Methylphenidate foods to avoid

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Ritalin

Ritalin is the brand name of the drug methylphenidate hydrochloride. Doctors prescribe Ritalin to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a sleep disorder known as narcolepsy.

Ritalin is in a class of medications called central nervous system stimulants (CNS stimulants). The drug works by altering the brain’s levels of dopamine and norepinephrine, which are neurotransmitters that allow signals to move from one nerve cell to another.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first licensed methylphenidate hydrochloride in 1955 for treating what was formerly known as hyperactivity, attention-deficit disorder or ADD. The drug was commonly prescribed in the 1990s when the diagnosis of ADHD became better known and accepted. In 2000, Janssen Pharmaceuticals received approval from the FDA to market Concerta, an extended-release form of Ritalin.

A 2012 survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found about 6.4 million children between ages 4 and 17 had been diagnosed with ADHD at some point. This was a 53 percent increase over the previous decade. Approximately two-thirds of those presently diagnosed have been prescribed drugs like Ritalin or Adderall (another common CNS stimulant).

When given for ADHD, Ritalin is usually one part of a treatment plan that may also include cognitive behavioral therapy, family counseling, or other therapies.

What Are the Key Things I Need to Know About Ritalin?

Ritalin can be habit-forming and can lead to dependence or abuse. If people take too much of the drug and find that it no longer controls symptoms, they may need to take larger doses. This can result in unusual changes in behavior.

Patients should also avoid abrupt discontinuation of this medication if they have been on it for a long time. You should tell your doctor if you have ever consumed large amounts of alcohol, have ever used street drugs, or have overused prescription medications.

Selling or giving Ritalin away is against the law and could cause harm to others. Patients should store the drug in a safe place so others cannot consume it. Ritalin should not be used in children under 6 years of age because safety and efficacy in this group have not been proven. The drug should also not be used for any condition for which it was not prescribed.

Ritalin may impair a person’s thinking and/or reactions. Patients should be particularly careful while driving or performing activities that require them to be alert.

For more information about Ritalin, you can call (888) 669-6682 or view the FDA’s medication guide.

Is There Anything Special I Should Discuss With My Doctor Before Taking Ritalin?

Cardiovascular Problems

You should tell your doctor if you have heart problems, heart defects, angina, high blood pressure, or a family history of these conditions. Ritalin and other stimulant medications have been reported to cause the following:

  • Sudden death in those who have heart defects or heart problems
  • Stroke and heart attack in adults
  • Increased blood pressure and heart rate

Mental Health Issues

You should tell your doctor if you have any mental health problems or a family history of suicide, psychosis, bipolar disorder, or depression. Ritalin has been associated with the following psychiatric problems:

  • Unusual behavior and thoughts
  • Bipolar disorder, especially mania
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Psychotic symptoms
  • Anxiety

Circulation Problems

Patients with circulation problems should alert a medical professional if they experience numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in the fingers or toes. You should call your doctor right away if you have any wounds or other injuries appearing on your fingers or toes while taking Ritalin, since these may be signs of numbness.

Seizure Disorder

Patients with a history of seizure disorder should inform their physician because Ritalin could lead to seizures.

Other Conditions

Ritalin is not appropriate for everyone. People should not take the drug if they:

  • Are very anxious, agitated, or tense
  • Have taken an anti-depression drug called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) in the past 14 days
  • Have tics (muscle twitches), Tourette’s syndrome, or a family history of Tourette’s
  • Have an eye condition known as glaucoma
  • Are allergic to any of the ingredients in Ritalin
  • Are under 6 years of age

PATIENT INFORMATION

RITALIN®
(rit-ah-lin)
(methylphenidate hydrochloride) tablets

What is the most important information I should know about RITALIN?

RITALIN is a federal controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep RITALIN in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away RITALIN may harm others and is against the law.

Tell your doctor if you or your child have abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines or street drugs.

The following have been reported with use of methylphenidate hydrochloride and other stimulant medicines.

  1. Heart-related problems:
    • sudden death in patients who have heart problems or heart defects
    • stroke and heart attack in adults
    • increased blood pressure and heart rate

Tell your doctor if you or your child have any heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems.

Your doctor should check you or your child carefully for heart problems before starting RITALIN.

Your doctor should check your or your child’s blood pressure and heart rate regularly during treatment with RITALIN.

Call your doctor right away if you or your child has any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking RITALIN.

  1. Mental (Psychiatric) problems:

    All Patients

    • new or worse behavior and thought problems
    • new or worse bipolar illness
    • new or worse aggressive behavior or hostility
    • new psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices, believing things that are not true, are suspicious) or new manic symptoms

Tell your doctor about any mental problems you or your child have, or about a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression.

Call your doctor right away if you or your child have any new or worsening mental symptoms or problems while taking RITALIN, especially seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not real, or are suspicious.

What is RITALIN?

  • RITALIN is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant prescription medicine. It is used for the treatment of Attention- Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). RITALIN may help increase attention and decrease impulsiveness and hyperactivity in patients with ADHD.
  • RITALIN should be used as a part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include counseling or other therapies.
  • RITALIN is also used in the treatment of a sleep disorder called narcolepsy.

It is not known if RITALIN is safe and effective in children under 6 years of age.

Who should not take RITALIN?

RITALIN should not be taken if you or your child:

  • are allergic to methylphenidate hydrochloride, or any of the ingredients in RITALIN. See the end of this Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in RITALIN.
  • are taking or have taken within the past 14 days an anti-depression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor or MAOI.

RITALIN may not be right for you or your child. Before starting RITALIN tell your or your child’s doctor about all health conditions (or a family history of) including:

  • heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure
  • mental problems including psychosis, mania, bipolar illness, or depression
  • circulation problems in fingers or toes
  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if RITALIN will harm your unborn baby. Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.
  • if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. RITALIN passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take RITALIN or breastfeed.

Tell your doctor about all of the medicines that you or your child takes including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. RITALIN and some medicines may interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Sometimes the doses of other medicines will need to be adjusted while taking RITALIN.

Your doctor will decide whether RITALIN can be taken with other medicines.

Especially tell your doctor if you or your child takes:

  • anti-depression medicines including MAOIs
  • blood pressure medicines (anti-hypertensive)

Know the medicines that you or your child takes. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your doctor and pharmacist.

  • You should not take RITALIN on the day of your operation if a certain type of anesthetic is used. This is because there is a chance of a sudden rise in blood pressure and heart rate during the operation.

Do not start any new medicine while taking RITALIN without talking to your doctor first.

How should RITALIN be taken?

  • Take RITALIN exactly as prescribed. Your doctor may adjust the dose until it is right for you or your child.
  • RITALIN is usually taken 2 to 3 times a day.
  • Take RITALIN 30 to 45 minutes before a meal.
  • From time to time, your doctor may stop RITALIN treatment for a while to check ADHD symptoms.
  • Your doctor may do regular checks of the blood, heart, and blood pressure while taking RITALIN.
  • Children should have their height and weight checked often while taking RITALIN. RITALIN treatment may be stopped if a problem is found during these check-ups.
  • In case of poisoning call your poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away, or go to the nearest hospital emergency room.

What are the possible side effects of RITALIN?

RITALIN may cause serious side effects, including:

What are possible side effects of RITALIN?

  • See “What is the most important information I should know about RITALIN?” for information on reported heart and mental problems.
  • painful and prolonged erections (priapism) have occurred with methylphenidate. If you or your child develops priapism, seek medical help right away. Because of the potential for lasting damage, priapism should be evaluated by a doctor immediately.
  • circulation problems in fingers and toes (Peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon):
    • fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful
    • fingers or toes may change color from pale, to blue, to red
  • Tell your doctor if you or your child have, numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in the fingers or toes.

  • Call your doctor right away if you have or your child has any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking RITALIN.
  • slowing of growth (height and weight) in children

Common side effects include:

  • fast heart beat
  • abnormal heartbeat (palpitations)
  • headache
  • trouble sleeping
  • nervousness
  • sweating a lot
  • decreased appetite
  • dry mouth
  • nausea
  • stomach pain

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store RITALIN?

  • Store RITALIN in a safe place and in a tightly closed container at room temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
  • Protect from light.
  • Dispose of remaining, unused, or expired RITALIN by a medicine take-back program at authorized collection sites such as retail pharmacies, hospital or clinic pharmacies, and law enforcement locations. If no take-back program or authorized collector is available, mix RITALIN with an undesirable, nontoxic substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds to make it less appealing to children and pets. Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag and throw away (discard) RITALIN in the household trash.
  • Keep RITALIN and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of RITALIN.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. You can ask your pharmacist or doctor for information about RITALIN that is written for healthcare professionals. Do not use RITALIN for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give RITALIN to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them and it is against the law.

What are the ingredients in RITALIN?

Active ingredient: methylphenidate HCl

MEDICATION GUIDE

RITALIN-SR®
(rit-ah-lin)
(methylphenidate hydrochloride) extended-release tablets

What is the most important information I should know about RITALIN-SR?

RITALIN-SR is a federal controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep RITALINSR in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away RITALIN-SR may harm others, and is against the law. Tell your doctor if you or your child have ever abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines or street drugs.

The following have been reported with use of methylphenidate hydrochloride and other stimulant medicines.

  1. Heart-related problems:
    • sudden death in patients who have heart problems or heart defects
    • stroke and heart attack in adults
    • increased blood pressure and heart rate

Tell your doctor if you or your child have any heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems.

Your doctor should check you or your child carefully for heart problems before starting RITALIN-SR.

Your doctor should check your or your child’s blood pressure and heart rate regularly during treatment with RITALIN-SR.

Call your doctor right away if you or your child has any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking RITALIN-SR.

  1. Mental (Psychiatric) problems:

    All Patients

    • new or worse behavior and thought problems
    • new or worse bipolar illness
    • new or worse aggressive behavior or hostility
    • new psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices, believing things that are not true, are suspicious) or new manic symptoms

Tell your doctor about any mental problems you or your child have, or about a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression.

Call your doctor right away if you or your child have any new or worsening mental symptoms or problems while taking RITALIN-SR, especially seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not real, or are suspicious.

What is RITALIN-SR?

RITALIN-SR is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant prescription medicine. It is used for the treatment of Attention- Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). RITALIN-SR may help increase attention and decrease impulsiveness and hyperactivity in patients with ADHD.

RITALIN-SR should be used as a part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include counseling or other therapies.

RITALIN-SR is also used in the treatment of a sleep disorder called narcolepsy

It is not known if RITALIN-SR is safe and effective in children under 6 years of age.

Who should not take RITALIN-SR?

RITALIN-SR should not be taken if you or your child:

  • are allergic to methylphenidate hydrochloride, or any of the ingredients in RITALIN-SR. See the end of this Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in RITALIN-SR.
  • are taking or have taken within the past 14 days an anti-depression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor or MAOI.

RITALIN-SR may not be right for you or your child. Before starting RITALIN-SR tell your or your child’s doctor about all health conditions (or a family history of) including:

  • heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure
  • mental problems including psychosis, mania, bipolar illness, or depression
  • circulation problems in fingers or toes
  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if RITALIN-SR will harm your unborn baby. Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.
  • if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. RITALIN-SR passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take RITALIN-SR or breastfeed.

Tell your doctor about all of the medicines that you or your child takes including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. RITALIN-SR and some medicines may interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Sometimes the doses of other medicines will need to be adjusted while taking RITALIN-SR.

Your doctor will decide whether RITALIN-SR can be taken with other medicines.

Especially tell your doctor if you or your child takes:

  • anti-depression medicines including MAOIs
  • blood pressure medicines (anti-hypertensive)

Know the medicines that you or your child takes. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your doctor and pharmacist.

Do not start any new medicine while taking RITALIN-SR without talking to your doctor first.

How should RITALIN-SR be taken?

  • Take RITALIN-SR exactly as prescribed. Your doctor may adjust the dose until it is right for you or your child.
  • Take RITALIN-SR 30 to 45 minutes before a meal. The effect of a dose of RITALIN-SR usually lasts about 8 hours.
  • Do not chew or crush RITALIN-SR tablets. Swallow RITALIN-SR tablets whole with water or other liquids. Tell your doctor if you or your child cannot swallow RITALIN-SR whole. A different medicine may need to be prescribed.
  • From time to time, your doctor may stop RITALIN-SR treatment for a while to check ADHD symptoms.
  • Your doctor may do regular checks of the blood, heart, and blood pressure while taking RITALIN-SR.
  • Children should have their height and weight checked often while taking RITALIN-SR. RITALIN-SR treatment may be stopped if a problem is found during these check-ups.
  • In case of poisoning call your poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away, or go to the nearest hospital emergency room.

What are the possible side effects of RITALIN-SR?

RITALIN-SR may cause serious side effects, including:

What are possible side effects of RITALIN-SR?

  • See “What is the most important information I should know about RITALIN-SR?” for information on reported heart and mental problems.
  • painful and prolonged erections (priapism) have occurred with methylphenidate. If you or your child develops priapism, seek medical help right away. Because of the potential for lasting damage, priapism should be evaluated by a doctor immediately.
  • circulation problems in fingers and toes (Peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon):
    • fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful
    • fingers or toes may change color from pale, to blue, to red
  • Tell your doctor if you or your child have numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in the fingers or toes.

  • Call your doctor right away if you have or your child has any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking RITALIN-SR.
  • slowing of growth (height and weight) in children

Common side effects include:

  • fast heart beat
  • abnormal heartbeat (palpitations)
  • headache
  • trouble sleeping
  • nervousness
  • sweating a lot
  • decreased appetite
  • dry mouth
  • nausea
  • stomach pain

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store RITALIN-SR?

  • Store RITALIN-SR in a safe place and in a tightly closed container at room temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
  • Protect from moisture.
  • Dispose of remaining, unused, or expired RITALIN by a medicine take-back program at authorized collection sites such as retail pharmacies, hospital or clinic pharmacies, and law enforcement locations. If no take-back program or authorized collector is available, mix RITALIN with an undesirable, nontoxic substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds to make it less appealing to children and pets. Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag and throw away (discard) RITALIN in the household trash.
  • Keep RITALIN-SR and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of RITALIN-SR.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. You can ask your pharmacist or doctor for information about RITALIN-SR that is written for healthcare professionals. Do not use RITALIN-SR for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give RITALIN-SR to other people, even if they have the same symptoms. It may harm them and it is against the law.

What are the ingredients in RITALIN-SR?

Active ingredient: methylphenidate HCl, USP

Inactive ingredients: Cetostearyl alcohol, lactose, magnesium stearate, mineral oil, povidone, titanium dioxide, and zein

This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Methylphenidate

Medically reviewed by Sophia Entringer, PharmD Last updated on Jan 7, 2020.

  • Overview
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What is methylphenidate?

Methylphenidate is a central nervous system stimulant. It affects chemicals in the brain and nerves that contribute to hyperactivity and impulse control.

Methylphenidate is used to treat attention deficit disorder (ADD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and narcolepsy.

Methylphenidate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Methylphenidate may be habit-forming, and this medicine is a drug of abuse. Tell your doctor if you have had problems with drug or alcohol abuse.

Stimulants have caused stroke, heart attack, and sudden death in people with high blood pressure, heart disease, or a heart defect.

Do not use methylphenidate if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Methylphenidate may cause new or worsening psychosis (unusual thoughts or behavior), especially if you have a history of depression, mental illness, or bipolar disorder.

You may have blood circulation problems that can cause numbness, pain, or discoloration in your fingers or toes.

Call your doctor right away if you have: signs of heart problems – chest pain, feeling light-headed or short of breath; signs of psychosis – paranoia, aggression, new behavior problems, seeing or hearing things that are not real; signs of circulation problems – unexplained wounds on your fingers or toes.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use methylphenidate if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

You may not be able to use methylphenidate if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;

  • a personal or family history of tics (muscle twitches) or Tourette’s syndrome; or

  • severe anxiety, tension, or agitation (stimulant medicine can make these symptoms worse).

You should not use Metadate CD if you have:

  • severe hypertension; or

  • heart failure; or

  • irregular heart rhythms; or

  • high thyroid levels; or

  • recent heart attack or related chest pain; or

  • hereditary problems of fructose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, or sucrose-isomaltase insufficiency

Stimulants have caused stroke, heart attack, and sudden death in certain people. Tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart problems or a congenital heart defect;

  • high blood pressure; or

  • a family history of heart disease or sudden death.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has ever had:

  • depression, mental illness, bipolar disorder, psychosis, or suicidal thoughts or actions;

  • motor tics (muscle twitches) or Tourette’s syndrome;

  • blood circulation problems in the hands or feet;

  • seizures or epilepsy;

  • problems with the esophagus, stomach, or intestines;

  • an abnormal brain wave test (EEG); or

  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry to track the effects of methylphenidate on the baby.

It is not known whether methylphenidate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Methylphenidate is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old.

How should I take methylphenidate?

Take methylphenidate exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your dose needs may change if you switch to a different brand, strength, or form of this medicine. Avoid medication errors by using only the form and strength your doctor prescribes.

Methylphenidate may be habit-forming. Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away this medicine is against the law.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

To prevent sleep problems, take this medicine in the morning.

Some brands of methylphenidate should be taken at least 30 minutes before a meal. Extended-release methylphenidate can be taken with or without food. Follow the directions on your medicine label

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

To make swallowing easier, you may open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use.

The chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before use and measure the dose very carefully using the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

To take the orally disintegrating tablet (Cotempla XR-ODT):

  • Keep the tablet in its blister pack until you are ready to take it. Open the package and peel back the foil. Do not push a tablet through the foil or you may damage the tablet.

  • Use dry hands to remove the tablet and place it in your mouth.

  • Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

While using methylphenidate, your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using methylphenidate. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of your medicine. Methylphenidate is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is later than 6:00 p.m. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of methylphenidate could be fatal.

What should I avoid while taking methylphenidate?

Avoid drinking alcohol, especially if you take extended-release methylphenidate. Alcohol may cause the medicine to be released into the bloodstream too fast.

Methylphenidate may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Methylphenidate side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to methylphenidate: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • signs of heart problems – chest pain, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out;

  • signs of psychosis – hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not real), new behavior problems, aggression, hostility, paranoia;

  • signs of circulation problems – numbness, pain, cold feeling, unexplained wounds, or skin color changes (pale, red, or blue appearance) in your fingers or toes;

  • a seizure (convulsions);

  • muscle twitches (tics);

  • changes in your vision; or

  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer (rare).

Methylphenidate can affect growth in children. Tell your doctor if your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medicine.

Common methylphenidate side effects may include:

  • excessive sweating;

  • mood changes, feeling nervous or irritable, sleep problems (insomnia);

  • fast heart rate, pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest, increased blood pressure;

  • loss of appetite, weight loss;

  • dry mouth, nausea, stomach pain; or

  • headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect methylphenidate?

Ask your doctor before using a stomach acid medicine (including Alka-Seltzer or sodium bicarbonate). Some of these medicines can change the way your body absorbs methylphenidate, and may increase side effects.

Do not use methylphenidate if you are taking a MAO inhibitor, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Many drugs can interact with methylphenidate. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use methylphenidate only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 20.01.

Related questions

  • Ritalin vs Vyvanse – What’s the difference between them?
  • Concerta vs Adderall. What is the difference between them?
  • How is Cotempla XR-ODT different to other brands of methylphenidate?
  • What is the difference between Jornay PM and other once-daily methylphenidate formulations?
  • What are the brands of methylphenidate?

Medical Disclaimer

More about methylphenidate

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  • Drug class: CNS stimulants
  • FDA Alerts (3)

Consumer resources

  • Methylphenidate Chewable Tablets
  • Methylphenidate Controlled-Release Tablets
  • Methylphenidate Extended-Release Chewable Tablets
  • Methylphenidate Extended-Release Oral-Disintegrating Tablets
  • Methylphenidate Extended-Release Tablets
  • … +7 more

Other brands: Ritalin, Concerta, Daytrana, Jornay PM, … +11 more

Professional resources

  • Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +8 more

Related treatment guides

  • Fatigue
  • Narcolepsy
  • Depression
  • ADHD
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Ritalin Overdose

Though many people consider prescription medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) safe and effective, there is still a chance of overdose when these substances are misused. Anyone misusing or abusing Ritalin, an ADHD medication, risks experiencing a Ritalin overdose.

Can You Overdose on Ritalin?

Yes, Ritalin overdose is possible, but it is impossible to know just how many milligrams are needed to overdose. For Ritalin, the dosage limit is usually 60 mg per day. Some adults may use up to one milligram per kilogram of their weight to ensure the best results.

Generally speaking, the Ritalin overdose amount is much higher than the recommended dose for the substance. People who misuse Ritalin surpass the safe dosage level many times over.

Someone who has never used Ritalin before could overdose on a relatively small dose while someone with a long history of Ritalin use may tolerate higher doses. Since many variables contribute to an overdose, there is no way to know how much Ritalin it takes to overdose.

Ritalin Overdose Symptoms

Ritalin overdose symptoms quickly replace the euphoria and increased energy linked to Ritalin misuse. Overdose symptoms of Ritalin include:

  • Vomiting
  • Agitation
  • Muscle twitching
  • Convulsions
  • Confusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusional thinking
  • Sweating
  • Headache
  • Cardiac issues

Ritalin overdose can be fatal if these symptoms do not receive the immediate medical attention they deserve.

Warning Signs of Ritalin Overdose

Seeing a person exhibiting the signs of a Ritalin overdose can be an overwhelming and confusing experience for anyone, especially if the person is a loved one. Knowing what to look for can help the person overdosing receive the help they need as soon as possible.

When experiencing an overdose, a person could appear sweaty and shaky while complaining of their rapid or irregular heart rate. Rather than having a heart attack or other cardiac emergency, they are actually feeling the effects of Ritalin overdose.

In other cases, a person overdosing on Ritalin may experience mental health problems. The person may be anxious and panicky, or they could be violently angry and aggressive with those around them.

People experiencing psychotic symptoms of Ritalin overdose will begin to see, hear, feel and smell things that are not present. They could have strange thoughts about people following them or listening to their thoughts. A person in this state could act erratically without regard for their safety or the well-being of others.

Whatever the signs and symptoms, be sure to seek emergency services immediately. Try to learn what substances the person consumed to better inform the professionals when they arrive.

Long-Term Effects of Ritalin Overdose

The Ritalin overdose side effects represent a group of long-term effects that may persist long after the symptoms and signs of overdose have passed. Long term-effects of Ritalin overdose include:

  • Vomiting, which can result in choking and pneumonia due to the material being inhaled into the lungs
  • Cardiac issues during overdose and possible dehydration from vomiting and diarrhea can lead to lasting heart problems
  • Seizures from an overdose that can carry over and begin a seizure disorder
  • Anxiety, hallucinations and delusional thinking can remain long after the overdose has ended

Some people may not experience any of these lasting effects, but the risk of overdose side effects are too serious to ignore.

Ritalin Overdose Prevention

Ritalin overdose prevention is not complex. To best avoid the hazards, a person should always take the medication as instructed.

If a person misuses the drug by taking large doses, snorting or injecting the drug, mixing the drug with other substances or taking medicine to get high, there is a much higher chance of an overdose occurring. Someone taking the drug under the supervision of a prescriber will always start at a low dose and build up over time to maintain safety.

Similarly, anyone who has a prescription for Ritalin should never give their medication to another person. Even if they claim it is safe, the other person could overdose on a single dose of Ritalin.

Ritalin Overdose Treatment

Unlike other substances, there is no Ritalin overdose antidote. Medical attention is always recommended to help minimize the impact of overdose. Ritalin overdose treatment will likely take place in a hospital’s emergency room.

If you or someone you love is currently abusing Ritalin, they are at risk of overdosing. The best way to avoid overdosing is by addressing the substance use disorder. Contact The Recovery Village Ridgefield to learn how professional treatment can address drug use and any co-occurring mental health disorders. You deserve a healthier future, call today.

Methylphenidate: 7 things you should know

3. Downsides

If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

  • A headache, abdominal pain, a loss of appetite, dry mouth, a fast heartbeat, nausea, nervousness, or insomnia. Rash, pruritus, irritability, an increase in blood pressure or excessive sweating may also occur.
  • May precipitate the emergence of psychotic thoughts such as hallucinations, delusions or mania in children and adolescents without a prior history of such thoughts. Discontinuation of treatment may be appropriate if this happens.
  • Methylphenidate can be addictive and cause dependence. The risk is greater with extended-release tablets and in people with a history of drug dependence and alcoholism. Tolerance can also develop to methylphenidate’s effect.
  • May impair judgment or reaction skills. Exercise caution before driving or operating machinery until the full effects of methylphenidate are known.
  • Depression may occur in those discontinuing methylphenidate, particularly if they have been overusing it. Methylphenidate may also aggravate pre-existing symptoms of anxiety, agitation, tension, behavioral or thought disturbances and is best avoided in people displaying marked levels of these symptoms.
  • May not be suitable for people with certain heart conditions, hyperthyroidism, and other psychiatric disorders including bipolar disorder. An increased risk of seizures, peripheral circulation problems, and visual disturbances have been associated with methylphenidate use. Should not be used in people with glaucoma, a history of tics or Tourette’s syndrome, severe hypertension or cardiac disease.
  • Alcohol may contribute to the side effects and interfere with the release of extended-release methylphenidate. Avoid.
  • May interact with a number of other drugs including monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors), and methylphenidate should not be used within 14 days of discontinuation of a MAO inhibitor, halogenated anesthetics (do not take methylphenidate on the day of surgery), warfarin, anticonvulsants, and some antidepressants.
  • Reports indicate some temporary slowing of growth may occur when regular methylphenidate is given to children aged 7 through 10 years. Doctors should monitor the child’s height and weight and consider stopping treatment if growth suppression is suspected.
  • Has been associated with sudden death. Cases were mainly in children and adults with serious structural cardiac abnormalities or other serious heart problems. Avoid in those known to have these risk factors.
  • Rare cases of priapism (painful erections more than 6 hours in duration) have been reported.
  • Caution when using in people with pre-existing bowel problems (includes those with severe narrowing of the intestinal tract and gut motility disorders) as extended-release tablets maintain their shape and potentially may cause a blockage. May affect blood circulation in the hands and feet. Symptoms may improve after a dosage reduction or discontinuation.
  • Periodic blood tests may be required with prolonged dosing.
  • Drug testing will reveal a positive result for methylphenidate.
  • Classified as a Schedule II controlled substance, meaning that methylphenidate has a high potential for abuse. Keep personal supplies of methylphenidate in a safe place, out of view of potential drug seekers.

Notes: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. For a complete list of all side effects, .

This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Brand Names: Canada

Warning

  • This drug has a risk of abuse and misuse. Use this drug only as you were told by your doctor. Tell your doctor if you have ever abused or been addicted to any drugs or alcohol.

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to treat attention deficit problems with hyperactivity.
  • It is used to treat narcolepsy.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take this drug?

All products:

  • If you have an allergy to methylphenidate or any other part of this drug.
  • If you are allergic to this drug; any part of this drug; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Glaucoma, agitation, anxiety, or overactive thyroid.
  • If you or a family member have any of these health problems: Blood vessel disease, high blood pressure, heart structure problems or other heart problems, or Tourette’s syndrome or tics.
  • If you have ever had a stroke.
  • If you have taken certain drugs for depression or Parkinson’s disease in the last 14 days. This includes isocarboxazid, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, selegiline, or rasagiline. Very high blood pressure may happen.
  • If you are taking any of these drugs: Linezolid or methylene blue.

All chewable products:

  • If you have trouble swallowing, talk with your doctor.

Long-acting tablets:

  • If you cannot swallow this product whole.
  • If you have ever had any of these health problems: Cystic fibrosis; narrowing of the GI (gastrointestinal) tract or other GI problems like bowel block, small bowel disease, short gut syndrome, or slow-moving swallowing tube (esophagus) or bowel tract; peritonitis.

Oral-disintegrating tablet:

  • If you are taking any of these drugs: Famotidine, omeprazole, or sodium bicarbonate.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this drug with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take this drug?

All products:

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this drug. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how this drug affects you.
  • Heart attacks, strokes, and sudden deaths have happened in adults taking this drug. Sudden deaths have also happened in children with some heart problems or heart defects. Call your doctor right away if you have a fast, slow, or abnormal heartbeat; weakness on 1 side of the body; trouble speaking or thinking; change in balance; drooping on 1 side of the face; change in eyesight; chest pain or pressure; shortness of breath; or severe dizziness or passing out.
  • You may need to have some heart tests before starting this drug. If you have questions, talk with your doctor.
  • Check blood pressure and heart rate as the doctor has told you.
  • This drug may raise the chance of seizures in some people, including people who have had seizures in the past. Talk to your doctor to see if you have a greater chance of seizures while taking this drug.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this drug.
  • A severe and sometimes deadly problem called serotonin syndrome may happen if you take this drug with certain other drugs. Call your doctor right away if you have agitation; change in balance; confusion; hallucinations; fever; fast or abnormal heartbeat; flushing; muscle twitching or stiffness; seizures; shivering or shaking; sweating a lot; severe diarrhea, upset stomach, or throwing up; or severe headache.
  • Rarely, low blood cell counts have happened with this drug. Call your doctor right away if you have any unexplained bruising or bleeding; signs of infection like fever, chills, or sore throat; or feel very tired or weak.
  • If you have phenylketonuria (PKU), talk with your doctor. Some products have phenylalanine.
  • If you are allergic to tartrazine, talk with your doctor. Some products have tartrazine.
  • This drug may affect growth in children and teens in some cases. They may need regular growth checks. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan on getting pregnant, or are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to you and the baby.

Long-acting tablets:

  • For some brands, you may see the tablet shell in your stool. For these brands, this is normal and not a cause for concern. If you have questions, talk with your doctor.
  • Tell your doctor that you use this drug if you are getting x-rays near the belly.

Skin patch:

  • Avoid use of heat sources (such as sunlamps, tanning beds, heating pads, electric blankets, heat lamps, saunas, hot tubs, heated waterbeds). Avoid long, hot baths or sunbathing. Your temperature may rise and cause too much drug to pass into your body.
  • This drug may lead to loss of skin color at or around where the patch is put on. Sometimes, this has happened at other areas. This may last even after this drug is stopped. The chance may be higher if you or someone in your family has ever had a skin problem called vitiligo. Talk with the doctor.
  • This drug may cause harm if chewed or swallowed. This includes used patches. If this drug has been put in the mouth, call a doctor or poison control center right away.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

All products:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of high blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • Signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Joint pain.
  • Purple patches on the skin or mouth.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Seizures.
  • Shakiness.
  • Trouble controlling body movements.
  • Sweating a lot.
  • Restlessness.
  • Change in color of hands or feet from pale to blue or red.
  • Numbness, pain, tingling, or cold feeling of the hands or feet.
  • Any sores or wounds on the fingers or toes.
  • Muscle pain or weakness, dark urine, or trouble passing urine.
  • Change in sex interest.
  • Call your doctor right away if you have a painful erection (hard penis) or an erection that lasts for longer than 4 hours. This may happen even when you are not having sex. If this is not treated right away, it may lead to lasting sex problems and you may not be able to have sex.
  • New or worse behavior and mood changes like change in thinking, anger, and hallucinations have happened with this drug. Tell your doctor if you or a family member have any mental or mood problems like low mood (depression) or bipolar illness, or if a family member has killed themselves. Call your doctor right away if you have hallucinations; change in the way you act; or signs of mood changes like low mood (depression), thoughts of killing yourself, nervousness, emotional ups and downs, thinking that is not normal, anxiety, or lack of interest in life.

Skin patch:

  • Change in skin color.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

All products:

  • Dizziness.
  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Headache.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Weight loss.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Not hungry.
  • Trouble sleeping.
  • Stomach pain or heartburn.
  • Nose or throat irritation.

Skin patch:

  • Skin irritation.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best taken?

Use this drug as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

Tablets:

  • Take 30 to 45 minutes before meals.
  • If taking this drug more than 1 time a day, take the last dose of the day before 6 pm.

Fast-release chewable tablet:

  • Take 30 to 45 minutes before meals.
  • Chew well before swallowing.
  • Take with a full glass of water.
  • If taking this drug more than 1 time a day, take the last dose of the day before 6 pm.

Extended-release chewable tablet:

  • Take in the morning.
  • Chew well before swallowing.
  • Take with or without food.
  • Take with a full glass of water.
  • Some products may be broken in half. If you are not sure if you can break this product in half, talk with the doctor.

Oral-disintegrating tablet:

  • Take in the morning.
  • Take with or without food but take the same way each time. Always take with food or always take on an empty stomach.
  • Do not push the tablet out of the foil when opening. Use dry hands to take it from the foil. Place on your tongue and let it dissolve. Water is not needed. Do not swallow it whole. Do not chew, break, or crush it.
  • Do not take this drug out of the blister pack until you are ready to take it. Take this drug right away after opening the blister pack. Do not store the removed drug for future use.

Liquid (solution):

  • Take 30 to 45 minutes before meals.
  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring device that comes with this drug. If there is none, ask the pharmacist for a device to measure this drug.
  • If taking this drug more than 1 time a day, take the last dose of the day before 6 pm.

Liquid (suspension):

  • Take in the morning with or without food. Shake bottle for 10 seconds or more before taking.
  • Check to make sure the drug in the bottle is a liquid. If this drug is still a powder, do not use it. Take it back to the pharmacist.
  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring device that comes with this drug. If there is none, ask the pharmacist for a device to measure this drug.

Long-acting capsules (Jornay PM):

  • Take in the evening.
  • Do not take this drug in the morning.
  • Take with or without food but take the same way each time. Always take with food or always take on an empty stomach.
  • You may sprinkle contents of capsule on applesauce. Do not chew.
  • After mixing, take your dose right away. Do not store for future use.

All other long-acting capsules and tablets:

  • Take in the morning.
  • Some drugs may need to be taken with food or on an empty stomach. For some drugs it does not matter. Check with your pharmacist about how to take this drug.
  • Swallow whole. Do not chew, break, or crush.

Long-acting capsules:

  • You may sprinkle contents of capsule on applesauce. Do not chew. Swallow right away and follow with water or juice.
  • Some products may also be sprinkled on yogurt. Read the package insert or talk with your pharmacist if you are not sure.
  • After mixing, take your dose right away. Do not store for future use.

Skin patch:

  • Do not use patches that are cut or do not look right.
  • Wash your hands before and after use.
  • Put patch on clean, dry, healthy skin on the hip. Do not put the patch on the waistline.
  • Do not put on cuts, scrapes, eczema, or damaged skin.
  • Put patch on in the morning and take off 9 hours later or as you have been told by the doctor.
  • Put the patch in a new area each time you change the patch.
  • Water from bathing, swimming, or showering can make the patch not stick well or fall off. If the patch falls off, do not touch the sticky side with your fingers.
  • If the patch falls off, put on a new one on some other part of the same hip. Take the new patch off at the normal time.

All products:

  • If you have been taking this drug for a long time or at high doses, it may not work as well and you may need higher doses to get the same effect. This is known as tolerance. Call your doctor if this drug stops working well. Do not take more than ordered.
  • Limit your use of caffeine (for example, tea, coffee, cola) and chocolate. Use with this drug may cause nervousness, shakiness, and a fast heartbeat.
  • Have your blood work checked if you are on this drug for a long time. Talk with your doctor.
  • If you are taking this drug and have high blood pressure, talk with your doctor before using OTC products that may raise blood pressure. These include cough or cold drugs, diet pills, stimulants, ibuprofen or like products, and some natural products or aids.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

Liquid (suspension):

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

Long-acting capsules (Jornay PM):

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it if you remember on the same evening you missed the dose.
  • If you do not think about the missed dose until the next morning, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal evening time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

All other long-acting capsules and tablets:

  • Skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

All other oral products:

  • Use a missed dose as soon as you think about it. Do not take this drug after 6 pm.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

Skin patch:

  • You may apply the patch later in the day. Then take off the patch at your normal time of day.
  • Do not put on 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

All products:

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Oral-disintegrating tablet:

  • Store blister packs in the plastic case that comes with this drug.

Liquid (suspension):

  • Throw away any part not used after 4 months.
  • Store upright with the cap on.

Skin patch:

  • Keep patches in the pouch. Use within 2 months of opening tray.
  • After you take off a skin patch, be sure to fold the sticky sides of the patch to each other. Throw away used patches where children and pets cannot get to them.

General drug facts

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Last Reviewed Date

Copyright

Vyvanse, used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (or ADHD), is one of the most commonly prescribed brand-name drugs in the US. Whether you’re taking Vyvanse long-term or thinking about starting it, here are 10 lesser-known—but important—things you should know.

1) Vyvanse is not just approved for ADHD.

Not only is Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) approved to treat ADHD, but it was the first medication in the US to be approved for binge eating disorder.

2) Vyvanse and Ritalin work differently.

Two types of medications are used to treat adult ADHD: amphetamines and methylphenidates. Vyvanse, as well as Adderall, belong to the amphetamine class. Ritalin and Concerta belong to the methylphenidate class. Both classes work differently to treat ADHD, so if one type doesn’t work for you, your doctor might prescribe the other to you instead.

3) Vyvanse carries a smaller risk of abuse than other stimulants.

Taken once daily, Vyvanse is a long-acting drug, which means it is released gradually over time. So, its effect at 90 minutes after taking it is similar to its effect at 14 hours after taking it. Due to its longer action compared to short-acting stimulants like Adderall, Ritalin, and Focalin, Vyvanse doesn’t need to be taken as often, which lowers its risk for abuse. The steady release of Vyvanse throughout the day also means that Vyvanse causes fewer rebound symptoms like over-excitement or irritability that happen when a stimulant wears off.

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4) You don’t need to take Vyvanse with food.

It’s true. A full or empty stomach doesn’t change affect how well Vyvanse works, but some patients do complain of losing their appetite after taking the medication. If you decide to take Vyvanse with food, know that while having food in your stomach isn’t a concern in itself, acidic foods should be avoided. More on that below.

5) Vyvanse can interact with some medications.

Medications that increase the acidity of your blood will make Vyvanse less effective. This might be difficult to research on your own, so be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist about drug interactions. Some examples of acidic drugs include aspirin penicillin, and furosemide.

The opposite is true for drugs like sodium bicarbonate (found in Zegerid), Benadryl, and metoprolol that decrease the acidity of your blood. These kinds of drugs make Vyvanse more potent than expected.

6) Vyvanse can interact with vitamin C.

Vitamin C, found in dietary supplements, citrus fruits, and some vegetables, like broccoli and cauliflower, can increase the acidity of your blood. As with acidic medications, vitamin C can cause Vyvanse to be less effective than expected.

7) Vyvanse should be taken in the morning.

The most commonly reported side effects in adults taking Vyvanse are decreased appetite, dry mouth, and trouble sleeping. Insomnia is why doctors recommend Vyvanse to be taken in morning long before you need to sleep at night.

8) Vyvanse may raise your blood pressure.

With Vyvanse, you should watch out for high blood pressure. Vyvanse activates your stress response, and that can raise your blood pressure and increase your heart rate. Call your doctor right away if you experience chest pain, trouble breathing, or fainting while taking Vyvanse.

9) Vyvanse may improve reaction time.

In a study observing young adults with ADHD, patients who took Vyvanse had reaction times that were almost twice as fast as those who did not take Vyvanse. Those who took Vyvanse also experienced significantly fewer traffic collisions in simulated tests.

10) And lastly, Vyvanse may improve parenting behavior.

An interesting study looked at Vyvanse treatment when both parent and child (ages 5 to 12) were diagnosed with ADHD. The parents who took Vyvanse displayed less negative talk and expressed more praise towards their children than parents who did not take Vyvanse. The study also showed that parents on Vyvanse were less likely to yell and more likely to talk things out.

– – –

What has your experience been?

Dr O.

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