Penicillin VK strep throat

Contents

What to know about antibiotics and tooth infections

Although antibiotics can help clear a tooth infection, it is important to use the appropriate antibiotic in each situation.

The type of antibiotic a dentist recommends will vary depending on the bacteria causing the infection. This is because different antibiotics work in different ways to eliminate different strains of bacteria.

As a study in the Dentistry Journal notes, there are over 150 different strains of bacteria that occur in the mouth. Many of these bacteria have the potential to grow and cause an infection.

Treatment may change depending on the bacteria causing the infection, though much of the time, dentists simply recommend an antibiotic that works against many types.

Penicillin class

Penicillin-type drugs are common forms of antibiotics for tooth infections. This includes penicillin and amoxicillin. Some dentists may also recommend amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, as the combination may help eliminate more stubborn bacteria.

Typical dosages of amoxicillin for a tooth infection are either 500 milligrams (mg) every 8 hours or 1,000 mg every 12 hours.

Typical dosages of amoxicillin with clavulanic acid are around 500–2,000 mg every 8 hours or 2,000 mg every 12 hours, depending on the minimum effective dosage.

However, some bacteria may resist these drugs, making them less effective. In fact, many doctors now choose other antibiotics as their first line of treatment.

Also, some people are allergic to these drugs. Anyone who has had an allergic reaction to similar medications should tell their dentist before receiving their treatment recommendation.

Clindamycin

Clindamycin is effective against a wide range of infectious bacteria. As a study in the International Dental Journal notes, some researchers recommend clindamycin as the drug of choice to treat dental infections, as bacteria may be less likely to resist this drug than penicillin-class drugs.

A typical dosage of clindamycin is either 300 mg or 600 mg every 8 hours, depending on which dosage will be effective.

Azithromycin

Azithromycin works against a wide variety of bacteria, working to halt their growth. It may be effective in treating some tooth infections, though dentists may only recommend it to people who are allergic to penicillin-class drugs or who do not respond to them or other drugs such as clindamycin.

The typical dosage of azithromycin is 500 mg every 24 hours for 3 consecutive days.

Metronidazole

Metronidazole is an antibiotic that doctors and dentists use to treat a number of infections. However, it may not be suitable for everyone and is typically not the first choice of treatment.

The dosage for metronidazole is around 500–750 mg every 8 hours.

The effects of antibiotics on toothache caused by inflammation or infection at the root of the tooth in adults

This Cochrane Review has been produced to assess the effects of antibiotics on the pain and swelling experienced by adults in two conditions commonly responsible for causing dental pain. The review set out to assess the effects of taking antibiotics when provided with, or without, dental treatment.

Background

Dental pain is a common problem and can arise when the nerve within a tooth dies due to progressing decay or injury. Without treatment, bacteria can infect the dead tooth and cause a dental abscess, which can lead to swelling and spreading infection, which can occasionally be life threatening.

The recommended treatment for these forms of toothache is removal of the dead nerve and associated bacteria. This is usually done by extraction of the tooth or root canal treatment (a procedure where the nerve and pulp are removed and the inside of the tooth cleaned and sealed). Antibiotics are only recommended when there is severe infection that has spread from the tooth into the surrounding tissues. However, some dentists still routinely prescribe oral antibiotics to patients with acute dental conditions who have no signs of spreading infection, or without dental treatment to remove the infected material.

Use of antibiotics contributes to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. It is therefore important that antibiotics are only used when they are likely to result in benefit for the patient. Dentists prescribe approximately 8% to 10% of all primary care antibiotics in high-income countries, and therefore it is important to ensure that dentists have good information about when antibiotics are likely to be beneficial for patients.

Study characteristics

The evidence on which this review is based was up-to-date as of 26 February 2018. We searched scientific databases and found two trials, with 62 participants included in the analysis. Both trials were conducted at dental schools in the USA and evaluated the use of oral antibiotics in the reduction of pain and swelling reported by adults after having the first stage of root canal treatment under local anaesthetic. The antibiotic used in both trials was penicillin VK and all participants also received painkillers.

Key results

The two studies included in the review reported that there were no clear differences in the pain or swelling reported by participants who received oral antibiotics compared with a placebo (a dummy treatment) when provided alongside the first stage of root canal treatment and painkillers. However, the studies were small and produced poor quality evidence, and therefore we cannot be certain if the results are correct. Neither study examined the effect of antibiotics on their own, without surgical dental treatment.

One trial reported side effects among participants: one person who received the placebo medication had diarrhoea and one person who received antibiotics experienced tiredness and reduced energy after their treatment.

Quality of evidence

We judged the quality of evidence to be very low. There is currently insufficient evidence to be able to determine the effects of antibiotics in these conditions.

About phenoxymethylpenicillin

Type of medicine A penicillin antibiotic
Used for Infections (in adults and children)
Also called Penicillin V
Available as Tablets and oral liquid medicine

Phenoxymethylpenicillin is an antibacterial medicine. This means that it stops infections caused by germs (bacteria). It works by killing the germs that are causing the infection.

Phenoxymethylpenicillin is prescribed to treat infections such as chest infections, tonsillitis, cellulitis, ear infections, and dental abscesses. It is used in particular for respiratory infections in children. You may also be prescribed phenoxymethylpenicillin to protect against infection if (for example) you have had rheumatic fever, or if you have sickle-cell disease, or if you have had your spleen removed.

Before taking phenoxymethylpenicillin

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you (or your child) start taking phenoxymethylpenicillin it is important that your doctor (or dentist) knows:

  • If you have an allergic condition (such as asthma, eczema, or hay fever), or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine. This is especially important if you have ever had a bad reaction to any penicillin antibiotic.
  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding (although phenoxymethylpenicillin is not known to be harmful to babies).
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.

How to take phenoxymethylpenicillin

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about phenoxymethylpenicillin, and it will also provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Take phenoxymethylpenicillin exactly as your doctor tells you to. It is taken four times daily for short-term infections. If you have been prescribed it long-term (to protect from infection) then you will be asked to take one or two doses every day. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you what dose is right for you to take, and the full directions will also be printed on the label of the pack to remind you about what was said to you. It is important that you space out the doses evenly during the day.
  • If you have been given liquid medicine for a child, read the directions carefully to make sure you measure out the correct amount of medicine.
  • You should take phenoxymethylpenicillin when your stomach is empty, which means taking your doses one hour before you eat any food, or waiting until two hours afterwards. This is because your body absorbs less of the medicine after a meal, which means it is less effective.
  • If you forget to take a dose at your usual time, take it as soon as you remember. Try to take the correct number of doses each day, but do not take two doses at the same time to make up for a forgotten dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Even if you feel your infection has cleared up, keep taking the antibiotic until the course is finished (unless you are told to stop sooner by a doctor). This is to prevent the infection from coming back.
  • A course of treatment for an infection often lasts around seven days, although it can be for up to 10 days. If you still feel unwell after finishing the course, go back to see your doctor. If you have been prescribed phenoxymethylpenicillin to protect you from infection then it is likely you will be asked to take it long-term.
  • After taking a course of an antibiotic, some people develop redness and itchiness in the mouth or vagina. These are caused by an infection commonly known as thrush. If this happens to you, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for advice.
  • This antibiotic can stop the oral typhoid vaccine from working. If you are due to have any vaccinations, make sure the person treating you knows that you are taking this medicine.

Can phenoxymethylpenicillin cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with phenoxymethylpenicillin. The best place to find a full list of the side-effects which can be associated with your medicine, is from the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet supplied with the medicine. Alternatively, you can find an example of a manufacturer’s information leaflet in the reference section below. Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common phenoxymethylpenicillin side-effects (these affect around 1 in 10 people) What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting), tummy (abdominal) pain Stick to simple foods
Diarrhoea Drink plenty of water to replace any lost fluids. If the diarrhoea continues, becomes severe, or contains blood, let your doctor know straightaway
Redness and itchiness (thrush) in the mouth or vagina Speak with your doctor or pharmacist for advice about treatment
Skin rash, and other allergic-type reactions Let your doctor know as soon as possible as your treatment may need to be changed

Important: if you develop an itchy rash, swollen face or mouth, or have difficulty breathing, these could be signs that you are allergic to a penicillin antibiotic. Do not take any more phenoxymethylpenicillin, and speak with your doctor or go to your local accident and emergency department straightaway.

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store phenoxymethylpenicillin

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.
  • If you have been given liquid medicine, store it in a refrigerator. It will have been made up by the pharmacy and lasts for seven days, so check the expiry date on the bottle and do not use it after this date.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

If you buy any medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take with your other medicines.

If you are having an operation or any dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Penicillin V Potassium

Penicillin V potassium is a slow-onset antibiotic that fights bacteria in your body.

Penicillin V potassium is used to treat many different types of infections including strep and staph infections, pneumonia, rheumatic fever, and infections affecting the mouth or throat.

Penicillin V potassium is also used to prevent infections of the heart valves in people with certain heart conditions who need to have dental work or surgery.

Penicillin V potassium may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to penicillin. Tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a cephalosporin antibiotic such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Omnicef, Keflex, and others.

Before taking penicillin V potassium, tell your doctor if you are allergic to cephalosporins such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Keflex, Omnicef, and others, or if you have asthma, kidney disease, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, a history of diarrhea caused by taking antibiotics, or a history of any type of allergy.

Penicillin V potassium can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before taking penicillin V potassium, tell your doctor if you use birth control pills.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Penicillin V potassium will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Do not share this medication with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to penicillin. Tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a cephalosporin antibiotic such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Omnicef, Keflex, and others.

To make sure you can safely take penicillin V potassium, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • asthma or a history of allergies;
  • kidney disease; or
  • if you are sick with severe vomiting or diarrhea.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Penicillin V potassium can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not take this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Best Antibiotics for Strep Throat

Table of Contents

Antibiotics are the best way to get rid of strep throat. So if you’re worried you or your child may have strep throat it’s important to know which antibiotics are going to get the job done.

Read on to learn which antibiotics are typically prescribed for strep throat.

Best Antibiotics for strep throat

There are several different antibiotics that can be prescribed for strep throat, but the most common are penicillin and amoxicillin.

They are the most effective, affordable and come with little side effects.

Some of the most common antibiotics your doctor might prescribe for strep, include:

Penicillin – Unless you are allergic to it, penicillin is the first antibiotic choice for treating strep throat. It was first introduced in the 1940s and has been the primary antibiotic for a wide range of ailments. Since its discovery, penicillin has consistently eliminated group A Streptococcus. There has yet to be a strain of the bacteria grown from a human that is resistant to penicillin.

Amoxicillin – A broader spectrum form of penicillin, amoxicillin may be more effective and convenient for some patients. Research suggests that a single daily dose of amoxicillin may be just as effective as multiple doses of penicillin taken in a day. Amoxicillin also tends to taste better than penicillin. However, amoxicillin can more commonly cause skin rash and gastrointestinal problems.

Amoxicillin Clavulanate Potassium – Amoxycillin clavulanate potassium is more frequently used to treat recurring cases of strep throat. Marketed as Augmentin, amoxicillin clavulanate potassium is resistant to degradation or damage caused by waste products like beta-lactamase created by Streptococcus. The main side effect of amoxicillin clavulanate potassium is that it can cause diarrhea.

Azithromycin – Azithromycin is best used for those who are allergic penicillin or tried penicillin with no results.

Clarithromycin – Clarithromycin goes by the brand name Biaxin and may act as a good alternative for those with penicillin allergies.

Clindamycin – Clindamycin is effective for those who are allergic to penicillin or have a case of strep throat that is resistant to penicillin.

Cefdiner – Branded as Omnicef, research suggests that a five-day course of cefdinir is equal to a ten-day regimen with pencillin.

When taken within the first 48 hours of the illness’ onset, antibiotics can reduce the severity of the symptoms and the amount of time they’ll last.

You should start feeling better and showing improvement within a day or two after treatment begins.

That said, it’s important you finish the prescribed course of antibiotics to avoid a recurring infection or antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Viral Infection vs Strep Throat

If you or your child has a sore throat that is accompanied by cold symptoms, like sneezing, coughing, a runny nose, or red eyes, it is most likely a viral infection.

Antibiotics are only used to treat bacterial infections. A doctor will be able to diagnose the infection as viral or bacterial and prescribed an appropriate treatment plan.

Think you or your child may be experiencing symptoms of strep throat? Book an appointment with a PlushCare doctor and get an antibiotic prescription today.

Read More About Antibiotics For Strep Throat:

  • Strep Throat Treatment Online
  • Tonsillitis vs Strep Throat
  • Strep Throat Signs, Symptoms and Treatments
  • Can You Get Antibiotics Over The Counter?

Sources

Penicillin VK Prescription Online

  • Request penicillin VK online
  • Same day prescriptions available
  • Responsive medical providers

Penicillin VK – Overview

Penicillin (oral), marketed as penicillin-VK, is an antibacterial medication used to treat infections that are thought to be susceptible to penicillin. Push Health can connect people who think they need a penicillin prescription with licensed medical providers who can prescribe penicillin if safe and appropriate to do so.

How Does Penicillin Work?

Penicillin is an antibacterial medication that is used to treat or prevent infections that are strongly suspected or proven to be caused by bacteria, especially microorganisms susceptible to penicillin. Penicillin V’s mechanism of action is interfering with the cell wall synthesis of microorganisms sensitive to penicillin during replication. Historically, penicillin has been indicated to treat susceptible Streptococcal infections (e.g. strep throat), Pneumococcal infections and Staphylococcal infections. Penicillin is structurally similar to a number of other antibacterial medications such as amoxicillin and ampicillin. For many types of infections, the use of penicillin has been replaced by cephalosporins such as cephalexin (Keflex) and cefdinir due to antibiotic resistance.

Penicillin – Dosage and Cost

Penicillin V is frequently administered as penicillin 250 mg or penicillin 500 mg every 6 to 8 hours. Penicillin V is similar to penicillin G as it is the phenoxymethyl analog of it. Penicillin – VK, also known as penicillin V potassium tablets, are made for oral administration as penicillin 250 mg or penicillin 500 mg tablets. The potassium salt added to penicillin V makes it more resistant to deactivation by acid in the stomach. In the serum, the majority of penicillin V is bound to proteins and penicillin in the body is excreted rapidly in healthy people. Penicillin-VK tablets are biconvex white tablets and should be stored at 20° C to 25° C in a tight container. Penicillin VK is considered very affordable at under 30 cents per tablet at many pharmacies. Insurance plans may also cover any costs associated with a penicillin tablet prescription and penicillin V coupons may also be available online at times.

Can I Buy Penicillin Online?

Penicillin is a prescription medication and should not be used casually. Because of this, penicillin OTC (over-the-counter) is not available and one cannot legally buy penicillin online in the United States. The first step to getting a penicillin medication prescription, including penicillin VK, is connecting with a medical provider who can prescribe penicillin. People in need of a penicillin prescription, however, can connect with a licensed medical provider through Push Health who can prescribe penicillin if it is appropriate to do so.

Penicillin – Side Effects

Penicillin, like other antibiotics, cause result in side effects when used. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea. People who have a known hypersensitivity or allergy to penicillin should not use the medication. Penicillin and alcohol should not be used together. Penicillin should not be used to treat viral infections. Concerns about possible side effects related to penicillin use should be discussed with one’s medical provider and pharmacist.

More Penicillin Information

Last updated December 30, 2019. Given the evolving nature of medicine and science, this information might not be accurate and should not be construed as medical advice or diagnosis / treatment recommendations. Please consult a licensed medical provider if you have additional questions.

Penicillin VK

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 12/18/2018

Penicillin V potassium (penicillin VK) is an antibiotic used to treat mild to moderately severe infections due to penicillin G-sensitive microorganisms. Penicillin VK is available in generic form. Side effects of penicillin VK include:

  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • diarrhea,
  • abdominal pain,
  • stomach upset,
  • skin rash,
  • hives,
  • itching, and
  • black “hairy” tongue.

Patients with a history of allergic reactions to other penicillins should not receive penicillin VK. Serious but rare reactions to penicillin VK include:

  • seizures,
  • severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis), and
  • low platelet or red blood cell count.

Penicillin VK can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and allow overgrowth of some bacteria such as Clostridium difficile, which causes inflammation of the colon (pseudomembranous colitis).

The usual adult dose of penicillin VK is 125 to 500 mg every 6-8 hours. Benemid (Probenecid) causes an increase in the level of penicillin VK in the blood by reducing the elimination of penicillin by the kidneys. Penicillin VK is considered safe during pregnancy. Penicillin VK is excreted in breast milk and may cause diarrhea or allergic responses in nursing infants.

Our Penicillin VK Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Penicillin v Potassium?

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

The number of tablets or teaspoonfuls of suspension that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are taking a penicillin.

  • For amoxicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage forms (capsules, oral suspension, tablets, and chewable tablets):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every eight hours or 500 to 875 mg every twelve hours, depending on the type and severity of the infection.
        • Neonates and infants up to 3 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 15 mg per kg (6.8 mg per pound) of body weight or less every twelve hours.
        • Infants 3 months of age and older and children weighing up to 40 kg (88 lbs.)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.7 to 13.3 mg per kg (3 to 6 mg per pound) of body weight every eight hours or 12.5 to 22.5 mg per kg (5.7 to 10.2 mg per pound) of body weight every twelve hours.
          • For duodenal ulcers (associated with Helicobacter pylori bacterial infection):
            • For oral dosage forms (capsules, oral suspension, tablets, and chewable tablets):
              • Adults: 1000 mg twice a day every twelve hours for fourteen days, along with the two other medicines, clarithromycin and lansoprazole, as directed by your doctor.
              • Teenagers and children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
                • For dual medicine therapy—
                  • Adults: 1000 mg three times a day every eight hours for fourteen days, along with the other medicine, lansoprazole, as directed by your doctor.
                  • Teenagers and children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For ampicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage forms (capsules and oral suspension):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kilograms (kg) (44 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours.
        • Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours; or 16.7 to 33.3 mg per kg (7.6 to 15 mg per pound) of body weight every eight hours.
          • For injection dosage form:
            • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kg (44 pounds)—250 to 500 mg, injected into a vein or muscle every three to six hours.
            • Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 mg per kg (5.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours.
  • For bacampicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage forms (oral suspension and tablets):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 25 kilograms (kg) (55 pounds)—400 to 800 milligrams (mg) every twelve hours.
        • Children weighing up to 25 kg (55 pounds)—Bacampicillin tablets are not recommended for use in children weighing up to 25 kg (55 pounds). The dose of the oral suspension is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every twelve hours.
  • For carbenicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (tablets):
        • Adults and teenagers—500 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every six hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
          • For injection dosage form:
            • Adults and teenagers—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50 to 83.3 mg per kilogram (kg) (22.8 to 37.9 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four hours.
            • Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 16.7 to 75 mg per kg (7.6 to 34 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
  • For cloxacillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (capsules and oral solution):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kilograms (kg) (44 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours.
        • Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
          • For injection dosage form:
            • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kg—250 to 500 mg, injected into a vein every six hours.
            • Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every six hours.
  • For dicloxacillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (capsules and oral suspension):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—125 to 250 milligrams (mg) every six hours.
        • Infants and children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 3.1 to 6.2 mg per kg (1.4 to 2.8 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
  • For flucloxacillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (capsules and oral suspension):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children more than 12 years of age and weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours.
        • Children less than 12 years of age and weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—125 to 250 mg every six hours; or 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
        • Infants up to 6 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 mg per kg (2.8 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
  • For methicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For injection dosage form:
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—1 gram injected into a muscle every four to six hours; or 1 gram injected into a vein every six hours.
        • Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 25 milligrams (mg) per kg (11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours.
  • For mezlocillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For injection dosage form:
        • Adults and teenagers—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 33.3 to 87.5 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) (15.1 to 39.8 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours; or 3 to 4 grams every four to six hours.
        • Infants over 1 month of age and children up to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50 mg per kg (22.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four hours.
  • For nafcillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (capsules and tablets):
        • Adults and teenagers—250 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every four to six hours.
        • Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kilogram (kg) (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
        • Newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 10 mg per kg (4.5 mg per pound) of body weight every six to eight hours.
          • For injection dosage form:
            • Adults and teenagers—500 mg to 2 grams injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
            • Infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 10 to 25 mg per kg (4.5 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every twelve hours; or 10 to 40 mg per kg (4.5 to 18.2 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every four to eight hours.

  • For oxacillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (capsules and oral solution):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—500 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every four to six hours.
        • Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours.
          • For injection dosage form:
            • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kg (88 pounds)—250 mg to 1 gram injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
            • Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
            • Premature infants and newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 mg per kg (2.8 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours.
  • For penicillin G:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (oral solution, oral suspension, and tablets):
        • Adults and teenagers—200,000 to 500,000 Units (125 to 312 milligrams ) every four to six hours.
        • Infants and children less than 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 4167 to 30,000 Units per kilogram (kg) (189 to 13,636 Units per pound) of body weight every four to eight hours.
          • For benzathine injection dosage form:
            • Adults and teenagers—1,200,000 to 2,400,000 Units injected into a muscle as a single dose.
            • Infants and children—300,000 to 1,200,000 Units injected into a muscle as a single dose; or 50,000 Units per kg (22,727 Units per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle as a single dose.
              • For injection dosage forms (potassium and sodium salts):
                • Adults and teenagers—1,000,000 to 5,000,000 Units, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
                • Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 8333 to 25,000 Units per kg (3788 to 11,363 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
                • Premature infants and newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 30,000 Units per kg (13,636 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every twelve hours.
                  • For procaine injection dosage form:
                    • Adults and teenagers—600,000 to 1,200,000 Units injected into a muscle once a day.
                    • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50,000 Units per kg (22,727 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle once a day.
  • For penicillin V:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For the benzathine salt oral dosage form (oral solution):
        • Adults and teenagers—200,000 to 500,000 Units every six to eight hours.
        • Children—100,000 to 250,000 Units every six to eight hours.
          • For the potassium salt oral dosage forms (oral solution, oral suspension, and tablets):
            • Adults and teenagers—125 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six to eight hours.
            • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 to 16.7 mg per kilogram (kg) (1.1 to 7.6 mg per pound) of body weight every four to eight hours.
  • For piperacillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For injection dosage form:
        • Adults and teenagers—3 to 4 grams, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours.
        • Infants and children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For pivampicillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (oral suspension):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children 10 years of age and older—525 to 1050 milligrams (mg) two times a day.
        • Children 7 to 10 years of age—350 mg two times a day.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age—262.5 mg two times a day.
        • Children 1 to 3 years of age—175 mg two times a day.
        • Infants 3 to 12 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 20 to 30 mg per kilogram (kg) (9.1 to 13.6 mg per pound) of body weight two times a day.
          • For oral dosage form (tablets):
            • Adults, teenagers, and children 10 years of age and older—500 mg to 1 gram two times a day.
            • Children up to 10 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For pivmecillinam:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For oral dosage form (tablets):
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—200 milligrams (mg) two to four times a day for three days.
        • Children up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For ticarcillin:
    • For bacterial infections:
      • For injection dosage form:
        • Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—3 grams injected into a vein every four hours; or 4 grams injected into a vein every six hours.
        • Children up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 33.3 to 75 milligrams (mg) per kg (15 to 34 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every four to six hours.

Penicillin V Potassium Dosage

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Sep 19, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Applies to the following strengths: 250 mg; 500 mg; 125 mg/5 mL; 250 mg/5 mL

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection

125 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

-Therapy should be guided by bacteriological studies (including sensitivity tests) and clinical response.
Use: For the treatment of mild to moderately severe infections due to penicillin G-sensitive microorganisms

Usual Adult Dose for Streptococcal Infection

125 to 250 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours for 10 days

-Streptococci in groups A, C, G, H, L, and M are very sensitive to penicillin; other groups (including group D ) are resistant.
Use: For the treatment of streptococcal infections (without bacteremia) including mild to moderate infections of the upper respiratory tract, scarlet fever, mild erysipelas

Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media

Streptococcal infections: 125 to 250 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours for 10 days
Pneumococcal infections: 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours until patient afebrile for at least 2 days
Uses:
-Streptococcal infections: For the treatment of mild to moderate infections of the upper respiratory tract
-Pneumococcal infections: For the treatment of mild to moderately severe infections of the respiratory tract, including otitis media

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

250 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

-Culture and sensitivity studies recommended when treating suspected staphylococcal infections as reports indicate rising numbers of penicillin G-resistant strains.
Use: For the treatment of mild staphylococcal infections (penicillin G-sensitive) of the skin and soft tissues
Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Recommendations: 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours

-Recommended for the treatment of streptococcal skin infections
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Fusospirochetosis

250 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

-For infections involving gum tissue, completion of essential dental care is recommended.
Use: For the treatment of fusospirochetosis (Vincent’s gingivitis and pharyngitis), mild to moderately severe infections of the oropharynx

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis

125 to 250 mg orally twice a day

-Prophylaxis with oral penicillin on a continuing basis has been effective in preventing recurrence.
-Since relatively penicillin-resistant alpha-hemolytic streptococci may be found in patients using continuous therapy for secondary prevention of rheumatic fever, other agents may be selected to add to their continuous prophylactic regimen.
Use: For the prevention of recurrence after rheumatic fever and/or chorea
American Heart Association (AHA) Recommendations: 250 mg orally twice a day
Duration of secondary prophylaxis (after last attack):
-Rheumatic fever with carditis and residual heart disease (persistent valvular disease): 10 years or until 40 years of age (whichever is longer); sometimes lifelong prophylaxis
-Rheumatic fever with carditis and no residual heart disease (no valvular disease): 10 years or until 21 years of age (whichever is longer)
-Rheumatic fever without carditis: 5 years or until 21 years of age (whichever is longer)

-Recommended as secondary prevention of rheumatic fever (prevention of recurrence); continuous prophylaxis provides the most effective protection.
-For high-risk patients, penicillin G benzathine given every 3 weeks may be more effective and is recommended; oral therapy can be used for prevention in lower risk patients whose compliance can be ensured.
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis

AHA Recommendations: 500 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day for 10 days

-Recommended for the treatment of streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis (primary prevention of rheumatic fever)
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Pharyngitis

IDSA Recommendations:
-Patients with group A streptococcal pharyngitis: 250 mg orally 4 times a day or 500 mg orally twice a day for 10 days
-Chronic pharyngeal carriers of group A streptococci: 12.5 mg/kg orally 4 times a day for 10 days
—Maximum dose: 2 g/day

-Recommended oral regimen for group A streptococcal pharyngitis in patients without penicillin allergy
-With 4 days of oral rifampin, recommended oral regimen for chronic carriers of group A streptococci
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis

2 g orally 1 hour before procedure followed by 1 g orally 6 hours later

-The AHA recommends amoxicillin as the oral penicillin regimen for dental procedures; current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.
Use: For prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis in patients with congenital heart disease or rheumatic or other acquired valvular heart disease for dental procedures or surgical procedures of the upper respiratory tract

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

US CDC Recommendations: 500 mg orally every 6 hours
Duration of Therapy:
-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days
-Naturally acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

-Recommended as an alternative oral regimen for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement; recommended for penicillin-susceptible strains
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.
IDSA Recommendations: 500 mg orally 4 times a day for 7 to 10 days

-Recommended regimen for naturally-acquired cutaneous anthrax
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis

US CDC Recommendations: 500 mg orally every 6 hours
Duration of prophylaxis: 60 days

-Recommended as an alternative oral regimen for postexposure prophylaxis; recommended for penicillin-susceptible strains
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Joint Infection

IDSA Recommendations: 500 mg orally 2 to 4 times a day

-Recommended as a preferred regimen for chronic oral antibacterial suppression for prosthetic joint infection; recommended for beta-hemolytic streptococci, penicillin-susceptible Enterococcus species, Propionibacterium species
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection

12 years or older: 125 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

-Therapy should be guided by bacteriological studies (including sensitivity tests) and clinical response.
Use: For the treatment of mild to moderately severe infections due to penicillin G-sensitive microorganisms
American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Recommendations:
1 month or older: 25 to 75 mg/kg/day orally in 3 or 4 divided doses
Maximum dose: 2 g/day

-Recommended for mild to moderate infections; this drug is inappropriate for severe infections.
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

12 years or older: 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

-Culture and sensitivity studies recommended when treating suspected staphylococcal infections as reports indicate rising numbers of penicillin G-resistant strains.
Use: For the treatment of mild staphylococcal infections (penicillin G-sensitive) of the skin and soft tissues

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis

AHA Recommendations:
-Children 27 kg or less: 250 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day
-Children greater than 27 kg and adolescents: 500 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day
Duration of therapy: 10 days

-Recommended for the treatment of streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis (primary prevention of rheumatic fever)
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumonia

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and IDSA Recommendations:
3 months or older: 50 to 75 mg/kg/day orally in 3 or 4 divided doses

-Recommended as a preferred oral regimen for community-acquired pneumonia due to group A streptococci; recommended for step-down therapy or mild infection
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis

AAP Recommendations:
Up to 1 week of age:
-Gestational age 32 to 37 weeks: 25 mg/kg orally every 12 hours
-Term neonate: 25 mg/kg orally every 8 hours
1 to 4 weeks:
-Gestational age 32 to 37 weeks: 25 mg/kg orally every 8 hours
-Term neonate: 75 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 6 to 8 hours
1 month or older: 50 to 75 mg/kg/day orally in divided doses every 6 to 8 hours
Duration of Therapy:
Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days after exposure
Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:
-Bioterrorism-related cases: To complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness
-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days
Follow-up for severe anthrax:
-To complete a regimen of 10 to 14 days or longer (up to 4 weeks of age) or to complete a regimen of 14 days or longer (1 month or older)
-Patients may require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

-Recommended as an alternative regimen for postexposure prophylaxis, the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement, and oral follow-up therapy for severe anthrax
-Recommended as an alternative for penicillin-susceptible strains
-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for follow-up therapy for severe anthrax (includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck).
-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Penicillin V potassium: 125 mg = 200,000 units; 250 mg = 400,000 units; 500 mg = 800,000 units
Administration advice:
-May administer with meals, but blood levels slightly higher when administered on an empty stomach
-In streptococcal infections, continue treatment for at least 10 days; take cultures after therapy completed to verify streptococci eliminated.
Storage requirements:
-Oral solution: Store dry powder at 20C to 25C (68F to 77F); after reconstitution, store solution in refrigerator; discard solution after 14 days.
-Tablets: Store at 20C to 25C (68F to 77F); keep bottle tightly closed.
Reconstitution/preparation techniques:
-Oral solution: The manufacturer product information should be consulted.
General:
-Dose should be determined based on sensitivity to infecting organisms and severity of infection and adjusted to patient’s clinical response.
-Culture and susceptibility information should be considered when selecting/modifying antibacterial therapy or, if no data are available, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may be considered when selecting empiric therapy.
-This drug should not be used to treat patients with severe illness or with nausea, vomiting, gastric dilatation, cardiospasm, or intestinal hypermotility.
-This drug should not be used during the acute phase of severe pneumonia, empyema, bacteremia, pericarditis, meningitis, or arthritis; it should not be used as adjunctive prophylaxis for genitourinary instrumentation/surgery, lower intestinal tract surgery, sigmoidoscopy, or childbirth.
Patient advice:
-Avoid missing doses and complete the entire course of therapy.
-Contact physician immediately if watery and bloody stools occur.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about penicillin v potassium

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 29 Reviews
  • Drug class: natural penicillins
  • FDA Alerts (2)

Consumer resources

  • Penicillin
  • Penicillin V potassium
  • Penicillin V Potassium Oral Solution
  • Penicillin V Potassium Tablets
  • Penicillin Oral, Injection, Intravenous, Intramuscular (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Penicillin VK, Veetids

Professional resources

  • Penicillin V (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +4 more

Related treatment guides

  • Bacterial Infection
  • Clostridioides difficile Infection
  • Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis
  • Fusospirochetosis, Trench Mouth
  • … +9 more

Penicillin V Potassium 500 MG

Indications and Usage

​To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Penicillin V Potassium Tablets, Penicillin V Potassium for Oral Solution and other antibacterial drugs, Penicillin V Potassium Tablets, and Penicillin V Potassium for Oral Solution should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antimicrobial therapy.

In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Penicillin V Potassium Tablets, USP and Penicillin V Potassium for Oral Solution, USP, are indicated in the treatment of mild to moderately severe infections due to penicillin G sensitive microorganisms. Therapy should be guided by bacteriological studies (including sensitivity tests) and by clinical response.

NOTE: Severe pneumonia, empyema, bacteremia, pericarditis, meningitis, and arthritis should not be treated with penicillin V during the acute stage.

Indicated surgical procedures should be performed.

The following Infections will usually respond to adequate dosage of Penicillin V:

Streptococcal infections (without bacteremia): Mild to moderate infections of the upper respiratory tract, scarlet fever and mild erysipelas.

NOTE: Streptococci in groups A, C, G, H, L, and M are very sensitive to penicillin. Other groups, including group D (enterococcus) are resistant.

Pneumococcal infections: Mild to moderately severe infections of the respiratory tract.

Staphylococcal infections – penicillin G sensitive: Mild infections of the skin and soft tissues.

NOTE: Reports indicate an increasing number of strains of staphylococci resistant to penicillin G, emphasizing the need for culture and sensitivity studies in treating suspected staphylococcal infections.

Fusospirochetosis (Vincent’s gingivitis and pharyngitis): Mild to moderately severe infections of the oropharynx usually respond to therapy with oral penicillin.

NOTE: Necessary dental care should be accomplished in infections involving the gum tissue.

Medical conditions in which oral penicillin therapy is indicated as prophylaxis:

For the prevention of recurrence following rheumatic fever and/or chorea: Prophylaxis with oral penicillin on a continuing basis has proven effective in preventing recurrence of these conditions.

Although no controlled clinical efficacy studies have been conducted, penicillin V has been suggested by the American Heart Association and the American Dental Association for use as an oral regimen for prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis in patients with congenital heart disease or rheumatic or other acquired valvular heart disease when they undergo dental procedures and surgical procedures of the upper respiratory tract.1 Oral penicillin should not be used in those patients at particularly high risk for endocarditis (e.g. those with prosthetic heart valves or surgically constructed systemic pulmonary shunts). Penicillin V should not be used as adjunctive prophylaxis for genitourinary instrumentation or surgery, lower-intestinal tract surgery, sigmoidoscopy, and childbirth. Since it may happen that alpha haemolytic streptococci relatively resistant to penicillin may be found when patients are receiving continuous oral penicillin for secondary prevention of rheumatic fever, prophylactic agents, other than penicillin may be chosen for these patients and prescribed in addition to their continuous rheumatic fever prophylactic regimen.

NOTE: When selecting antibiotics for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis, the physician or dentist should read the full joint statement of the American Heart Association and the American Dental Association.

THE MANUFACTURER’S COMPLETE DRUG INFORMATION CAN BE VIEWED ON THE FDA SITE HERE;

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *