Prednisolone AC 1%

Contents

Prednisolone (ophthalmic)

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Nov 28, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is prednisolone ophthalmic?

Prednisolone ophthalmic (for the eyes) is a steroid medicine used to treat eye inflammation caused by allergies, severe acne, shingles (herpes zoster), eye injury, chemical burns, or certain other conditions.

Prednisolone ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use prednisolone if you have an eye infection (including herpes simplex).

Before taking this medicine

You should not use prednisolone if you are allergic to it, or if you have an eye infection (including herpes simplex).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • glaucoma; or

  • cataracts.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

You should not breast-feed while using prednisolone ophthalmic.

Prednisolone ophthalmic is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take prednisolone ophthalmic?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Shake the eye drops well just before each use.

Wash your hands before using eye medication.

Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye and squeeze a drop into this pocket. Close your eyes for 1 or 2 minutes.

Use only the number of drops your doctor has prescribed.

Do not touch the tip of the eye dropper or place it directly on your eye. A contaminated dropper can infect your eye, which could lead to serious vision problems.

Do not use while wearing soft contact lenses. A preservative in prednisolone could permanently stain the lenses. Use the medicine at least 15 minutes before inserting your contact lenses.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 2 days of treatment.

If you use this medicine for longer than 10 days, you may need frequent vision tests to check the pressure inside your eyes.

Store this medicine in an upright position at room temperature. Do not freeze.

You should not stop using this medicine suddenly. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of prednisolone ophthalmic is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

What should I avoid while taking prednisolone ophthalmic?

Do not share prednisolone with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Prednisolone ophthalmic side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;

  • small white or yellow patches on the surface of your eye;

  • pain behind your eyes; or

  • signs of eye infection–swelling, redness, severe discomfort, crusting or drainage.

Common side effects may include:

  • mild stinging, burning, or irritation in your eyes.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prednisolone ophthalmic?

Medicine used in the eyes is not likely to be affected by other drugs you use. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about prednisolone ophthalmic

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 16 Reviews
  • Drug class: ophthalmic steroids

Consumer resources

  • Prednisolone Eye Drops (Solution)
  • Prednisolone Eye Drops (Suspension)
  • Prednisolone Ophthalmic (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Pred Forte, Prednisol, Omnipred, Pred Mild, … +5 more

Professional resources

  • Prednisolone Acetate eent (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +4 more

Related treatment guides

  • Iritis
  • Postoperative Ocular Inflammation
  • Conjunctivitis, Allergic
  • Keratitis

What is Prednisolone Acetate?

For patients who wear contact lenses:

  • Use of ophthalmic corticosteroids while you are wearing contact lenses (either hard lenses or soft lenses) may increase the chance of infection. Therefore, do not apply this medicine while you are wearing contact lenses. Also, check with an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) for advice on how long to wait after applying this medicine before inserting your contact lenses. It is possible that you may be directed not to wear contact lenses at all during the entire time of treatment and for a day or two after treatment has been stopped.

For patients using an ophthalmic solution or suspension (eye drop) form of this medicine:

  • If you are using a suspension form of this medicine, always shake the container very well just before applying the eye drops.
  • To use:
    • First, wash your hands. Tilt the head back and, pressing your finger gently on the skin just beneath the lower eyelid, pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to make a space. Drop the medicine into this space. Let go of the eyelid and gently close the eyes. Do not blink. Keep the eyes closed and apply pressure to the inner corner of the eye with your finger for 1 or 2 minutes to allow the medicine to be absorbed by the eye.
    • If you think you did not get the drop of medicine into your eye properly, use another drop.
    • Immediately after using the eye drops, wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them.
    • To keep the medicine as germ-free as possible, do not touch the dropper or the applicator tip to any surface (including the eye). Always keep the container tightly closed.

For patients using an ointment form of this medicine:

  • First, wash your hands. Tilt the head back and, pressing your finger gently on the skin just beneath the lower eyelid, pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to make a space. Squeeze a thin strip of ointment into this space. A 1-cm (approximately ⅓ inch) strip of ointment is usually enough, unless you have been told by your doctor to use a different amount. Let go of the eyelid and gently close the eyes. Keep the eyes closed for 1 or 2 minutes to allow the medicine to come into contact with the irritation.
  • First, wash your hands. Tilt the head back and, pressing your finger gently on the skin just beneath the lower eyelid, pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to make a space. Squeeze a thin strip of ointment into this space. A 1-cm (approximately 1/3 inch) strip of ointment is usually enough, unless you have been told by your doctor to use a different amount. Let go of the eyelid and gently close the eyes. Keep the eyes closed for 1 or 2 minutes to allow the medicine to come into contact with the irritation.
  • To keep the medicine as germ-free as possible, do not touch the applicator tip to any surface (including the eye). After using the eye ointment, wipe the tip of the ointment tube with a clean tissue. Do not wash the tip with water. Always keep the tube tightly closed.

Do not use corticosteroids more often or for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects, especially in children 2 years of age or younger.

Do not use any leftover medicine for future eye problems without first checking with your doctor. This medicine should not be used if certain kinds of infections are present. To do so may make the infection worse and possibly lead to eye damage.

Treatment


Uveitis

Do not stop using your eyedrops until a GP or ophthalmologist tells you it’s safe to do stop, even if your symptoms disappear. Stopping treatment too soon could lead to your symptoms returning. The frequency of drops will usually be slowly reduced over a number of weeks.

Steroid injections

If the middle or back of your eye is affected or steroid eyedrops have not worked, you may need steroid injections.

Local anaesthetic eyedrops are used to numb your eye so you will not feel any pain or discomfort.

You’ll usually only require 1 injection while your symptoms are at their worst.

Steroid injections rarely cause significant side effects, but in some people they can make the pressure in the eye increase. The ophthalmologist will check for this and advise you if this happens.

Steroids tablets or capsules

Steroids tablets or capsules are the strongest form of steroids. They’re usually used if steroid eyedrops and injections have not worked or are unsuitable, or for uveitis affecting the back of the eye.

Steroids tablets can cause a wide range of side effects, so will only be recommended if it’s thought there’s a risk of permanent damage to your vision.

How long you’ll have to take steroid tablets for depends on how well you respond to treatment and whether you have an underlying autoimmune condition.

Some people only need to take them for 3 to 6 weeks, while others need to take them for months or possibly years.

Short-term side effects of steroids tablets or capsules can include weight gain, increased appetite, insomnia and mood changes such as feeling irritable or anxious.

In the long term they can cause osteoporosis, thinning of the skin, and an increased risk of infection.

To minimise any side effects, you’ll be prescribed the lowest possible dose to control your symptoms.

Read more about steroids.

Do not stop taking steroids until a doctor says it’s safe to do so. Suddenly stopping your medicine can cause unpleasant withdrawal effects.

When a GP or ophthalmologist thinks you can stop the treatment, they’ll advise you about how to gradually reduce the amount of steroids you’re taking.

Pred Forte

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 7/2/2018

Pred Forte (prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension) is a steroid medicine used to treat eye swelling caused by allergy, infection, injury, surgery, or other conditions. Pred Forte is available in generic form. Side effects of Pred Forte are uncommon and may include:

  • stinging/burning/itching/irritation of the eyes for 1 to 2 minutes when you apply this medication,
  • temporary cloudy vision,
  • increased sensitivity to light,
  • visual disturbance (blurry vision),
  • feeling like something is in your eye, and
  • allergic reactions.

Tell your doctor if you have rare but serious side effects of Pred Forte including:

  • pain behind your eyes,
  • sudden vision changes,
  • severe headache,
  • sudden eye irritation,
  • blurred vision,
  • tunnel vision,
  • eye pain,
  • seeing halos around lights, or
  • signs of new eye infection (such as swelling, draining, or crusting of your eyes).

The dosage and length of treatment with Pred Forte is based on the patient’s medical condition and response to treatment. The usual dose is to instill one to two drops into the conjunctival sac two to four times daily. It is unlikely other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on Pred Forte used in the eyes. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. During pregnancy, Pred Forte should be used only when prescribed. It is not known if the medication in this product passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Pred Forte (prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ophthalmic prednisolone comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (eye drops) to instill in the eye and as an eye ointment to apply to the eye. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use prednisolone eye drops or eye ointment exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Continue to use prednisolone eye drops or eye ointment even if you feel well. Do not stop using prednisolone eye drops or eye ointment without talking to your doctor.

To use the eye drops, follow these instructions:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
  2. Check the label on your bottle to see if you should shake the eye drops before using. Shake the bottle well if the label says that you should
  3. Check the dropper tip to make sure that it is not chipped or cracked.
  4. Avoid touching the dropper tip against your eye or anything else; eye drops and droppers must be kept clean.
  5. While tilting your head back, pull down the lower lid of your eye with your index finger to form a pocket.
  6. Hold the dropper (tip down) with the other hand, as close to the eye as possible without touching it.
  7. Brace the remaining fingers of that hand against your face.
  8. While looking up, gently squeeze the dropper so that a single drop falls into the pocket made by the lower eyelid. Remove your index finger from the lower eyelid.
  9. Close your eye for 2 to 3 minutes and tip your head down as though looking at the floor. Try not to blink or squeeze your eyelids.
  10. Place a finger on the tear duct and apply gentle pressure.
  11. Wipe any excess liquid from your face with a tissue.
  12. If you are to use more than one drop in the same eye, wait at least 5 minutes before instilling the next drop.
  13. Replace and tighten the cap on the dropper bottle. Do not wipe or rinse the dropper tip.
  14. Wash your hands to remove any medication.

Toapply the eye ointment, follow these steps:

  1. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
  2. Use a mirror or have someone else apply the ointment.
  3. Avoid touching the tip of the tube against your eye or anything else. The ointment must be kept clean.
  4. Tilt your head forward slightly.
  5. Holding the tube between your thumb and index finger, place the tube as near as possible to your eyelid without touching it.
  6. Brace the remaining fingers of that hand against your cheek or nose.
  7. With the index finger of your other hand, pull the lower lid of your eye down to form a pocket.
  8. Place a small amount of ointment into the pocket made by the lower lid and the eye. A 1/2-inch (1.25-centimeter) strip of ointment usually is enough unless otherwise directed by your doctor.
  9. Gently close your eyes and keep them closed for 1 to 2 minutes to allow the medication to be absorbed.
  10. Replace and tighten the cap right away.
  11. Wipe off any excess ointment from your eyelids and lashes with a clean tissue. Wash your hands again.
  12. Your vision may be blurry for a short amount of time after using the eye ointment. Wait until you can see normally before you drive or do other activities that require good vision.

GENERIC NAME: SULFACETAMIDE/PREDNISOLONE – OPHTHALMIC SUSPENSION (SUL-fa-SEET-a-mide/pred-NIS-oh-loan)

BRAND NAME(S): Blephamide, Vasocidin

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: This medication is used to prevent or treat eye infections and to treat swelling in the eye. This product contains an antibiotic (sulfacetamide) that stops the growth of bacteria and a corticosteroid (prednisolone) that reduces inflammation.This medication treats only bacterial eye infections. It will not work for other types of eye infections. Unnecessary use or overuse of any antibiotic can lead to its decreased effectiveness.

HOW TO USE: To apply eye drops, wash your hands first. Shake this suspension well before each dose. To avoid contamination, do not touch the dropper tip or let it touch your eye or any other surface.Before using this product, check it visually. Do not use if it has darkened in color.Do not wear contact lenses while you are using this medicine. Sterilize contact lenses according to manufacturer’s directions and check with your doctor before using them.Tilt your head back, look upward and pull down the lower eyelid to make a pouch. Hold the dropper directly over your eye and place one drop into it. Look downward and gently close your eyes for 1 to 2 minutes. Place one finger at the corner of your eye (near the nose) and apply gentle pressure. This will prevent the medication from draining out. Try not to blink and do not rub your eye. Repeat these steps for your other eye if so directed, and if your dose is for more than 1 drop. Apply as often as directed by your doctor.Do not rinse the dropper. Replace the dropper cap after each use.If you are using another kind of eye medication (e.g., drops or ointments), wait at least 5 minutes before applying other medications. Use eye drops before eye ointments to allow the eye drops to enter the eye.Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Continue using it for the full time prescribed even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a relapse of the infection.Do not use this medication for longer than prescribed. If you use it regularly for an extended period of time, do not suddenly stop using it without consulting your doctor. Your dosage may need to be gradually decreased.Inform your doctor if your condition does not improve after 2 days.

SIDE EFFECTS: This medication may temporarily sting or burn your eyes for a minute or two when applied. Eye discomfort, dry eyes, tearing, itching, or redness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in a new type of eye infection (e.g., viral, fungal). Do not use it for longer than prescribed. Contact your doctor if you notice new or worsening symptoms.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: vision changes, eye pain, staining of the eyes.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing, signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), easy bleeding/bruising, yellowing of the eyes/skin, dark urine.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Steroid use in cataract surgery: On its way out?

As cataract surgery becomes “gentler,” how will a surgeon’s post-op treatment strategy change?

Ten years ago, a supposition that ocular steroids used in cataract surgery were on the decline would have been laughable. Today, with the advent of cold phacoemulsification, a smaller incision, and more effective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the market, the theory is not as radical as once thought. Topical steroids are still needed in today’s uncomplicated cataract surgeries “simply because you can’t predict who is and who isn’t going to have more inflammatory reaction after surgery,” said Stephen S. Lane, M.D., adjunct professor of ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn. Surgeons may perform the same procedure on similar patients with no significant risk factors—one may have minimal or no inflammation post-op; the other may have quite a bit of inflammation, he said. But there are alternatives to using the stronger steroids, Dr. Lane said. “There are steroids available —that I call ‘safe’ steroids. At the head of the class is Lotemax ,” he said. “The efficacy of this particular steroid is very high—almost as strong as prednisolone acetate or phosphate but with far fewer side effects.”

“In cases of more complicated surgery or those that have uveitis or trauma, I find that steroids are imperative to reduce inflammation and improve outcomes,” said Rosa Braga-Mele, M.D., M.Ed., associate professor, University of Toronto, Canada, and director of cataract unit and surgical teaching, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto.

The NSAID effect

Despite the current phaco techniques, “significant inflammation is encountered in a large percentage of eyes following uncomplicated surgery if no medication is used,” said David F. Chang, M.D., clinical professor of ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco. In the late 1990s, Dr. Chang was an investigator for Surodex, a sustained release steroid delivery system. In the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) trial, there was a placebo control arm that received no medication at all.

“Although some control eyes were indeed very quiet in the absence of any anti-inflammatory medication, most patients had significant iridocyclitis, discomfort, and photophobia until a topical steroid was instituted,” Dr. Chang said. Minimizing patient discomfort while suppressing inflammation as rapidly as possible is the key to post-op cataract management, he added. “The synergy of topical steroids and NSAIDs accomplishes these goals and prevents cystoid macular edema . Even if 80% of patients did well on a topical NSAID alone, I would still routinely use topical steroids to prevent excessive inflammation in the other 20%,” he said.

Samuel Masket, M.D., clinical professor of ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, conducted a study that looked at post-op change in astigmatism as affected by topical steroids versus topical NSAIDs. (Masket S. Comparison of the effect of topical corticosteroids and nonsteroidals on postoperative corneal astigmatism. J Cataract Refract Surg. 1990 Nov; 16(6):715-8.) “This was before the potent NSAIDs we have today were available,” said Dr. Masket, “In that study, 75% of the patients who were treated with NSAIDs alone did not need a steroid to reduce inflammation. But we couldn’t predict who was going to fall where.”

Dr. Masket has changed his post-op regimen as a result of the “absolute hard evidence” that combining NSAIDs with steroids prevents CME. Dr. Masket now uses a less potent steroid such as Lotemax and typically uses nepafenac as his NSAID of choice.

“NSAIDs are not nearly as potent in their anti-inflammatory effects as steroids, plain and simple,” countered Kevin M. Miller, M.D., Kolokotrones professor of clinical ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute. “You can’t reasonably treat a cataract patient with NSAIDs alone—too many will develop CME.”

Louis D. “Skip” Nichamin, M.D., Brookville, Penn., said there’s still controversy around the issue. He noted studies that eliminated steroids and used just NSAIDs showed patients did well; other studies have examined weaker steroids (such as Lotemax) that have a better safety profile than prednisolone acetate, and those eyes did well, too. “We don’t have a plethora of prospective studies comparing the NSAIDs to prednisolone acetate,” he said. “We see slightly higher levels of inflammation without using the stronger steroids, but that may be acceptable if there are no complications during surgery,” said Dr. Nichamin. Until a head-to-head comparison between NSAIDs and corticosteroids is performed that involve enough eyes to show statistical significance, Dr. Nichamin will continue to combine the two post-op.

Decreased steroid duration

Dr. Braga-Mele said that by using NSAIDs both pre- and post-op she has been able to effectively use a weaker steroid for a shorter period of time than in previous years, a sentiment echoed by others.

“Using an NSAID adds a protective arm to the inflammatory cascade that a steroid does not inhibit,” Dr. Nichamin said. “Most importantly, this means that NSAIDs help to block CME, which remains one of the last banes of cataract surgery.”

Once he added NSAIDs to his routine treatment regimen, Dr. Nichamin began to experience a noticeable drop in the incidence of CME. His normal routine is to begin the NSAID along with a fourth-generation fluoroquinolone three days prior to surgery. On the day of surgery, a corticosteroid is used every two hours, and then continued four times per day along with the NSAID.

“When combined with a NSAID, tapering patients off of the steroid may begin to take place in two to four weeks instead of a month or two,” he said. In the past, Dr. Lane prescribed prednisolone acetate four times daily for “about four to six weeks post-op.” After adding NSAIDs to his post-op regimen, his dosing changed. He now prescribes loteprednol three times daily for about two to three weeks, or until the 5c bottle runs out,” he said.

The change in prescribing habits is due to three variables that weren’t in play years ago, Dr. Lane said.

“First, you have a safer, gentler surgical procedure. Second, there are newer NSAIDs that work synergistically with steroids. And third, we have very good steroids that although not quite as strong as prednisolone are still very effective, work well in a situation where you don’t need much anti-inflammatory action, and have a much improved safety margin,” he said.

“The only real negative of steroids is intraocular pressure rise,” said Dr. Miller. “If there wasn’t that side effect, no one would reduce the amount of time a patient is on steroids.”

Dr. Miller continues to prescribe a four-week treatment of steroids even when he prescribes NSAIDs because he found eliminating steroid use after just two weeks caused rebound inflammation. “We used to prescribe steroids for six weeks, but now that we’re creating clear corneal incisions, we’ve cut it back to four,” said Dr. Miller, who added that surgeons need to remain vigilant and aggressively treat any side effects. “Ten years ago, I was using prednisolone acetate 1% as a topical steroid of choice, but now I’m using a much less potent one,” Dr. Masket said. “Most physicians tend to discontinue treatment too soon. The scientific evidence suggests the blood aqueous barrier does not reform until about six weeks after surgery.” During the last four weeks of his six-week post-op regimen, Dr. Masket prescribes both NSAIDs and steroids twice daily. Dr. Chang, however, continues to use 1% prednisolone acetate—but at a lower dose.

“The newer NSAIDs are dosed b.i.d. and t.i.d. , and I usually prescribe the steroid at this same frequency for the sake of easier compliance,” he said. “Concurrent use of topical NSAIDs generally allows us to stop the steroid drops sooner.”

What the future might hold

Continued advances in pharmacology may lead to more potent NSAIDs that may, in turn, obviate the need for corticosteroids, Dr. Lane suggested. Other advances could lead to even safer steroids or lower dosing than are currently used, he added. “There’s ongoing work with sustained release devices as well—perhaps a steroid that would soak into the lens material and the lens itself might work as a delivery vehicle,” he said.

Dr. Chang said that with the development of more potent steroids and NSAIDs, the possibility of once-daily dosing of both NSAIDs and steroids is not out of reach and that such dosing would help alleviate the patient compliance problem.

“I keep wishing there was a way to combine both in the same bottle,” he said, adding that intraocular sustained release drug delivery systems would be able to eliminate the need to use any topical medications. Those innovations are on the horizon, he noted.

Dr. Nichamin said the future of drug delivery may be “depositing medications intracamerally, either with pellets in the eye or an implant that’s soaked in a cocktail of anti-inflammatory medications.” “Even though we’re using less potent steroids, we cannot forget steroids can—and do—have negative side effects,” Dr. Masket said. “These are potent agents that need to be treated with respect.”

Editor’s note: Dr. Braga-Mele is a consultant for Alcon (Fort Worth, Texas) and Bausch & Lomb (Rochester, N.Y.). Dr. Chang has no financial interests related to his comments. Dr. Lane has a financial interest in Advanced Vision Science (Goleta, Calif.), Alcon, Bausch & Lomb, and other ophthalmic companies. Drs. Masket and Miller are consultants for Alcon. Dr. Nichamin is a medical monitor for Bausch & Lomb.

Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%

What is Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% is in a class called corticosteroids. It is used to inhibit inflammation and, therefore, swelling and pain from inflammation are lessened. Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% is used to treat eye inflammation caused by infections, injury, surgery, or other conditions. Additionally, Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% may also be used for purposes other than those listed. Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% requires a prescription from your veterinarian.

For:

Dogs and Horses

Benefits:

  • Successfully treats inflammation due to infections, injury, and surgery
  • Reduces swelling associated with bacterial infections
  • Available as a dropper bottle

How does Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% work?

Prednisolone acetate is a corticosteroid which is used to treat inflammation.

Cautions:

Before using Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%, tell your veterinarian if your pet is using other eye drops or eye medications. If your pet has swelling of the face, itching, or appears to have difficulty breathing, contact your veterinarian immediately. Do not touch the dropper opening to any surface including eyes or hands. This medication may cause blurred vision.

What is the most important information I should know about Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% is not FDA approved for use in veterinary medicine; however, it is a commonly accepted practice to use this product in dogs and horses. Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% is available by prescription as 1% sterile eye drops. Do not stop using this medication suddenly especially if it has been used for several weeks or more. The dose may need to be reduced over several days to prevent side effects. Contact your veterinarian if the pet’s symptoms begin to get worse or if you do not see any improvement to the pet’s condition after a few days. Do not touch the dropper opening to any surface, including eyes and hands. The dropper opening is sterile. If it becomes contaminated, it could cause an infection in the eye.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before applying Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% to my pet?

Do not use Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% if the pet has a bacterial, viral or fungal infection without also using proper anti-infective treatment. Tell your veterinarian if your pet is pregnant or lactating.

How should Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% be applied on my pet?

Use this medication exactly as directed by your veterinarian. If you do not understand the directions ask your pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you. Wash your hands prior to using the eye drops. Shake the bottle gently to be sure the medication is properly mixed. Do not use any eye drop that is discolored or has particles in it. Store Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle properly capped.

What happens if I miss applying a dose of Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and apply the next one as directed. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What happens if I overdose my pet on Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

An overdose of this medication is unlikely. If an overdose is suspected, seek emergency veterinary medical treatment. If the drops are ingested, contact a veterinary emergency center for advice.

What should I avoid while applying Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1% to my pet?

Do not touch the dropper opening to any surface including eyes or hands. This medication may cause blurred vision.

What are the possible side effects of Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

Serious side effects are not expected. Rarely, pressure increase inside the eye, formation of cataracts or a perforation of the cornea may occur. Other, more common side effects may also occur such as burning, stinging, irritation, itching, redness, blurred vision, or sensitivity to light. Continue the medication and talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to your pet.

What other drugs will affect Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%?

Before giving Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%, tell your veterinarian if your pet is using other eye drops or eye medications. Tell your veterinarian if your pet is being given oral steroid medications such as prednisone, methylprednisolone or others. Drugs other than those listed may also interact with Prednisolone Acetate Ophthalmic Suspension 1%. Talk to your veterinarian or pharmacist before giving any prescription or over the counter medicines.

ratio-Prednisolone

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Prednisolone acetate belongs to the family of medications called corticosteroids and is used for its ability to reduce inflammation in many parts of the body.

When used in an eye drop, this medication is used to treat swelling and itching of the eye.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than the ones listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Each mL of suspension contains: prednisolone acetate 1%. Nonmedicinal ingredients: benzalkonium chloride 0.004% (as preservative), boric acid, disodium edetate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polysorbate 80, purified water, sodium bisulfite, sodium chloride, and sodium citrate.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended dose of prednisolone acetate eye drops varies depending on the condition being treated. You can use them as often as every hour until your condition improves. Your doctor will be able to provide you with more specific instructions on how often to instill the drops.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

To use eye drops properly:

  1. Wash your hands before using the eye drops.
  2. Shake the container well before use to ensure the medication is evenly mixed throughout the bottle.
  3. Remove the cap and place it in a clean location. To avoid possible contamination, keep the tip of the container away from contact with any surface.
  4. Tilt your head back and look towards the ceiling.
  5. With your index finger, gently pull your lower eyelid down and away from your eye to form a pouch.
  6. Apply one drop into the pouch but do not allow the tip of the container to touch your eye or areas around your eye.
  7. Gently apply pressure to the inner corner of your eye (at the bridge of the nose) for about 30 seconds. (This is called nasolacrimal occlusion.) This prevents the medication from dripping down through the tear duct and entering the bloodstream, which could cause you to experience some side effects.
  8. Repeat with your other eye, if prescribed by your physician.
  9. Wash your hands again to remove any medication.

If you are using more than one topical eye medication (eye drops or ointment), wait at least 5 minutes before putting another medication in your eye.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist to show you the correct method of applying eye drops. It is very important to avoid touching the dropper tip to any surface, skin, or your eye. This contamination can result in a bacterial infection. Report any signs of an eye infection (e.g., redness, irritation, pain) to your doctor immediately.

It is important to use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, instill it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not instil a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture and keep it out of the reach of children.

Safely discard any medication remaining in the dropper bottle after you have used the medication for the full length of time recommended by your doctor. Discard any remaining medication 28 days after opening the bottle.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not use prednisolone acetate eye drops if you:

  • are allergic to prednisolone or any ingredients of the medication
  • have had an allergic or sensitivity reaction to other corticosteroids
  • have acute herpes simplex, tuberculosis of the eye, vaccinia, chickenpox, or other viral or fungal diseases of the eye
  • have any eye infection associated with discharge
  • have conjunctivitis or blepharitis associated with discharge
  • have recently had a foreign body removed from the eye

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • blurred vision
  • eye irritation
  • watery eyes

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • difficulty focusing
  • eye pain
  • skin rash, itching, redness, or swelling in or around the eyes
  • vision changes

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Contact lenses: Using contact lenses with corticosteroid eye drops increases the risk of infection. It is advisable to avoid wearing contact lenses while using corticosteroid eye drops.

Glaucoma: The use of corticosteroids in the eyes may cause an increase in the pressure in the eye. If you are using this eye drop for 10 days or more, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your vision, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Infection: Corticosteroids such as prednisolone acetate reduce symptoms of inflammation by reducing the effect of the immune system. As a result, the use of this medication may hide the signs of new infections or worsening of existing infections. If you notice any new eye symptoms such as pain, redness, sensitivity to sunlight or vision changes, contact your doctor immediately. If the condition you are treating does not seem to improve in several days, contact your doctor.

Pregnancy: Very little prednisolone acetate in an eye drop form is absorbed into the body and available to affect an unborn baby. For this reason, prednisolone acetate eye drops are considered safe to use during pregnancy for short periods of time. If you are concerned about using this medication, discuss the benefits and risks of using this medication with your doctor.

Breast-feeding: Corticosteroids pass into breast milk, however in an eye drop form, very little prednisolone acetate is absorbed into the body and available to pass into breast milk. The use of corticosteroid eye drops, including prednisolone acetate, is considered to be safe while breast-feeding.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications that you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/ratio-Prednisolone

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