Neomycin and dexamethasone eye drops

Dexamethasone / Neomycin / Polymyxin B Ophthalmic Dosage

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 28, 2018.

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Applies to the following strengths: 1 mg-3.5 mg-10000 units/mL; 1 mg-3.5 mg-10000 units/g

Usual Adult Dose for:

  • Uveitis
  • Ocular Infection
  • Bacterial Conjunctivitis
  • Keratitis
  • Keratoconjunctivitis
  • Blepharitis

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

  • Uveitis
  • Ocular Infection
  • Bacterial Conjunctivitis
  • Keratitis
  • Keratoconjunctivitis
  • Blepharitis

Additional dosage information:

  • Renal Dose Adjustments
  • Liver Dose Adjustments
  • Precautions
  • Dialysis
  • Other Comments

Usual Adult Dose for Uveitis

Ointment: Apply a small amount (about 1/2 inch) into the conjunctival sac of the affected eye(s) up to 3 or 4 times a day
Suspension: Instill 1 to 2 drops into the conjunctival sac of the affected eye(s) up to 4 to 6 times a day; in severe disease, may be used hourly and tapered to discontinuation as inflammation subsides

-A maximum of 20 mL of suspension or a maximum of 8 g of ointment should be prescribed initially and should not be refilled without further evaluation of the patient’s condition.
-If signs/symptoms fail to improve after 2 days of treatment, the patient should be re-evaluated.
Uses:
-For the treatment of steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions for which a corticosteroid is indicated and where bacterial infection or risk of bacterial ocular infection exists
-Ocular corticosteroids are indicated in inflammatory conditions of the palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, and anterior segment of the globe where the inherent risk of corticosteroid use in certain infective conjunctivitides is accepted to obtain a diminution in edema and inflammation; also indicated in chronic anterior uveitis and corneal injury from chemical, radiation, or thermal burns; or penetration of foreign bodies.
-The anti-infective component of this drug is active against the following common bacterial eye pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella/Enterobacter species, Neisseria species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; this drug does not provide adequate coverage against Serratia marcescens and Streptococci including S pneumoniae

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Ophthalmic ointment: Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 18 years.
Ophthalmic suspension: Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 2 years.
Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Administration advice:
-For topical ophthalmic use only.
-Suspension: Shake well before use.
Storage requirements:
-Ophthalmic suspension: Store upright; keep tightly closed.
Monitoring:
-Ocular: Monitor intraocular pressure frequently or routinely, especially if used for longer than 10 days.
Patient advice:
-Discontinue use and contact your physician if inflammation or pain persists for longer than 48 hours or becomes aggravated.
-Care should be taken to avoid touching the tip of the bottle to the eyelids or to any other surface.
-Use of the bottle by more than 1 person may spread infection and should be avoided.
-Vision may be temporarily blurred following administration and therefore care should be taken when operating heavy machinery, including driving a motor vehicle.
-To apply the ointment: Tilt your head back, place a finger on your cheek just under your eye and gently pull down until a “V” pocket is formed between your eyeball and your lower lid; place a small amount (about 1/2 inch) of ointment in the “V” pocket without letting the tip of the tube touch your eye and look downward before closing your eye.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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  • Drug class: ophthalmic steroids with anti-infectives

Consumer resources

  • Dexamethasone, neomycin, and polymyxin B ophthalmic
  • Neomycin, Polymyxin B, and Dexamethasone Eye Drops
  • Neomycin, Polymyxin B, and Dexamethasone Eye Ointment
  • Neomycin, polymyxin b, and dexamethasone Ophthalmic (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Maxitrol, Ocu-Trol, Poly-Dex

Professional resources

  • Neomycin, Polymyxin B, and Dexamethasone (Wolters Kluwer)
  • … +2 more

Related treatment guides

  • Blepharitis
  • Keratitis
  • Conjunctivitis, Bacterial
  • Keratoconjunctivitis
  • Uveitis

Maxitrol

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 1/2/2018

Maxitrol (neomycin and polymyxin B sulfates and dexamethasone) Ophthalmic Suspension Sterile is a combination of two antibiotics and a steroid used to treat bacterial infections of the eyes. Maxitrol is available in generic form. Common side effects of Maxitrol include:

  • stinging/burning of the eyes for 1 to 2 minutes when Maxitrol is applied,
  • irritation,
  • itching,
  • redness,
  • blurred vision,
  • eyelid itching,
  • eyelid swelling, or
  • sensitivity to light.

Serious side effects are generally not expected with Maxitrol. Use of Maxitrol for prolonged or repeated periods may result in a new fungal eye infection and may increase your risk for other eye problems (e.g., glaucoma, cataracts, delayed wound healing). Do not use Maxitrol for longer than prescribed. Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects of Maxitrol including new or worsening eye symptoms (e.g., discharge, swelling, redness), vision problems, or eye pain.

Dosing of Maxitrol: One to two drops in the conjunctival sac(s). In severe disease, drops may be used hourly, being tapered to discontinuation as the inflammation subsides. In mild disease, drops may be used up to four to six times daily. Avoid other eye medications unless approved by your doctor. Before using Maxitrol, tell your doctor if you are taking an oral steroid medication such as prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone, others). Other drugs may also interact with Maxitrol. Talk to your doctor before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines. During pregnancy, Maxitrol should be used only when prescribed. It is not known if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Maxitrol (neomycin and polymyxin B sulfates and dexamethasone) Ophthalmic Suspension Sterile Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic

Generic Name: neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic (nee oh MYE sin DEX a METH a sone off THAL mik)
Brand Name: Neo-Decadron, Neo-Decadron Ocumeter, AK-Neo-Dex, Neo-Dex, Neo-Dexair

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What is neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Neomycin is an antibiotic. It is used to treat bacterial infections.

Dexamethasone is a steroid. It is used to treat the inflammation associated with bacterial infections of the eye.

Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic is used to treat bacterial infections of the eyes.

Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Contact your doctor if your symptoms begin to get worse or if you do not see any improvement in your condition after a few days.

Do not touch the dropper or tube opening to any surface, including your eyes or hands. The dropper or tube opening is sterile. If it becomes contaminated, it could cause an infection in your eye.

Apply light pressure to the inside corner of your eye (near your nose) after each drop to prevent the fluid from draining down your tear duct.

Who should not use neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Do not use neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic if you have a viral or fungal infection in your eye. It is used to treat infections caused by bacteria only.

Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is also not known whether neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic passes into breast milk. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Use neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic eyedrops or ointment exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Wash your hands before and after using your eyedrops or ointment.

To apply the eyedrops:

  • Tilt your head back slightly and pull down on your lower eyelid. Position the dropper above your eye. Look up and away from the dropper. Squeeze out a drop and close your eye. Apply gentle pressure to the inside corner of your eye (near your nose) for about 1 minute to prevent the liquid from draining down your tear duct. Repeat the process in the other eye if your doctor has prescribed drops in both eyes. If you are using more than one drop in the same eye, repeat the process with about 5 minutes between drops.

To apply the ointment:

  • Hold the tube in your hand for a few minutes to warm it up so that the ointment comes out easily. Tilt your head back slightly and pull down gently on your lower eyelid. Apply a thin film of the ointment into your lower eyelid. Close your eye and roll your eyeball around in all directions for 1 to 2 minutes. Repeat the process in the other eye if your doctor has prescribed ointment in both eyes.

If you are applying another eye medication, allow at least 10 minutes before your next application.

Do not touch the dropper or tube opening to any surface, including your eyes or hands. The dropper or tube opening is sterile. If it becomes contaminated, it could cause an infection in your eye.

Do not use any eyedrop that is discolored or has particles in it.

Store neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle or tube properly capped.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and apply the next one as directed. Do not use a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this medication is unlikely to occur. If you do suspect an overdose, wash the eye with water and call an emergency room or poison control center near you. If the drops or ointment have been ingested, drink plenty of fluid and call an emergency center for advice.

What should I avoid while using neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Do not touch the dropper or tube opening to any surface, including your eyes or hands. The dropper or tube opening is sterile. If it becomes contaminated, it could cause an infection in your eye.

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic may cause blurred vision. If you experience blurred vision, avoid these activities.

Use caution with contact lenses. Wear them only if your doctor approves. After applying this medication, wait at least 15 minutes before inserting contact lenses.

Avoid other eye medications unless your doctor approves.

Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic side effects

Serious side effects are not expected with this medication.

Some burning, stinging, irritation, itching, redness, blurred vision, eyelid itching, eyelid swelling, or sensitivity to light may occur.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Uveitis:

Steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions with superficial bacterial infection or risk of infection:
Initial dose: Instill 1 or 2 drops into the conjunctival sac every hour during the day and every 2 hours at night.
Maintenance dose: Instill 1 drop into the conjunctival sac every 4 hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Conjunctivitis:

Steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions with superficial bacterial infection or risk of infection:
Initial dose: Instill 1 or 2 drops into the conjunctival sac every hour during the day and every 2 hours at night.
Maintenance dose: Instill 1 drop into the conjunctival sac every 4 hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Keratitis:

Steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions with superficial bacterial infection or risk of infection:
Initial dose: Instill 1 or 2 drops into the conjunctival sac every hour during the day and every 2 hours at night.
Maintenance dose: Instill 1 drop into the conjunctival sac every 4 hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Keratoconjunctivitis:

Steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions with superficial bacterial infection or risk of infection:
Initial dose: Instill 1 or 2 drops into the conjunctival sac every hour during the day and every 2 hours at night.
Maintenance dose: Instill 1 drop into the conjunctival sac every 4 hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Blepharitis:

Steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions with superficial bacterial infection or risk of infection:
Initial dose: Instill 1 or 2 drops into the conjunctival sac every hour during the day and every 2 hours at night.
Maintenance dose: Instill 1 drop into the conjunctival sac every 4 hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

What other drugs will affect neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic?

Avoid other eye medications unless they are approved by your doctor.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking an oral steroid medication such as prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone, others).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

  • Your pharmacist has additional information about neomycin and dexamethasone ophthalmic written for health professionals that you may read.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.03. Revision Date: 2010-12-15, 5:01:39 PM.

Medical Disclaimer

More about dexamethasone / neomycin ophthalmic

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • 1 Review
  • Drug class: ophthalmic steroids with anti-infectives
  • Blepharitis
  • Conjunctivitis, Bacterial
  • Keratitis
  • Keratoconjunctivitis
  • Uveitis

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