Np thyroid 60 mg

NP Thyroid Side Effects

Generic Name: thyroid desiccated

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 7, 2018.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about thyroid desiccated. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name NP Thyroid.

For the Consumer

Applies to thyroid desiccated: oral tablet

Warning

Oral route (Tablet)

In euthyroid patients, doses within the range of daily hormonal requirements are ineffective for weight reduction. Larger doses may produce serious or even life-threatening manifestations of toxicity, particularly when given in association with sympathomimetic amines such as those used for their anorectic effects.

Along with its needed effects, thyroid desiccated (the active ingredient contained in NP Thyroid) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking thyroid desiccated:

  • Changes in appetite
  • changes in menstrual periods
  • chest pain
  • diarrhea
  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • fever
  • hand tremors
  • headache
  • irritability
  • leg cramps
  • nervousness
  • sensitivity to heat
  • shortness of breath
  • sweating
  • trouble sleeping
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to thyroid desiccated: compounding powder, oral capsule, oral tablet

General

Adverse reactions other than those attributable to hyperthyroidism due to therapeutic overdose are rare. Excessive doses may result in a hypermetabolic state resembling in every respect the condition of endogenous origin.

If signs and symptoms of overdosage appear, the dosage should be reduced or therapy temporarily discontinued and may be reinstituted at a lower dosage. Normal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function has been restored in 6 to 8 weeks after thyroid suppression.

1. “Product Information. Armour thyroid (thyroid desiccated).” Forest Pharmaceuticals, St. Louis, MO.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about NP Thyroid (thyroid desiccated)

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 133 Reviews
  • Drug class: thyroid drugs
  • FDA Alerts (1)

Consumer resources

  • NP Thyroid

Other brands: Armour Thyroid, Nature-Throid, WP Thyroid, Westhroid

Professional resources

  • NP Thyroid 30 (FDA)
  • … +3 more

Related treatment guides

  • Hashimoto’s disease
  • TSH Suppression
  • Hypothyroidism, After Thyroid Removal
  • Thyroid Cancer
  • Underactive Thyroid

NP-Thyroid

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 8/15/2018

NP Thyroid (thyroid tablets) is a natural preparation derived from porcine thyroid glands indicated to treat hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone) and to treat or prevent goiter (enlarged thyroid gland), and in the management of thyroid cancer. Common side effects of NP Thyroid include:

  • hair loss during the first few months of treatment

This side effect is usually temporary as your body adjusts to the medication.

The dosage of NP Thyroid is determined by the indication and is individualized based on patient response and laboratory findings. NP Thyroid may interact with oral anticoagulants, insulin or oral diabetes drugs, cholestyramine, and estrogen and oral contraceptives. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using NP Thyroid; thyroid hormones do not readily cross the placental barrier and NP Thyroid is expected to be safe for use during pregnancy. Minimal amounts of NP Thyroid pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our NP Thyroid (thyroid tablets) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

A Natural* ChoiceFor Thyroid Therapy

INDICATION

NP Thyroid® (thyroid tablets, USP) is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism from any cause, except for cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace or supplement a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland.

NP Thyroid® is also used in the treatment and prevention of normal functioning thyroid goiters, such as thyroid nodules, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, multinodular goiter, and in the management of thyroid cancer.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Drugs with thyroid hormone activity, alone or together with other therapeutic agents, have been used for the treatment of obesity. In euthyroid patients, doses within the range of daily hormonal requirements are ineffective for weight reduction. Larger doses may produce serious or even life-threatening manifestations of toxicity, particularly when given in association with sympathomimetic amines such as those used for their anorectic effects.

  • NP Thyroid® is contraindicated in patients with uncorrected adrenal insufficiency, untreated thyrotoxicosis, and hypersensitivity to any component of the product.
  • In the elderly and in patients with cardiovascular disease, NP Thyroid® should be used with greater caution than younger patients or those without cardiovascular disease.
  • Use of NP Thyroid® in patients with diabetes mellitus or adrenal cortical insufficiency may worsen the intensity of their symptoms.
  • The therapy of myxedema coma requires simultaneous administration of glucocorticoids.
  • Concomitant use of NP Thyroid® with oral anticoagulants alters the sensitivity of oral anticoagulants. Prothrombin time should be closely monitored in thyroid-treated patients on oral anticoagulants.
  • In infants, excessive doses of NP Thyroid® may produce craniosynostosis.
  • Partial loss of hair may be experienced by children in the first few months of therapy but is usually transient.
  • Adverse reactions associated with NP Thyroid® therapy are primarily those of hyperthyroidism due to therapeutic overdosage.
  • Many drugs and some laboratory tests may alter the therapeutic response to NP Thyroid®. In addition, thyroid hormones and thyroid status have varied effects on the pharmacokinetics and actions of other drugs. Administer at least 4 hours before or after drugs that are known to interfere with absorption. Evaluate the need for dose adjustments when regularly administering within one hour of certain foods that may affect absorption.
  • NP Thyroid® should not be discontinued during pregnancy, and hypothyroidism diagnosed during pregnancy should be promptly treated.

NP Thyroid 90 Dosage

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: The dosage of thyroid hormones is determined by the indication and must in every case be individualized according to patient response and laboratory findings. Thyroid hormones are given orally. In acute, emergency conditions, injectable levothyroxine sodium may be given intravenously when oral administration is not feasible or desirable, as in the treatment of myxedema coma, or during total parenteral nutrition. Intramuscular administration is not advisable because of reported poor absorption.
Hypothyroidism—Therapy is usually instituted using low doses, with increments which depend on the cardiovascular status of the patient. The usual starting dose is 30 mg NP Thyroid, with increments of 15 mg every 2 to 3 weeks. A lower starting dosage, 15 mg/day, is recommended in patients with long standing myxedema, particularly if cardiovascular impairment is suspected, in which case extreme caution is recommended. The appearance of angina is an indication for a reduction in dosage. Most patients require 60 to 120 mg/day. Failure to respond to doses of 180 mg suggests lack of compliance or malabsorption. Maintenance dosages 60 to 120 mg/day usually result in normal serum levothyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Adequate therapy usually results in normal TSH and T4 levels after 2 to 3 weeks of therapy. Readjustment of thyroid hormone dosage should be made within the first four weeks of therapy, after proper clinical and laboratory evaluations, including serum levels of T4, bound and free, and TSH. T3 may be used in preference to levothyroxine (T4) during radio-isotope scanning procedures, since induction of hypothyroidism in those cases is more abrupt and can be of shorter duration. It may also be preferred when impairment of peripheral conversion of T4 and T3 is suspected.
Myxedema Coma—Myxedema coma is usually precipitated in the hypothyroid patient of longstanding by intercurrent illness or drugs such as sedatives and anesthetics and should be considered a medical emergency. Therapy should be directed at the correction of electrolyte disturbances and possible infection besides the administration of thyroid hormones. Corticosteroids should be administered routinely. T4 and T3 may be administered via a nasogastric tube but the preferred route of administration of both hormones is intravenous. Levothyroxine sodium (T4) is given at starting dose of 400 mcg (100 mcg/mL) given rapidly, and is usually well tolerated, even in the elderly. This initial dose is followed by daily supplements of 100 to 200 mcg given intravenously. Normal T4 levels are achieved in 24 hours followed in 3 days by threefold elevation of T3. Oral therapy with thyroid hormone would be resumed as soon as the clinical situation has been stabilized and the patient is able to take oral medication.
Thyroid Cancer—Exogenous thyroid hormone may produce regression of metastases from follicular and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid and is used as ancillary therapy of these conditions with radioactive iodine. TSH should be suppressed to low or undetectable levels. Therefore, larger amounts of thyroid hormone than those used for replacement therapy are required. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is usually unresponsive to this therapy.
Thyroid Suppression Therapy—Administration of thyroid hormone in doses higher than those produced physiologically by the gland results in suppression of the production of endogenous hormone. This is the basis for the thyroid suppression test and is used as an aid in the diagnosis of patients with signs of mild hyperthyroidism in whom base line laboratory tests appear normal, or to demonstrate thyroid gland autonomy in patients with Grave’s ophthalmopathy. 131I uptake is determined before and after the administration of the exogenous hormone. A 50 percent or greater suppression of uptake indicates a normal thyroid-pituitary axis and thus rules out thyroid gland autonomy. For adults, the usual suppressive dose of levothyroxine (T4) is 1.56 mcg/kg of body weight per day given for 7 to 10 days. These doses usually yield normal serum T4 and T3 levels and lack of response to TSH. Thyroid hormones should be administered cautiously to patients in whom there is strong suspicion of thyroid gland autonomy, in view of the fact that the exogenous hormone effects will be additive to the endogenous source.
Pediatric Dosage—Pediatric dosage should follow the recommendations summarized in Table 1. In infants with congenital hypothyroidism, therapy with full doses should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis has been made.

Ask Your Doctor About
a Nonsynthetic Option

Thyroid hormones, including ARMOUR THYROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of ARMOUR THYROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

WHAT IS ARMOUR® THYROID?

ARMOUR THYROID (thyroid tablets, USP) is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism from any cause, except for cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace or supplement a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland.

ARMOUR THYROID is also used in the treatment and prevention of normal functioning thyroid goiters, such as thyroid nodules, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, multinodular goiter, and in the management of thyroid cancer.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION (cont’d)

  • Do not use ARMOUR THYROID if you have hyperthyroidism, overactive thyroid, uncorrected adrenal problems, or are allergic to any of its ingredients.
  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking ARMOUR THYROID.
  • Tell your doctor immediately if you experience chest pain, increased pulse rate, rapid, strong, irregular heartbeat, excessive sweating, or any other unusual event.
  • If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes.
  • If you are taking oral anticoagulants, blood clotting status should be checked often by your doctor.
  • Partial loss of hair may be experienced by children in the first few months of thyroid therapy, but this will usually go away on its own.
  • Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, are breastfeeding or are taking any other drugs, as well as prescription and over-the-counter products.
  • Use ARMOUR THYROID only as ordered by your doctor. Do not stop or change the amount you take, or how often you take it, unless told to do so by your doctor.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

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