Hyaluronic acid side effects

Everything you need to know about hyaluronic acid

Researchers have looked at whether hyaluronic acid is effective for a range of uses:

Anti-aging

The anti-aging effects of hyaluronic acid products may vary from person to person, depending on other factors that influence the skin, such as:

  • genetics
  • nutrition
  • smoking and alcohol consumption
  • pollution
  • sun exposure

In a 2017 study, researchers examined the anti-aging effects of hyaluronic acid supplements in 60 Japanese adults. The researchers randomly assigned the study participants to either a treatment or a placebo group.

The participants who ingested the hyaluronic acid supplements experienced a decrease in wrinkles and an improvement in skin condition compared with those in the placebo group.

However, the study involved only a small sample size. It also received funding from a company that produce hyaluronic acid supplements, which may have influenced the results.

Another small study found that hyaluronic acid may improve skin elasticity and reduce skin roughness in as little as 2–8 weeks.

In a 2016 German study, researchers compared the anti-aging effects of four different face creams containing hyaluronic acid. The researchers observed increased skin tightness and a 10–20% reduction in wrinkle depth in all 20 participants.

Many cosmetic brands claim that their hyaluronic acid products can reverse signs of aging. However, most over-the-counter products contain hyaluronic acid molecules that are too large to pass through the outer layer of skin cells, according to a 2015 review article.

Wound healing

Share on PinterestHyaluronic acid may help with wound healing by promoting skin hydration.

Hyaluronic acid not only promotes skin hydration, but it also plays a crucial role in wound healing.

According to a 2016 review article, hyaluronic acid speeds up wound healing by controlling inflammation and redirecting blood vessels to areas of damaged skin.

In a study from the same year, researchers observed that hyaluronic acid helped diabetic foot ulcers heal more quickly compared with standard wound dressing materials.

In a 2019 animal study, researchers applied a biodegradable gel containing hyaluronic acid and poloxamer to skin wounds. The gel promoted wound healing by preventing bacterial infections and moisturizing the wound.

Relieving joint pain

Synovial fluid lubricates and cushions the joints. This fluid contains hyaluronic acid.

Over time, the hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid breaks down, which contributes to joint pain and stiffness, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

Doctors can use hyaluronic acid injections to treat people who have osteoarthritis.

Although hyaluronic acid injections can relieve osteoarthritis-related pain, it takes an average of 5 weeks before people experience the full benefits.

Usually, people need multiple injections before they notice significant pain relief, according to some research. However, receiving five or more injections may increase the risk of adverse effects.

The findings of a 2017 study suggest that combining hyaluronic acid injections with anti-inflammatory medications increases their effectiveness in relieving pain.

Is Hyaluronic Acid All Hype?

A quick search of Amazon for hyaluronic acid turns up thousands of products, from liquid serums to pills to creams that make a variety of claims. Balms and serums seem to focus on hyaluronic acid’s ability to ease skin redness and reduce wrinkles while oral supplements focus on the benefits of hyaluronic acid on the joints. Some products, like this powder, make claims about hyaluronic acid’s benefits to both the skin and joints.

How can one substance have so many effects? And is there any truth to the ‘organic liquid facelift’ or ‘joint solution’ declarations?

Within the body, hyaluronic acid plays an important, albeit diverse, role. It is a major component of epithelial tissue, and seems to play a role in cell division and movement. It is also a chief component of synovial fluid- the fluid found inside a synovial joint (like a human’s hips or wrists)- and acts as a lubricating agent. Hyaluronic acid is also found in joint cartilage, where it coats all the cells, and it even plays a role in the body’s innate immune system (high hyaluronic acid levels can be used as a marker for prostate and breast cancers). The average person has ~15 g of hyaluronic acid in their body, and about 1/3 of it is degraded each day.

In short, hyaluronic acid does a lot of things, from skin repair to joint lubrication, so it makes sense that promoters hype it as a possible treatment for a wide variety of health problems ranging from osteoarthritis to sun burns. But what does the science say about its efficacy?

Studies have shown intra-articular injections (injections into the joint) of hyaluronic acid to be just as effective, and sometimes more effective, at managing pain than NSAIDS or placebos, often with fewer side effects, for patients with osteoarthritis. Likewise, studies looking at artificial tears containing hyaluronic acid, used to treat chronic dry eyes, have found it to be a safe and effective option. Same story with dry skin. The thing that begs investigation however, is the oral administration of hyaluronic acid.

There have been a few studies on oral treatments of hyaluronic acid, and they all seem to have quite positive results. This study found that daily supplementation with oral hyaluronic acid enhanced several markers of quality of life in adults with osteoarthritis of the knee, and this study concluded that oral intake of high purity hyaluronic acid is effective in the treatment of American patients of knee osteoarthritis. Some studies, like this one partnered oral hyaluronic acid supplements with exercise and also had positive results.

These results seem promising, and I’d be right on board the hype train with everyone else, if I hadn’t spent some time reading the methods sections of these studies. Each study used a daily amount of hyaluronic acid ranging from 60-200 mg. Most supplements recommend hyaluronic in the 100-200 mg range, but Novisyn, perhaps one of the best known supplements, contains only 17 mg of hyaluronic acid in its once a day packets.

There is good reason to believe that orally administered hyaluronic acid is absorbed in the digestive tract and that it does migrate to the relevant connective tissues. There is also evidence that it can have a biological effect without even being absorbed. These functions however, depend on there being enough hyaluronic acid molecules present to interact with the relevant receptors, and in a 17 mg dose, this likely just isn’t the case.

So by all means, ask your doctor about hyaluronic acid for your osteoarthritis or chronic dry eyes, but make sure to read the package before you buy the pills. As Dr Joe always says, it’s all about the dose!

@AdaMcVean

HYALURONIC ACID

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  • Hyaluronic acid is naturally produced by the body and is an essential component in lubricating the skin, eyes, joints, connective tissue, and organs.
  • HA supplements are able to increase moisture in skin cells which inhibits dry, sagging, and wrinkled skin.
  • The benefits of HA supplements extend beyond skin care.
  • Generally, HA is safe; however, there are possible side effects for those with select pre-existing health conditions.

The hydrating power of HA supplementation is notable for improving the overall health of the skin. HA supplements achieve this by restoring moisture in the skin. This means that HA supplements do more than hydrate dry skin, improve elasticity, and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. Plumped, moisturized skin also fortifies the skin barrier while simultaneously combating signs of aging.

HA supplements can also help alleviate a number of non-cosmetic issues.

Contents

What Is Hyaluronic Acid and Why Take It as a Supplement?

Hyaluronic acid, or hyaluronan, is naturally produced by the human body and is an essential component in lubricating the skin, but also the eyes, joints, connective tissue, and organs.

HA works by attracting and locking in moisture to restore the outermost layer of the skin’s surface. What makes it so effective at skin hydration is its high molecular weight and water-binding potential.

As we age, our natural HA production decreases and elastic tissue is lost, resulting in thin, wrinkled, and dry skin. Reintroducing HA to the body via supplements can improve the overall health of skin, as well as supporting vision and joints.

Benefits of Hyaluronic Acid Supplements for the Skin

Consuming HA daily offers many skin benefits. Firstly, HA hydrates the skin. This is because the metabolites of HA naturally increase moisture content in skin cells. By directly re-hydrating skin cells, the overall physiology of skin improves.

This makes HA supplements an effective solution in combating the appearance of fine lines and deep wrinkles. The high water content gives HA its unique hydrating power which contributes to firmness, resilience, and the elasticity of youthful skin.

When taken orally HA also possesses antioxidant properties that can protect the skin from environmental elements such as sun exposure, harsh chemicals, and free radicals, which are equally the culprits behind sagging and wrinkly skin.

Furthermore, the skin protects the body’s organs from external threats like infectious agents, chemicals, systemic toxicity, and allergens. Keeping the skin barrier healthy, plump, and moisturized is vital to overall health.

Does it really work?

A recent study published in Nutrition Journal demonstrated that oral HA supplements significantly moisturize the skin and relieve signs of aging in as little as 12 weeks.

Research from 2017 determined that HA supplements work to reduce wrinkle volume after eight weeks.

When taken orally HA combats the dryness that results from aging, sun exposure, smoking, and free radical air pollutants. This ultimately improves skin health overall.

Supplements vs. topicals

Topical HA treatments are effective at improving targeted areas of the face.

When ingested, HA hydrates skin across the entire body. Because HA possesses antioxidant properties, it ultimately improves the overall health of the skin.

Other Benefits of Hyaluronic Acid Supplements

In addition to hydrating the skin, HA plays a key role in a number of non-cosmetic uses. It is instrumental in the tissue regeneration process and can help expedite wound healing. HA supplements are also effective in supporting joint health and in relieving osteo-related pain. Since HA naturally lubricates the eyes, it is similarly a principal ingredient in eye medication for dry eyes.

Tissue regeneration and wound healing

HA production in the body naturally increases during wound healing. By supplementing with additional HA, the healing process is essentially supported and expedited. HA does this by activating specific responses in the cells that are key to the tissue regeneration process.

Joint health and osteoarthritis

HA administered orally has shown to reduce pain and discomfort related to osteoarthritis, joint pain and in particular, knee pain. This is due to its lubricating, anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties. Because humans, on average, are living longer than before, osteoarthritis is becoming increasingly more widespread. HA as strong contender in treatment options.

Lubricates the eyes

Eye drops formulated with HA lubricate the eye in the same way that HA naturally produced by the body does. HA supplements also help to stabilize, heal, and protect the eye. Essentially, the same properties of HA that are capable of moisturizing the skin by attracting water and activating cell responses that are key to tissue regeneration, are effective in relieving dry eyes.

In addition to being an effective line of treatment, the fact that HA has virtually no side effects compared to other prescription medications makes HA a viable solution in supporting wound healing, joint health, and dry eyes.

Are Hyaluronic Acid Supplements Safe?

HA is generally very safe with few reported adverse effects.

When taken as an oral supplement, HA equally has a good safety record. A recent double-blind study shows that long-term use is safe, with no negative side effects from year-long HA supplementation.

Because HA is a natural component of the body, allergic reactions or irritation are extremely rare.

Side effects

Those with a known or pre-existing liver condition or cancer should avoid taking HA supplements.

Similarly, the effects of HA during pregnancy or while breastfeeding have not been sufficiently researched, and as such HA should be avoided.

Which Hyaluronic Acid Supplement Is Best for Your Skin?

A clinical trial from 2014 published in Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology reports that GliSODin Skin Nutrients Advanced Anti-Aging Formula is effective at moisturizing the skin, as well as improving elasticity, structural integrity, and the function of the skin, as well as photoaging caused by oxidative stress. The study goes on to point out that pairing this particular supplement with a topical, wrinkle-fighting cream like FDA-approved 0.1% tazarotene cream produces significant results.

How to Use Hyaluronic Acid Supplements

In accordance with a study referred to above, a daily dose of just 240 mg is both safe to ingest and produces positive results in as few as eight weeks.

Alternatives

For the most part, there isn’t much else on the market that compares to the hydrating power of topical and supplemental HA.

Hyaluronic acid creams, serums, and other skincare products

Opt for a topical product containing at least 0.1% and apply HA twice daily. As HA is available in many forms, choose a product that works best with your skin type.

It’s possible to layer topical HA products (cleansers, serums, moisturizers, and creams). For even better results, pair topical products with an HA supplement to help improve skin’s overall moisture.

Hyaluronic acid-rich foods

Some reports suggest that the following foods are either high in HA or contribute to HA production:

  • Bone broth
  • Organ meats
  • Red wine
  • Dark chocolate
  • Almonds
  • Leafy greens
  • Soy-based foods
  • Starchy root vegetables
  • Citrus fruits

However, there is a lack of sufficient evidence that these foods can significantly improve skin hydration. And certainly, in comparison to HA topical products and supplements.

Similar active ingredients

On a topical level, ceramides have the ability to help retain moisture and protect the skin from environmental pollutants.

From a supplemental perspective, vitamins D and E, fish oil, and antioxidants can contribute to the overall lubricating of skin and joints.

As we age, our HA production depletes. Aging skin, therefore, requires special treatment.

Incorporating HA supplements has the ability to significantly moisturize skin. This helps defend against the natural signs of aging and combats dry and rough-looking skin, all the while simultaneously fortifying the skin barrier against external elements. Ultimately, taking HA orally can improve overall skin health.

HA supplements can offer a multitude of other health benefits, ranging from wound healing to helping with dry eye and supporting joint health.

Lastly, it’s important to remember that while HA is generally very safe, people with certain pre-existing health conditions should consult with their healthcare provider before incorporating supplements.

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In the world of wellness, certain supplements have some amped-up skills on their resumes—think biotin for healthy hair and turmeric to battle inflammation, for example. In the skin-care world, on the other hand, one in particular has reigned supreme: collagen. The multi-beneficial, celeb-beloved protein supplement is known to promote plumper, smoother skin from the inside out, and it’s been buzzing for quite some time now.

Perhaps it’s time to move over, though—because another complexion-boosting supplement is gaining some (glow-inducing) momentum, and like collagen, you’re accustomed to seeing it in your topical skin-care products. I’m talking about hyaluronic acid.

On a recent Reddit thread, people have been raving about the supplement for its beautifying prowess. You may already know hyaluronic acid (HA) as a serum superhero, because it’s a moisture magnet and binds water within the complexion to hydrate and plump it topically—but, according to those in-the-know, it works wonders when ingested as well.

Reddit users rave about taking HA capsules to increase skin elasticity and plumpness and make skin feel even softer. Like collagen, hyaluronic acid is a compound actually found in your skin already. “Hyaluronic acid helps your skin retain water so that it stays hydrated and smooth,” says Amanda Doyle, MD, a dermatologist at Russak Dermatology in New York. “Studies show that ingesting it orally leads to the improvement in the appearance of skin by actually softening wrinkles and increasing luster.”

She’s not alone, New York City-based plastic surgeon Norman Rowe, MD agrees that you could see improvement: “Hyaluronic acid supplements are often used to improve the appearance of skin by keeping it moist and supple in addition to supporting healthy joints and vision,” he says. “The use of hyaluronic acid supplements for skin has been rising in popularity because people are drawn to its reputation to create a youthful, radiant appearance without any negative side effects.”

So there you have it: Collagen’s not the only supplement on the plumper skin block.

Shop hyaluronic acid supplements

These are more of the best supplements for clear, glowy skin. And these are the supplements to take for thicker, fuller hair.

Baker, C. L., Jr. and Ferguson, C. M. Future treatment of osteoarthritis. Orthopedics 2005;28(2 Suppl):s227-s234. View abstract.

Holmes and et al. Hyaluronic acid in human articular cartilage: Age-related changes in content and size. Biochem.J 1988;250:435-441.

Lupo, M. P. Hyaluronic acid fillers in facial rejuvenation. Semin.Cutan.Med Surg. 2006;25(3):122-126. View abstract.

Petrella, R. J. Hyaluronic acid for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: long-term outcomes from a naturalistic primary care experience. Am J Phys.Med Rehabil. 2005;84(4):278-283. View abstract.

Smith, K. C. Practical use of Juvederm: early experience. Plast.Reconstr.Surg. 2007;120(6 Suppl):67S-73S. View abstract.

Altman RD, Moskowitz R. Intraarticular sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan) in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized clinical trial. Hyalgan Study Group. J Rheumatol 1998;25:2203-12. View abstract.

Altman RD. Intra-articular sodium hyaluronate in osteoarthritis of the knee. Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000;30(2 Suppl 1):11-8. View abstract.

Becker LC, Bergfeld WF, Belsito DV, et al. Final report of the safety assessment of hyaluronic acid, potassium hyaluronate, and sodium hyaluronate. Int J Toxicol 2009;28(4 Suppl):5-67. View abstract.

Chen WY, Abatangelo G. Functions of hyaluronan in wound repair. Wound Repair Regen 1999;7:79-89. View abstract.

De Vita D, Antell H, Giordano S. Effectiveness of intravesical hyaluronic acid with or without chondroitin sulfate for recurrent bacterial cystitis in adult women: a meta-analysis. Int Urogynecol J 2013;24(4):545-52. View abstract.

Dougados M. Sodium hyaluronate therapy in osteoarthritis: arguments for a potential beneficial structural effect. Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000;30(2 Suppl 1):19-25. View abstract.

Duperre J, Grenier B, Lemire J, Mihalovits H, Sebag M, Lambert J. Effect of timolol vs. acetazolamide on sodium hyaluronate-induced rise in intraocular pressure after cataract surgery. Can J Ophthalmol 1994;29:182-6. View abstract.

Felson DT, Anderson JJ. Hyaluronate sodium injections for osteoarthritis: hope, hype, and hard truths. Arch Intern Med 2002;162:245-7. View abstract.

Frizziero L, Govoni E, Bacchini P. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: clinical and morphological study. Clin Exp Rheumatol 1998;16:441-9. View abstract.

Gelclair Prescribing Information. Cell Pathways, Inc. Horsham, PA, 2002.

Goa KL, Benfield P. Hyaluronic acid. A review of its pharmacology and use as a surgical aid in ophthalmology, and its therapeutic potential in joint disease and wound healing. Drugs 1994;47:536-66. View abstract.

Goldberg LD, Crysler C. A single center, pilot, double-blinded, randomized, comparative, prospective clinical study to evaluate improvements in the structure and function of facial skin with tazarotene 0.1% cream alone and in combination with GliSODin Skin Nutrients Advanced Anti-Aging Formula. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2014;7:139-44. View abstract.

Hyalgan Prescribing Information. Sanofi-Synthelabo, Inc. New York, NY, 2002.

Kavouni A, Stanec JJ. Human antihyaluronic acid antibodies. Dermatol Surg 2002;28:359-60. View abstract.

King SR, Hickerson WL, Proctor KG. Beneficial actions of exogenous hyaluronic acid on wound healing. Surgery 1991;109:76-84. View abstract.

Kramer K, Senninger N, Herbst H, Probst W. Effective prevention of adhesions with hyaluronate. Arch Surg 2002;137:278-82. View abstract.

Mayer O, Simon J, Rosolova H, et al. The effects of folate supplementation on some coagulation parameter and oxidative status surrogates. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2002;58:1-5.. View abstract.

Migliore A, Bizzi E, Herrero-Beaumont J, et al. The discrepancy between recommendations and clinical practice for viscosupplementation in osteoarthritis: mind the gap! Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2015;19(7):1124-9. View abstract.

Nelson FR, Zvirbulis RA, Zonca B, et al. The effects of an oral preparation containing hyaluronic acid (Oralvisc) on obese knee osteoarthritis patients determined by pain, function, bradykinin, leptin, inflammatory cytokines, and heavy water analyses. Rheumatol Int. 2015;35(1):43-52. View abstract.

New Product: Gelclair concentrated oral gel. Pharmacist’s Letter/Prescriber’s Letter 2002;18(7):180711.

Nieman DC, Shanely RA, Luo B, Dew D, Meaney MP, Sha W. A commercialized dietary supplement alleviates joint pain in community adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled community trial. Nutr J 2013;12(1):154. View abstract.

Palmieri B, Merighi A, Corbascio D, Rottigni V, Fistetto G, Esposito A. Fixed combination of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-sulphate oral formulation in a randomized double blind, placebo controlled study for the treatment of symptoms in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2013;17(24):3272-8. View abstract.

Percival SP. Complications from use of sodium hyaluronate (Healonid) in anterior segment surgery. Br J Ophthalmol 1982;66:714-6. View abstract.

Percival SP. Sodium hyaluronate in perspective: experiences from a four-year clinical trial. Trans Ophthalmol Soc U K 1985;104:616-20. View abstract.

Petrella RJ, DiSilvestro MD, Hildebrand C. Effects of hyaluronate sodium on pain and physical functioning in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Arch Intern Med 2002;162:292-8. View abstract.

Rolando M, Valente C. Establishing the tolerability and performance of tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) in treating dry eye syndrome: results of a clinical study. BMC Ophthalmol 2007;7:5. View abstract.

Ruusuvaara P, Pajari S, Setala K. Effect of sodium hyaluronate on immediate postoperative intraocular pressure after extracapsular cataract extraction and IOL implantation. Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh) 1990;68:721-7. View abstract.

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Synvisc Prescribing Information. Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA, 2000.

von Tirpitz C, Klaus J, Bruckel J, et al. Increase of bone mineral density with sodium fluoride in patients with Crohn’s disease. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:19-24.. View abstract.

LubriSynHA Human Joint Supplement

Age and exercise can break down synovial fluid – the naturally occurring fluid that cushions and protects every joint in the body – leading to bone-on-bone friction and inflammation. The resulting pain can impact with athletic performances and interfere with daily activities.

LubriSynHA is an oral application of high-molecular weight Hyaluronic Acid (HA) which is bio-identical to the synovial fluid found in our joints. This revolutionary science surpasses many of the available products on the market, especially glucosamine and chondroitin, and is much safer than many prescriptions.

By drinking LubriSynHA once daily, users can feel relief from arthritis symptoms in as little as 7-10 days. LubriSynHA is all-natural and has no side-effects.

For those of you who don’t suffer from arthritis pain, your active lifestyle does have an expiration date. Taking LubriSynHA preventatively can improve the quality of your joints assisting in reducing pain and help prevent later damage!

LubriSynHA is available in two flavors, Original and Grape and comes in 11.8oz bottles that last an average of 30 days. It can be purchased in single bottles or in three-packs.

Click here for dosage and label for our GRAPE flavor. Click here for dosage and label for our ORIGINAL flavor.

Hyaluronan is the accepted scientific nomenclature for hyaluronic acid (HA) and physiological salts of hyaluronate, the conjugate base of hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronan is classified as a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a long, unbranched polysaccharide made of repeating disaccharides of glucuronic acid and glucosamine (Fraser, 1997). The polymer chain of hyaluronan ranges in molecular weight from hundreds of units (or Daltons) up to several million.

Hyaluronan is found ubiquitously throughout the mammalian body. It is either directly or indirectly involved in every physiological function of the body. It is found in dense concentrations in cartilage, synovial fluid, skin, vertebral discs, bones, urinary tract, cardiac valves, eyes, and various other soft tissue. Hyaluronan is most abundant during embryogenesis and declines in overall quantity and quality throughout life (McDonald, 2002).

Canonically, hyaluronan is recognized for its role in the maintenance of joint health. It is the presence of hyaluronan that makes cartilage strong enough to handle compressive forces within the joint (Seog, 2002). Hyaluronan is also found in the synovial fluid, where it provides the major source of lubrication that allows for smooth fluid movements in joints (Sabaratnam, 2005). Within bone itself, the presence of hyaluronan is primarily linked to its roles in bone modeling and remodeling processes.

Hyaluronan makes up a large part of the vitreous humor of the eye where it provides ocular moisturization and lubrication.

Hyaluronan has established itself as a protectant by its ability to confer defense to gut mucosal tissue. A recent study aimed to evaluate the effects of hyaluronan on gastric mucosa (Al-Bayaty 2011). Laboratory findings revealed that a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan-containing gel significantly protected the gastric mucosa.

Oral viscosupplementation of hyaluronan is preferential to injectable products because it eliminates the risk of adverse reactions, is more convenient, and more cost effective (Spirito, 2011).

Oral hyaluronan has been shown to be absorbed and effective (Ma, 2008). Recent clinical studies are consistent with these laboratory findings (Lukens, 2005; Kiburz, 2006). Studies with labeled, high-molecular-weight hyaluronan administered orally show distribution to the joints in as little as four hours post-administration (Balough, 2008).

Clearly, there is the potential for benefit from hyaluronan treatment as exogenous hyaluronan administration and supplementation has been shown to be safe and effective.

To be compared to the CSG family of products, any oral hyaluronan supplement must be bioavailable, absorbed, and effective. Hyaluronan must be completely hydrated in order to be bioavailable and absorbed. Once absorbed it must have the appropriate molecular characteristics to be effective.

COGENT SOLUTIONS – Baxyl Joint Relief 6oz

Article number: CO0000
Quantity: 11

Baxyl® is a liquid hyaluronan (HA) supplement formulated for human consumption to alleviate joint discomfort. With MHB3® Hyaluronan as its active ingredient, Baxyl is covered by six U.S. Patents and demonstrates proven efficacy and safety with double blind, placebo controlled university studies.

Because Baxyl’s liquid formulation is fully hydrated, it is absorbed quickly and is immediately put to work by the body. Baxyl is vegan, gluten-free, soy-free, yeast-free, corn-free, sugar-free, non-GMO, and has no artificial or natural colors or flavors. Baxyl uses only the finest ingredients from the USA and Europe with full traceability on all ingredients and offers a customer satisfaction guarantee.

  • FEEL BETTER< – Baxyl’s highly concentrated oral liquid formulation matches the body’s own High Molecular Weight Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid or HA) for maximum absorption and joint relief.* Baxyl is 3.8 times more effective than other dosage forms, C Hefner PhD.
  • MOVE BETTER – Baxyl relieves joint discomfort & occasional stiffness, and promotes healthy cartilage & bone formation.* In a clinical study D Kiburz MD FAAOS reported 84% of participants had excellent to good results in an average of only 21 days.
  • PROVEN EFFECTIVE – A three-time Best of Supplements Award winner, Baxyl’s nutritional grade MHB3 Hyaluronan has multiple double-blind, placebo controlled, pre-clinical studies and earned four US Patents for the support of joint and bone health.*
  • COMPLETELY SAFE – Baxyl is vegan, gluten free, non-GMO, and contains no Chinese ingredients. It is odorless, colorless and tasteless. There are no known adverse side effects, contraindications, or drug interactions. Produced via microbial fermentation to ensure there are no extraneous animal proteins that may cause allergic reactions. Cogent Solutions Group’s USFDA regulated cGMP facility is staffed with highly skilled workers who take great pride in producing outstanding products.

Hyaluronan is a natural substance found throughout the body with high concentrations in the synovial fluid (joint lubrication) and skin. Baxyl contains a patented molecule, MHB3, and promotes healthy joints. Unlike some other supplements that use processed animal by-products, Baxyl’s patented formulation is 100% vegan. Use this readily-absorbed liquid supplement to support synovial fluid and promote healthy cartilage.

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