How many allegra can I take in 24 hours?

Allegra-D 24 Hour

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Fexofenadine hydrochloride, the major active metabolite of terfenadine, is an antihistamine with selective peripheral H1-receptor antagonist activity. Fexofenadine hydrochloride inhibited antigen-induced bronchospasm in sensitized guinea pigs and histamine release from peritoneal mast cells in rats. In laboratory animals, no anticholinergic or alpha1-adrenergic-receptor blocking effects were observed. Moreover, no sedative or other central nervous system effects were observed. Radiolabeled tissue distribution studies in rats indicated that fexofenadine does not cross the blood-brain barrier.

Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride is an orally active sympathomimetic amine and exerts a decongestant action on the nasal mucosa. Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride is recognized as an effective agent for the relief of nasal congestion due to allergic rhinitis. Pseudoephedrine produces peripheral effects similar to those of ephedrine and central effects similar to, but less intense than, amphetamines. It has the potential for excitatory side effects.

Pharmacokinetics

The pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine hydrochloride in subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis were similar to those in healthy volunteers.

Absorption

Fexofenadine hydrochloride and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride administered as ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) tablets are absorbed at a similar rate and are equally available under single-dose and steady-state conditions as the separate administration of the components. Coadministration of fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine does not significantly affect the bioavailability of either component. The administration of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) tablets 30 minutes or 1.5 hour after a high-fat meal decreased the bioavailability of fexofenadine by approximately 50% (AUC 42% and Cmax 54%). Pseudoephedrine pharmacokinetics were unaffected when coadministered with a high-fat meal. Therefore, ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR should be taken on an empty stomach with water (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

A pharmacokinetic study following single and multiple oral doses over 7 days of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) in 66 healthy volunteers showed that fexofenadine, the immediate release component of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) , was rapidly absorbed with mean maximum plasma concentrations of 634 ng/mL and 674 ng/mL after single and multiple doses, respectively. The median time to maximum concentration of fexofenadine was 1.8-2.0 hours post-dose. In the same study, the mean maximum plasma concentrations of pseudoephedrine, the extended-release component of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) , were 394 ng/mL and 495 ng/mL after single and multiple doses, respectively, with median time to maximum concentration of 12 hours post-dose. Pseudoephedrine concentrations at the end of the dosing interval (mean: 172 ng/mL) at steady state were equivalent to those observed from a comparator pseudoephedrine hydrochloride 240 mg tablet.

Distribution

Fexofenadine hydrochloride is 60% to 70% bound to plasma proteins, primarily albumin and α1 acid glycoprotein. The protein binding of pseudoephedrine in humans is not known. Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride is extensively distributed into extravascular sites (apparent volume of distribution between 2.6 and 3.5 L/kg).

Metabolism

Approximately 5% of the total dose of fexofenadine hydrochloride and less than 1% of the total oral dose of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride were eliminated by hepatic metabolism.

Elimination

The mean terminal elimination half-life of fexofenadine was 14.6 hours following administration of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) tablets in healthy volunteers, which is consistent with observations from separate administration. Human mass balance studies documented a recovery of approximately 80% and 11% of the -fexofenadine hydrochloride dose in the feces and urine, respectively. Because the absolute bioavailability of fexofenadine hydrochloride has not been established, it is unknown if the fecal component is primarily unabsorbed drug or the result of biliary excretion. The mean terminal half-life of pseudoephedrine was 7 hours following single-dose administration of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) tablets.

Pseudoephedrine has been shown to have a mean elimination half-life of 4-6 hours which is dependent on urine pH. The elimination half-life is decreased at urine pH lower than 6 and may be increased at urine pH higher than 8.

Special Populations

Pharmacokinetics in special populations (for renal, hepatic impairment, and age), obtained after a single dose of 80 mg fexofenadine hydrochloride, were compared to those from healthy volunteers in a separate study of similar design.

Effect of Age. In older subjects ( ≥ 65 years old), peak plasma levels of fexofenadine were 99% greater than those observed in younger subjects (<65 years old). Mean fexofenadine elimination half-lives were similar to those observed in younger subjects.

Renally Impaired. In subjects with mild (creatinine clearance 41-80 mL/min) to severe (creatinine clearance 11-40 mL/min) renal impairment, peak plasma levels of fexofenadine were 87% and 111% greater, respectively, and mean elimination half-lives were 59% and 72% longer, respectively, than observed in healthy volunteers. Peak plasma levels in subjects on dialysis (creatinine clearance < 10 mL/min) were 82% greater and half-life was 31% longer than observed in healthy volunteers. No data are available on the pharmacokinetics of pseudoephedrine in renally impaired subjects. However, most of the oral dose of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (43 96%) is excreted unchanged in the urine. A decrease in renal function is, therefore, likely to decrease the clearance of pseudoephedrine significantly, thus prolonging the half-life and resulting in accumulation. (See PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.)

Hepatically Impaired. The pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine hydrochloride in subjects with hepatic disease did not differ substantially from that observed in healthy volunteers. The effect on pseudoephedrine pharmacokinetics is unknown.

Effect of Gender. Across several trials, no clinically significant gender-related differences were observed in the pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine hydrochloride.

Pharmacodynamics

Wheal and Flare. Human histamine skin wheal and flare studies following single and twice daily doses of 20 mg and 40 mg fexofenadine hydrochloride demonstrated that the drug exhibits an antihistamine effect by 1 hour, achieves maximum effect at 2-3 hours, and an effect is still seen at 12 hours. There was no evidence of tolerance to these effects after 28 days of dosing. The clinical significance of these observations is unknown.

Effects on QTc. In dogs (30 mg/kg orally twice daily for 5 days) and rabbits (10 mg/kg intravenously over 1 hour), fexofenadine hydrochloride did not prolong QTc at plasma concentrations that were at least 7 and 15 times, respectively, the therapeutic plasma concentrations in man (based on a 180 mg once daily fexofenadine hydrochloride dose when administered as ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR). No effect was observed on calcium channel current, delayed K+ channel current, or action potential duration in guinea pig myocytes, Na+ current in rat neonatal myocytes, or on the delayed rectifier K+ channel cloned from human heart at concentrations up to 1 x 10-5 M of fexofenadine. This concentration was at least 8 times the therapeutic plasma concentration in man (based on a 180 mg once daily fexofenadine hydrochloride dose).

No statistically significant increase in mean QTc interval compared to placebo was observed in 714 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis given fexofenadine hydrochloride capsules in doses of 60 mg to 240 mg twice daily for 2 weeks or in 40 healthy volunteers given fexofenadine hydrochloride as an oral solution at doses up to 400 mg twice daily for 6 days.

A 1-year study designed to evaluate safety and tolerability of 240 mg of fexofenadine hydrochloride (n=240) compared to placebo (n=237) in healthy volunteers, did not reveal a statistically significant increase in the mean QTc interval for the fexofenadine hydrochloride treated group when evaluated pretreatment and after 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of treatment.

Administration of the 60 mg fexofenadine hydrochloride/120 mg pseudoephedrine hydrochloride combination tablet for approximately 2 weeks to 213 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis demonstrated no statistically significant increase in the mean QTc interval compared to fexofenadine hydrochloride administered alone (60 mg twice daily, n=215), or compared to pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (120 mg twice daily, n=215) administered alone.

Clinical Studies

Clinical efficacy and safety studies were not conducted with ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) Extended-Release Tablets. The effectiveness of ALLEGRA-D 24 HOUR (fexofenadine hcl 180 and pseudoephendrine hcl 240) for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis is based on an extrapolation of the demonstrated efficacy of ALLEGRA 180 mg and the nasal decongestant properties of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride.

In one 2-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial in subjects 12 to 65 years of age with seasonal allergic rhinitis (n=863), fexofenadine hydrochloride 180 mg once daily significantly reduced total symptom scores (the sum of the individual scores for sneezing, rhinorrhea, itchy nose/palate/throat, itchy/watery/red eyes) compared to placebo. Although the number of subjects in some of the subgroups was small, there were no significant differences in the effect of fexofenadine hydrochloride across subgroups of subjects defined by gender, age, and race.

Fexofenadine

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on May 1, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

What is fexofenadine?

Fexofenadine is an antihistamine that is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal allergies (hay fever) in adults and children.

Fexofenadine is also used to treat skin itching and hives caused by a condition called chronic idiopathic urticaria in adults and children at least 6 years old.

There are many brands and forms of fexofenadine available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Fexofenadine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Do not take fexofenadine with fruit juice (such as apple, orange, or grapefruit).

Before taking this medicine

You should not use fexofenadine if you are allergic to it.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if fexofenadine is safe to use if you have:

  • kidney disease.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine. If you are 65 or older, ask a doctor before taking fexofenadine.

This medicine may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

How should I take fexofenadine?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Always follow directions on the medicine label about giving cough or cold medicine to a child.

  • Ask a doctor before giving fexofenadine liquid to a child younger than 2 years old.

  • The disintegrating (melting) tablets are not for use in a child younger than 6 years old.

  • The 12-hour and 24-hour forms of fexofenadine are not for use in a child younger than 12 years old.

Take this medicine only with water.

Take the disintegrating tablet on an empty stomach.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose. Use the dosing cup provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Remove an orally disintegrating tablet from the package only when you are ready to take the medicine. Place the tablet on your tongue and allow it to dissolve, without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse.

Store fexofenadine in its original package at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Do not allow liquid medicine to freeze.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since allergy medicine is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. Skip any missed dose if it’s almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include dry mouth, dizziness, or drowsiness.

What should I avoid while taking fexofenadine?

Do not take fexofenadine with fruit juice (such as apple, orange, or grapefruit). These juices can make it harder for your body to absorb fexofenadine.

Avoid taking an antacid within 2 hours before or after you take fexofenadine. Certain antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb fexofenadine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using other cough or cold medicines that may contain similar ingredients.

Fexofenadine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using fexofenadine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • flu-like symptoms (fever, chills, unusual tiredness);

  • new or worsening cough;

  • pain; or

  • signs of an ear infection–fever, ear pain or full feeling, trouble hearing, drainage from the ear, fussiness in a child.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache;

  • back pain; or

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect fexofenadine?

Using fexofenadine with other drugs that make you drowsy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using fexofenadine with any other medications, especially:

  • ketoconazole; or

  • erythromycin.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect fexofenadine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 11.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about fexofenadine

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • 123 Reviews
  • Drug class: antihistamines

Consumer resources

  • Fexofenadine Orally Disintegrating Tablets
  • Fexofenadine Tablets
  • Fexofenadine Oral Suspension
  • Fexofenadine (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Allegra, Allegra Allergy, Mucinex Allergy, Allegra ODT, Aller-Ease

Professional resources

  • Fexofenadine Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +2 more

Related treatment guides

  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Physical Urticaria
  • Urticaria

Fexofenadine is suitable for adults and children over 6 years.

Fexofenadine should be used with caution for elderly people, people with epilepsy or a history of heart disease.

Is fexofenadine safe to take if pregnant?

Fexofenadine is not usually recommended during pregnancy unless other treatment options are not working or suitable. Hay fever treatments such as nasal sprays, eye drops and natural remedies to reduce exposure to pollen are preferred options for pregnant women.

Read more about using fexofenadine during pregnancy here

Is it safe to take fexofenadine if breastfeeding?

Loratadine or cetirizine are recommended antihistamines for breastfeeding mums. If you can’t take either of these, your doctor may prescribe you fexofenadine as it only small amounts pass in to breastmilk.

Key info to know about fexofenadine

▪️ Fexofenadine is called a non-drowsy antihistamine because it doesn’t enter the brain in significant amounts and is very unlikely to cause drowsiness. However, a few people may find that it makes them feel slightly drowsy. Make sure you know how you or your child react to it before doing potentially hazardous activities like driving, cycling or operating machinery.

▪️ It is ok to drink alcohol with fexofenadine, but if you do find fexofenadine makes you sleepy you should avoid drinking alcohol with it, as this could make any sleepiness or reduced alertness worse.

▪️ If you’re due to have any skin prick or patch tests to diagnose allergies you should stop taking fexofenadine at least three days before the tests. This is because antihistamines can prevent or lessen the skin reactions that indicate an allergy, and so can make the test results unreliable.

▪️ Most people only need to take fexofenadine for a short amount of time to relieve their symptoms, but you can take it every day for as long as you need to, for example throughout the pollen season. You should stop taking it once your symptoms have eased, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Medicine interactions with fexofenadine

It is fine to take painkillers such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, co-codamol with fexofenadine

Fexofenadine and other hay fever products

It’s fine to take fexofenadine in combination with other forms of medicine for hay fever, for example nasal sprays, such as Beconase or eye drops such as Opticrom. However, you should not take other medicines containing antihistamines in combination with fexofenadine. Check with your pharmacist.

If you have hayfever and are suffering from a blocked nose, it is fine to use pseudoephedrine tablets/nasal spray in combination with loratadine. You should only use pseudoephedrine for a few days.

Fexofenadine and antacids

Don’t take indigestion remedies (antacids) that contain aluminium or magnesium with a dose of fexofenadine. These types of antacids may decrease the absorption of fexofenadine from the gut and so could make it less effective. You can still take antacids if taking fexofenadine but you should wait for at least two hours between your dose of fexofenadine and taking an antacid.

Fexofenadine with other medicines

Fexofenadine is safe to take with most medicines, apart from betahistine (used to treat Ménière’s disease). Fexofenadine may decrease the effect of betahistine, making it ineffective, so should not be taken in combination.

▪️ Find more detailed information about medicines that interaction with fexofenadine here

Read more about fexofenadine

  • What is fexofenadine used for and how does it work?
  • How do I take fexofenadine?
  • What are the possible side effects of fexofenadine?

Last updated: 14.08.2019

Rita Ghelani (BPharm, MRPharmS) Pharmacist A UK registered practising pharmacist with over 20 years’ experience, Rita is a member of the medical journalists’ association (MJA) and has a wealth of experience in community pharmacy.

That’s because as we age, our kidneys aren’t able to flush many drugs — including this one — out of the body as efficiently as they used to, with the result that “excess” drugs can build up in your body to toxic, even life-threatening, levels.

Your creatinine clearance (CrCL) — a number that reflects the rate at which your kidneys can flush out drugs — is about 60cc/min. This is normal for your age, height (5′ 9″) and weight (150 pounds). But patients with a renal clearance of less than 80cc/min should be on reduced doses of Allegra, which means that the 180mg a day is already too high for you. Continuing at this dose or going even higher could cause irregular heart rhythms, which can lead to death.

Since you’ve had the uticaria for such a long time, I’d suggest that you consult an allergist/immunologist, if you haven’t recently. The doctor may be able to uncover an autoimmune problem, which could perhaps be directly treated. Unfortunately, though, the specific cause of urticaria can be identified in only one of five cases.

People who take the same antihistamine over a long period of time may build up a tolerance to the drug. Accordingly, you may get better relief of your symptoms by taking a smaller dose of Allegra, say 75mg or 90mg daily, and then switching in alternate months to loratadine (Claritin) or cetirizine (Zyrtec), at a dose of 10mg daily.

“Ask the Pharmacist” is written by Armon B. Neel Jr., PharmD, CGP, in collaboration with journalist Bill Hogan. They are coauthors of Are Your Prescriptions Killing You?, published this month by Atria Books.
Also of interest: Are your prescription drugs making you fat?

Dec. 13, 1999 (Minneapolis) — Allegra, the newest addition to a long list of drugs to treat those nasty effects of seasonal allergies, has received rave reviews from European researchers. So what puts this medication head and noses above the rest? According to the co-author of study, Martin Stern, BMBCh, FRCP, old sedating allergy medications are out of date and shouldn’t be used anymore. Instead, he tells WebMD, “Patients should demand a nonsedating antihistamine. I think is unparalleled at this stage of development.”

Researchers in the United Kingdom compared the safety and effectiveness of Allegra (fexofenadine) with Zyrtec (cetirizine), another popular allergy medication, and a placebo, or sugar pill. More than 700 patients aged 12-65 were included in the study. The findings were published in the November issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Researchers were particularly interested in learning how well the antihistamines controlled the symptoms of sneezing, runny nose, itchy throat, watery, red eyes, and nasal congestion.

They found that once-daily doses of 120 mg or 180 mg of Allegra were superior to placebo in reducing total symptoms. In addition, the single dose was effective in relieving symptoms for the entire 24-hour period. They also found that Allegra and Zyrtec were comparable in relieving the symptoms of seasonal allergies. Whereas drowsiness was a side effect of Zyrtec, no major side effects were noted with Allegra. Patients also experienced less fatigue, nausea, and throat irritations with Allegra.

However, in the U.S., Allegra is only available in 60 mg capsules taken twice a day and not in the 120 mg or 180 mg once-daily capsules. WebMD spoke with one U.S. physician who said that when the 24-hour form of Allegra is available in this country, he intends to use the drug more often, particularly for patients who are noncompliant or tend to forget to take their medications.

“Development of an effective and safe drug that does not cause drowsiness is a major breakthrough,” Stern says. “The only known value would be if the patient has an itchy skin condition and needs help sleeping at night,” he says. “We have clear evidence that the sedating antihistamines seriously impair driving performance. Even at twice the dose recommended for seasonal , was not sedating.”

Allegra-D

Generic Name: fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine (FEX oh FEN a deen and SOO doe ee FED rin)
Brand Names: Allegra-D 12 Hour, Allegra-D 24 Hour

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 9, 2018.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is Allegra-D?

Allegra-D contains a combination of fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine. Fexofenadine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

Allegra-D is used to treat sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, hives, skin rash, itching, and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Allegra-D may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Do not use Allegra-D if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cough, cold, allergy, or sleep medicine. Antihistamines and decongestants are contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of a certain drug. Check the label to see if a medicine contains an antihistamine or decongestant.

Allegra-D may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Allegra-D.

Do not use Allegra-D if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Allegra-D if you have:

  • kidney disease;

  • glaucoma;

  • heart disease or high blood pressure;

  • diabetes;

  • thyroid disorder; or

  • bladder obstruction or other urination problems.

It is not known whether Allegra-D will harm an unborn baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant.

Pseudoephedrine can pass into breast milk and may cause side effects in the nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using Allegra-D if you are breast-feeding.

Do not give Allegra-D to a child without medical advice.

How should I take Allegra-D?

Use Allegra-D exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Cold or allergy medicine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 2 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole.

Take Allegra-D on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Take this medicine only with water. Avoid fruit juice; especially orange, apple, or grapefruit juice. Fruit juice can make it harder for your body to absorb fexofenadine.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the surgeon or doctor ahead of time if you have taken a cold or allergy medicine within the past few days.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Allegra-D dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

one tablet (60 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day.
or
one tablet (180 mg-240 mg) orally once a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

13 years or older:
one tablet (60 mg-120 mg) orally twice a day.
or
one tablet (180 mg-240 mg) orally once a day.

Since cold or allergy medicine is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Allegra-D?

Avoid using antacids within 15 minutes before or after taking Allegra-D. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb this medication.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold or allergy medicine. Many combination medicines contain pseudoephedrine. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of this medicine.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of this medication.

Allegra-D side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Allegra-D: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Allegra-D and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest; or

  • severe dizziness, anxiety, restless feeling, tremors, or nervousness.

Common Allegra-D side effects may include:

  • mild dizziness;

  • dry mouth, nose, or throat;

  • nausea; or

  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Allegra-D?

Taking Allegra-D with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can worsen these effects. Ask your doctor before taking Allegra-D with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Other drugs may interact with fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about Allegra-D 12 Hour (fexofenadine / pseudoephedrine)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • 11 Reviews
  • Drug class: upper respiratory combinations
  • Allegra-D 12 Hour
  • Allegra D 12 hour (FDA)

Other Formulations

  • Allegra
  • … +3 more
  • Allergic Rhinitis

Drinking Alcohol While On Allegra

Allegra: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings – Drugs.com Do not drink fruit juice at the same you take Allegra with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Allegra with and risks of using Allegra while you are Can u drink alcohol while on allegra – lfqlp.fyglh.mobi Can u drink alcohol while on allegra Do not drink fruit juice at the same time that you take Allegra.. However, Allegra and Alcohol – Alcohol Explained Allegra and alcohol speaks to Allegra alcohol to consume alcohol while using Allegra as side effects if probably dependent on alcohol from the first drink. Is it okay to drink alcohol while taking allegra – kol.sbzdf.mobi Is it okay to drink alcohol while taking allegra Do not drink fruit juice at the same time that you take Allegra.. Can u drink alcohol while on allegra – umi.agfpp.mobi Can u drink alcohol while on allegra Do not drink fruit juice at the same time that you take Allegra.. However, Can I drink alcohol after taking allergy medicine? | Yahoo would involve in drinking some alcohol. of the alcohol more strongly. If the Allegra you are drink alcohol after taking allergy What Will Happen If I Drink Alcohol While Taking Allegra D and cautions: Dr. Lin on what will happen if i drink alcohol while taking allegra d: What will happen if i drink alcohol while on allegra? Does drinking a glass or two of wine before taking Allegra Does drinking a glass or two of wine before taking Allegra so while it’s possible, it What does it mean when a pill bottle says “don’t take with alcohol”? Can What are the affects of taking allegra d and drinking alcohol? What are the affects of taking allegra d and drinking alcohol? Can you drink alcohol while taking allegra? e Allegra with alcohol or certain medicines. allegra with alcohol – MedHelp Allegra with alcohol. and the reaction continues to grow if I don’t stop drinking) but now, not even the allegra is able to stop this reaction.

Allegra-D 24 Hour – RxList

(Allegra-D 24 Hour)? Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine. Allegra-D; Allegra-D 24 Hour Allegra d while drinking – qfo.ancgb.mobi Allegra d while drinking Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Allegra-D.. You should not breast-feed whi. Comprehensive alcohol & food Allegra alcohol – fiqux.nxvgf.mobi Warning labels on antihistamines caution against drinking alcohol while taking medication,. so taking Allegra and drinking alcohol.Allegra Allegra D – Drugs.com You should not breast-feed while using Allegra-D. How should I take Allegra-D? Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Allegra-D. Is It Safe to Combine Fexofenadine and Alcohol? (with pictures) Is It Safe to Combine Fexofenadine and Alcohol? When we drink alcohol, I was put on fexofenadine a few weeks ago and I haven’t drank alcohol while on them yet. Drinking Alcohol And Allegra – sidewindercam.com Fexofenadine should be taken with water and refrain from drinking large amounts of Can u drink alcohol while on allegra – noa.ecfng.mobiCan u drink alcohol while on Can I drink beer after taking allegra – lnlft.agfpp.mobi Can I drink beer after taking allegra Do not drink fruit juice at the same time that you What will happen if I drink alcohol while taking allegra (fexofenadine) d Drinking Alcohol While Taking Allegra D – Czarter jachtów What Will Happen If I Drink Alcohol While Taking Allegra D Dr. Lin on what will happen if i drink alcohol while taking allegra d: Can I Drink Wine If I’m Taking an Antihistamine Can I Drink Wine If I’m Taking an Antihistamine? Warning labels on antihistamines caution against drinking alcohol while taking medication, Allegra What happens if I miss a dose (Allegra-D 12 Hour, Allegra-D (Allegra-D 12 Hour, Allegra-D 24 Allegra-D 24 Hour)? What should I avoid while taking fexofenadine Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of

Okay to drink alcohol when on antihistamines? | Go Ask Alice!

Okay to drink alcohol when on antihistamines? Dear Alice, In deciding whether to drink while on antihistamines, Allegra alcohol – 7ts4l.visitorsinsurance.mobi Drinking alcohol can increase.. Talk to your doctor about consuming alcohol while taking Allegra. The largest comparison of Allegra, Zyrtec and Claritin. Take allegra with alcohol – qkppr.nxvgf.mobi Talk to your doctor about consuming alcohol while taking Allegra. 50 years of leading contemporary dance training so taking Allegra and drinking alcohol.Oct 21, Allegra Safe With Alcohol – johnsonsswimmingschool.co.uk Warning labels on antihistamines caution against drinking alcohol while taking Allegra Side PDF Drug Facts Labels Claritin and Alcohol – Allergies Home Page Whether Claritin and alcohol is a it is always a good idea to be cautious while combining alcohol You may want to limit your alcohol intake and drink Allegra D And Alcohol Interaction – noithattranlegia.com runny or stuffy Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects Hegab remarks on whether or not you can drink alcohol while taking Allegra D for allergy Albuterol – Allegra Allergies Medication Articles eMedTV Articles A-Z Albuterol – Allegra Allergies Medication. This eMedTV resource explains that drinking alcohol while taking this drug is not known to cause any Zantac and Alcohol Don’t Mix – WebMD – Better information Zantac and Alcohol Don’t Mix. By Jeanie Lerche Up to 30% of healthy people actually develop higher blood alcohol levels after drinking due to Allegra-D 12 Hour, Allegra-D 24 Hour (fexofenadine and Drug information on Allegra-D 12 Hour, Allegra-D 24 Hour Allegra-D 24 Hour)? What should I avoid while taking Drinking alcohol can increase certain side Allegra-D (Fexofenadine HCl and – RxList (Allegra-D)? What should I avoid while taking fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Allegra; AllerNaze;

Is it safe to drink alcohol while taking allergy medicine?

Seasonal allergies are as common as they are annoying. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of American, allergic rhinitis (aka hay fever) affects 20 million adults in the United States each year. And millions more experience various other types of allergies—everything from insect bites and pet dander to shellfish, peanuts, and mold spores (to name a few). If your allergy is severe enough, you might carry an EpiPen or receive allergy shots from your doctor. For most people, however, over-the-counter allergy medicine is the first line of defense.

But how does taking allergy medication impact your ability to enjoy those #weekendvibes? In other words, will you still have the option to enjoy a cold beer on a hot summer night if you are taking something to combat your itchy eyes, runny nose, hives, or scratchy throat?

First-generation allergy medicines, like Benadryl, and alcohol

If your allergy med of choice is diphenhydramine, also known as Benadryl, the answer is an emphatic NO. Benadryl and alcohol should never, EVER, be combined, says David Corry, MD, a pulmonologist and professor of medicine in the immunology, allergy, and rheumatology department at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. The same rule goes for other first-generation allergy medications such as chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), clemastine (Tavist) and hydroxyzine (Atarax).

“That is a big contraindication,” Dr. Corry says.

Why? Because the primary side effect of these medications is drowsiness (case in point: Benadryl is also used to treat insomnia), which is also one of the primary side effects of alcohol consumption.

“First-generation antihistamines will cause drowsiness in just about everybody, alcohol does that, too,” Dr. Corry explains. “So if you are taking alcohol and antihistamines your chances of having a double dose of that drowsiness are very, very high.”

And in the worst-case scenario, he explains, this double-dose of drowsiness can not only impair your ability to function and increase the likelihood of some sort of accident, it can also lead to unconsciousness. Meaning, that cold beer is not worth the risk.

The only exception to this hard-and-fast rule is if someone has a severe allergic reaction to something, like food or an insect bite, in the midst of alcohol consumption.

“If you are allergic to shellfish and you had two martinis and then somebody passes you a shrimp and you are having a reaction … you would not withhold Benadryl,” says Maria Marzella Mantione, Pharm.D., director of the Doctor of Pharmacy program at St. John’s University in Queens, New York. She adds that in this scenario the patient needs professional medical care so call 911 or get them to a doctor immediately.

“These concerns are really outside of this particular context of severe, life-threatening situations,” Dr. Corry agrees.

Fortunately, Benadryl clears from your system in four to six hours, says Dr. Mantione. So, presuming the allergic reaction is kept at bay, you won’t be teetotaling indefinitely.

Second-generation allergy medicines, like Zyrtec, and alcohol

If you have chronic seasonal allergies it is unlikely your doctor will recommend a first-generation antihistamine, says Dr. Mantione, because these are normally used for acute reactions. Instead, she explains, you’ll likely be steered toward one of the second-generation allergy medications. Loratadine (Claritin), fexofenadine (Allegra), or cetirizine (Zyrtec) and alcohol are generally considered a slightly safer combination. These medications do not typically cause drowsiness or other side effects that are intensified by alcohol consumption.

“Most of these have a reduced, if not completely absent, side effect of sleepiness,” Dr. Corry says.

This is not to say, however, that it is okay to go on a bender while taking Claritin, Zyrtec, Xyzal, or Allegra—Dr. Corry recommends avoiding alcohol altogether while taking any medication.

But is doing so going to lead to a critical medical emergency? Probably not, explains Dr. Mantione. “It is one of those situations where, as a pharmacist, I say it is best to avoid because we don’t know how it is going to affect you, but it is not a life-threatening combination,” she says.

She also offers an alternative for those who don’t want to give up the opportunity to have a drink—nasal corticosteroids, such as Flonase or Nasonex. These are used as needed, and are safe to use regularly throughout the allergy season. They don’t have a contraindication with alcohol, and they don’t cause drowsiness or other systemic side effects, she says.

“If somebody came to me and said ‘I am on this allergy medication but I am going away on vacation and I am hoping to have Bahama Mamas every day’ I would recommend the nasal corticosteroid,” Dr. Mantione says.

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *