Nadolol corgard

Corgard

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nadolol (Corgard)?

You should not use nadolol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • asthma;
  • a serious heart condition such as “AV block” (2nd or 3rd degree) or severe heart failure; or
  • if your heart cannot pump blood properly.

To make sure nadolol is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • coronary artery disease (clogged arteries);
  • congestive heart failure;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • kidney disease;
  • diabetes (taking nadolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar); or
  • a history of allergies.

It is not known whether nadolol will harm an unborn baby. Nadolol may cause heart or lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medicine during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using nadolol.

Nadolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while taking nadolol.

How should I take nadolol (Corgard)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Nadolol is usually taken once per day. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Do not skip doses or stop using nadolol suddenly. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often.

This medicine can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using nadolol.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medicine even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life.

Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

Nadolol

Nadolol is the generic form of the brand-name medicine Corgard, which is used to treat high blood pressure and chest pain.

This prescription medicine is also sometimes given to prevent migraine headaches. In addition, it’s used to treat Parkinson’s disease (a movement disorder) and irregular heartbeat.

Nadolol belongs to a class of drugs called beta-blockers. It works by relaxing blood vessels and slowing the heart rate.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved nadolol in 1979.

Nadolol Warnings

Nadolol contains a black box warning because it could cause chest pain or a heart attack if you stop taking it suddenly.

Don’t stop using this medicine without first talking to your doctor. Your healthcare provider will gradually take you off nadolol.

Before you use this medicine, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had:

  • Breathing conditions, such as bronchitis, asthma, sleep apnea, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Heart failure, a heart blockage, a slow heart rate, heart disease, chest pain, or any other heart problems
  • Blood vessel problems
  • Circulation problems
  • Stroke
  • A thyroid disorder
  • Liver or kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Psoriasis (a skin condition)
  • Myasthenia gravis (a chronic neuromuscular disease)
  • Pheochromocytoma (a tumor on a small gland near the kidneys)
  • Depression
  • Severe allergies

Tell your healthcare provider that you’re using this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental procedure.

If you have diabetes, this medicine may mask the symptoms of a low blood sugar episode. Monitor your blood sugar levels carefully while using nadolol.

Your doctor may recommend following a diet and exercise plan while taking nadolol. Follow these instructions carefully.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and laboratory while taking this medicine. You’ll need to have your blood pressure and heart rate checked regularly.

Your doctor may also order other tests to check your body’s response to this medicine.

Pregnancy and Nadolol

It’s not known whether nadolol could harm an unborn baby if it’s taken during pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant, or plan to become pregnant before using this medicine.

This drug passes into breast milk. Don’t breastfeed a baby without first talking to your doctor while using nadolol.

Beta Blockers

Beta blockers are sometimes used to prevent migraine. They were originally developed to treat high blood pressure and other heart symptoms. But they also reduce the frequency of migraine attacks in 60 to 80 percent of people.1 This fact was discovered by coincidence in the 1960s.2

Beta blockers have not been prescribed to stop migraine attacks that are already in progress, although there is recent preliminary evidence that beta blockers in eye drops might disrupt an active migraine.2

Still, many people who experience severe migraine need two kinds of medication—one for acute episodes and another for prevention.

How do beta blockers work?

Beta blockers work to relax and open up blood flow in blood vessels. Changes in blood vessels in the brain are thought to cause migraine, however it is unclear exactly how beta-blockers prevent migraine symptoms.

In general these medicines work by blocking chemicals called neurotransmitters in the body from interacting with beta receptors, which sit within blood vessels and other tissues. Beta-blockers are sometimes called beta-adrenergic blocking agents. They block the effect of adrenaline, the body’s natural fight or flight chemical. They also reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat.

What are some common beta blockers for migraine?

What are some side effects of beta blockers?

  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Reduced ability to exercise
  • Insomnia, sleep problems, nightmares and vivid dreams
  • Memory problems
  • Depression
  • Weight Gain
  • Exacerbation of asthma

This is not a complete list of side effects.

What else should I know about beta blockers for migraine?

Preventive medications for migraine should be taken daily, and it’s generally advisable to take them for six to eight weeks before assessing how well they work. It’s also important to taper off these medications when stopping their use and never stop them suddenly.

People with asthma, emphysema, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, sinus bradycardia (a slow pulse), partial AV block heart block, and low blood pressure should use beta blockers with caution. Those with the circulatory problem, peripheral artery disease are sometimes advised against taking beta blockers.

Earlier studies of beta blockers taken during pregnancy showed they might slightly slow fetal growth or cause congenital heart defects, but more recent research that adjusts for characteristics of the mother show that some beta blockers are safe during pregnancy.5 Women are pregnant should consult with their healthcare providers before taking beta blockers.

It is always important to talk to your doctor about all the medications you are taking, because some do not mix well with beta blockers.

About nadolol

Type of medicine A beta-adrenoceptor blocking medicine (often referred to as a beta-blocker)
Used for Hypertension; angina; arrhythmias; thyroid problems; to prevent migraines
Also called Corgard®
Available as Tablets

Nadolol belongs to the group of medicines known as beta-blockers. It is a medicine which is used to treat several different medical conditions. It works on the heart and blood vessels.

Nadolol slows down the activity of your heart by stopping messages sent by some nerves to your heart. It does this by blocking tiny areas (called beta-adrenergic receptors) where the messages are received by your heart. As a result, your heart beats more slowly and with less force. This allows the pressure of blood within your blood vessels to be reduced if you have high blood pressure (hypertension), and helps to prevent abnormally fast heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Because your heart is using less energy, this helps to reduce chest pain if you have angina.

Nadolol is also prescribed to help ease some of the symptoms of an overactive thyroid gland, such as a fast heartbeat and trembling. It relieves these symptoms quickly, which allows time for other antithyroid treatments to take effect. Nadolol is also prescribed to help stop migraines. It can be helpful for people who find other treatments to prevent migraine unsuitable.

Before taking nadolol

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking nadolol it is important that your doctor knows:

  • If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding.
  • If you have asthma or any other breathing disorder.
  • If you have any problems with the way your liver works, or with the way your kidneys work.
  • If you have low blood pressure or poor circulation.
  • If you have high blood sugar levels (diabetes mellitus).
  • If you have a skin problem called psoriasis.
  • If you have a condition causing muscle weakness, called myasthenia gravis.
  • If you have been told you have a slow heartbeat or heart block (a slow and irregular heartbeat).
  • If you have been told you have chest pain called Prinzmetal’s angina (caused by spasms of your heart’s blood vessels).
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine, or if you have ever had any other serious allergic reaction.

How to take nadolol

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about nadolol and will provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Take nadolol exactly as your doctor tells you to. It is usual to take one dose daily. Your doctor may prescribe you a small dose initially (half of an 80 mg tablet) and then increase your dose slowly over the next few weeks. This allows your doctor to make sure that you have the dose that helps your condition and helps to prevent unwanted side-effects. Try to take your doses at the same time of day each day, as this will help you to remember to take nadolol regularly. You can take nadolol tablets before or after meals.
  • If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you do not remember until the following day, miss out the forgotten dose completely. Do not take two doses at the same time to make up for a missed dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Try to keep your regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress.
  • Treatment with nadolol can often be long-term. Continue to take the tablets unless your doctor tells you to stop. Stopping treatment suddenly can cause problems in some people, so your doctor may want you to reduce your dose gradually if this becomes necessary.
  • If you are due to have an operation or dental treatment, it is important to tell the person carrying out the treatment that you are taking a beta-blocker. This is because some anaesthetics may increase the risk of unwanted effects.
  • Ask your doctor for advice before drinking alcohol while you are on nadolol. Alcohol will add to the blood pressure-lowering effect of nadolol which will increase the possibility of you experiencing side-effects such as dizziness.
  • If you buy any medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are suitable for you to take. Some medicines (including some cough, cold and flu remedies) may not be.
  • Your doctor may give you dietary and lifestyle advice about eating a healthy diet, not smoking, and taking regular exercise. If so, it is important that you follow the advice you are given.
  • If you have diabetes, nadolol can block the symptoms of low blood sugar. Your doctor will advise you about this.

Can nadolol cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with nadolol. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common nadolol side-effects (these affect less than 1 in 10 people) What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling dizzy or tired Do not drive and do not use tools or machines until you feel better
Cold hands or feet, slow heartbeat Speak with your doctor if troublesome
Less common nadolol side-effects include: What can I do if I experience this?
Headache Drink plenty of water and ask your pharmacist to recommend a suitable painkiller. If the headaches continue, let your doctor know
Feeling sick (nausea), stomach upset Stick to simple foods – avoid rich or spicy meals
Tingling feelings, dry mouth, feeling breathless, impotence, reduced sexual desire, mood changes, itchy rash, blurred vision Speak with your doctor if any of these become troublesome

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the tablets, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store nadolol

  • Keep all medicines out of the sight and reach of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital at once. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Generic Name: nadolol (na DOE lol)
Brand Name: Corgard

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Aug 12, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is nadolol?

Nadolol is a beta-blocker that affects the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Nadolol is used to treat angina (chest pain) or hypertension (high blood pressure).

Nadolol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use nadolol if you have asthma, a serious heart condition, severe heart failure, or if your heart cannot pump blood properly.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use nadolol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • asthma;

  • a serious heart condition such as “AV block” (2nd or 3rd degree) or severe heart failure; or

  • if your heart cannot pump blood properly.

To make sure nadolol is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • coronary artery disease (clogged arteries);

  • congestive heart failure;

  • a thyroid disorder;

  • kidney disease;

  • diabetes (taking nadolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar); or

  • a history of allergies.

It is not known whether nadolol will harm an unborn baby. Nadolol may cause heart or lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medicine during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using nadolol.

Nadolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while taking nadolol.

How should I take nadolol?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use nadolol in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Nadolol is usually taken once per day. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Do not skip doses or stop using nadolol suddenly. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often.

This medicine can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using nadolol.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medicine even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life.

Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 8 hours away. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, extreme dizziness, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking nadolol?

nadolol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of nadolol.

Nadolol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • slow heartbeats;

  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), swelling, rapid weight gain; or

  • bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing).

Common side effects may include:

  • numbness or cold feeling in your hands or feet;

  • dizziness;

  • feeling tired;

  • upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation;

  • vision problems; or

  • mood changes, confusion, memory problems.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Nadolol dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day; may be increased by 40 to 80 mg every 3 to 7 days until optimum response is obtained or pronounced heart rate reduction occurs
Maintenance dose: 40 to 80 mg orally once a day; up to 240 mg once a day may be required
Maximum dose: 240 mg/day

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day; may be increased in 40 to 80 mg increments until optimum blood pressure reduction is achieved
Maintenance dose: 40 to 80 mg orally once a day; up to 320 mg once a day may be required

What other drugs will affect nadolol?

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • digoxin, digitalis;

  • insulin or oral diabetes medicine; or

  • reserpine, or other blood pressure medications.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with nadolol, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 10.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about nadolol

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  • Drug class: non-cardioselective beta blockers

Consumer resources

  • Nadolol
  • Nadolol (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Corgard

Professional resources

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Nadolol tablets

What is this medicine?

NADOLOL (nay DOE lole) is a beta-blocker. Beta-blockers reduce the workload on the heart and help it to beat more regularly. This medicine is used to treat high blood pressure and to relieve chest pain caused by angina.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Corgard

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart or vessel disease like slow heart rate, worsening heart failure, heart block, sick sinus syndrome or Raynaud’s disease

  • kidney disease

  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma or emphysema

  • pheochromocytoma

  • thyroid disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nadolol, other beta-blockers, medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. You can take this medicine with or without food. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking this medicine suddenly. This could lead to serious heart-related effects.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

This medicine may interact with the following medications:

  • certain medicines for blood pressure, heart disease, irregular heart beat

  • certain medicines for diabetes, like glipizide or glyburide

  • general anesthetics

  • medicines used to treat allergic reactions like epinephrine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check ups. Check your blood pressure and pulse rate regularly. Ask your health care professional what your blood pressure and pulse rate should be, and when you should contact them.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine can affect blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor or health care professional before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetic medicine.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds, or pain while you are taking this medicine without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients may increase your blood pressure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives

  • cold, tingling, or numb hands or feet

  • difficulty breathing, wheezing

  • irregular heart beat

  • mental depression

  • slow heart rate

  • swelling of the legs or ankles

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • dry itching skin

  • headache

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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