How to use drysol?

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Hyperhidrosis is the medical term for excessive sweating. The problem may be limited to a few problem areas or may be all over. The armpits and the palms are the areas most often troublesome. Excessive sweating starts after puberty. It may be present to some degree all the time, but is at its worst when under stress such as during exams, interviews or dating. Excess sweating that affects areas other than the armpits and palms may a sign of serious problems. Systemic, neurological and anxiety conditions need to be ruled out; however most cases have no underlying cause.

Most over-the-counter antiperspirants are not strong enough to do the job. The best topical product, Drysol, is available by prescription. It may be somewhat irritating and sometimes takes a while to get used to it. Drysol is applied at bedtime to completely dry skin and washed off in the morning shower. Do not use a regular deodorant afterwards. Repeat the treatment nightly until the sweating is under control. If it does not work after one or two weeks, begin covering the affected area with a square of “saran wrap” overnight. After it begins to work, use once or twice weekly to maintain the effect, and use a regular deodorant on the other days. The medication is less effective on the thick skin of the palms and soles.

If this treatment doesn’t work well enough there are alternatives. Botox injections, a treatment popular for wrinkles, will control excessive sweating for 4 to 6 months. Botox is a purified protein which has the ability to block the chemical which activates sweat glands. The FDA has approved this treatment for underarm hyperhidrosis. Many insurances are now covering the cost of Botox for this condition. Some physicians are using Botox for sweating of the palms, however sometimes it may cause a temporary weakness of the grip.

Another treatment option is iontophoresis. This is especially good for palmar sweating in people who do not respond well to topical products. Iontophoresis uses an electrical device connected to a water bath. Hands are placed in the bath and a weak electrical current is conducted through the skin which inhibits sweating. There are no significant side effects from long term use of this device. For mild hyperhidrosis, the battery powered Drionic device may be helpful, and can be purchased without a prescription. A stronger option is the plug in iontophoresis unit, which does need a prescription. In the US, it may be rented or purchased from the R.A. Fischer Company.

People who have not had success with the above treatments may consider oral medications, including Robinul and Pro-Banthine pills. This is an especially good option when someone has generalized sweating. These drugs are fairly safe but may have some annoying side effects including dry mouth, constipation, urine retention, blurring of vision, and heart palpitations. Since these side effects are dose dependent, it’s best to start with a low dose and slowly increase the dose if needed.

A surgical procedure called ‘endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy’ can cure hyperhidrosis of the palms. An experienced surgeon must do it. It may cause some increased sweating on other parts of the body, but most patients don’t seem to be bothered by this. Some liposuction surgeons know a special technique to scrape out the sweat glands from the armpits. These treatments should be discussed in detail before they are considered.

A novel treatment for hyperhidrosis is miraDry. It was approved by the FDA in 2011 for excessive underarm sweating. This treatment uses a hand held device which delivers electromagnetic energy non-invasively to the area where the sweat glands reside. As a result the glands are destroyed and don’t grow back, resulting in a dramatic and lasting reduction of underarm sweat.

The newest treatment for underarm sweating is glycopyrronium cloths (Qbrexza). This is a pre-moistened medicated cloth towelette that comes in individually wrapped packets. When wiped under the arm the solution enters the affected area to inhibit neurotransmitters on the sweat glands, reducing the amount of sweat produced. It is used once daily.

The International Hyperhidrosis Society’s website contains more information about these treatments.

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The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician – patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.

Important Note

The following information is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. It should not be construed to indicate that use of the drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Consult your healthcare professional before using this drug.

ALUMINUM CHLORIDE – TOPICAL SOLUTION

(uh-LEW-mih-num KLOR-ide)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Drysol, Xerac AC

Uses

This medication is used on the skin to help control excessive sweating.

How To Use

Apply this medication as directed to the affected area with the special applicator. This is usually applied once a day at bedtime for the first few days then once or twice a week as needed. For maximum effect, make sure area is completely dry before applying the medication. Apply a thin layer of solution then cover the area with plastic wrap kept in place by a snug fitting T-shirt, sock or mitten depending on area being treated. In the morning, wash the treated area. Avoid contact with the eyes. Do not apply to broken, irritated or recently shaved skin.

Side Effects

Burning or a prickly sensation may occur when first applied. If any of these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: a skin rash, redness/ irritation/swelling in the treated area. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Precautions

Tell your doctor if you have: other illnesses, any allergies. This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

Drug Interactions

Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval.

Overdose

If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. This medicine may be harmful if swallowed.

Notes

This medication may stain clothing or certain fabrics. Handle with caution.

Missed Dose

If you miss an application, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not “double-up” the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store this medication at room temperature between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) away from heat and light.

Reducing underarm sweat can help you get back your confidence

2. Drysol Dab-O-Matic Topical

Effective for controlling perspiration, the Drysol Dab-O-Matic needs to be applied in a thin layer in the underarms. Your doctor will likely give you careful directions for using this product. For instance, you should apply it on absolutely dry skin and wear a t-shirt afterward. Leave the solution on for about 6 to 8 hours before washing off properly with soap and water. In the initial 2 to 3 days of using the product, your doctor will advise that you use it once a day, but as the sweating eases, she might ask you to apply only once or twice a week. As long as you’re using the Drysol Dab-O-Matic to reduce underarm sweat, you should avoid using any other antiperspirant products.

3. Xerac AC Topical

Similar to the Drysol Dab-O-Matic, the Xerac AC Topical works well as a solution to help you reduce underarm sweat. Make sure you follow the directions of your dermatologist and use it carefully. Wear a t-shirt after application and wash off after 6 to 8 hours. In case, the problem persists or you notice any redness or rashes, make sure you contact your doctor right away. You can use this solution for controlling excessive sweating in other areas such as the hands, feet, or scalp.

4. Bromi-Lotion Topical

Highly effective and easy to use, the Bromi-Lotion contains aluminum hydroxychloride but does not have any alcohol. The product is safe to use but if you’re allergic to any of the active ingredients, you might experience a slight irritation of the skin. Inform you doctor if you see any reactions right away.

5. Botox Injections

Botox or Botulinum Toxin is available in different forms such as Toxin A and B with each product intended for a particular medical issue. For instance, your doctor could prescribe it for migraines, muscular spasms, uncontrolled blinking, and an overactive bladder. By getting the injections in your armpits, you can reduce underarm sweating. Botox works by blocking the chemical reactions that stimulate sweating. However, the effects of the injection remain for only a while and you notice the sweating return when the effects of Botox begin to wear off.

My Drysol Review: The Side Effects You Need to Know About

If you sweat severely in your underarms, you’ve spent a good portion of your nights (and paycheck) searching for heavy-duty solutions. Some people go the Drysol deodorant route when over-the-counter options don’t work.

After a long, brutal battle with hyperhidrosis, I was also prescribed Drysol. In this post, I share my Drysol review, common side effects and some ugly truths your doctor might not disclose.

How I Ended Up With Hyperhidrosis

My Drysol review and story begin at 12 years old — when I first experienced cranial hyperhidrosis (excessive head sweating). Extreme sweating affected my self-confidence for years until a doctor finally diagnosed me with hyperhidrosis in my 20s.

I underwent endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) surgery to treat my cranial hyperhidrosis. You can read more about my experience with hyperhidrosis surgery here.

Unfortunately, I didn’t know about the potential side effects before surgery. Although the procedure stopped my head from sweating, I started sweating profusely on my chest and torso.

It turned out I was suffering from compensatory sweating – the most common side effect of ETS surgery. With compensatory sweating, your body compensates for not sweating in the area treated with ETS by sweating excessively from other areas.

I thought ETS would cure my sweating problem for good, but instead, I was sweating worse than before. I was back to the drawing board, looking for another cure.

Trying Hyperhidrosis Medications

I started experimenting with different prescription medications to correct my compensatory sweating. The doctor prescribed me Ditropan XL, an oral medication for hyperhidrosis that works by drying up your whole body.

When Ditropan XL and other prescriptions failed to work, the doctor prescribed me a much stronger hyperhidrosis medication – Drysol.

What Is Drysol?

Drysol consists of aluminum chloride hexahydrate, an antiperspirant that affects the cells that produce sweat.

Most over-the-counter antiperspirants contain aluminum-based active ingredients. While regular antiperspirants usually have 12-25 percent aluminum concentration, Drysol contains up to 30 percent. It’s much stronger than anything you’ll find in the deodorant aisle.

Drysol deodorant/antiperspirant penetrates sweat glands and blocks them from producing sweat. You apply it overnight because you sweat less while sleeping. You’re supposed to notice an improvement after several nightly treatments. But my experience was not so positive.

My Ugly Drysol Side Effects

The doctor instructed me to rub a dosage of Drysol all over my torso before bed and wrap myself with Saran wrap. The next morning, I had to unwrap myself and rub baking soda on the affected area to neutralize the drug so it wouldn’t harm my skin.

Sleeping was difficult, to say the least. Saran wrap was uncomfortable to sleep in, and aluminum chloride reeked of metal.

On the second night, I woke up suddenly with a painful, bright red rash across my chest and torso. At that point, I knew Drysol wasn’t the right cure for me.

Should You Try Drysol?

Internet reviews are mixed when it comes to Drysol. Lots of people report experiencing severe skin irritations like I did. Itchy, painful rashes and dry skin are common Drysol side effects. Some people say Drysol didn’t solve their sweating problem at all.

If you have sensitive skin, you need to be extra careful when using Drysol. If you shave regularly, you’ll need to wait 24 to 48 hours after shaving before applying the medication to decrease irritation. Plus, the skin has to be completely dry before applying. Water causes irritating hydrochloric acid to form on your skin, causing pain and burning.

If you’ve tried every other sweat medication on the market and nothing seems to work, Drysol might be worth a try. But if you have sensitive skin or prefer natural remedies, you may want to exhaust other options first.

Check out our complete list of axillary hyperhidrosis treatments.

An Alternative to Drysol Deodorant

For people with hyperhidrosis, medications like Drysol just aren’t enough to stop the sweat. They usually cause more discomfort and irritation than relief. Although there’s no permanent cure for hyperhidrosis, solutions exist that can improve your life and self-confidence.

At Thompson Tee, my co-founder Billy Thompson and I relate to the struggles of excessive sweating and the pain of many treatments on the market. We’ve both dealt with the condition for most of our lives and set out to create a safe, affordable and convenient solution to help others stay dry and confident.

Thompson Tee is the only patented sweat proof undershirt guaranteed to block underarm sweat from soaking through your outer layer. Our Hydro-Shield sweat proof technology completely absorbs armpit sweat and allows it to evaporate, keeping you sweat mark-free all day long.

I hope you found my Drysol review helpful. If you need a safer solution to hyperhidrosis, try a Thompson Tee risk free today and take 20% off with code TEES20!

PRECAUTIONS: Before using aluminum chloride, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history.This medication may stain clothing or certain fabrics or harm metals. Use this medication cautiously to avoid contact with clothes, bed linens, other fabrics, or metals. Let this medication dry completely before putting clothing over the treated area.During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.Some products that may interact with this drug include: deodorants, other antiperspirants, disulfiram, metronidazole, tinidazole.

OVERDOSE: This medicine may be harmful if swallowed. If swallowing or overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 59-86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) away from heat. Do not use near an open flame. Keep container tightly closed. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Information last revised August 2013. Copyright(c) 2013 First Databank, Inc.

SLIDESHOW

Rosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases See Slideshow

Q. My problem is that I sweat excessively. I can’t understand why. I shower every day and have tried a variety of antiperspirants. I have ruined many blouses and blazer linings, and the problem is eating away at my self-confidence. I read in a magazine about a product called Drysol. What is it and how does it work? Is it available in Canada? If so, how do I get it?

A. Excessive sweating, while not a serious threat to your physical health, certainly is a distressing condition that affects day-to-day life. And, as you have indicated, it can have major effect on a person’s self esteem.

Excessive sweating, or hyperhidrosis, may affect the entire surface of the skin, but is most often localized in the hands, feet and underarms. The cause is unknown. Overreaction to exercise, stress, pain, caffeine and nicotine can aggravate the sweating.

The most common method of control is the use of strong antiperspirants that contain aluminum chloride such as Drysol. Drysol is a prescription drug, so you’ll have to see a doctor to get it.

It contains a solution of aluminum chloride in alcohol. Because of the alcohol, Drysol may be irritating to the skin. To help prevent irritation, the affected area should be completely dry before application.

You can apply this antiperspirant at bedtime three or four times a week. When the treated areas are covered by a thin plastic film during these applications, this method seems to be effective for mild to moderate sweating. Once the sweating is under control, you can reduce the number of times you apply it per week.

If the Drysol doesn’t work, another approach to excessive localized sweating is a device that applies a weak electric current to the sweaty area (called iontophoresis). This device works for some people but not for others. Ask your doctor or a dermatologist if you can try it out at the doctor’s office before spending the money for a device.

There are no oral drugs available specifically for controlling excessive sweating. There are medications, such as those found in decongestant preparations, that dry your mouth and nasal lining. But they do not work well for underarms and have too many side effects to be used for very long.

Some people resort to wearing absorbent pads under their arms. You may find that adapting pads used for other purposes will work.

If your problem with sweating is particularly bad when you are under stress, counseling or anti-anxiety medications may help reduce your problem. And some counseling also may help you if you do not find a good solution.

Finally there is the more drastic step of surgery. The surgery, known as sympathectomy, blocks nerves’ signals to the sweat glands. But before deciding on this surgery, be sure that you understand the potential benefits and risks.

Commentary on battered women: I hope everyone was horrified after hearing about the recent trial of the white man who dragged a black man behind a truck until he was dismembered.

Although this is a rare occurrence, it’s only the tip of an iceberg of bigotry that causes physical and emotional harm to many people because of race, creed and age.

But an equally great injustice is perpetrated against women. It’s estimated that every year, there are almost 1 million rapes and 6 million physical assaults on women.

The place we all hope is safe–our home–is really the most dangerous place for a woman. And domestic violence against women can wreak havoc on the emotional lives of their children.

The federal government is providing over $200 million for help in these areas, but at $40 per assault, it’s only a beginning. And in the long run, our own actions–helping the victims and reporting the batterers–will make the biggest difference.

Write to Dr. Douma in care of the Chicago Tribune, Room 400, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611.

Pink Sheet – No Sweat – Hyperhidrosis Patients Seek Broader Approvals; Botox Access An Issue

Executive Summary

US FDA not looking to reduce attendance at third-party patient meetings, which deliver ‘bang for the buck.’ Excessive sweating is first externally led PFDD meeting for a more common condition.

Drug sponsors interested in hyperhidrosis research and development should focus on treatments that are effective for all types of excessive sweating – not just underarm or foot/hand sweating, according to patients participating in a patient-focused drug development meeting hosted by the International Hyperhidrosis Society in Washington, DC on Nov. 13.

While there are treatments for hyperhidrosis approved by the US FDA – like Botox injections and DrySol prescription antiperspirant – they are not a realistic option for all areas where patients present with excessive sweating. Hyperhidrosis of the groin/buttocks or face/head are especially hard to treat, and off-label treatments are not always effective. Furthermore, Botox is only FDA-approved for underarm sweating, and is therefore not covered by payors for other body areas.

The hyperhidrosis meeting offered a lesson for other groups planning externally-led patient-focused drug development (PFDD) meetings: leave more time to discuss specific endpoints to help guide industry R&D efforts. Much of the discussion was focused on conveying patient stories, but the meeting ran long, and there was little time for patients to talk about new treatment options or to make recommendations about clinical trial endpoints.

One International Hyperhidrosis Society board member, David Pariser (Eastern Virginia Medical School), was able to sum up his thoughts on those topics in closing remarks, and he argued that the clinical trial endpoints need to be reconsidered. Bona fide hyperhidrosis patients, he said, are often denied access to a clinical trial because the gravimetric assessment used to determine whether a patient meets the “sweat threshold” does not capture everyone.

FDA’s Sherman underscored the importance of the post-PDUFA V patient-focused drug development meetings, saying that they deliver an “enormous bang for the buck.”

“You don’t sweat the same amount 24/7,” Pariser said. “Some do, but it is variable. And if you have to hit a certain gravimetric minimum – meaning you have to sweat a certain amount, at that very moment when you are in the doctor’s office. You may not be sweating that day, and you may be denied access to a clinical trial because of it.”

The hyperhidrosis meeting is the latest in a wave of externally-led patient focused-drug development meetings. At least 10 third-party meetings have been held over the past two years, including those for amyloidosis, spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich’s Ataxia, and most recently, lupus. While FDA is not announcing the meetings nor keeping official track of them, the agency says it has found the discussions valuable. (See sidebar.)

Speaking at the Biopharma Congress hosted by Prevision Policy and Friends of Cancer Research Nov. 14, FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Rachel Sherman underscored the importance of the post-PDUFA V patient-focused drug development meetings, saying that they deliver an “enormous bang for the buck.” When asked if divisions would need to start prioritizing externally led PFDD meetings due to resource constraints, Sherman said “this is not a place where we want to cut back.”

Hyperhidrosis is the first externally-led PFDD meeting for a condition that falls under the purview of the Division of Dermatology & Dental Products. DDDP organized meetings for psoriasis and alopecia areata as part of the 24 FDA-led PFDD meetings convened as part of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act agreement. Now that those FDA-led meetings have concluded, the agency has said it will attend as many third-party meetings as possible, and will encourage drug developers to attend as well.

FDA Division of Dermatology & Dental Products Director Kendall Marcus delivered general opening remarks to the hyperhidrosis meeting about the drug development process, and then went into listen-only mode. Two other FDA officials from the division were in the audience: Deputy Director for Safety Tatiana Oussuva and Medical Officer Melissa Reyes. Meghana Chalasani from the Office of Strategic Programs, who has moderated many of the FDA-led sessions, was also in attendance.

The meeting was hosted by the International Hyperhidrosis Society, a global non-profit patient advocacy organization founded in 2003. The PFFD meeting was supported by a number of IHS corporate partners: Dermira Inc. (two investigational treatments, glycopyrronium tosylate and olumacostat glasaretil are in late-stage clinical trials), RA Fischer and Hidrex (both market iontophoresis machines) and Brickell Biotech (sofpironium bromide is in Phase II trials).

A Common Condition With Few Treatments

Unlike most of the preceding externally-led PFDD meetings, hyperhidrosis is (by some definitions at least) an extremely common condition. Recent studies suggest a worldwide prevalence rate of 4.8%, including 15.3 million people in the U.S. The average age of onset is 25 years old, and a family history is apparent in 30%-65% of cases.

Hyperhidrosis patients used the first half of the meeting to discuss the impact of their condition on their quality of life: telling stories about needing to change clothes several times a day, shorting out computer keyboards (or suffering electrical shocks), dropping objects from slippery hands (participants were especially worried about holding babies), being afraid to shake hands with others and sweating through their shoes.

Many of the patient participants on the panels were young (20s and 30s), underscoring the early age of onset for hyperhidrosis. As a sign of the day-to-day adjustments required by patients, boxes of tissues were made available on both the stage and audience tables for participants to wipe their sweaty hands. Many of the presenters carried copies of their remarks in plastic covers so as to not smear the ink as they held the paper.

The lack of an effective treatment forces patients to self-treat or self-regulate their body temperature. Participants talked about using a hair dryer to dry underarm sweat stains, keeping air conditioning on high year-round, wearing fans around their necks to cool their face and head, or using adult diapers to collect sweat in the groin area (or women avoiding pants altogether in favor of skirts or dresses). One patient, Sachin, built a homemade iontophoresis machine out of aluminum pie plates and batteries.

Patients said they needed more effective and safe minimally invasive treatments. The limited FDA-approved and off-label treatment options include:

  • Non-invasive: Topical antiperspirants (like DrySol); iontophoresis (mild electrical currents through water and into the skin); anticholinergics like Robinul (glycopyrrolate) and oxybutynin.
  • Minimally invasive: Botulinum injections (Botox, Dysport, Myobloc) to temporarily paralyze sweat glands; microwave thermolysis (miraDry) to destroy sweat glands in the underarm.
  • Surgical: Local excision, subcutaneous curettage or liposuction of axillary tissue; endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) surgery.

Patients with underarm or hand/feet sweating tend to start with DrySol and move to botulinum injections upon treatment failure. Iontophoresis is an option favored by many parents of children with hyperhidrosis as it is not invasive, but it requires multiple doctor visits per week. Anticholinergics are most often used off-label for hand/face sweating, but they can cause severe dry mouth and dry eyes. ETS surgery used to be promoted as a “quick fix” but it is expensive ($20,000 for a 20-minute procedure) and has been found to cause compensatory sweating elsewhere on the body.

Botox Access An Issue For Many

Many patients found Botox injections to be highly effective in treating underarm or hand/foot sweating, and were willing to endure the painful injections (as many as 100 needle sticks) to treat their condition. But access is a significant barrier to Botox treatment as payors rarely cover the procedure, and patients are forced to pay out of pocket for treatments up to four times a year.

One patient, Michelle, noted that she reserves Botox for “special occasions,” like her wedding, where the cost of the injections needed to keep her dry was factored into her wedding budget.

Another patient, Wendy, illustrated the side effects that patients will endure for an effective treatment. After she was unable to access Botox due to a change in insurance, she tried the oral anticholinergic Robinul (glycopyrrolate). Robinul works for her, but causes extreme dry eye and dry mouth, and at least 15 “crippling” leg cramps a night. Despite those side effects, she stays on therapy. “We shouldn’t have to suffer these side effects,” Wendy said. “There has to be a better option out there.”

In his closing remarks, Pariser pushed drug sponsors to come up with accessible treatment options. “As new things are developed, are they going to be costly, designer drugs for people who can pay cash, like miraDry, or are they going to be drugs that are going to be more equally available?”

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