Orajel makes pain worse

How to get rid of a toothache at night

Treating a toothache at night may be more difficult, as there is not much to distract a person from the pain.

However, people can try the following methods to relieve pain:

1. Oral pain medication

Share on PinterestOral pain medication may help treat a toothache at night.

Taking over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) is a quick, simple way for many people to effectively reduce mild-to-moderate toothaches.

Always stay within the recommended dosage on the packaging.

If the toothache is severe, it is best to see a dentist and speak to them about stronger pain relievers.

2. Cold compress

Using a cold compress may help ease the pain of a toothache.

Applying a bag of ice wrapped in a towel to the affected side of the face or jaw helps constrict the blood vessels in the area, which can reduce pain to allow a person to fall asleep.

Applying a cold compress to the area for 15–20 minutes every few hours in the evening may also help prevent pain when going to bed.

3. Elevation

Pooling blood in the head may cause additional pain and inflammation. For some people, elevating the head with an extra pillow or two may relieve the pain enough for them to fall asleep.

4. Medicated ointments

Some medicated ointments may also help reduce toothache pain. OTC numbing gels and ointments that contain ingredients such as benzocaine may numb the area.

However, benzocaine is not suitable for use by young children.

5. Salt water rinse

A simple salt water rinse is a common home remedy for a toothache.

Salt water is a natural antibacterial agent, so it may reduce inflammation. This, in turn, helps protect damaged teeth from infection.

Rinsing with salt water may also help remove any food particles or debris stuck in the teeth or gums.

6. Hydrogen peroxide rinse

Periodontitis is a serious gum infection that generally occurs as a result of poor oral hygiene. It can cause issues such as soreness, bleeding gums, and teeth that come loose in their sockets.

The author of a 2016 study found that rinsing with hydrogen peroxide mouthwash helped reduce plaque and symptoms of periodontitis.

People should always dilute food-grade hydrogen peroxide with equal parts water. Swish the solution in the mouth, but do not swallow it.

This remedy is not suitable for children, as there is a risk they may accidentally swallow the mixture.

7. Peppermint tea

Swishing peppermint tea or sucking on peppermint tea bags may also help temporarily relieve pain from a toothache.

Researchers note that peppermint contains antibacterial and antioxidant compounds. Menthol, an active ingredient in peppermint, may also have a mild numbing effect on sensitive areas.

8. Clove

Eugenol, which is one of the main compounds in cloves, can reduce tooth pain. The results of a 2015 clinical trial indicated that people who applied eugenol to their gums and socket after having a tooth extracted had less pain and inflammation during healing.

Eugenol acts as an analgesic, which means that it numbs the area. To use clove for a toothache, soak ground cloves in water to make a paste. Then, apply the paste to the tooth, or put it in an empty tea bag and place it in the mouth.

Alternatively, gently chewing or sucking on a single clove and then allowing it to sit near the painful tooth may help relieve pain.

This is not a suitable remedy for children, as they may swallow too much clove. Single cloves can be spiky and painful if a person swallows them.

9. Garlic

Share on PinterestThe antibacterial effect of garlic may help kill bacteria in the mouth.

Garlic is a common household ingredient that some people use to relieve toothache pain.

Allicin, which is the main compound in garlic, has a strong antibacterial effect that may help kill the bacteria in the mouth that lead to cavities and tooth pain.

Simply chewing a clove of garlic and allowing it to sit near the tooth may help relieve pain. That said, the taste of raw garlic can be too strong for some people, so this may not be the right solution for everyone.

How to Get Rid of a Nagging Toothache at Night

At the end of a long day, we all like to be able to snuggle into bed and drift into a peaceful and refreshing sleep. However, many people don’t realize they are experiencing a toothache until it begins to nag them at night. You may find you are going to fall asleep only to be kept awake by an annoying and painful toothache. Unfortunately, most people can’t visit their dentist at night and are stuck suffering until the morning. In this blog post, we are going to address some of the best at-home remedies for toothaches to help you make it through the night and to the dentist. We will then talk about some of the underlying causes of toothaches and how you can address these with a comprehensive oral health care routine. Of course, if you are experiencing a recurrent and painful toothache, it is important to book an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible.

Toothache Home Remedies

If you find that you are awake all night with a persistent toothache, you may require an at-home remedy to help you make it until the morning. These remedies can also help in the interim while you wait for your emergency dental appointment. However, these suggestions are only intended to help alleviate pain in the short term.

  1. Try sleeping with your head elevated on a thick pillow or several pillows. Elevation can help prevent pressure caused by blood flow into the head and mouth. Elevating your head can therefore help to alleviate some of the pain, improve circulation and reduce swelling.
  2. Following a comprehensive oral health care routine can help prevent additional food or debris in the mouth from contributing to pain. Before going to sleep, make sure you brush your teeth for a full two minutes with a fluoride toothpaste and then floss. This will help remove any trapped food particles that may be contributing to pain.
  3. Another trick for reducing tooth pain is to soak a cotton ball in clove oil and then place it over the painful tooth. This is an effective, all-natural pain relief strategy for short term management of discomfort.
  4. When gums are infected or causing pain, try rinsing your mouth with a hot saltwater solution. This can help rinse the mouth of debris and clean any wounds or sites of infection.
  5. For short-term pain management, you can also use over-the-counter pain medication that can reduce inflammation and/or pain at the site of the infected tooth. Always consult a pharmacist before taking any over-the-counter medication.
  6. If you are experiencing any swelling in the face or gums, you can limit the inflammation and soothe the area with an ice pack or cold compress.

However, each of these recommendations should only be utilized for short-term pain management. If you are experiencing a persistent toothache, it is important to visit your dentist as soon as possible and use these suggestions to manage pain only until you can talk to your healthcare provider.

Why do I get a toothache at night?

There are many reasons you might get a toothache at night. You may experience a dull throb, a sharp pain or even severe discomfort depending on the type of toothache, what is causing it and how long it’s gone untreated. Unfortunately, an untreated toothache can severely affect your oral health if neglected, and the pain and discomfort can compromise your sleep and overall wellbeing. Some of the most common causes of a nighttime toothache include:

  1. The simplest and most common cause of a toothache is food particles stuck between your teeth or gums. Popcorn kernels, apple skins, small seeds or nuts can all easily get trapped between teeth and cause discomfort or pain. This can often be improved by simply brushing and flossing to remove the trapped food.
  2. Many people grind their teeth at night, especially during periods of excessive stress. You may be grinding your teeth at night if you wake up with a sore jaw or teeth. However, if you already have a toothache due to an infection, cavity or food stuck between teeth, the grinding motion can make the pain worse.
  3. Lying down at night can result in blood flow increasing to the head, contributing to the throbbing feeling of pain.

There are a number of dental health issues that can cause toothaches

There are many possible causes of a nagging toothache and the below list is by no means comprehensive. If you are experiencing a toothache, no matter what the underlying issue may be, you should immediately book an appointment with your dentist.

  • Cavities are the most common cause of toothaches. A cavity is a hole in your tooth and the resulting pain can range from mild to severe with increased sensitivity to hot and cold extremes.
  • Periodontal disease is a common but serious affliction of the gums that results in swelling, tenderness, pain and sometimes bleeding.
  • Cracked or chipped teeth can cause mild to severe pain depending on the level of damage and the location of the tooth.
  • A sinus infection can cause pressure to build up above the molar teeth and create a toothache around the infected jaw area.
  • Pulpitis is another common but serious infection of the pulp that results in inflammation, swelling, pressure and pain.

If you are experiencing a persistent toothache, it may be a sign of a cavity, gum disease or serious infection. In order to get to the root of the problem, it is important to book an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible. If you are looking for a dentist in the Greater Toronto Area, Dr. Lloyd Pedvis has over 25 years of experience in family and cosmetic dentistry. Conveniently located in Woodbridge, Mackenzie Dental Centre can provide you with comprehensive dental care, from regular check-ups for cavities and decay to Invisalign braces and veneers. Contact our friendly team at 905-417-8700 to book your dental appointment today.

Benzocaine

FDA Alert

In 2018, FDA requested the Drug Facts label for oral benzocaine products be updated to include:

1. Benzocaine oral drug products should not be used for teething.
2. Do not use benzocaine oral drug products in children under 2 years old.
3. Use of oral benzocaine products may cause methemoglobinemia, a serious condition that must be treated promptly because it reduces the amount of oxygen in blood. This can occur even if you have used this product before. Stop use and seek immediate medical attention if you or a child in your care develops:
– pale, gray, or blue colored skin (cyanosis)
– headache
– rapid heart rate
– shortness of breath
– dizziness or lightheadedness
– fatigue or lack of energy

What is benzocaine?

Benzocaine is a topical analgesic (meaning it is to be used on the body surface or in the mouth but should not be swallowed) that has a number of different uses in over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. Depending on the dose and form, benzocaine can be used to relieve a sore throat or address mouth pain caused by cold sores, canker sores, teething, and other issues. It can also help alleviate external vaginal itching and burning, pain and itching caused by hemorrhoids, as well as relieve minor skin irritations, pain, and itching.

What is benzocaine used to treat?

  • Throat and mouth pain
  • External vaginal itching and burning
  • Pain and itching due to hemorrhoids
  • Minor skin irritations, pain, and itching
Common brands containing benzocaine:

For throat and mouth pain:

  • Anbesol®
  • Cēpacol®
  • Chloraseptic®
  • Kank-A®
  • Orajel™

For external vaginal itching and burning:

  • Vagisil®

For hemorrhoids:

  • Americaine®

For minor skin irritations:

  • Lanacane®

And store brands (ex. Walmart’s “Equate” store brand or CVS Health store brand)

How much benzocaine can you take?

Different types of products containing this active ingredient have different strengths. That’s why it is always important to read and follow the Drug Facts label. Most medicines warn against use of an active ingredient for longer than 7-10 days. Stop use and ask a doctor if symptoms persist.

Safety guide for benzocaine

Benzocaine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is safe and effective when used according to the Drug Facts label

Safe use tips for throat and mouth pain medicines
  • You should not use lozenges to treat a sore throat for more than two days.
  • You should not use a medicine to treat toothache pain for more than seven days.
Safe use tips for external vaginal itching and burning medicines
  • Do not apply vaginal medicines containing benzocaine to large areas of your body.
Safe use tips for hemorrhoid medicines
  • Hemorrhoid treatments containing benzocaine are intended to be used only on the outer surface of the lower rectum or anus. Do not put inside the rectum.
Safe use tips for skin irritation medicines
  • You should not use skin irritation medicines containing benzocaine over large areas of the body or in the eyes.

Ask a healthcare provider before use if:

For throat and mouth pain medicines
  • You have a personal or family history of methemoglobinemia, or any genetic (inherited) enzyme deficiency.
  • You have asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, or other breathing disorder.
  • You have heart disease.
  • You smoke.
  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding.
For external vaginal itching and burning medicines
  • Do not use for children under 12 years of age before consulting with a doctor.
For hemorrhoid medicines
  • Do not use for children under 12 years of age before consulting with a doctor.

Do not use if:

  • You have a history of allergy to local anesthetics such as procaine, butacaine, benzocaine, or any other “caine” anesthetics.
  • Your condition worsens or does not improve within seven days.

  • Do not use benzocaine oral drug products in children under 2 years old.
  • Benzocaine oral drug products should not be used for teething. Fever and nasal congestion in infants are not symptoms of teething and could mean your baby has an infection. Contact a healthcare provider if your baby’s symptoms do not go away.
  • Do not give an OTC throat lozenge containing benzocaine to a child under the age of 5.
  • Children older than 2 years old should be supervised when using an oral discomfort treatment for toothache.
  • Rectal bleeding occurs while using a hemorrhoid treatment.
For skin irritation medicines
  • You have deep wounds, puncture wounds, an animal bite, or a serious burns

Stop use and ask a doctor if:

  • Your sore throat has lasted for more than two days, is severe, or is accompanied by high fever, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Your toothache does not improve within seven days, or if irritation, pain, or redness lasts or gets worse.
  • You experience swelling of the mouth or a rash or fever develops.
  • You take too much. Immediately contact a healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222.
  • Conditions worsen.
  • If symptoms persist for more than 7 days, or clear up and occur again within a few days.
  • Topical vaginal medicines containing benzocaine are for external use only. If swallowed, immediately contact your healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222.
  • Conditions worsen or do not improve in 7 days.
  • Bleeding occurs.
  • Symptoms do not get better, or if redness, irritation, swelling, pain, or other symptoms occur or increase.
  • Hemorrhoid medicines containing benzocaine are for external use only. If swallowed, immediately contact your healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222.
  • Conditions worsen or do not improve in 7 days.
  • If swallowed, immediately contact your healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222.

What are the side effects of benzocaine?

  • Use of oral benzocaine products may cause methemoglobinemia, a serious condition that must be treated promptly because it reduces the amount of oxygen carried in blood. This can occur even if you have used this product before. Stop use and seek immediate medical attention if you or a child in your care develops:
    • pale, gray, or blue colored skin (cyanosis)
    • headache
    • rapid heart rate
    • shortness of breath
    • dizziness or lightheadedness
    • fatigue or lack of energy
  • Certain people may develop an allergic reaction to the active ingredient benzocaine. Get emergency medical help if you have difficulty breathing or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Contact your healthcare provider or the poison control national helpline at 800.222.1222.

Benzocaine topical

Generic Name: benzocaine topical (BENZ oh kane TOP ik al)
Brand Name: Americaine, Anacaine, Anbesol Gel, Benzodent, Cepacol Ultra, Dent-O-Kain, Dermoplast, Kank-a, Lanacane, Medicone Maximum Strength, Numzident, Num-Zit, Orabase, Orajel, Outgro Pain Relief, Retre-Gel, Solarcaine Aerosol, Topex, zilactin-B, …show all 100 brand namesAmericaine Anesthetic Lubricant, Chiggerex, Spec-T, Maintain, Orabase Lip Healer, Orajel Mouth-Aid, Orajel Maximum Strength, Orajel Baby, Orajel Denture, Detane, Foille Plus, Hurricaine, Isodettes, Lanacane with Aloe, Anbesol Maximum Strength, Orajel D, Orajel Baby Nighttime, Mosco Nail A Cain, Orabase Baby Teething Gel, Orabase with Benzocaine, Anbesol Baby Teeth, Vagisil Feminine Cream, Bicozene, Solarcaine Plus Aloe (obsolete), Sting-Kill, Americaine Hemorrhoidal, Hem-Prep, Babee Teething Lotion, Rid-A-Pain, Orajel Maximum Strength PM, Chigger-Tox, Chloraseptic (obsolete), Orajel Mouth Aid, Anbesol Cold Sore Therapy, Skeeter Stik, Anbesol Extra Strength, Topex Topical Anethetic, Hurricaine Kit, Cepacol Regular Strength, Cepacol Maximun Strength(obsolete), Cepacol Extra Strength Cherry, Cepacol Extra Strength Menthol Sugar Free, Cepacol Extra Strength Cherry Sugar Free, Dermoplast Antibacterial (obsolete), Cepacol Maximum Strength Mint, Cepacol Maximum Strength Honey Lemon, Cepacol Extra Strength Citrus, Zilactin Toothache, Orajel Medicated Mouth Sores, Anbesol Liquid, Boil Ease Pain Relieving, Orajel Denture Plus, Anbesol Baby, Cepacol Maximum Strength Menthol, Anbesol Liquid Cool Mint, Baby Orajel Nighttime Formula, Benz-O-Sthetic, Zilactin Toothache and Gum Pain Reliever, Play Longer, Orajel Regular Strength, Caine Tips Oral Pain Relief, Benzo-O-Sthetic, Cepacol Extra Strength, Hurricaine Snap-n-Go, Orabase Gel-B, Orajel Severe Pain Formula, Lanacane Maximum Strength, Benz-Protect (obsolete), Orajel Mouth Sore Medicine, Cepacol Extra Strength Menthol, Cepacol Extra Strength Honey Lemon, Cepacol Dual Relief Sore Throat Cherry, Cepacol Dual Relief Sore Throat Mint, OraMagic Plus, Trocaine, Oral Pain Relief, Cepacol Fizzlers, Cepacol Sore Throat & Coating, Cepacol Sensations Warming, Cepacol Sensations Hydra, LolliCaine

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Jun 8, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is benzocaine topical?

Benzocaine is a local anesthetic (numbing medication). It works by blocking nerve signals in your body.

Benzocaine topical is used to reduce pain or discomfort caused by minor skin irritations, sore throat, sunburn, vaginal or rectal irritation, ingrown toenails, hemorrhoids, and many other sources of minor pain on a surface of the body. Benzocaine is also used to numb the skin or surfaces inside the mouth, nose, throat, vagina, or rectum to lessen the pain of inserting a medical instrument such as a tube or speculum.

Benzocaine topical should not be used to treat teething pain in infants, and is not approved for use in a child younger than 2 years old. There are many brands and forms of benzocaine topical available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Benzocaine topical may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Benzocaine topical used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). Do not use benzocaine topical if you have ever had methemoglobinemia.

GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE SYMPTOMS OF METHEMOGLOBINEMIA: headache, tired feeling, confusion, fast heart rate, and feeling light-headed or short of breath, with a pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

An overdose of numbing medication can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. Use the smallest amount needed.

Do not use benzocaine topical on a child younger than 2 years old.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use benzocaine topical if you have ever had methemoglobinemia in the past.

Do not use benzocaine topical on a child younger than 2 years old.

An overdose of numbing medication can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. This can happen if you apply more than the recommended dose.

Fatal overdoses have occurred when numbing medicines were used without the advice of a medical doctor (such as during a cosmetic procedure like laser hair removal). Be aware that many cosmetic procedures are performed without a medical doctor present.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if this medicine is safe to use if you have:

  • a personal or family history of methemoglobinemia, or any genetic (inherited) enzyme deficiency;

  • asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, or other breathing disorder;

  • heart disease; or

  • if you smoke.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

If you apply benzocaine topical to your chest, avoid areas that may come into contact with the baby’s mouth.

How should I use benzocaine topical?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Read all medication guides or instruction sheets.

Your body may absorb more of benzocaine topical if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas, or if you apply heat, bandages, or plastic wrap to treated skin areas. Skin that is cut or irritated may also absorb more topical medication than healthy skin.

Use the smallest amount needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of benzocaine topical. Do not cover treated skin areas with a bandage or plastic wrap without medical advice.

Do not use benzocaine topical to treat large skin areas or deep puncture wounds. Avoid using the medicine on skin that is raw or blistered, such as a severe burn or abrasion.

To treat minor skin conditions, apply a thin layer of benzocaine topical to the affected area. If using the spray, hold the container 6 to 12 inches away from the skin. Do not spray this medication onto your face. Spray it instead on your hands and then rub it onto the face, avoiding contact with your eyes.

Clean the area with soap and water before applying benzocaine topical. Wash your hands before and after inserting a rectal suppository.

Do not take a rectal suppository by mouth. It is for use only in your rectum.

Remove the wrapper, but avoid handling the suppository too long or it will melt. Lie on your back with your knees up toward your chest. Gently insert the suppository into your rectum about 1 inch, pointed tip first.

Stay lying down for a few minutes while the suppository melts. You should feel little or no discomfort. Avoid using the bathroom for at least an hour.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse within the first 7 days of using benzocaine topical. Also call your doctor if your symptoms had cleared up but then came back.

If you are treating a sore throat, call your doctor if the pain is severe or lasts longer than 2 days, especially if you also develop a fever, headache, skin rash, swelling, nausea, vomiting, cough, or breathing problems.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since benzocaine topical is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. Skip any missed dose if it’s almost time for your next dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of benzocaine topical applied to the skin can cause life-threatening side effects such as uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

What should I avoid while using benzocaine topical?

Avoid eating within 1 hour after using benzocaine topical on your gums or inside your mouth.

Benzocaine topical is for use only on the surface of your body, or just inside the mouth, vagina, or rectum. Avoid getting this medication in your eyes. Avoid swallowing the gel, liquid, or ointment while applying it to your gums or the inside of your mouth. The throat spray or oral lozenge may be swallowed gradually during use.

Benzocaine topical side effects

Benzocaine topical used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). This condition may occur after only one use of benzocaine or after several uses.

Signs and symptoms may occur within minutes or up to 2 hours after using benzocaine topical in the mouth or throat. GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE:

  • a headache, tiredness, confusion;

  • fast heartbeats;

  • feeling light-headed or short of breath; and

  • pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using benzocaine topical and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe burning, stinging, or sensitivity where the medicine is applied;

  • swelling, warmth, or redness; or

  • oozing, blistering, or any signs of infection.

Common side effects may include:

  • mild stinging, burning, or itching where the medicine is applied;

  • skin tenderness or redness; or

  • dry white flakes where the medicine was applied.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect benzocaine topical?

Medicine used on the skin is not likely to be affected by other drugs you use. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.01.

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More about benzocaine topical

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