until the tablet is dispersed. Then empty the syringe into your mouth within 15 minutes after mixing. Refill the syringe with water, shake gently, and empty into your mouth.

  • The orally disintegrating tablet may also be given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube as follows: Disperse the tablet in an oral syringe as directed above. Then inject the mixture through the NG tube into the stomach within 15 minutes. Flush the tube with 5 more milliliters of water to wash the contents down.

Take Prevacid for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before your condition is completely treated.

Prevacid OTC should be taken only once daily for 14 days. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prevacid OTC.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking Prevacid. If you take Prevacid OTC, call your doctor if your heartburn gets worse over the 14-day treatment, or if you need treatment more than once every 4 months.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed.

If you use lansoprazole for longer than 3 years, you could develop a vitamin B-12 deficiency. Talk to your doctor about how to manage this condition if you develop it.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not freeze the liquid medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Prevacid?

This medicine can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

Prevacid side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction ro Prevacid: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

  • new or unusual pain in your wrist, back, hip, or thigh;

  • a seizure (convulsions);

  • kidney problems – little or no urination, blood in your urine, swelling, rapid weight gain;

  • low magnesium – dizziness, fast or irregular heart rate, tremors (shaking) or jerking muscle movements, feeling jittery, muscle cramps, muscle spasms in your hands and feet, cough or choking feeling; or

  • new or worsening symptoms of lupus – joint pain, and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

Common Prevacid side effects may include:

  • nausea, stomach pain;

  • diarrhea, constipation; or

  • headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Prevacid?

Sucralfate (Carafate) can make it harder for your body to absorb lansoprazole. Wait at least 30 minutes after taking lansoprazole before you take sucralfate.

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Tell your doctor if you use methotrexate.

Many drugs can interact with lansoprazole, and some drugs should not be used at the same time. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Prevacid only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 15.02.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Prevacid (lansoprazole)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 53 Reviews
  • Generic Availability
  • Drug class: proton pump inhibitors
  • FDA Alerts (4)

Consumer resources

  • Prevacid
  • Prevacid (Advanced Reading)

Professional resources

  • Prevacid (FDA)
  • … +2 more

Other Formulations

  • Prevacid SoluTab
  • Prevacid OTC

Related treatment guides

  • Barrett’s Esophagus
  • Aspiration Pneumonia
  • Duodenal Ulcer
  • Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis
  • … +9 more

Prevacid SoluTab

Generic Name: lansoprazole (lan SOE pra zol)
Brand Name: FIRST Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Prevacid OTC, Prevacid SoluTab

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Jun 25, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • More

What is Prevacid SoluTab?

Prevacid SoluTab is a proton pump inhibitor. This medicine decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Prevacid SoluTab is used to treat and prevent stomach and intestinal ulcers, erosive esophagitis (damage to the esophagus from stomach acid), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Over-the-counter Prevacid SoluTab (Prevacid OTC) is used to treat frequent heartburn that happens 2 or more days per week.

Prevacid SoluTab is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Prevacid SoluTab may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Prevacid SoluTab can cause kidney problems. Tell your doctor if you are urinating less than usual, or if you have blood in your urine.

Diarrhea may be a sign of a new infection. Call your doctor if you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it.

Prevacid SoluTab may cause new or worsening symptoms of lupus. Tell your doctor if you have joint pain and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

You may be more likely to have a broken bone while taking Prevacid SoluTab long term or more than once per day.

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel anxious or light-headed.

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to Prevacid SoluTab, or if you take any medicine that contains rilpivirine (Edurant, Complera, Odefsey).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease;

  • lupus;

  • low levels of magnesium in your blood; or

  • osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia).

Do not use over-the-counter Prevacid SoluTab (Prevacid OTC) without the advice of a doctor if you have:

  • trouble or pain with swallowing;

  • bloody or black stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;

  • heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;

  • frequent chest pain, heartburn with wheezing;

  • unexplained weight loss;

  • nausea or vomiting, stomach pain; or

  • an electrolyte imbalance or metabolic disorder.

Some forms of lansoprazole may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

You may be more likely to have a broken bone in your hip, wrist, or spine while taking a proton pump inhibitor long-term or more than once per day. Talk with your doctor about ways to keep your bones healthy.

Do not give Prevacid SoluTab to a child younger than 1 year old. Prevacid OTC is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I take Prevacid SoluTab?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Prevacid SoluTab is usually taken before eating. Prevacid OTC should be taken in the morning before you eat breakfast.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Swallow the capsule whole and do not crush, chew, break, or open it.

Remove an orally disintegrating tablet from the package only when you are ready to take the medicine. Place the tablet in your mouth and allow it to dissolve, without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Use Prevacid SoluTab for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve.

Prevacid OTC should be taken only once daily for 14 days. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prevacid OTC.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking Prevacid SoluTab. If you take Prevacid OTC, call your doctor if your heartburn gets worse over the 14-day treatment, or if you need treatment more than once every 4 months.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not freeze the liquid medicine.

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Prevacid SoluTab?

Prevacid SoluTab can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

What other drugs will affect Prevacid SoluTab?

Sucralfate (Carafate) can make it harder for your body to absorb Prevacid SoluTab. Wait at least 30 minutes after taking this medicine before you take sucralfate.

Tell your doctor if you use methotrexate.

Many drugs can affect Prevacid SoluTab, and some drugs should not be used at the same time. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about Prevacid SoluTab (lansoprazole)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 2 Reviews
  • Drug class: proton pump inhibitors
  • FDA Alerts (4)
  • Prevacid SoluTab
  • Prevacid SoluTab (Advanced Reading)
  • Lansoprazole (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +1 more
  • Prevacid
  • Prevacid OTC
  • Aspiration Pneumonia
  • Barrett’s Esophagus
  • Duodenal Ulcer
  • Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis
  • … +9 more

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lansoprazole?

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel anxious or light-headed.

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to lansoprazole, or if you take any medicine that contains rilpivirine (Edurant, Complera, Odefsey).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease;
  • lupus;
  • low levels of magnesium in your blood; or
  • osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia).

Do not use over-the-counter lansoprazole (Prevacid OTC) without the advice of a doctor if you have:

  • trouble or pain with swallowing;
  • bloody or black stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;
  • heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;
  • frequent chest pain, heartburn with wheezing;
  • unexplained weight loss;
  • nausea or vomiting, stomach pain; or
  • an electrolyte imbalance or metabolic disorder.

Some forms of lansoprazole may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

You may be more likely to have a broken bone in your hip, wrist, or spine while taking a proton pump inhibitor long-term or more than once per day. Talk with your doctor about ways to keep your bones healthy.

Do not give lansoprazole to a child younger than 1 year old. Prevacid OTC is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I take lansoprazole?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Lansoprazole is usually taken before eating. Prevacid OTC should be taken in the morning before you eat breakfast.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Swallow the capsule whole and do not crush, chew, break, or open it.

Remove an orally disintegrating tablet from the package only when you are ready to take the medicine. Place the tablet in your mouth and allow it to dissolve, without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve.

Prevacid OTC should be taken only once daily for 14 days. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prevacid OTC.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking lansoprazole. If you take Prevacid OTC, call your doctor if your heartburn gets worse over the 14-day treatment, or if you need treatment more than once every 4 months.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not freeze the liquid medicine.

WEDNESDAY, June 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Many people with heartburn aren’t taking their acid-reducing medicine at the right time, which makes the drugs less effective and wastes money, according to new research.

Only about one-third of those buying these medications — such as Nexium, Prevacid and Prilosec — over-the-counter used them properly compared to just under half of those who were prescribed the drugs by their primary care doctor. Those who were given a prescription by a gastroenterologist were most likely to use the drugs as they’re supposed to be used, with seven out of 10 taking the drugs properly, according to the study.

These drugs are activated once in the body, said the study’s senior author, Dr. M. Michael Wolfe, a gastroenterologist and chair of the department of medicine at MetroHealth System. “In order to activate the medicine, you must eat. For that reason, you take it before breakfast. If you don’t take the drug correctly, you don’t do as well,” Wolfe said.

Despite labels advising users to take the drugs before breakfast, people aren’t following those directions, he said. Those who aren’t taking the medicines properly “are wasting money, they’re not feeling well and they aren’t getting symptom relief,” Wolfe added.

The study was published in the June issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Heartburn is a painful, burning feeling just below the breastbone, experienced at least once a month by about 44 percent of U.S. adults. About 7 percent have heartburn daily. Frequent heartburn may indicate a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Food and acid from the stomach backs up, or refluxes, into the esophagus. Reflux can damage the esophagus and cause serious issues over time.

Direct costs related to GERD, including acid-reducing medicines, top $10 billion each year in the United States, according to background information in the study.

The medications looked at in this study are a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors. They work by reducing the amount of stomach acid produced, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Unlike antacids, such as Tums or Rolaids, proton pump inhibitors don’t provide immediate relief of heartburn symptoms. It takes about 7 days of continuous use for the drugs to reach their maximum acid-suppressing potential, the study noted.

About lansoprazole

Type of medicine Proton pump inhibitor
Used for Gastric ulcer; duodenal ulcer; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; Helicobacter pylori infection; Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; acid-related dyspepsia
Also called (UK) Zoton FasTab®
Also called (USA) Prevacid®; Prevacid SoluTab®
Available as Capsules, orodispersible (melt-in-the-mouth) tablets

Acid is produced naturally in your stomach to help you digest food and to kill bacteria. This acid is irritant so your body produces a natural mucous barrier which protects the lining of your stomach. In some people, this barrier can break down allowing the acid to damage the stomach, causing inflammation, ulcers and other conditions. Other people can have a problem with the muscular band at the top of the stomach that keeps the stomach tightly closed. This may allow the acid to escape and irritate the oesophagus, causing heartburn. This is often referred to as ‘acid reflux’.
Proton pump inhibitors such as lansoprazole stop cells in the lining of the stomach from producing too much acid. This helps to prevent ulcers from forming, or assists the healing process where damage has already occurred. By decreasing the amount of acid, they can also help to reduce the symptoms of acid reflux disease, such as heartburn.
Lansoprazole is also given as one part of a treatment to get rid of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium found in the stomach, which can cause ulcers.

Before taking lansoprazole

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking lansoprazole it is important that your doctor or pharmacist knows:

  • If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding.
  • If you have any problems with the way your liver works.
  • If you have any of the following symptoms: difficulty swallowing, loss of blood, weight loss, or if you are being sick (vomiting).
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.

How to take lansoprazole

  • Before you start this treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about lansoprazole and will provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Take lansoprazole exactly as your doctor tells you to. There are different strengths of tablets and capsules available so your doctor will tell you which is right for you. It is usually taken once a day in the morning. If you are taking it for either Helicobacter pylori eradication or for Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, it is likely you will be asked to take two doses a day. Your doctor will tell you which dose is right for you and the directions will also be on the label of the pack to remind you.
  • Lansoprazole should be taken at least 30 minutes before a meal, which is usually breakfast. This is because your body absorbs less lansoprazole after you have eaten a meal, so the medicine is less effective. If you have been asked to take two doses daily, take your first dose 30 minutes before breakfast and your second dose in the evening.
  • If you have been given capsules to take, swallow the capsule with a drink of water. Do not chew, crush or open the capsule before you swallow.
  • If you have been given orodispersible tablets (Zoton FasTabs®), you can swallow the tablet with a drink of water as usual, or you can place it on your tongue and allow it to ‘melt’ there before you swallow. Alternatively, you can stir it into a small amount of water to take it.
  • Do not take indigestion remedies during the two hours before or during the two hours after you take lansoprazole as they can interfere with the way lansoprazole is absorbed by your body.
  • If you forget to take a dose at your usual time, you can take it when you remember (unless it is nearly time for your next dose, in which case leave out the missed dose). Do not take two doses at the same time to make up for a forgotten dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Try to keep your regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your progress can be checked. If you are taking lansoprazole on a long-term basis your doctor will want to review your treatment at least once a year to make sure it is still right for you.
  • Typical courses of treatment last for one or two weeks if you are taking lansoprazole for Helicobacter pylori eradication. If you are taking it for acid-related dyspepsia, your treatment will typically last for two to four weeks. It will last for around one or two months if it is for an ulcer. For acid reflux or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, your treatment will last for as long as is necessary to control your symptoms.
  • Some foods may make your symptoms worse. Foods and drinks that have been suspected of this include peppermint, tomatoes, chocolate, spicy foods, hot drinks, coffee, and alcoholic drinks. If it seems that a food is aggravating your symptoms, try avoiding it for a while to see if your symptoms improve. Also, try avoiding eating large meals, as these can make your symptoms worse too.
  • If you are overweight, it puts extra pressure on your stomach and encourages the symptoms of acid reflux. Losing some weight and eating a healthy balanced diet may help you.
  • Smoking increases the amount of acid produced by the stomach and may make your symptoms worse. If you are a smoker, speak with your doctor or pharmacist about how to quit.
  • Recent studies suggest that there may be a slight increase in the risk of bone fractures when proton pump inhibitors like lansoprazole are taken for longer than a year. If this affects you, your doctor will check that you are taking enough vitamin D and calcium to reduce this risk.
  • If you buy any medicines ‘over-the-counter’, always check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take alongside your other medicines.

Can lansoprazole cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with lansoprazole. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common lansoprazole side-effects (these affect less than 1 in 10 people) What can I do if I experience this?
Stomach upset (such as feeling sick (nausea), stomach ache, or wind) Stick to simple meals – avoid rich or spicy foods
Diarrhoea Drink plenty of water. If it continues or becomes severe, let your doctor know
Constipation Try to eat a well-balanced diet and drink several glasses of water each day
Headache Drink plenty of water and ask your pharmacist to recommend a suitable painkiller. If the headaches continue, let your doctor know
Feeling dizzy or tired Do not drive and do not use tools or machines until you feel better
Dry mouth or throat, itchy skin rash If any of these become troublesome, let your doctor know

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store lansoprazole

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

If you are having an operation or any dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

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