Is benazepril a diuretic?

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Benazepril and Hydrochlorothiazide

Before taking benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to benazepril (Lotensin); hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Microzide, Oretic); angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (in Prinzide, in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc, in Uniretic), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril, in Accuretic, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); sulfa drugs; any other medications; any other medications; or any ingredients in benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking valsartan and sacubitril (Entresto) or if you have stopped taking it within the last 36 hours. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide, if you are also taking valsartan and sacubitril. Also, tell your doctor if you have diabetes and you are taking aliskiren (Tekturna, in Amturnide, Tekamlo, Tekturna HCT). Your doctor will probably tell you not to take benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide if you have diabetes and you are also taking aliskiren.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); cholestyramine (Prevalite); colestipol (Colestid); insulin; lithium (Lithobid); oral steroids such as dexamethasone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Rayos); other diuretics (‘water pills’); other medications for high blood pressure; and potassium supplements. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have recently had severe diarrhea or vomiting and if you have or have ever had allergies; asthma; heart failure; diabetes; gout; high cholesterol; lupus; scleroderma; or kidney or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide.
  • you should know that diarrhea, vomiting, not drinking enough fluids, and sweating a lot can cause a drop in blood pressure, which may cause lightheadedness and fainting.

Lotensin Hct

Brand Names: Lotensin HCT

Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril

  • What is hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • What other drugs will affect hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?
  • Where can I get more information (Lotensin HCT)?

What is hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) and benazepril is an ACE inhibitor (ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril is a combination medicine used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, severe stomach pain, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

You may be more likely to have an allergic reaction if you are African-American.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;
  • fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, sore throat, mouth sores;
  • signs of an electrolyte imbalance–leg cramps, constipation, muscle pain or weakness, irregular heartbeats, feeling jittery, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, loss of movement;
  • kidney problems–little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath; or
  • new or worsening symptoms of lupus–joint pain, and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

Common side effects may include:

  • dizziness;
  • cough;
  • headache; or
  • feeling tired.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (Lotensin HCT)?

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away.

You should not use this medicine if you are unable to urinate, if you have ever had angioedema, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or any ACE inhibitor. Do not take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubitril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (a blood pressure medicine).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril

Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril (HYE droe KLOR oh THY a zide and ben AZ e pril)
Brand Name: Lotensin HCT

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on May 29, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril?

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) and benazepril is an ACE inhibitor (ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril is a combination medicine used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril and tell your doctor right away.

You should not use this medicine if you are unable to urinate, if you have ever had angioedema, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or any ACE inhibitor. Do not take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubitril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (a blood pressure medicine).

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide or benazepril, or if:

  • you are unable to urinate;

  • you have ever had angioedema;

  • you recently took a heart medicine called sacubitril;

  • you are allergic to sulfa drugs; or

  • you are allergic to any ACE inhibitor (captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, moexipril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, trandolapril).

Do not take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubitril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (a blood pressure medicine).

You may also need to avoid taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril with aliskiren if you have kidney disease.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • asthma or allergies;

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;

  • glaucoma;

  • congestive heart failure;

  • gout;

  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);

  • lupus;

  • if you are allergic to penicillin; or

  • if you are on a low salt diet.

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away. Benazepril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester.

You should not breastfeed while you are using this medicine.

How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Call your doctor if you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual. You can easily become dehydrated while taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your kidney function may also need to be checked. Your blood and urine may also be tested if you have been vomiting or are dehydrated.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril.

Keep using hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the tablets in their original container, along with the packet or canister of moisture-absorbing preservative.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include increased thirst, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril?

Do not use potassium supplements or salt substitutes, unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise, in hot weather, or by not drinking enough fluids. Follow your doctor’s instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

Drinking alcohol may increase certain side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril.

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, severe stomach pain, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

You may be more likely to have an allergic reaction if you are African-American.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;

  • fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, sore throat, mouth sores;

  • signs of an electrolyte imbalance–leg cramps, constipation, muscle pain or weakness, irregular heartbeats, feeling jittery, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, loss of movement;

  • kidney problems–little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath; or

  • new or worsening symptoms of lupus–joint pain, and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

Common side effects may include:

  • dizziness;

  • cough;

  • headache; or

  • feeling tired.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Benazepril 5 to 20 mg-Hydrochlorothiazide 6.25 to 25 mg orally once a day
Maximum dose: Benazepril 20 mg-Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg
Comments: May increase dose after 2 to 3 weeks as needed to achieve blood pressure goal.

What other drugs will affect hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril?

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines. Many drugs can affect hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril, especially:

  • other blood pressure medications, including another diuretic or “water pill”;

  • digoxin;

  • lithium;

  • cancer medicine;

  • gold injections to treat arthritis;

  • insulin or oral diabetes medicine;

  • a muscle relaxer;

  • medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection–cyclosporine, everolimus, sirolimus, tacrolimus; or

  • NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)–aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 14.01.

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Other brands: Lotensin HCT

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Benazepril-Hydrochlorothiazide

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention.

Benazepril is an ACE inhibitor. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. Benazepril lowers blood pressure and also relieves symptoms of fluid retention.

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril is a combination medicine used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).

Hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away.

You should not use this medicine if you are unable to urinate, if you have ever had angioedema, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs or any ACE inhibitor. Do not take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubatril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (such as Tekturna or Tekamlo).

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide or benazepril, or if:

  • you are unable to urinate;
  • you have ever had angioedema;
  • you recently took a heart medicine called sacubatril;
  • you are allergic to sulfa drugs; or
  • you are allergic to any ACE inhibitor (captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, moexipril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, trandolapril).

Do not take hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubatril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (such as Tekturna or Tekamlo).

You may also need to avoid taking hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril with aliskiren if you have kidney disease.

To make sure hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;
  • glaucoma;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • lupus;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • an allergy to sulfa drugs or penicillin; or
  • if you are on a low salt diet.

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away. Benazepril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester.

Hydrochlorothiazide can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using this medicine.

Benazepril; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ tablets

What is this medicine?

BENAZEPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE (ben AY ze pril; hye droe klor oh THYE a zide) is a combination of an ACE inhibitor and a diuretic. It is used to treat high blood pressure.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Lotensin HCT

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bone marrow disease

  • decreased urine

  • heart or blood vessel disease

  • if you are on a special diet like a low salt diet

  • immune system problems, like lupus

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • previous swelling of the tongue, face, or lips with difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, or tightening of the throat

  • recent heart attack or stroke

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to benazepril, hydrochlorothiazide, sulfa drugs, other medicines, insect venom, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor’s advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medication with any of the following medications:

  • sacubitril; valsartan

This medicine may also interact with the following:

  • barbiturates like phenobarbital

  • blood pressure medicines

  • corticosteroids like prednisone

  • diabetic medications

  • diuretics, especially potassium-sparing diuretics like triamterene, spironolactone or amiloride

  • everolimus

  • lithium

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • potassium salts or potassium supplements

  • prescription pain medicines

  • sirolimus

  • skeletal muscle relaxants like tubocurarine

  • some cholesterol-lowering medications like cholestyramine or colestipol

  • temsirolimus

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Check your blood pressure regularly while you are taking this medicine. Ask your doctor or health care professional what your blood pressure should be and when you should contact him or her. When you check your blood pressure, write down the measurements to show your doctor or health care professional. If you are taking this medicine for a long time, you must visit your health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Make sure you schedule appointments on a regular basis.

You must not get dehydrated. Ask your doctor or health care professional how much fluid you need to drink a day. Check with him or her if you get an attack of severe diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, or if you sweat a lot. The loss of too much body fluid can make it dangerous for you to take this medicine.

Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine may affect your blood sugar level. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor or health care professional before changing the dose of your diabetic medicine.

Avoid salt substitutes unless you are told otherwise by your doctor or health care professional.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Do not treat yourself for coughs, colds, or pain while you are taking this medicine without asking your doctor or health care professional for advice. Some ingredients may increase your blood pressure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • confusion

  • eye pain

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • muscle cramps

  • nausea and vomiting

  • problems swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • stomach pain

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • worsened gout pain

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • cough

  • headache

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature below 30 degrees C (86 degrees F). Protect from moisture and light. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Lotensin HCT

Warning

  • Do not take if you are pregnant. Use during pregnancy may cause birth defects or loss of the unborn baby. If you get pregnant or plan on getting pregnant while taking this drug, call your doctor right away.

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to treat high blood pressure.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take this drug?

  • If you have an allergy to benazepril, hydrochlorothiazide, or any other part of this drug.
  • If you are allergic to this drug; any part of this drug; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have ever had a very bad or life-threatening reaction called angioedema. Signs may be swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes, tongue, or throat; trouble breathing; trouble swallowing; unusual hoarseness.
  • If you have high calcium levels.
  • If you are not able to pass urine.
  • If you are taking a drug that has aliskiren in it and you also have diabetes or kidney problems.
  • If you are taking dofetilide.
  • If you have taken a drug that has sacubitril in it in the last 36 hours.
  • If you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this drug with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take this drug?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this drug. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how this drug affects you.
  • To lower the chance of feeling dizzy or passing out, rise slowly if you have been sitting or lying down. Be careful going up and down stairs.
  • If you have high blood sugar (diabetes), you will need to watch your blood sugar closely.
  • Check your blood pressure as you have been told.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • This drug may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take this drug.
  • If you are on a low-salt or salt-free diet, talk with your doctor.
  • If you are taking a salt substitute that has potassium in it, a potassium-sparing diuretic, or a potassium product, talk with your doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor before using OTC products that may raise blood pressure. These include cough or cold drugs, diet pills, stimulants, ibuprofen or like products, and some natural products or aids.
  • If you take cholestyramine or colestipol, talk with your pharmacist about how to take them with this drug.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol or use other drugs and natural products that slow your actions.
  • Watch for gout attacks.
  • If you have lupus, this drug can make your lupus active or get worse. Tell your doctor right away if you get any new or worse signs.
  • Low white blood cell counts have happened with captopril, a drug like this one. This may lead to more chance of getting an infection. Most of the time, this has happened in people with kidney problems, mainly if they have certain other health problems. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of infection like fever, chills, or sore throat.
  • Be careful in hot weather or while being active. Drink lots of fluids to stop fluid loss.
  • Tell your doctor if you have too much sweat, fluid loss, throwing up, or loose stools. This may lead to low blood pressure.
  • A severe and sometimes deadly reaction called angioedema has happened. The chance of angioedema may be higher in black patients.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this drug with care. You could have more side effects.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of kidney problems like unable to pass urine, change in how much urine is passed, blood in the urine, or a big weight gain.
  • Signs of high blood sugar like confusion, feeling sleepy, more thirst, more hungry, passing urine more often, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit.
  • Signs of fluid and electrolyte problems like mood changes, confusion, muscle pain or weakness, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad dizziness or passing out, fast heartbeat, more thirst, seizures, feeling very tired or weak, not hungry, unable to pass urine or change in the amount of urine produced, dry mouth, dry eyes, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Cough that does not go away.
  • Belly pain.
  • Any skin change.
  • This drug can cause certain eye problems. If left untreated, this can lead to lasting eyesight loss. If eye problems happen, signs like change in eyesight or eye pain most often happen within hours to weeks of starting this drug. Call your doctor right away if you have these signs.
  • Liver problems have happened with drugs like this one. Sometimes, this has been deadly. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Dizziness.
  • Cough.
  • Headache.
  • Feeling tired or weak.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best taken?

Use this drug as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take this drug at the same time of day.
  • Keep taking this drug as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.
  • This drug may cause you to pass urine more often. To keep from having sleep problems, try not to take too close to bedtime.
  • Drink lots of noncaffeine liquids unless told to drink less liquid by your doctor.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Keep lid tightly closed.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

General drug facts

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This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Last Reviewed Date

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benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide 10-12.5 mg tab (generic lotensin hct)

Contraindications

Benazepril is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to benazepril, other angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or any ingredient in the formulation; those with a history of angioedema with or without prior ACE inhibitor therapy; and in patients with diabetes mellitus who are receiving aliskiren therapy. Benazepril also is contraindicated in combination with a neprilysin inhibitor (e.g., sacubitril) and should not be administered within 36 hours of switching to or from sacubitril/valsartan.

Warnings/Precautions

Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality

Drugs that act directly on the renin-angiotensin system (e.g., ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists) reduce fetal renal function and can cause fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality when used during pregnancy. Such potential risks of these drugs occur throughout pregnancy, especially during the second and third trimesters. ACE inhibitors also have been reported to increase the risk of major congenital malformations when administered during the first trimester of pregnancy. Potential neonatal effects include skull hypoplasia, anuria, hypotension, renal failure, and death. Resulting oligohydramnios can be associated with fetal lung hypoplasia and skeletal deformations. ACE inhibitors (e.g., benazepril) should be discontinued as soon as possible when pregnancy is detected, unless continued use is considered lifesaving. Nearly all women can be transferred successfully to alternative therapy for the remainder of pregnancy. For additional information on the risk of ACE inhibitors during pregnancy, and in .

Sensitivity Reactions

Sensitivity reactions, including anaphylactoid reactions and angioedema (including laryngeal angioedema and tongue edema), are potentially fatal. Head and neck angioedema have occurred in patients receiving an ACE inhibitor and have been reported at a higher rate in black patients compared with patients of other races. Patients with a history of angioedema unrelated to ACE inhibitor therapy may be at increased risk of angioedema while receiving an ACE inhibitor. In addition, concomitant use of an ACE inhibitor and a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (e.g., everolimus, sirolimus, temsirolimus) or a neprilysin inhibitor (e.g., sacubitril) may increase the risk of angioedema; patients should be monitored for signs of angioedema during such concomitant therapy. Head and neck angioedema involving the tongue, glottis, or larynx may cause airway obstruction, especially in those with a history of airway surgery. If laryngeal stridor or angioedema of the face, tongue, or glottis occurs, ACE inhibitors (e.g., benazepril) should be discontinued promptly and appropriate therapy (e.g., epinephrine) and monitoring initiated until complete and sustained resolution of manifestations of angioedema has occurred.

Intestinal angioedema (occasionally without a prior history of facial angioedema or elevated serum levels of complement 1 esterase inhibitor) also has been reported in patients receiving ACE inhibitors. Intestinal angioedema, which frequently presents as abdominal pain (with or without nausea or vomiting), usually is diagnosed by abdominal CT scan, ultrasound, or surgery; symptoms usually have resolved after discontinuance of the ACE inhibitor. Intestinal angioedema should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who develop abdominal pain during therapy with an ACE inhibitor.

Life-threatening anaphylactoid reactions have been reported in at least 2 patients receiving ACE inhibitors while undergoing desensitization treatment with hymenoptera venom. When ACE inhibitors were temporarily discontinued before desensitization with the venom, anaphylactoid reactions did not recur; however, such reactions recurred after inadvertent rechallenge. Anaphylactoid reactions also have been reported following initiation of hemodialysis that used a high-flux membrane in patients receiving an ACE inhibitor. In addition, anaphylactoid reactions have been reported in patients undergoing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis with dextran sulfate absorption. In such patients, dialysis must be stopped immediately, and aggressive treatment for anaphylactoid reactions must be initiated. Antihistamine treatment has been ineffective in the alleviation of symptoms in these situations. In these patients, consideration should be given to using a different type of dialysis membrane or a different class of antihypertensive drug.

Other Warnings and Precautions

Deterioration of renal function, including acute renal failure, may occur in patients receiving ACE inhibitor therapy. Patients whose renal function depends on the activity of the renin-angiotensin system, particularly those with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis, chronic kidney disease, severe congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction (MI), or volume depletion, may be at particular risk of developing acute renal failure while receiving benazepril. Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations have occurred in patients with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis; such increases generally are reversible following discontinuance of benazepril and/or diuretic therapy. Renal function should be monitored periodically in patients receiving benazepril. Withholding or discontinuance of therapy should be considered in patients who develop clinically important decreases in renal function while receiving benazepril.

Cardiovascular Effects

Symptomatic hypotension may occur; patients at particular risk include those with heart failure with systolic blood pressure less than 100 mm Hg, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, hyponatremia, high-dose diuretic therapy, renal dialysis, or severe volume and/or salt depletion of any etiology. Symptomatic hypotension also may occur in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Volume and/or salt depletion should be corrected before starting benazepril therapy.

Excessive hypotension may occur in patients with heart failure (with or without associated renal impairment), which may be associated with oliguria and/or progressive azotemia and, rarely, acute renal failure and/or death. In patients with heart failure, benazepril therapy should be started under close medical supervision and patients should be followed closely for at least 2 weeks after initiation of benazepril or diuretic therapy or dosage adjustment of either drug. (See Dosage and Administration: Dosage.) Benazepril therapy should be avoided in patients who have hemodynamic instability following MI.

If hypotension occurs, the patient should be placed in the supine position, and if necessary, an IV infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride injection to expand fluid volume may be administered. Benazepril therapy usually may be continued following restoration of blood pressure and volume.

Hypotension may occur in patients undergoing major surgery or during anesthesia with agents that produce hypotension due to ACE inhibitor blockade of angiotensin II formation secondary to compensatory renin release. Hypotension in such patients may be corrected by volume expansion.

Effects on Potassium

Hyperkalemia can develop in patients receiving drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system, especially in those with renal impairment or diabetes mellitus and those receiving other drugs that can increase serum potassium concentration (e.g., potassium-sparing diuretics, potassium supplements, potassium-containing salt substitutes). Serum potassium concentrations should be monitored periodically in patients receiving benazepril.

Hepatic Effects

An ACE inhibitor-associated clinical syndrome manifested initially by cholestatic jaundice has occurred; the syndrome may progress to fulminant hepatic necrosis and is potentially fatal. Patients receiving an ACE inhibitor, including benazepril, who develop jaundice or marked elevations of hepatic enzymes should discontinue the drug and receive appropriate monitoring and medical follow-up.

Hematologic Effects

Neutropenia/agranulocytosis, particularly in patients with renal impairment (especially those with concomitant collagen vascular disease), have been reported with another ACE inhibitor (captopril). Data are insufficient to rule out a similar incidence of agranulocytosis with benazepril in patients without prior reactions to other ACE inhibitors. Monitoring of leukocyte counts in patients with collagen vascular disease, especially if renal impairment exists, should be considered.

Respiratory Effects

Persistent, nonproductive cough has been reported with all ACE inhibitors; this effect resolves after drug discontinuance. ACE inhibitor-induced cough should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who develop cough during benazepril therapy.

Use of Fixed Combinations

When hydrochlorothiazide, amlodipine, or other drugs are used in fixed combination with benazepril, the usual cautions, precautions, and contraindications associated with these other drugs must be considered in addition to those associated with benazepril.

Specific Populations

Category D. Benazepril can cause fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality when administered to a pregnant woman. Benazepril should be discontinued as soon as possible when pregnancy is detected.(See Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality under Warnings/Precautions: Warnings, in Cautions.)

Lactation

Benazepril and benazeprilat are distributed into human milk in minimal amounts. Because of the unknown effects of benazepril or benazeprilat in nursing infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or benazepril, taking into account the importance of the drug(s) to the woman.

Pediatric Use

If oliguria or hypotension occurs in neonates with a history of in utero exposure to benazepril, blood pressure and renal function should be supported; exchange transfusions or dialysis may be required.(See Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality under Warnings/Precautions: Warnings, in Cautions.) Benazepril, which crosses the placenta, can theoretically be removed from the neonatal circulation by these means. There are occasional reports of benefit from these maneuvers with another ACE inhibitor; however, experience is limited.

Safety and efficacy of benazepril have not been established in children younger than 6 years of age and in pediatric patients with creatinine clearances of less than 30 mL/minute. Safety and efficacy of benazepril in fixed combination with amlodipine or hydrochlorothiazide have not been established in children. The long-term effects of benazepril on growth and development in children have not been studied. Although the safety profile of benazepril in pediatric patients is similar to that in adults, because of the potential for adverse effects on kidney development, ACE inhibitors should not be administered to pediatric patients younger than 1 year of age.

Geriatric Use

No substantial differences in safety and efficacy have been observed in geriatric patients relative to younger adults, but increased sensitivity cannot be ruled out.

Because geriatric patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, dosage should be selected cautiously; it may be useful to monitor renal function in such patients.

Renal Impairment

Renal function may decrease with ACE inhibitor therapy in susceptible patients. Benazepril should be used with caution in those with renal impairment.

Benazepril in fixed combination with amlodipine is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment; the recommended daily dosage of benazepril hydrochloride in such patients is 5 mg, which is not available in this combination preparation. (See Dosage and Administration: Special Populations and also Renal Effects under Warnings/Precautions: Other Warnings and Precautions, in Cautions.)

Black Patients

ACE inhibitors are not as effective and are associated with a higher incidence of angioedema in black patients compared with patients of other races.(See Uses: Hypertension.)

Common Adverse Effects

Adverse effects reported in at least 2% of patients receiving benazepril and at an incidence more than 1% greater than that with placebo include headache, dizziness, somnolence, and postural dizziness. Adverse effects reported in greater than 1% of patients receiving benazepril in fixed combination with hydrochlorothiazide and possibly or probably study drug-related include dizziness, fatigue, postural dizziness, headache, cough, hypertonia, vertigo, nausea, impotence, and somnolence. Adverse effects reported in greater than 1% of patients receiving benazepril in fixed combination with amlodipine and possibly or probably drug-related include cough, headache, dizziness, and edema.

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