Hydrocodone homatropine syrup side effects

Contents

Homatropine and hydrocodone

Generic Name: homatropine and hydrocodone (HOM a TROE peen and HYE dro KOE done)
Brand Name: Hydromet, Tussigon, Hycodan, Hydrotropine, Hydromide, Hydropane

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Oct 1, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is homatropine and hydrocodone?

Homatropine and hydrocodone is a combination medicine used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, cough, and sinus congestion caused by allergies or the common cold.

Homatropine and hydrocodone contains a narcotic cough medicine and may be habit-forming.

Homatropine and hydrocodone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

MISUSE OF homatropine and hydrocodone CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Fatal side effects can occur if you use this medicine with alcohol, or with other drugs that cause drowsiness or slow your breathing.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to homatropine or hydrocodone, or if you have:

  • severe asthma or breathing problems;

  • a stomach or bowel obstruction (including paralytic ileus);

  • severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure;

  • severe coronary artery disease (clogged arteries);

  • narrow-angle glaucoma; or

  • if you are unable to urinate.

Do not give this medicine to anyone younger than 6 years old.

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • lung disease or breathing problems;

  • a head injury, brain tumor, or seizure;

  • constipation, a bowel obstruction, or stomach problems;

  • problems with your bile duct, pancreas, or adrenal gland;

  • an enlarged prostate;

  • urination problems;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • low blood pressure;

  • heart disease, a blood vessel disorder;

  • a drug addiction; or

  • if you have a fever and cough with mucus.

If you use hydrocodone while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on the drug. This can cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the baby after it is born. Babies born dependent on habit-forming medicine may need medical treatment for several weeks. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Do not breast-feed. Hydrocodone can pass into breast milk and may cause drowsiness, breathing problems, or death in a nursing baby.

How should I take homatropine and hydrocodone?

Follow the directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides. Never use homatropine and hydrocodone in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Cold or cough medicine is only for short-term use until your symptoms clear up.

Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. MISUSE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH. Keep the medicine in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away this medicine is against the law.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon). Rinse after each use.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 5 days, or if you have a fever, rash, or headaches.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the surgeon or doctor ahead of time if you have taken a cough or cold medicine within the past few days.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze.

Do not keep leftover medication. Just one dose can cause death in someone using this medicine accidentally or improperly. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with this medicine about how to safely dispose of any unused portion.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medicine is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. Skip any missed dose if it’s almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. A hydrocodone overdose can be fatal, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription. Overdose symptoms may include slow breathing and heart rate, severe drowsiness, muscle weakness, cold and clammy skin, pinpoint pupils, and fainting.

What should I avoid while taking homatropine and hydrocodone?

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur.

Avoid driving or operating machinery until you know how homatropine and hydrocodone will affect you. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls or other accidents.

Homatropine and hydrocodone side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

This medicine can slow or stop your breathing, and death may occur. A person caring for you should seek emergency medical attention if you have slow breathing with long pauses, blue colored lips, or if you are hard to wake up.

Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • noisy breathing, sighing, shallow breathing;

  • extreme drowsiness, confusion, feeling weak or limp;

  • a seizure;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • severe constipation, stomach pain;

  • little or no urination; or

  • adrenal gland problems–nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, dizziness, worsening tiredness or weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Serious side effects may be more likely in older adults and those who are overweight, malnourished, or debilitated.

Long-term use of opioid medication may affect fertility (ability to have children) in men or women. It is not known whether opioid effects on fertility are permanent.

Common side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, dizziness;

  • lack of energy, coordination problems;

  • headache, confusion;

  • dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation;

  • tremors, fast or irregular heart rate; or

  • feeling anxious, restless, nervous, or irritable.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Homatropine and hydrocodone dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Cough:

One tablet OR 5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed
Maximum dose: 6 tablets OR 30 mL in 24 hours

-Each tablet contains hydrocodone 5 mg-homatropine 1.5 mg
-Each 5 mL contains hydrocodone 5 mg-homatropine 1.5 mg
Use: Symptomatic relief of cough.

What other drugs will affect homatropine and hydrocodone?

You may have breathing problems or withdrawal symptoms if you start or stop taking certain other medicines. Tell your doctor if you also use certain antibiotics, antifungal medications, seizure medication, or medicines to treat HIV or hepatitis C.

Using homatropine and hydrocodone with other drugs that slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines. Many drugs can affect phenylephrine, especially:

  • a sedative like Xanax or Valium (diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, and others);

  • other cough, cold, or allergy medicines;

  • asthma medication;

  • pain medicine or a muscle relaxer;

  • medicine to treat depression, anxiety, mood disorders, or mental illness;

  • heart or blood pressure medication;

  • a diuretic or “water pill”;

  • bladder or urinary medicines;

  • seizure medication; or

  • medicine to treat stomach problems.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect homatropine and hydrocodone. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about homatropine / hydrocodone

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 87 Reviews
  • Drug class: upper respiratory combinations
  • FDA Alerts (2)

Consumer resources

  • Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup
  • Hydrocodone and Homatropine Tablets
  • Hydrocodone and homatropine (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Hydromet, Hycodan, Tussigon

Professional resources

  • Hydrocodone and Homatropine (Wolters Kluwer)
  • … +3 more

Related treatment guides

  • Cough

Homatropine; Hydrocodone oral syrup

What is this medicine?

HYDROCODONE (hye droe KOE done) is used to help relieve cough.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Hycodan, Hydromet, Hydropane, Mycodone

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • brain tumor

  • drug abuse or addiction

  • head injury

  • heart disease

  • if you frequently drink alcohol-containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • lung disease, asthma, or breathing problems

  • mental problems

  • an allergic reaction to hydrocodone, other opioid analgesics, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Use a specially marked spoon or container to measure each dose. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. This medicine is not approved for use in children.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • antihistamines for allergy, cough and cold

  • certain medicines for anxiety or sleep

  • certain medicines for depression like amitriptyline, fluoxetine, sertraline

  • certain medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone

  • general anesthetics like halothane, isoflurane, methoxyflurane, propofol

  • local anesthetics like lidocaine, pramoxine, tetracaine

  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

  • other narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain or cough

  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • antiviral medicines for HIV and AIDS

  • atropine

  • certain antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin

  • certain medicines for bladder problems like oxybutynin, tolterodine

  • certain medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • certain medicines for Parkinson’s disease like benztropine, trihexyphenidyl

  • certain medicines for stomach problems like dicyclomine, hyoscyamine

  • certain medicines for travel sickness like scopolamine

  • ipratropium

  • rifampin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Use exactly as directed by your doctor or health care professional. Do not take more than the recommended dose. You may develop tolerance to this medicine if you take it for a long time. Tolerance means that you will get less cough relief with time. Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.

If you have been taking this medicine for a long time, do not suddenly stop taking it because you may develop a severe reaction. Your body becomes used to the medicine. This does NOT mean you are addicted. Addiction is a behavior related to getting and using a drug for a nonmedical reason. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

There are different types of narcotic medicines (opiates). If you take more than one type at the same time or if you are taking another medicine that also causes drowsiness, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing or unusual sleepiness.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine will cause constipation. Try to have a bowel movement at least every 2 to 3 days. If you do not have a bowel movement for 3 days, call your doctor or health care professional.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • confusion

  • signs and symptoms of low blood pressure like dizziness; feeling faint or lightheaded, falls; unusually weak or tired

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation

  • dry mouth

  • nausea, vomiting

  • tiredness

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

This medicine may cause accidental overdose and death if taken by other adults, children, or pets. Mix any unused medicine with a substance like cat littler or coffee grounds. Then throw the medicine away in a sealed container like a sealed bag or a coffee can with a lid. Do not use the medicine after the expiration date.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

Share Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Get useful, helpful and relevant health + wellness information enews

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup

Generic Name: Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup (HIGH droe KOE dohn/hoe MA troe peen)
Brand Name: Hycodan, Hydromet

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jul 9, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Warning

  • This medicine may be habit-forming with long-term use.
  • This medicine has an opioid drug in it. Opioid drugs can put you at risk for addiction, abuse, and misuse. Misuse or abuse of hydrocodone and homatropine syrup can lead to overdose and death. If you have questions, talk with your doctor.
  • This medicine has an opioid drug in it. Severe side effects have happened when opioid drugs were used with benzodiazepines or other drugs that may make you drowsy or slow your actions. This includes slow or troubled breathing and death. Benzodiazepines include drugs like alprazolam, diazepam, and lorazepam. Benzodiazepines may be used to treat many health problems like anxiety, trouble sleeping, or seizures. If you have questions, talk with your doctor.
  • Many drugs interact with hydrocodone and homatropine syrup and can raise the chance of side effects like deadly breathing problems. Talk with your doctor and pharmacist to make sure it is safe to use hydrocodone and homatropine syrup with all of your drugs.
  • Do not take with alcohol or products that have alcohol. Unsafe and sometimes deadly effects may happen.
  • Get medical help right away if you feel very sleepy, very dizzy, or if you pass out. Caregivers or others need to get medical help right away if the patient does not respond, does not answer or react like normal, or will not wake up.
  • Very bad and sometimes deadly breathing problems have happened with hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. Talk with the doctor.
  • Get medical help right away if you have slow breathing, shallow breathing, or trouble breathing.
  • Even one dose of hydrocodone and homatropine syrup may be deadly if it is taken by someone else or by accident, especially in children. If hydrocodone and homatropine syrup is taken by someone else or by accident, get medical help right away.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Do not take if you are pregnant.
  • Using hydrocodone and homatropine syrup for a long time during pregnancy may lead to withdrawal in the newborn baby. This can be life-threatening. Talk with the doctor.
  • Be sure that you know your dose and how to take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. Dosing errors can lead to accidental overdose and death. If you have any questions, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Uses of Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup:

  • It is used to relieve coughing.

Children:

  • The use of hydrocodone in children younger than 6 years has led to deadly breathing problems. Talk with the doctor.
  • This medicine is not for use in children younger than 18 years of age. The benefits of taking hydrocodone and homatropine syrup for a cough due to allergies, a cold, or other infection do not outweigh the risks in children. If your child has been given hydrocodone and homatropine syrup or if you have any questions, talk with your child’s doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup?

  • If you have an allergy to hydrocodone, homatropine, or any other part of hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Lung or breathing problems like asthma, trouble breathing, or sleep apnea; high levels of carbon dioxide in the blood; or stomach or bowel block or narrowing.
  • If you have a cough with a lot of mucus.
  • If you have a long-term cough caused by smoking or being around smoke, or lung problems like asthma or emphysema.
  • If you have had a recent head injury, brain injury or tumor, or raised pressure in the brain.
  • If you have taken certain drugs for depression or Parkinson’s disease in the last 14 days. This includes isocarboxazid, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, selegiline, or rasagiline. Very high blood pressure may happen.
  • If you are taking any of these drugs: Linezolid or methylene blue.
  • If you are breast-feeding. Do not breast-feed while you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Do not take more than what your doctor told you to take. Taking more than you are told may raise your chance of very bad side effects.
  • Do not take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup for longer than you were told by your doctor.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for alertness while you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. Talk with your doctor.
  • To lower the chance of feeling dizzy or passing out, rise slowly if you have been sitting or lying down. Be careful going up and down stairs.
  • If you have been taking hydrocodone and homatropine syrup on a regular basis and you stop it all of a sudden, you may have signs of withdrawal. Do not stop taking hydrocodone and homatropine syrup all of a sudden without calling your doctor. Tell your doctor if you have any bad effects.
  • Do not take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup with other strong pain drugs or if you are using a pain patch without talking to your doctor first.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.
  • This medicine may raise the chance of seizures in some people, including people who have had seizures in the past. Talk to your doctor to see if you have a greater chance of seizures while taking hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.
  • If you are 65 or older, use hydrocodone and homatropine syrup with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Long-term use of an opioid drug may lead to lower sex hormone levels. Call your doctor if you have a lowered interest in sex, fertility problems, no menstrual period (women), or change in sex ability (men).
  • This medicine may cause harm to the unborn baby if you take it while you are pregnant. If you are pregnant or you get pregnant while taking hydrocodone and homatropine syrup, call your doctor right away.

How is this medicine (Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup) best taken?

Use hydrocodone and homatropine syrup as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take with or without food. Take with food if it causes an upset stomach.
  • Take by mouth only.
  • Drink lots of noncaffeine liquids unless told to drink less liquid by your doctor.
  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring device that comes with hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. If there is none, ask the pharmacist for a device to measure hydrocodone and homatropine syrup.
  • Do not use a household teaspoon or tablespoon to measure hydrocodone and homatropine syrup. Doing so could lead to the dose being too high.
  • Rinse the measuring device with water after each use.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • If you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup on a regular basis, take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.
  • Many times hydrocodone and homatropine syrup is taken on an as needed basis. Do not take more often than told by the doctor.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of high or low blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • Signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI) like blood in the urine, burning or pain when passing urine, feeling the need to pass urine often or right away, fever, lower stomach pain, or pelvic pain.
  • Trouble breathing, slow breathing, or shallow breathing.
  • Chest pain or pressure or a fast heartbeat.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Feeling confused.
  • Seizures.
  • Very bad belly pain.
  • Very bad constipation.
  • Shakiness.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Feeling very sleepy.
  • Feeling very tired or weak.
  • Trouble passing urine.
  • Anxiety.
  • Mood changes.
  • Swelling in the arms or legs.
  • Hot flashes.
  • Sweating a lot.
  • Taking an opioid drug like hydrocodone and homatropine syrup may lead to a rare but very bad adrenal gland problem. Call your doctor right away if you have very bad dizziness or passing out, very bad upset stomach or throwing up, or if you feel less hungry, very tired, or very weak.
  • A severe and sometimes deadly problem called serotonin syndrome may happen if you take hydrocodone and homatropine syrup with certain other drugs. Call your doctor right away if you have agitation; change in balance; confusion; hallucinations; fever; fast or abnormal heartbeat; flushing; muscle twitching or stiffness; seizures; shivering or shaking; sweating a lot; severe diarrhea, upset stomach, or throwing up; or severe headache.

What are some other side effects of Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Dizziness.
  • Headache.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Constipation.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Hydrocodone and Homatropine Syrup?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Keep lid tightly closed.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Consumer information use

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • This medicine comes with an extra patient fact sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it with care. Read it again each time hydrocodone and homatropine syrup is refilled. If you have any questions about hydrocodone and homatropine syrup, please talk with the doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

Homatropine-Hydrocodone

About Drugs A-Z

Drugs A-Z provides drug information from Everyday Health and our partners, as well as ratings from our members, all in one place. Cerner Multum™ provides the data within some of the Basics, Side Effects, Interactions, and Dosage tabs. The information within the Reviews and FAQ tabs is proprietary to Everyday Health.

You can browse Drugs A-Z for a specific prescription or over-the-counter drug or look up drugs based on your specific condition. This information is for educational purposes only, and not meant to provide medical advice, treatment, or diagnosis. Remember to always consult your physician or health care provider before starting, stopping, or altering a treatment or health care regimen.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by on this page is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. The information on this page has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore neither Everyday Health or its licensor warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Neither Everyday Health nor its licensors endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. The drug information above is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Neither Everyday Health nor its licensor assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of the information provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have any questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Sizzurp is the actual cough syrup ingredient used to create what is known as “Lean”. It can be sold illegally or be attained with a prescription. To create Lean, a popular drink created in Houston Texas, you require the following for the original formula:
-Promethazine w/Codeine VC <- Sizzurp (active ingredient)
-Original Sprite Soda <- Mixing ingredient (although different flavors of sprite are now used, such as sprite remix)
-Jolly rancher candy <- Flavor additive
Put it all in a styrofoam cup and enjoy. The codeine is mainly responsible for the euphoric feeling after drinking lean. Promethazine causes motor skill impairment, lethargy, extreme drowsiness, as well as a disassociative feeling from all other parts of the body, specifically the stomach and digestive system. If it doesn’t have promethazine w/ Codeine, it isn’t real sizzurp.
Sizzurp is normally the color purple, although there are different colored sizzurps with different doses of codeine, that all produce the same effect but are NOT of the same strength and potency of the original purple colored sizzurp. Following these guidelines, the TRUE sizzurp is of the color purple.
The true sizzurp (when mixed with the ingredients listed), does not contain ANY form of alcohol, crushed pills, or other liquids in general.
DXM is not a component of sizzurp, although it may produce vaguely similar effects to the above recipe in doses ranging from 150 – 250 mg. DXM is also an upper, codeine is a downer. DXM is also found in fake ecstacy tablets, and can be bought over the counter.
Sizzurp is a prescription drug and cannot be bought in any store, in the United States or over the counter without a proper prescription.

The Cocktail That’s Killing Lil Wayne

Is excessive consumption of codeine-containing cough syrup responsible for recurrent seizures suffered by the rap star Lil Wayne?

As reported by the gossip site TMZ, earlier this week the performer suffered two seizures while on a private plane en route from Milwaukee to California. After being forced to land in Nebraska, their sources indicate Lil Wayne refused medical care after a first seizure, only to suffer another one minutes after his plane took off again.

In a related report, TMZ also cites witnesses who claim to have seen the rapper consuming large amounts of cough syrup containing codeine during a club appearance in Milwaukee—three entire 16 oz. bottles, to be exact.

Codeine is a narcotic painkiller that is also used as a cough suppressant. (Its use in children is dangerous, and I do not prescribe it for my patients.) It is converted to the drug morphine in the liver and, like all medications in the opioid category, can have mood-altering effects. Like all opioids, overdose can have serious consequences, including death.

As is often the case, reports of celebrity excess can be challenging to confirm. Obviously, Lil Wayne is not a patient of mine, and I cannot speak authoritatively about his medical care. However, this is not the first time his health has been threatened by imbibing a hazardous drug cocktail.

As reported by The Daily Beast in 2013, he suffered a combination of seizures that required hospitalization. Sources close to him expressed concern about his recreational consumption of codeine-containing cough syrup, which is one of the central ingredients in a cocktail popular among rappers called “lean” (codeine, Sprite, and Jolly Ranchers). He himself had acknowledged difficulty quitting the habit several years earlier, saying that trying to do without it felt like “death in your stomach.”

Seizures are not listed among the common symptoms of codeine overdose. The primary hazard is suppression of a person’s drive to breathe. If a high enough dose is taken, patients can lapse into a coma or die. Such an overdose resulted in the death of Pimp C, a rapper who had alluded to his own affinity for lean in the track “Sippin’ on Some Syrup.”

The degree to which codeine may have played a role in Lil Wayne’s seizures is difficult to say. Given that his comments about the difficulty of quitting cough syrup date to 2008, it is very possible he’s developed a chemical dependence to it, and seizures have been reported as a complication of opioid withdrawal. Lil Wayne has also claimed he suffers from epilepsy, and once told MTV News’ Sway Calloway, “No warning, no nothing, I don’t feel sick. I get headaches real bad. And the headaches? I didn’t get no headaches or nothing.”

But even if ultimately lean has nothing to do with Lil Wayne’s seizures specifically, recreational consumption of codeine is terribly dangerous. The music world is still coming to grips with the loss of Prince, whose death was attributed to accidental overdose of the opioid Fentanyl. While that pain medication is far more potent than cough syrup, both drugs are in the same class. Both carry substantial risk for addiction and potentially fatal overdose.

I never order narcotic-containing cough suppressants for my patients because the risks outweigh the benefits, and that’s presuming that their parents would give the medications only within the boundaries of the dosing I prescribed. People who consume the syrup as some kind of beverage are doing so outside even those boundaries, and taking a substantial risk with their health.

No narcotic is safe for recreational use. No narcotic should be sipped as a cocktail. All narcotics have the potential to severely harm those who take them, even in something that seems as harmless as cough syrup.

Whether or not Lil Wayne’s seizures are due to excessive consumption of lean is hard to say at this time. But it doesn’t matter in the end. If he’s drinking it as has been reported, he needs to stop. Codeine overdose can be fatal, even if seizures aren’t part of the picture.

Hydromet

Generic Name: homatropine and hydrocodone (HOM a TROE peen and HYE dro KOE done)
Brand Name: Hydromet, Tussigon

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Oct 1, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is Hydromet?

Hydromet is a combination medicine used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, cough, and sinus congestion caused by allergies or the common cold.

Hydromet contains a narcotic cough medicine and may be habit-forming.

Hydromet may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I avoid while taking Hydromet?

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur.

Avoid driving or operating machinery until you know how Hydromet will affect you. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls or other accidents.

More about Hydromet (homatropine / hydrocodone)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 30 Reviews
  • Drug class: upper respiratory combinations
  • FDA Alerts (2)
  • Hydromet
  • Hydromet (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Hycodan, Tussigon

  • Hydromet (FDA)
  • Cough

Hydromet Side Effects

Use exactly as directed by your doctor or health care professional. Do not take more than the recommended dose. You may develop tolerance to this medicine if you take it for a long time. Tolerance means that you will get less cough relief with time. Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.

If you have been taking this medicine for a long time, do not suddenly stop taking it because you may develop a severe reaction. Your body becomes used to the medicine. This does NOT mean you are addicted. Addiction is a behavior related to getting and using a drug for a nonmedical reason. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

There are different types of narcotic medicines (opiates). If you take more than one type at the same time or if you are taking another medicine that also causes drowsiness, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing or unusual sleepiness.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine will cause constipation. Try to have a bowel movement at least every 2 to 3 days. If you do not have a bowel movement for 3 days, call your doctor or health care professional.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *