How to stop taking chlorthalidone?

Edarbyclor

SIDE EFFECTS

The following potential adverse reactions with Edarbyclor, azilsartan medoxomil, or chlorthalidone and similar agents are included in more detail in the Warnings and Precautions section of the label:

  • Fetal toxicity
  • Hypotension in Volume- or Salt-Depleted Patients
  • .

  • Impaired Renal Function
  • Hypokalemia
  • Hyperuricemia

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Edarbyclor has been evaluated for safety in more than 3900 patients with hypertension; more than 700 patients were treated for at least 6 months and more than 280 for at least 1 year. Adverse reactions have generally been mild and transient in nature.

Common adverse reactions that occurred in the 8-week factorial design trial in at least 2% of Edarbyclor-treated patients and greater than azilsartan medoxomil or chlorthalidone are presented in Table 1.

Table 1. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of ≥2% of Edarbyclor-treated Patients and > Azilsartan medoxomil or Chlorthalidone

Hypotension and syncope were reported in 1.7% and 0.3%, respectively, of patients treated with Edarbyclor.

Study discontinuation because of adverse reactions occurred in 8.3% of patients treated with the recommended doses of Edarbyclor compared with 3.2% of patients treated with azilsartan medoxomil and 3.2% of patients treated with chlorthalidone. The most common reasons for discontinuation of therapy with Edarbyclor were serum creatinine increased (3.6%) and dizziness (2.3%).

The adverse reaction profile obtained from 52 weeks of open-label combination therapy with azilsartan medoxomil plus chlorthalidone or Edarbyclor was similar to that observed during the double-blind, active controlled trials.

In 3 double-blind, active controlled, titration studies, in which Edarbyclor was titrated to higher doses in a step-wise manner, adverse reactions and discontinuations for adverse events were less frequent than in the fixed-dose factorial trial.

Azilsartan Medoxomil

A total of 4814 patients were evaluated for safety when treated with azilsartan medoxomil at doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg in clinical trials. This includes 1704 patients treated for at least 6 months, of these, 588 were treated for at least 1 year. Generally, adverse reactions were mild, not dose related and similar regardless of age, gender and race.

Adverse reactions with a plausible relationship to treatment that have been reported with an incidence of ≥0.3% and greater than placebo in more than 3300 patients treated with azilsartan medoxomil in controlled trials are listed below:

Gastrointestinal Disorders: diarrhea, nausea

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: asthenia, fatigue

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: muscle spasm

Nervous System Disorders: dizziness, dizziness postural

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: cough

Chlorthalidone

The following adverse reactions have been observed in clinical trials of chlorthalidone: rash, headache, dizziness, GI upset, and elevations of uric acid and cholesterol.

Clinical Laboratory Findings with Edarbyclor

In the factorial design trial, clinically relevant changes in standard laboratory parameters were uncommon with administration of the recommended doses of Edarbyclor.

Renal Parameters

Increased blood creatinine is a known pharmacologic effect of renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers, such as ARBs and ACE inhibitors, and is related to the magnitude of blood pressure reduction. The incidence of consecutive increases of creatinine ≥50% from baseline and >ULN was 2.0% in patients treated with the recommended doses of Edarbyclor compared with 0.4% and 0.3% with azilsartan medoxomil and chlorthalidone, respectively. Elevations of creatinine were typically transient, or non-progressive and reversible, and associated with large blood pressure reductions.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during the postmarketing use of EDARBYCLOR. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

  • Nausea
  • Syncope
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Rash
  • Pruritus
  • Angioedema

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Edarbyclor (Azilsartan Medoxomil and Chlorthalidone Tablets)

Clonidine and Chlorthalidone

Generic Name: Clonidine and Chlorthalidone (KLON i deen & klor THAL i done)
Brand Name: Clorpres

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 20, 2019.

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Uses of Clonidine and Chlorthalidone:

  • It is used to treat high blood pressure.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Clonidine and Chlorthalidone?

  • If you have an allergy to clonidine, chlorthalidone, or any other part of clonidine and chlorthalidone.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you are not able to pass urine.
  • If you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with clonidine and chlorthalidone.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take clonidine and chlorthalidone with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Clonidine and Chlorthalidone?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take clonidine and chlorthalidone. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how clonidine and chlorthalidone affects you.
  • To lower the chance of feeling dizzy or passing out, rise slowly if you have been sitting or lying down. Be careful going up and down stairs.
  • If you have asthma, talk with your doctor. You may be more sensitive to clonidine and chlorthalidone.
  • If you have high blood sugar (diabetes), you will need to watch your blood sugar closely.
  • If you are on a low-salt or salt-free diet, talk with your doctor.
  • Check blood pressure and heart rate as the doctor has told you. Talk with the doctor.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take clonidine and chlorthalidone.
  • Talk with your doctor before using OTC products that may raise blood pressure. These include cough or cold drugs, diet pills, stimulants, ibuprofen or like products, and some natural products or aids.
  • This medicine is a strong fluid-lowering drug (diuretic). Sometimes too much water and major elements (potassium) in the blood may be lost. This can lead to serious health problems. Your doctor will follow you closely to change the dose to match your body’s needs.
  • You may need extra potassium. Talk with your doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol or use other drugs and natural products that slow your actions.
  • Be careful in hot weather or while being active. Drink lots of fluids to stop fluid loss.
  • Tell your doctor if you have too much sweat, fluid loss, throwing up, or loose stools. This may lead to low blood pressure.
  • Watch for gout attacks.
  • If you have lupus, clonidine and chlorthalidone can make your lupus active or get worse. Tell your doctor right away if you get any new or worse signs.
  • This medicine may make you sunburn more easily. Use care if you will be in the sun. Tell your doctor if you sunburn easily while taking this drug.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using clonidine and chlorthalidone while you are pregnant.

How is this medicine (Clonidine and Chlorthalidone) best taken?

Use clonidine and chlorthalidone as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Keep taking clonidine and chlorthalidone as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.
  • To gain the most benefit, do not miss doses.
  • Take with or without food.
  • This medicine may cause you to pass urine more often. To keep from having sleep problems, try to take before 6 pm.
  • Do not stop taking clonidine and chlorthalidone all of a sudden without calling your doctor. You may have a greater risk of side effects. If you need to stop clonidine and chlorthalidone, you will want to slowly stop it as ordered by your doctor.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of high blood sugar like confusion, feeling sleepy, more thirst, more hungry, passing urine more often, flushing, fast breathing, or breath that smells like fruit.
  • Signs of fluid and electrolyte problems like mood changes, confusion, muscle pain or weakness, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad dizziness or passing out, fast heartbeat, more thirst, seizures, feeling very tired or weak, not hungry, unable to pass urine or change in the amount of urine produced, dry mouth, dry eyes, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Signs of kidney problems like unable to pass urine, change in how much urine is passed, blood in the urine, or a big weight gain.
  • Signs of a pancreas problem (pancreatitis) like very bad stomach pain, very bad back pain, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Very bad dizziness or passing out.
  • Change in eyesight.
  • Yellow skin or eyes.
  • A burning, numbness, or tingling feeling that is not normal.
  • Fever or chills.
  • Very bad sore throat.
  • Any unexplained bruising or bleeding.
  • Feeling very tired or weak.
  • Restlessness.

What are some other side effects of Clonidine and Chlorthalidone?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Constipation.
  • Dizziness.
  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Not hungry.
  • Stomach cramps.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Headache.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Clonidine and Chlorthalidone?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Consumer information use

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about clonidine and chlorthalidone, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about chlorthalidone / clonidine

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Drug class: antiadrenergic agents (central) with thiazides

Consumer resources

  • Clonidine and chlorthalidone (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Clorpres

Professional resources

  • Clonidine and Chlorthalidone (Wolters Kluwer)

Related treatment guides

  • High Blood Pressure

Chlorthalidone (Oral)

klor-THAL-i-done

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 14, 2018.

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Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Thalitone

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Tablet

Therapeutic Class: Cardiovascular Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Diuretic

Chemical Class: Thiazide Related

Uses for chlorthalidone

Chlorthalidone is used alone or together with other medicines to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure adds to the workload of the heart and arteries. If it continues for a long time, the heart and arteries may not function properly. This can damage the blood vessels of the brain, heart, and kidneys, resulting in a stroke, heart failure, or kidney failure. High blood pressure may also increase the risk of heart attacks. These problems may be less likely to occur if blood pressure is controlled.

Chlorthalidone is also used to treat fluid retention (edema) that is caused by congestive heart failure, severe liver disease (cirrhosis), kidney disease, or treatment with a hormone or steroid medicine.

Chlorthalidone is a diuretic (water pill). It reduces the amount of water in the body by increasing the flow of urine, which helps to lower blood pressure.

Chlorthalidone is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

Before using chlorthalidone

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For chlorthalidone, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to chlorthalidone or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of chlorthalidone in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of chlorthalidone in geriatric patients. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney disease, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving chlorthalidone.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking chlorthalidone, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using chlorthalidone with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aceclofenac
  • Acemetacin
  • Acetyldigoxin
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Arsenic Trioxide
  • Aspirin
  • Bepridil
  • Bromfenac
  • Bufexamac
  • Celecoxib
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Clonixin
  • Deslanoside
  • Desmopressin
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Diclofenac
  • Diflunisal
  • Digitalis
  • Digitoxin
  • Digoxin
  • Dipyrone
  • Dofetilide
  • Droperidol
  • Droxicam
  • Etodolac
  • Etofenamate
  • Etoricoxib
  • Felbinac
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fepradinol
  • Feprazone
  • Flecainide
  • Floctafenine
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Ibuprofen
  • Indomethacin
  • Ketanserin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Ketorolac
  • Levomethadyl
  • Lithium
  • Lornoxicam
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Meclofenamate
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meloxicam
  • Metildigoxin
  • Morniflumate
  • Nabumetone
  • Naproxen
  • Nepafenac
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nimesulide
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Oxaprozin
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Parecoxib
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Piketoprofen
  • Piroxicam
  • Proglumetacin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proquazone
  • Rofecoxib
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Salsalate
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Sotalol
  • Sulindac
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolmetin
  • Valdecoxib

Using chlorthalidone with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aminolevulinic Acid
  • Gossypol
  • Licorice
  • Warfarin

Interactions with food/tobacco/alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other medical problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of chlorthalidone. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Anuria (not able to form urine)—Should not be used in patients with this condition.
  • Asthma or
  • Diabetes or
  • Gout or
  • Hypercalcemia (high calcium in the blood) or
  • Hyperuricemia (high uric acid in the blood) or
  • Hypochloremia (low chloride in the blood) or
  • Hypokalemia (low potassium in the blood) or
  • Hypomagnesemia (low magnesium in the blood) or
  • Hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood) or
  • Hypophosphatemia (low phosphorus in the blood) or
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus—Use with caution. Chlorthalidone may make these conditions worse.
  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects of the medicine may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper use of chlorthalidone

In addition to the use of chlorthalidone, treatment for your high blood pressure may include weight control and changes in the types of foods you eat, especially foods high in sodium or potassium. Your doctor will tell you which of these are most important for you. You should check with your doctor before changing your diet.

Many patients who have high blood pressure will not notice any signs of the problem. In fact, many may feel normal. It is very important that you take your medicine exactly as directed and that you keep your appointments with your doctor even if you feel well.

Remember that chlorthalidone will not cure your high blood pressure, but it does help control it. You must continue to take it as directed if you expect to lower your blood pressure and keep it down. You may have to take high blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life. If high blood pressure is not treated, it can cause serious problems such as heart failure, blood vessel disease, stroke, or kidney disease.

Chlorthalidone is usually taken in the morning with food.

Dosing

The dose of chlorthalidone will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of chlorthalidone. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets):
    • For fluid retention (edema):
      • Adults—At first, 50 to 100 milligrams (mg) once a day, or 100 mg once every other day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For high blood pressure:
      • Adults—At first, 25 milligrams (mg) once a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed dose

If you miss a dose of chlorthalidone, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions while using chlorthalidone

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure chlorthalidone is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Check with your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms while taking chlorthalidone: convulsions or seizures; decreased urine; drowsiness; dry mouth; excessive thirst; muscle pains or cramps; nausea or vomiting; increased heart rate or pulse; or unusual tiredness or weakness. These may be symptoms of a condition called hypokalemia or potassium loss.

Chlorthalidone may cause some people to become dizzy. Do not drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy.

Drinking alcoholic beverages may also make the dizziness worse. While you are taking chlorthalidone, be careful to limit the amount of alcohol you drink.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter ) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Chlorthalidone side effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Incidence not known

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of skin
  • bloating
  • blood in urine or stools
  • blurred vision
  • burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • cold sweats
  • confusion
  • constipation
  • cough or hoarseness
  • coughing up blood
  • darkened urine
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly
  • dry mouth
  • fast heartbeat
  • fatigue
  • fever
  • flushed, dry skin
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • general feeling of tiredness or weakness
  • headache
  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • indigestion
  • itching
  • joint pain, stiffness, or swelling
  • loss of appetite
  • lower back or side pain
  • nausea
  • pain in joints or muscles
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pains in stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  • pinpoint red spots on skin
  • red irritated eyes
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • redness, soreness or itching skin
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on lips or in mouth
  • sores, welting, or blisters
  • sugar in the urine
  • sweating
  • swelling of feet or lower legs
  • swollen glands
  • tightness in chest
  • troubled breathing
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • unusual weight loss
  • vomiting
  • vomiting of blood
  • weight loss
  • wheezing
  • yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known

  • Cramping
  • decreased interest in sexual intercourse
  • difficulty having a bowel movement (stool)
  • feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
  • hives
  • inability to have or keep an erection
  • increased sensitivity of skin to sunlight
  • loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance
  • muscle spasm
  • redness or other discoloration of skin
  • restlessness
  • sensation of spinning
  • severe sunburn
  • weakness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 2019 Truven Health Analytics, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Medical Disclaimer

More about chlorthalidone

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 20 Reviews
  • Drug class: thiazide diuretics
  • Chlorthalidone

Other brands: Thalitone

  • Chlorthalidone (AHFS Monograph)
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  • High Blood Pressure
  • Edema

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