How long does your arm hurt after a tetanus shot?

Contents

Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed

Tetanus is a serious disease caused by bacteria. Tetanus (lockjaw) causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. It can lead to “locking” of the jaw so the victim cannot open his mouth or swallow. Tetanus leads to death in about 1 out of 10 cases.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria (or a protein from the bacteria), which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

The tetanus toxoid vaccine is used to help prevent this disease in adults and children who are at least 7 years old.

Like any vaccine, the tetanus toxoid vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You may not be able to receive tetanus toxoid vaccine if you have ever received a similar vaccine that caused a life-threatening allergic reaction or a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain.

Before you receive this vaccine, tell your healthcare provider if you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, easy bruising or bleeding, a history of Guillain Barré syndrome, an allergy to latex rubber, a weak immune system, or if you are receiving treatments that can weaken the immune system (such as radiation, chemotherapy, or steroids).

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Call your doctor at once if you have deep, aching pain and muscle wasting in the upper arm(s). This rare but serious reaction to a tetanus vaccine may begin 2 days to 4 weeks after you receive the vaccine, and could last up to many months.

Becoming infected with tetanus is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

You may not be able to receive tetanus toxoid vaccine if you have ever received a similar vaccine that caused any of the following:

  • a life-threatening allergic reaction; or
  • a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain.

If you have any of these other conditions, your vaccine may need to be postponed or not given at all:

  • a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, such as hemophilia;
  • thrombocytopenia purpura (easy bruising or bleeding);
  • Guillain Barré syndrome (within 6 weeks after receiving a vaccine that contains tetanus);
  • an allergy to latex rubber;
  • a weak immune system caused by disease (such as cancer, HIV, or AIDS); or
  • if you are receiving treatments that can weaken the immune system (such as radiation, chemotherapy, or steroids).

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with the bacteria that causes tetanus.

It is not known whether tetanus toxoid vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Tetanus

SIDE EFFECTS

BODY SYSTEM AS A WHOLE

Adverse reactions may be local and include redness, warmth, edema, induration with or without tenderness as well as urticaria, and rash. Malaise, transient fever, pain, hypotension, nausea and arthralgia may develop in some patients after the injection. Arthus-type hypersensitivity reactions, characterized by severe local reactions (generally starting 2 to 8 hours after an injection) may occur, particularly in persons who have received multiple prior boosters.2 On rare occasions, anaphylaxis has been reported following administration of products containing tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid. Upon review, a report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) concluded the evidence established a causal relationship between tetanus toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) and anaphylaxis.17 Deaths have been reported in temporal association with the administration of tetanus toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) -containing vaccines.

NERVOUS SYSTEM

The following neurologic illnesses have been reported as temporally associated with vaccines containing tetanus toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) : neurological complications 18,19 including cochlear lesion, 20 brachial plexus neuropathies, 20,21 paralysis of the radial nerve, 22 paralysis of the recurrent nerve, 20 accommodation paresis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and EEG disturbances with encephalopathy. The IOM, following review of the reports of neurologic events following vaccination with tetanus toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) , DT or Td, concluded the evidence favored acceptance of a causal relationship between tetanus toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) and brachial neuritis and GBS.17,23

Reporting of Adverse Events

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, established by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, requires physicians and other health-care providers who administer vaccines to maintain permanent vaccination records and to report occurrences of certain adverse events to the US Department of Health and Human Services.11-13 Reportable events include those listed in the Act for each vaccine and events such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock within 7 days, brachial neuritis within 28 days; any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, 5 disability, injury, or condition referred to above, or any events that would contraindicate further doses of vaccine, according to this Tetanus Toxoid (tetanus (tetanus toxoid) toxoid) for Booster Use Only package insert.

Adverse events following immunization with vaccine should be reported by health-care providers to the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Reporting forms and information about reporting requirements or completion of the form can be obtained from VAERS through a toll-free number 1-800-822-7967.11-13

Health-care providers also should report these events to the Pharmacovigilance Department, Aventis Pasteur Inc., Discovery Drive, Swiftwater, PA 18370 or call 1-800-822-2463.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Tetanus (Tetanus Toxoid)

Tetanus Shot Pain and Shoulder Injuries

Tetanus shot pain and adverse reactions are common following vaccine administration. In severe cases, various side effects include shoulder injuries, Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, Anaphylaxis, and other injuries. If you suffered an adverse reaction or injury after receiving the tetanus vaccine, you may be entitled to compensation from a federal trust fund called the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

About the Tetanus Shot

The tetanus vaccine is administered to prevent tetanus which is a bacterial infection. Sometimes referred to as Lockjaw, it is a serious bacterial infection that affects your nervous system, leading to painful muscle contractions, particularly of your jaw and neck muscles. Tetanus can interfere with your ability to breathe and ultimately threaten your life. The bacteria can be found in soil, dust, and animal feces making young children a susceptible target.

Tetanus shots are a part of the childhood vaccine schedule, which calls for four injections between two (2) months and four-to-six (4 to 6) years of age with a booster provided at 11 or 12 years of age. Adults generally have the option of one (1) booster every 10 years thereafter.

Injured by a Vaccine? TEXT ‘VACCINE’ TO 833-670-7851 FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

Tetanus Shot Injury Compensation

  • $135,000 for a client who suffered Shoulder Tendonitis, Bursitis and a Rotator Cuff Tear caused by a Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis (“TDaP”) vaccination in Texas
  • $4,095,193 for a client who suffered from Encephalitis, acute respiratory failure, and seizures caused by a Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis (“TDaP”) vaccination in South Carolina

Related

  • We are Seeing a Definitive Increase in Shoulder Injury (“SIRVA”) Claims
  • NBC4 with Jodie Fleischer of the News4 I-Team from Washington, D.C., spoke with Paul Brazil about the frequency of incorrect vaccine administration, SIRVA injuries, and much more

Tetanus Shot Ingredients

The TENIVAC Tetanus vaccine, made by Sanofi Pasteur, Ltd., is made up of the following ingredients (not in order of quantity):

  • Aluminum phosphate
  • Formaldehyde
  • Sodium chloride
  • Water for injection

The Tetanus and Diphtheria Toxoids vaccine, made by Mass Biologics, is made up of the following ingredients (not in order of quantity):

  • Aluminum adjuvant
  • Formaldehyde
  • Thimerosal

Risks That the Vaccine Poses

Reaction to tetanus vaccine is common and differs somewhat between children and adults. Mild side effects are very common, with approximately one in four (1 in 4) children experiencing them. Some of these are common in adults too.

  • Slight fever
  • Swelling and/or redness at the site of injection
  • Tenderness or soreness
  • Fussiness
  • Non-stop Crying
  • Seizure
  • Other conditions

Tetanus shots can also cause Brachial Neuritis which is commonly referred to as Parsonage-Turner Syndrome (“PTS”). This condition causes paralysis throughout the shoulder muscles accompanied by extreme pain. Although pain and treatment can vary between individuals, Parsonage-Turner Syndrome can last as long as two (2) years and lead to irreversible muscle deterioration.

Compensation for vaccine injuries

If you or a loved one has suffered an adverse reaction, illness, or severe injury after receiving the tetanus vaccine, you may qualify for compensation from a federal program called the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Call the national vaccine injury attorneys at My Vaccine Lawyer for more information. Not only is the phone call free, but our representation comes at no cost to you. If you want to learn more about our settlement victories for vaccine injury clients, click on the link below to see a detailed table for compensation amounts for various injuries and vaccines.

Page last reviewed and updated: November 20, 2019

Body System As a Whole

Adverse reactions may be local and include redness, warmth, edema, induration with or without tenderness as well as urticaria, and rash. Malaise, transient fever, pain, hypotension, nausea and arthralgia may develop in some patients after the injection. Arthus-type hypersensitivity reactions, characterized by severe local reactions (generally starting 2 to 8 hours after an injection) may occur, particularly in persons who have received multiple prior boosters.1

Rarely, an anaphylactic reaction (i.e., hives, swelling of the mouth, difficulty breathing, hypotension, or shock) and death have been reported after receiving preparations containing tetanus and diphtheria antigens.

Deaths have been reported in temporal association with the administration of tetanus toxoid containing vaccines. On rare occasion, anaphylaxis has been reported following administration of products containing tetanus toxoid. Upon review, a report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) concluded the evidence established a causal relationship between tetanus toxoid and anaphylaxis.6

Nervous System

The following neurologic illnesses have been reported as temporally associated with vaccine containing tetanus toxoid: neurological complications13 including cochlear lesion,14 brachial plexus neuropathies,14,15 paralysis of the radial nerve,16 paralysis of the recurrent nerve,14 accommodation paresis, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and EEG disturbances with encephalopathy. The IOM following review of the reports of neurologic events following vaccination with tetanus toxoid, Td or DT, concluded the evidence favored acceptance of a causal relationship between tetanus toxoid and brachial neuritis and GBS.6,17

EPINEPHRINE INJECTION (1:1000) MUST BE IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE SHOULD AN ACUTE ANAPHYLACTIC REACTION OCCUR DUE TO ANY COMPONENT OF THE VACCINE.

Reporting of Adverse Events

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, established by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, requires physicians and other health-care providers who administer vaccines to maintain permanent vaccination records and to report occurrences of certain adverse events to the US Department of Health and Human Services. Reportable events include those listed in the Act for each vaccine and events specified in the package insert as contraindications to further doses of the vaccine.9,10

Reporting by parents or guardians of all adverse events after vaccine administration should be encouraged. Adverse events following immunization with vaccine should be reported by health-care providers to the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Reporting forms and information about reporting requirements or completion of the form can be obtained from VAERS through a toll-free number 1-800-822-7967.8,9,10

Health-care providers also should report these events to Director of Scientific and Medical Affairs, Aventis Pasteur Inc., Discovery Drive, Swiftwater, PA 18370 or call 1-800-822-2463.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed (Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed)

The most common side effects of tetanus (lockjaw) vaccines are mild injection-site reactions, but there are also rare reports of severe neurological disorders, seizures, encephalitis, and more.

What are tetanus vaccine names?

How is the tetanus vaccine given?

Tetanus vaccines are given by injection in the thigh of infants and the upper arm of older children and adults. There are 4 different types of tetanus vaccines and they are given at different ages.

All tetanus vaccines are combined with vaccines against other bacterial diseases, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough).

Infants receive 5 doses of the DTaP tetanus vaccine. Older children and adults receive 1 dose of the Tdap booster shot, typically at age 11 or 12 years old. Tdap is also given to pregnant women in the 3rd trimester. Afterward, adults receive the Td booster shot against tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years.

Can the vaccine cause tetanus?

No. Tetanus vaccines contain modified toxins (tetanospasmin) from the tetanus bacteria, Clostridium tetani. These toxins can’t cause tetanus infections. Instead, they trigger an immune response so the body develops anti-toxins and immunity to tetanus infections.

What are common side effects of the tetanus vaccine?

  • Injection-site pain, redness, swelling, itching
  • Fever
  • Fussiness
  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Malaise (general ill feeling)
  • Muscle aches
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness

What are severe side effects of the tetanus vaccine?

  • Allergic reaction
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Brachial neuritis
  • Brain inflammation
  • Collapse or shock-like state
  • Coma
  • Decreased level of consciousness
  • Death
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Extensive swelling
  • Facial palsy
  • Fainting and fall injuries after the shot
  • Febrile seizure (fever causing seizure)
  • Fever over 104ºF
  • Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS)
  • Hypersensitivity (Arthus reaction)
  • Hypotonic-Hyporesponsive Episode (HHE)
  • Latex reaction
  • Muscle pain
  • Nerve damage
  • Progressive neurological disorder
  • Seizures

What other side effects have been reported?

  • Apnea (stop breathing temporarily)
  • Arthus-type hypersensitivity reactions
  • Bronchitis
  • Blood disorders
  • Brain inflammation
  • Cellulitis
  • Cyanosis or “Blue Baby Syndrome”
  • Diarrhea
  • Ear pain
  • Encephalitis
  • Encephalopathy
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Fainting
  • Low blood platelet count
  • Lymphadenopathy
  • Respiratory tract infection
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Unusual crying or screaming

Can tetanus vaccines cause a Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA)?

Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA) can occur after any immunization in which a needle is injected into the shoulder (deltoid muscle), particularly if it is injected too high or too deep. The symptoms include pain, weakness, inflammation, and poor flexibility.

Can I file a Tetanus vaccine lawsuit?

Our lawyers are evaluating tetanus vaccine lawsuits for anyone who was diagnosed with a shoulder injury (SIRVA) from DT (generic), Td (Tenivac® and generic), DTaP (Daptacel®, Infanrix®, Kinrix®, Pediarix®, Pentacel®, Quadracel®), or Tdap (Adacel®, Boostrix®)

Where can I get more information?

  • Tetanus Vaccine Lawsuits
  • Vaccine Injury Compensation Program
  • What are the side effects and risks of Tdap and Td?
  • Tdap Tetanus Vaccine Information
  • DTaP Tetanus Vaccine Side Effects

What is the Tetanus Shot?

While there are a number of vaccinations that people get as infants and children, one vaccine that experts recommend you get as an adult is Tdap. Tdap is a combination vaccine that helps protect against three different bacterial diseases that can be life-threatening. Because it’s an inactive vaccine, Tdap contains bacteria, so getting the vaccine can’t make you sick.

The Tdap vaccine helps boost your immunity to the following diseases:

  • Tetanus – This disease enters the body through an open cut or burn and causes extremely painful muscle spasms. Tetanus is probably best known for causing lockjaw, which is when a person’s muscle spasms in the jaw make it impossible to open their mouth.
  • Diphtheria – Diphtheria is a highly contagious infection that affects the respiratory system and makes it hard to breathe. In severe cases, damage to the heart and nerves can occur.
  • Pertussis – Also known as whooping cough, pertussis is another contagious infection of the respiratory system. While it first looks identical to a regular cold, pertussis progresses to cause intense coughing spells.

Who Should Receive a Tdap Vaccine?

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), adults between the ages of 19 and 64 should get the Tdap vaccine, even if they were given the DTaP vaccine (which helps young children develop immunity to these diseases) earlier in life. It is especially important to get the Tdap vaccine if you work in health care, are regularly around infants, are a new mother, are in your third trimester of pregnancy, or are traveling to a country where pertussis is common.

4 Reasons Why You Would Need a Tetanus Shot

1. Avoid a Tetanus Infection

The poisonous bacteria that cause tetanus live nearly everywhere and can lead to an infection when the bacteria enter through a break in the skin. A tetanus shot can help you stay safe and avoid tetanus while doing everyday activities that could expose you to the bacteria, such as handling soil and dirt, cleaning up pet feces, and dusting the furniture in your home.

Nearly all cases of tetanus are among people who never received the tetanus vaccine or who haven’t received a booster shot in at least 10 years. Other risk factors for tetanus include diabetes, intravenous drug use, and a history of immunosuppression.

2. School Requirement

Many states and school districts require children to receive vaccines and booster shots for certain diseases prior to starting a new school or beginning a new school year. A tetanus shot is normally on the list of required vaccines for kids going back to school. Even if a tetanus shot is not required by your child’s school, taking your child to receive a tetanus vaccination can help them stay safe if they come into contact with the bacteria.

3. Bring Immunizations Up to Date

Staying up to date on immunizations lowers your risk for diseases and infections like tetanus. Children should receive the DTaP vaccine at two months, four months, six months, and once again between the ages of 15 and 18 months. Kids between the ages of four and six should receive another DTaP booster shot.

Preteens aged 11 or 12 are recommended to get the Tdap vaccine, and adults are urged to get one Tdap vaccine if they’ve never had one, followed by regular Td booster shots every 10 years. Talk to your doctor if you’re not sure when you or your children last received a tetanus booster shot, so everyone in your family can stay up to date on immunizations.

4. Contaminated Wound

A tetanus shot is recommended for those who sustain serious wounds and have not had a tetanus vaccine or booster in longer than five years, as protective antibody levels are known to decrease after this time period. A tetanus shot can prevent you from getting tetanus if a deep wound becomes contaminated with the bacteria.

Examples of wounds that could cause tetanus include gunshot wounds, knife wounds, burns, surgical wounds, and punctures from nails, splinters, body piercings, and intravenous drugs. Insect and animal bites, foot ulcers, and wounds that contain dirt can also cause tetanus. Visit the doctor immediately to receive a tetanus shot if you have a contaminated wound that puts you at risk for tetanus.

Understanding a Tetanus Shot

A tetanus shot prevents you from getting a disease called tetanus, also known as lockjaw. Tetanus is an infection caused by bacteria called Clostridium tetani, which live in places like water, soil, and dust. This bacteria can enter the body through breaks in the skin such as cuts and puncture wounds and irritate the nerves to cause muscle spasms, muscle tightness, and muscle cramps. Tetanus can also lead to difficulty breathing and seizures that are powerful enough to break bones in the body. When left untreated, tetanus can cause death.

Most tetanus shots also contain vaccines to prevent diphtheria and pertussis. DTaP and DT are normally given to children under the age of seven, while Tdap and Td are given to people of all other ages.

Risks of a Tetanus Shot

All medicines, including vaccines, can cause side effects. The effects of a tetanus shot are generally mild and go away on their own. Mild symptoms from a tetanus shot can include nausea, vomiting, body aches, headache, and tiredness. Moderate symptoms from the tetanus vaccine include all the mild symptoms, along with fever over 102 degrees F and swelling of the entire arm that received the shot.

In severe cases, pain, redness, and bleeding can occur in addition to swelling of the arm, but occurrences such as these are rare. Some people experience an allergic reaction to the tetanus vaccine that produces symptoms of dizziness, weakness, high fever, unusual behavior, hives, difficulty breathing, rapid heartrate, and swelling of the face and throat. Allergic reactions to the tetanus vaccine normally begin within a few minutes to a few hours after being vaccinated.

What to Expect With a Tetanus Shot

Most people who receive a tetanus shot do not experience any problems with the vaccine. Some people have mild reactions that include tenderness, redness, and swelling at the injection site that lasts for up to two days after receiving the tetanus shot.

During your appointment to receive a tetanus shot, inform the doctor as to whether you or your children are currently ill and whether you suffer from allergies, are pregnant, or have had any serious side effects from vaccines in the past. After receiving your tetanus shot, move around the arm that received the shot to reduce pain, swelling, and other side effects. Contact the doctor immediately if any serious side effects persist.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor About a Tetanus Shot

  • When should I get a tetanus shot?
  • How often do I need a tetanus shot?
  • Will a tetanus shot cause any problems with the medications I take?
  • Will this worsen any of my existing health conditions?
  • How quickly does the vaccine start working?
  • Will a tetanus shot protect me against a wound I got prior to getting the shot?
  • How will I know if I’m having an adverse reaction from the vaccine?

The Tdap Vaccine May Also be Known as

  • DTaP
  • Td
  • Tdap vaccine
  • Tdap shot
  • Tetanus booster
  • Tetanus vaccine

Sources

Any wound should be cleaned thoroughly with soap and water.

Vaccination is the best way to protect against tetanus (see Immunisation). If a person suffers a tetanus-prone wound and is not fully vaccinated or has not had a tetanus booster dose in the previous five years, seek medical attention immediately.

Immunisation

The National Immunisation Program Schedule provides funded tetanus-containing vaccinations for the following groups:

  • all children at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with booster doses 18 months and 4 years of age (each dose is one injection combined with other childhood vaccines)
  • adolescents receive another booster dose of tetanus-containing vaccine through the School Immunisation Program.

The tetanus vaccine is available for adolescent/adults as a combined vaccine, either as diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (whooping cough) or diphtheria-tetanus vaccine.

Immunisation to protect against tetanus is also recommended, but not funded, for:

  • all adults aged 50 years and over who have not received a booster dose in the previous 10 years
  • adults with a tetanus-prone wound who have not received a booster dose of tetanus-containing vaccine in the previous five years
  • persons who have not received a primary course of tetanus vaccination
  • travellers to countries where health services are difficult to access.

To be fully effective, it is important that all recommended doses of the vaccine are received at the recommended times.

Like all medications, vaccines may have side effects. Most side effects are minor, last a short time and do not lead to any long-term problems. Possible side effects of the tetanus vaccine may include fever, redness and soreness where the injection was given, nausea, headache, tiredness and aching muscles. More serious side effects are extremely rare and can include severe allergic reactions. Contact your immunisation provider if you or your child has a reaction following vaccination which you consider serious or unexpected.

Tdap (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis) VIS

Current Edition Date: 2/24/2015

  • More information about:
    • Tetanus vaccination
    • Diphtheria vaccination
    • Pertussis vaccination

Tdap Vaccine

What You Need to Know

Why get vaccinated?

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis are very serious diseases. Tdap vaccine can protect us from these diseases. And, Tdap vaccine given to pregnant women can protect newborn babies against pertussis.

TETANUS (Lockjaw) is rare in the United States today. It causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body.

  • It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus kills about 1 out of 10 people who are infected even after receiving the best medical care.

DIPHTHERIA is also rare in the United States today. It can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat.

  • It can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death.

PERTUSSIS (Whooping Cough) causes severe coughing spells, which can cause difficulty breathing, vomiting, and disturbed sleep.

  • It can also lead to weight loss, incontinence, and rib fractures. Up to 2 in 100 adolescents and 5 in 100 adults with pertussis are hospitalized or have complications, which could include pneumonia or death.

These diseases are caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person through secretions from coughing or sneezing. Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.

Before vaccines, as many as 200,000 cases of diphtheria, 200,000 cases of pertussis, and hundreds of cases of tetanus, were reported in the United States each year. Since vaccination began, reports of cases for tetanus and diphtheria have dropped by about 99% and for pertussis by about 80%.

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Tdap vaccine

Tdap vaccine can protect adolescents and adults from tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. One dose of Tdap is routinely given at age 11 or 12. People who did not get Tdap at that age should get it as soon as possible.

Tdap is especially important for health care professionals and anyone having close contact with a baby younger than 12 months.

Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap during every pregnancy, to protect the newborn from pertussis. Infants are most at risk for severe, life-threatening complications from pertussis.

Another vaccine, called Td, protects against tetanus and diphtheria, but not pertussis. A Td booster should be given every 10 years. Tdap may be given as one of these boosters if you have never gotten Tdap before. Tdap may also be given after a severe cut or burn to prevent tetanus infection.

Your doctor or the person giving you the vaccine can give you more information.

Tdap may safely be given at the same time as other vaccines.

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Some people should not get this vaccine

  • A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of any diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis containing vaccine, OR has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, should not get Tdap vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccine about any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who had coma or long repeated seizures within 7 days after a childhood dose of DTP or DTaP, or a previous dose of Tdap, should not get Tdap, unless a cause other than the vaccine was found. They can still get Td.
  • Talk to your doctor if you:
    • have seizures or another nervous system problem,
    • had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis,
    • ever had a condition called Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS),
    • aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

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Risks

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own. Serious reactions are also possible but are rare.

Most people who get Tdap vaccine do not have any problems with it.

Mild problems following Tdap:
(Did not interfere with activities)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 3 in 4 adolescents or 2 in 3 adults)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 5)
  • Mild fever of at least 100.4°F (up to about 1 in 25 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
  • Headache (about 3 or 4 people in 10)
  • Tiredness (about 1 person in 3 or 4)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 in 4 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Chills, sore joints (about 1 person in 10)
  • Body aches (about 1 person in 3 or 4)
  • Rash, swollen glands (uncommon)

Moderate problems following Tdap:
(Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

  • Pain where the shot was given (up to 1 in 5 or 6)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 in 16 adolescents or 1 in 12 adults)
  • Fever over 102°F (about 1 in 100 adolescents or 1 in 250 adults)
  • Headache (about 1 in 7 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 or 3 people in 100)
  • Swelling of the entire arm where the shot was given (up to about 1 in 500).

Severe problems following Tdap:
(Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

  • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding, and redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

  • People sometimes faint after a medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
  • Some people get severe pain in the shoulder and have difficulty moving the arm where a shot was given. This happens very rarely.
  • Any medication can cause a severe allergic reaction. Such reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at fewer than 1 in a million doses, and would happen within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.

The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit the Vaccine Safety site.

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What if there is a serious problem?

What should I look for?

  • Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or unusual behavior.
  • Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would usually start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

What should I do?

  • If you think it is a severe allergic reaction or other emergency that can’t wait, call 9-1-1 or get the person to the nearest hospital. Otherwise, call your doctor.
  • Afterward, the reaction should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Your doctor might file this report, or you can do it yourself through the VAERS websiteExternal, or by calling 1-800-822-7967.

VAERS does not give medical advice.

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The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program that was created to compensate people who may have been injured by certain vaccines.

Persons who believe they may have been injured by a vaccine can learn about the program and about filing a claim by calling 1-800-338-2382 or visiting the VICP websiteExternal. There is a time limit to file a claim for compensation.

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How can I learn more?

  • Ask your doctor. He or she can give you the vaccine package insert or suggest other sources of information.
  • Call your local or state health department.
  • Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):
    • Call 1-800-232-4636 (1-800-CDC-INFO)
    • Visit CDC’s vaccines website

Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in español and other languages. See http://www.immunize.org/visExternal.

Hojas de información sobre vacunas están disponibles en español y en muchos otros idiomas. Visite http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_spanish.aspExternal

Vaccine Information Statement
Tdap Vaccine (2/24/2015)
42 U.S.C. § 300aa-26

Office Use Only

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Td (tetanus and diphtheria) vaccine – what you need to know

Why get vaccinated?

Tetanus and diphtheria are very serious diseases. They are rare in the United States today, but people who do become infected often have severe complications. Td vaccine is used to protect adolescents and adults from both of these diseases.

Both diphtheria and tetanus are infections caused by bacteria. Diphtheria spreads from person to person through secretions from coughing or sneezing. Tetanus-causing bacteria enter the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.

TETANUS (Lockjaw) causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body.

  • It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus kills about 1 out of every 10 people who are infected, even after receiving the best medical care.

DIPHTHERIA can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat.

  • It can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death.

Before vaccines, as many as 200,000 cases of diphtheria and hundreds of cases of tetanus were reported in the United States each year. Since vaccination began, reports of cases for both diseases have dropped by about 99%.

Td Vaccine

Td vaccine can protect adolescents and adults from tetanus and diphtheria. Td is usually given as a booster dose every 10 years but it can also be given earlier after a severe and dirty wound or burn.

Another vaccine, called Tdap, which protects against pertussis in addition to tetanus and diphtheria, is sometimes recommended instead of Td vaccine.

Your doctor or the person giving you the vaccine can give you more information.

Td may safely be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Some people should not get this vaccine

A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of any tetanus or diphtheria containing vaccine, OR has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine should not get Td vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccine about any severe allergies.

Talk to your doctor if you:

  • Had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria or tetanus
  • Ever had a condition called Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS)
  • Aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled

Risks of a vaccine reaction

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Serious reactions are also possible, but are rare.

Most people who get Td vaccine do not have any problems with it.

Mild problems following a Td vaccine

(Did not interfere with activities)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 8 people in 10)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 4)
  • Mild fever (rare)
  • Headache (about 1 person in 4)
  • Tiredness (about 1 person in 4)

Moderate problems following a Td vaccine

(Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

  • Fever over 102°F (rare)

Severe problems following a Td vaccine

(Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

  • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and/or redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

  • People sometimes faint after a medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
  • Some people get severe pain in the shoulder and have difficulty moving the arm where a shot was given. This happens very rarely.
  • Any medication can cause a severe allergic reaction. Such reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at fewer than 1 in a million doses, and would happen within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing serious injury or death.

The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit: www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/index.html.

What is there is a serious reaction?

What should I look for?

  • Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or unusual behavior.
  • Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would usually start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

What should I do?

  • If you think it is a severe allergic reaction or other emergency that can’t wait, call 9-1-1 or get the person to the nearest hospital. Otherwise, call your doctor.
  • Afterward, the reaction should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Your doctor might file this report, or you can do it yourself through the VAERS web site at www.vaers.hhs.gov/ or by calling 1-800-822-7967.

VAERS does not give medical advice.

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program that was created to compensate people who may have been injured by certain vaccines.

Persons who believe they may have been injured by a vaccine can learn about the program and about filing a claim by calling 1-800-338-2382 or visiting the VICP web site at www.hrsa.gov/vaccine-compensation/index.html. There is a time limit to file a claim for compensation.

How can I learn more?

  • Ask your doctor. He or she can give you the vaccine package insert or suggest other sources of information.
  • Call your local or state health department.

Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Call 1-800-232-4636 (1-800-CDC-INFO)
  • Visit CDC’s web site at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/index.html.

Summit Medical Group Web Site

Reactions to vaccines are common and almost always harmless. Severe allergic (anaphylactic) reactions to any vaccine are possible, but they are extremely rare or have never been reported. Listed below are the symptoms for a severe allergic reaction as well as common reactions to specific vaccines.

What should I do if my child has a severe allergic reaction?

A severe reaction is very rare. If it does happen, it is almost always within 20 minutes after the immunization. Seek help immediately or call 911 if you notice the following severe allergic reactions:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Weakness
  • Wheezing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Hives
  • Dizziness
  • Paleness
  • Swelling of the throat

What are the possible reactions to the different vaccines?

The percentage listed next to each reaction shows the percentage of children who have this reaction.

Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP)

  • Pain, tenderness, swelling, or redness at the injection site is the main side effect. It lasts for 3 to 7 days (25% to 45%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and place a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area.
  • Fever for 24 to 48 hours (7% to 26%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C). The next time your child gets a DTaP shot, give your child acetaminophen at your healthcare provider’s office and continue the medicine every 4 to 6 hours for 24 hours.
  • Mild drowsiness (15%), poor appetite (10% to 15%) for 24 to 48 hours, or prolonged crying (more than 3 hours) (4%).
  • A large swelling (over 4 inches) of the arm or leg can follow the 4th or 5th dose of DTaP. This occurs in 5% of children. Most children can still move the leg or arm normally. The swelling resolves without treatment by day 3 to day 7. This is not an allergy and future DTaP vaccines are safe to give.
  • Painless lump at the injection site 1 or 2 weeks later. The lump is harmless and will disappear in about 2 months. Call your provider within 24 hours if it turns red or is tender.

CALL YOUR PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF the following rare but serious reactions occur:

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

These reactions may begin 5 to 12 days after getting the vaccine:

  • Fever of 103°F (39.5°C) or more (10%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C). Call your provider within 24 hours if the fever lasts over 72 hours or is over 104°F (40°C).
  • A mild pink rash mainly on the body (5%) may occur 1 to 6 weeks after getting the MMR. No treatment is necessary. The rash will last 2 to 3 days. Call your provider immediately if the rash changes to purple spots. Call within 24 hours if the rash becomes itchy or the rash lasts more than 3 days.
  • Three to four weeks after the MMR, about 1 child in 7 may get swollen lymph glands, and 1 child in 100 may have pain or stiffness in the joints that can last from a few days to a few weeks.
  • In 1 in 30,000 to 1 in 40,000 cases, low blood platelet counts can lead to bruising and bleeding into the skin. The risk of this happening from the wild-type measles disease is much greater than the risk from the vaccine.

Polio Vaccine (IPV)

  • Sore injection site (rare). No treatment is necessary. Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.
  • Fever (1% to 4%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C).

Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

  • Fever, usually, mild (10%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C).
  • Redness, tenderness, or swelling at the shot site (30%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

Haemophilus Influenza Type B Vaccine (Hib)

  • Sore injection site (up to 25%) or mild fever (5%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

Hepatitis B Vaccine (Hep B)

  • Sore injection site (3% to 29%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.
  • Fever (up to 7%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C).

Chickenpox Vaccine (VAR)

  • Never give your child aspirin for any symptom within 6 weeks of receiving the vaccine. (Reye’s syndrome has been linked with the use of aspirin to treat fever or pain caused by a virus.) For fever or pain, give ibuprofen or acetaminophen.
  • The chickenpox vaccine may cause pain or swelling at the injection site for 1 to 2 days (20%).
  • Some children (15%) may have a fever that begins 2 to 4 weeks after the vaccination and lasts 1 to 3 days. Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 102°F (38.9°C).
  • A few children (3%) develop a mild rash at the injection site or elsewhere on the body. The rash begins 5 to 26 days after the vaccine, looks like a few (2 to 10) chickenpox sores, and usually lasts a few days.

Children with these rashes can go to day care or school. If the vaccine rash contains fluid, cover it with clothing or a Band-Aid. Avoid school if there are widespread, weepy sores (because this may be real chickenpox).

Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Vaccine

  • Sore injection shot site (20% to 50%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.
  • Headache or fatigue (less than 10%).

Influenza Virus Vaccine (Injection)

  • Pain, tenderness, or swelling at the injection site within 6 to 8 hours (10%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.
  • Fever of 101°F to 103°F, or 38.3°C to 39.5°C (18%). Fevers mainly occur in young children. Give your child acetaminophen or ibuprofen for fever over 102°F (38.9°C).

Influenza Virus Vaccine (Intranasal)

Some children who get the nasal spray form of the flu vaccine will have symptoms such as:

  • A runny nose, congestion, and cough
  • Headache or muscle aches
  • A stomachache, and sometimes vomiting or diarrhea
  • Fever. Give your child acetaminophen or ibuprofen for fever over 102°F (38.9°C).

These symptoms do not last long and go away on their own.

Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (MCV)

  • Pain, soreness at the vaccination site (60%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.
  • Fever (4%) and headache (40%)
  • Painful joints (15-20%)
  • Decrease in appetite (10%)
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome is a very rare but serious side effect. The vaccine never causes meningitis.

Human Papillomavirus Virus Vaccine (HPV)

  • Pain at the injection site (85 to 90%)
  • Redness and swelling (25 to 45%)
  • Headache (30%)

Fainting is very rare after receiving a vaccine. Anyone receiving a vaccine should be observed for 15 minutes after the shot.

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