How long does it take for celebrex to leave your system?

Contents

watch collector corporation

How long does celebrex stay in your system? – drugs.comHow long does celebrex stay in your system? Asked 7 May 2011 by polock503 Active 7 May 2011 Topics celebrex. Answer this Question. Report Favorite. Responses (1) RA.How long does Celebrex stay in my system? | Yahoo AnswersHow long does it take to get out of my system? How long does Celebrex stay in my system? How long does Celebrex 200mg stay in my system?How long does Celebrex 200mg stay in my system? | Yahoo How long does Celebrex 200mg stay in my system? I was prescribed Celebrex (200mg) twice a day How long does ibuprofen stay in system? 200mg?How long does celebrex stay in system – 5mze.myg1g.comHow long does celebrex stay in system Consumer comments and questions on Celebrex covering significant weight.How long does Celebrex stay in your system – Answers.comHow long does Celebrex stay in your system? How long does celebrex stays in the system? 10 hours 6 people found this useful Edit. Share to:Celebrex 200mg * How Long Does Celebrex Stay In System how long does celebrex stay in system Health issues with anything better than how to buy metformin in singapore how long does celebrex stay in system endone.How long does Celebrex stay in your system? | Arthritis How long does Celebrex stay in your system? would make me think that they stay in your system at least that long? take a while to built up in your system.

How Long Does Celebrex Stay in Your System? – HAN

How Long Does Celebrex Stay in Your System? In Eileane, Brainerd Malie. On average, Celebrex can stay in your system for up How Long does Gum Stay in Your System?How long does celebrex stays in the system – Answers.comHow long does celebrex stays in the system? How long does Celebrex stay in your system? Celebrex is part of a large family of NSAIDs used to treat arthritis.how long will celebrex stay in your system – isahongkong.comWhat is the drug 200 mg is for how long does 200 mg of last celebrex and knee pain can commercial location how long will celebrex stay in your system can I take how long will celebrex stay in your system – isahongkong.comWhat is the drug 200 mg is for how long does 200 mg of last celebrex and knee pain can commercial location how long will celebrex stay in your system can I take How long does it take for celebrex to get out of your system?How long does it take for celebrex to get out of your system? Follow . 2 answers 2. Report Abuse. How long does Celebrex stay in my system?How long does Celebrex stay in my system? | Yahoo AnswersMy doctor prescribed me Celebrex for my sciatic nerve but after researching all of it’s negative side How long does it take to get out of my system?How long do nsaids stay in your system – How long does it How long does it take for a nsaid to get out of your systemCelebrex * Celebrex How Long Does It Stay In System celebrex how long does it stay in system Ad location lake causes rashes how many mg of flagyl to cure gardenerella celebrex how long does it stay in system and coversyl.

How long before Celebrex works? – drugs.com

Does Celebrex become more effective with use or does it have to help soon after taking? How long does it normally take Celebrex to work?What Are CELEBREX® (celecoxib) Capsules? | Safety InfoCELEBREX is used to treat pain and redness, swelling, and heat (inflammation) from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in patients 2 how long does it take for celebrex to work – MedHelpHow long does it take for celebrex to how long does it take for the subs to get out of your system i know they have a long half celebrex does increase your Hiw long does extended release adderall stay in the systemHiw long does extended release adderall stay in the system Years of American history own party hiw long does extended release adderall stay in the system of from How Long Does Alcohol Stay In Your System | Health Guides How Long Does Alcohol Stay In Your System Alcohol has the ability to create a liver damage. Celebrex gets metabolized in the liver in your body.

celecoxib (CeleBREX)

Brand Names: CeleBREX

Generic Name: celecoxib

  • What is celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • What are the possible side effects of celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • How should I take celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (CeleBREX)?
  • What happens if I overdose (CeleBREX)?
  • What should I avoid while taking celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • What other drugs will affect celecoxib (CeleBREX)?
  • Where can I get more information (CeleBREX)?

What is celecoxib (CeleBREX)?

Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

Celecoxib is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and menstrual pain. Celecoxib is used to treat juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children who are at least 2 years old. Celecoxib is also used in the treatment of hereditary polyps in the colon.

Celecoxib may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

000251515_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 50

000251520_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 100

000251525_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 200

000251530_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 400

000937165_PB

capsule, blue/white, imprinted with TEVA, 7165

000937166_PB

capsule, white/yellow, imprinted with TEVA, 7166

000937170_PB

capsule, green, imprinted with TEVA, 7170

000937306_PB

capsule, orange/white, imprinted with Teva, 7306

597621517_PB

capsule, gold/white, imprinted with 7767, 200

605053848_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with APO C100

605053849_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with APO C200

681800598_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 200

Celebrex 100 mg

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 100

Celebrex 200 mg

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 200

Celebrex 400 mg

capsule, white, imprinted with 7767, 400

Celecoxib 100 mg 003787160

capsule, lavender, imprinted with MYLAN 7160, MYLAN 7160

Celecoxib 100 mg 005913983

capsule, blue/white, imprinted with WPI, 100

Celecoxib 100 mg 136680441

capsule, blue/white, imprinted with 1441, 100

Celecoxib 100 mg 138110659

capsule, white, imprinted with 135, A

Celecoxib 100 mg 510790199

capsule, lavender, imprinted with MYLAN 7160, MYLAN 7160

Celecoxib 100 mg 623320141

capsule, white, imprinted with 135, A

Celecoxib 200 mg 005913984

capsule, white/yellow, imprinted with WPI, 200

Celecoxib 200 mg 136680442

capsule, yellow, imprinted with 1442, 200

Celecoxib 400 mg 136680310

capsule, green, imprinted with 1310, 400

Celecoxib 400 mg 138110661

capsule, white, imprinted with 137, A

Celecoxib 50 mg 136680307

capsule, red, imprinted with 1307, 50

Celecoxib 50 mg 138110658

capsule, white, imprinted with 134, A

Celecoxib 50 mg 623320140

capsule, white, imprinted with A, 134

What are the possible side effects of celecoxib (CeleBREX)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling).

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke: chest pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, leg swelling, feeling short of breath.

Stop using celecoxib and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild;
  • heart problems–swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath;
  • signs of stomach bleeding–bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • liver problems–nausea, stomach pain (upper right side), itching, tiredness, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • kidney problems–little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath; or
  • low red blood cells (anemia)–pale skin, unusual tiredness, feeling light-headed or short of breath, cold hands and feet.

Common side effects may include:

  • stomach pain, heartburn, gas, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting;
  • swelling in your hands or feet;
  • dizziness; or
  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about celecoxib (CeleBREX)?

Celecoxib can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, even if you don’t have any risk factors. Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Celecoxib may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using celecoxib, especially in older adults.

Celecoxib

Generic Name: celecoxib (SEL e KOX ib)
Brand Names: CeleBREX

Medically reviewed by P. Thornton, DipPharm Last updated on Aug 1, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

What is celecoxib?

Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Celecoxib is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and menstrual pain.

Celecoxib is used to treat juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children who are at least 2 years old. It is also used in the treatment of hereditary polyps in the colon.

Important Information

Celecoxib can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, even if you don’t have any risk factors. Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Celecoxib may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using this medicine, especially in older adults. You should not take this medicine if you already have bleeding in your stomach or intestines.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use celecoxib if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • an allergy to sulfa drugs; or

  • a history of asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID.

To make sure celecoxib is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • a stomach ulcer, bleeding in your stomach or intestines;

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;

  • asthma;

  • bleeding problems;

  • liver or kidney disease; or

  • if you smoke or drink alcohol.

Taking celecoxib during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

This medicine may affect fertility (ability to have children) in women. Ask your doctor about this risk.

It may not be safe to breast-feed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

How should I take celecoxib?

Take celecoxib exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides. Use the lowest dose that is effective in treating your condition.

You may take celecoxib with or without food.

If you cannot swallow a capsule whole, open it and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce. Swallow the mixture with water. You may save this applesauce mixture for later use in a refrigerator for up to 6 hours.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Celecoxib dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Pain:

Acute pain: 400 mg initially, followed by 200 mg if needed on the first day. Then, 200 mg twice daily as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea:

400 mg initially, followed by 200 mg if needed on the first day. Then, 200 mg twice daily as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis:

200 mg orally once daily or 100 mg orally twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

100 to 200 mg orally twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis:

400 mg orally twice daily with food.

Usual Adult Dose for Ankylosing Spondylitis:

200 mg orally once daily or 100 mg orally twice daily. If after 6 weeks of therapy no results are observed, a trial dose of 400 mg orally daily may be worthwhile. If no response is seen after 6 weeks, consideration should be given to alternate treatment options.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis:

2 years or older:
10 to less than or equal to 25 kg: 50 mg orally twice daily
Greater than 25 kg: 100 mg orally twice daily

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking celecoxib?

Avoid taking aspirin or other NSAIDs while you are taking celecoxib.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using other medicines for pain, fever, swelling, or cold/flu symptoms. They may contain ingredients similar to celecoxib (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen).

Celecoxib side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to celecoxib (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling).

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke: chest pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, leg swelling, feeling short of breath.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild;

  • heart problems – swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath;

  • signs of stomach bleeding – bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

  • liver problems – nausea, stomach pain (upper right side), itching, tiredness, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • kidney problems – little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath; or

  • low red blood cells (anemia) – pale skin, unusual tiredness, feeling light-headed or short of breath, cold hands and feet.

Common celecoxib side effects may include:

  • stomach pain, heartburn, gas, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting;

  • swelling in your hands or feet;

  • dizziness; or

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect celecoxib?

Ask your doctor before using celecoxib if you take an antidepressant, steroid medicine, or medicine to treat or prevent blood clots. Taking certain medicines with an NSAID may increase your risk of a stomach ulcer or bleeding.

Many drugs can interact with celecoxib. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use celecoxib only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 16.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about celecoxib

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 194 Reviews
  • Drug class: cox-2 inhibitors
  • FDA Alerts (2)

Consumer resources

  • Celecoxib
  • Celecoxib (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Celebrex

Professional resources

  • Celecoxib (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +2 more

Related treatment guides

  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Fibromatosis
  • Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • … +5 more

About celecoxib

Type of medicine A selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase-2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)
Used for Relief of pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis
Also called Celebrex®
Available as Capsules

Anti-inflammatory painkillers like celecoxib are sometimes called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or just ‘anti-inflammatories’. Celecoxib is used to treat painful rheumatic conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. It eases pain and reduces inflammation.

Celecoxib is also known as a cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor. This is because it works to relieve pain and inflammation by blocking an enzyme in the body called cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). COX-2 is involved in the production of irritant substances in the body in response to disease. By blocking the action of COX-2, celecoxib reduces the symptoms of pain and inflammation in arthritis.

Before taking celecoxib

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking celecoxib, it is important that your doctor knows:

  • If you have asthma or any other allergic disorder.
  • If you have had a stomach or duodenal ulcer, or if you have an inflammatory bowel disorder such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.
  • If you are pregnant, trying for a baby, or breast-feeding.
  • If you are under 18 or over 65 years of age.
  • If you have liver or kidney problems.
  • If you have a heart condition, or a problem with your blood vessels or circulation.
  • If you have high blood pressure.
  • If you have ever had blood clotting problems.
  • If you have a connective tissue disorder, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (an inflammatory condition also called lupus, or SLE).
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine. It is particularly important that you tell your doctor if you have ever had a bad reaction to any other NSAID (such as aspirin, naproxen, diclofenac, and indometacin), or if you are allergic to a sulfonamide medicine (used to treat infection).

How to take celecoxib

  • Before you start taking celecoxib, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. The manufacturer’s leaflet will give you more information about celecoxib and provide a full list of side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Take celecoxib exactly as your doctor tells you to. The usual dose is one capsule, taken once or twice daily. There are two strengths of capsule available, 100 mg and 200 mg – your doctor will tell you which is right for you. Try to take your doses at the same times of day each day, as this will help you to remember to take the capsules regularly.
  • Swallow the capsules whole with a drink of water. If you have difficulty swallowing the capsules they can be opened and the entire contents sprinkled on to a spoonful of soft food such as apple sauce, yoghurt or mashed banana. Swallow the mixture straightaway, followed by drinking a large glass of water.
  • It is not important whether you take your doses before or after meals.
  • If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember unless it is nearly time for your next dose, in which case leave out the missed dose. Do not take two doses together to make up for a missed dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Your doctor will try to prescribe you the lowest dose for the shortest time to reduce the risk of side-effects. If you need to take celecoxib for a long time, your doctor may want to prescribe another medicine along with it to protect your stomach from irritation.
  • Try to keep any regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress. Your doctor will want to check your blood pressure from time to time while you are taking celecoxib.
  • You should find that your pain is eased within a few days of starting to take the capsules. If after two weeks you find your pain is no better despite taking celecoxib, you should discuss this with your doctor, as an alternative painkiller may be more suitable for you.
  • If you have asthma, symptoms such as wheeze or breathlessness can be made worse by anti-inflammatories such as celecoxib. If this happens to you, you should stop taking celecoxib and see your doctor as soon as possible.
  • If you buy any medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take with an anti-inflammatory like celecoxib. This is because you should not take celecoxib with any other anti-inflammatory painkiller, some of which are available in cold and flu remedies which can be bought over the counter.
  • If you are having an operation or dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Can celecoxib cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with celecoxib. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common celecoxib side-effects What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling dizzy Do not drive and do not use tools or machines until you feel better
Diarrhoea Drink plenty of water to replace any lost fluids
Headache Drink plenty of water. If the headaches continue, speak to your doctor
Indigestion, wind, tummy (abdominal) pain Stick to simple meals – avoid rich or spicy foods. If the discomfort continues, speak with your doctor
High blood pressure, swollen ankles, joint pain, fluid retention, flu-like illness, runny nose, cough, chest or urinary infections, and difficulties sleeping If any of these become troublesome, speak with your doctor

Important: if you experience any of the following less common but more serious symptoms, stop taking celecoxib and contact your doctor for advice straightaway:

  • If you have any breathing difficulties such as wheeze or breathlessness.
  • If you have any signs of an allergic reaction such as swelling around your mouth or face, or a severe itchy skin rash.
  • If you pass blood or black stools, bring up (vomit) blood, or have abdominal pains.

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to this medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist.

How to store celecoxib

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Celebrex

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the labeling:

  • Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events
  • GI Bleeding, Ulceration and Perforation
  • Hepatotoxicity
  • Hypertension
  • Heart Failure and Edema
  • Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia
  • Anaphylactic Reactions
  • Serious Skin Reactions
  • Hematologic Toxicity

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The adverse reaction information from clinical trials does, however, provide a basis for identifying the adverse events that appear to be related to drug use and for approximating rates.

Of the CELEBREX-treated patients in the pre-marketing controlled clinical trials, approximately 4,250 were patients with OA, approximately 2,100 were patients with RA, and approximately 1,050 were patients with post-surgical pain. More than 8,500 patients received a total daily dose of CELEBREX of 200 mg (100 mg twice daily or 200 mg once daily) or more, including more than 400 treated at 800 mg (400 mg twice daily). Approximately 3,900 patients received CELEBREX at these doses for 6 months or more; approximately 2,300 of these have received it for 1 year or more and 124 of these have received it for 2 years or more.

Pre-Marketing Controlled Arthritis Trials

Table 1 lists all adverse events, regardless of causality, occurring in ≥2% of patients receiving CELEBREX from 12 controlled studies conducted in patients with OA or RA that included a placebo and/or a positive control group. Since these 12 trials were of different durations, and patients in the trials may not have been exposed for the same duration of time, these percentages do not capture cumulative rates of occurrence.

Table 1: Adverse Events Occurring in ≥2% of CELEBREX Patients from Pre-marketing Controlled Arthritis Trials

In placebo-or active-controlled clinical trials, the discontinuation rate due to adverse events was 7.1% for patients receiving CELEBREX and 6.1% for patients receiving placebo. Among the most common reasons for discontinuation due to adverse events in the CELEBREX treatment groups were dyspepsia and abdominal pain (cited as reasons for discontinuation in 0.8% and 0.7% of CELEBREX patients, respectively). Among patients receiving placebo, 0.6% discontinued due to dyspepsia and 0.6% withdrew due to abdominal pain.

The Following Adverse Reactions Occurred In 0.1% To 1.9% Of Patients Treated With CELEBREX (100 mg To 200 mg Twice Daily Or 200 mg Once Daily)

Gastrointestinal: Constipation, diverticulitis, dysphagia, eructation, esophagitis, gastritis, gastroenteritis, gastroesophageal reflux, hemorrhoids, hiatal hernia, melena, dry mouth, stomatitis, tenesmus, vomiting

Cardiovascular: Aggravated hypertension, angina pectoris, coronary artery disorder, myocardial infarction

General: Hypersensitivity, allergic reaction, chest pain, cyst NOS, edema generalized, face edema, fatigue, fever, hot flushes, influenza-like symptoms, pain, peripheral pain

Central, peripheral nervous system: Leg cramps, hypertonia, hypoesthesia, migraine, paresthesia, vertigo

Hearing and vestibular: Deafness, tinnitus

Heart rate and rhythm: Palpitation, tachycardia

Liver and biliary: Hepatic enzyme increased (including SGOT increased, SGPT increased)

Metabolic and nutritional: blood urea nitrogen (BUN) increased, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) increased, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, hypokalemia, NPN increased, creatinine increased, alkaline phosphatase increased, weight increased

Musculoskeletal: Arthralgia, arthrosis, myalgia, synovitis, tendinitis

Platelets (bleeding or clotting): Ecchymosis, epistaxis, thrombocythemia,

Psychiatric: Anorexia, anxiety, appetite increased, depression, nervousness, somnolence

Hemic: Anemia

Respiratory: Bronchitis, bronchospasm, bronchospasm aggravated, cough, dyspnea, laryngitis, pneumonia

Skin and appendages: Alopecia, dermatitis, photosensitivity reaction, pruritus, rash erythematous, rash maculopapular, skin disorder, skin dry, sweating increased, urticaria

Application site disorders: Cellulitis, dermatitis contact

Urinary: Albuminuria, cystitis, dysuria, hematuria, micturition frequency, renal calculus

The Following Serious Adverse Events (Causality Not Evaluated) Occurred In <0.1% Of Patients

Cardiovascular: Syncope, congestive heart failure, ventricular fibrillation, pulmonary embolism, cerebrovascular accident, peripheral gangrene, thrombophlebitis

Gastrointestinal: Intestinal obstruction, intestinal perforation, gastrointestinal bleeding, colitis with bleeding, esophageal perforation, pancreatitis, ileus

General: Sepsis, sudden death

Liver and biliary: Cholelithiasis

Hemic and lymphatic: Thrombocytopenia

Nervous: Ataxia, suicide

Renal: Acute renal failure

The Celecoxib Long-Term Arthritis Safety Study

Hematological Events

The incidence of clinically significant decreases in hemoglobin (>2 g/dL) was lower in patients on CELEBREX 400 mg twice daily (0.5%) compared to patients on either diclofenac 75 mg twice daily (1.3%) or ibuprofen 800 mg three times daily 1.9%.

The lower incidence of events with CELEBREX was maintained with or without aspirin use .

Withdrawals/Serious Adverse Events

Kaplan-Meier cumulative rates at 9 months for withdrawals due to adverse events for CELEBREX, diclofenac and ibuprofen were 24%, 29%, and 26%, respectively. Rates for serious adverse events (i.e., causing hospitalization or felt to be life-threatening or otherwise medically significant), regardless of causality, were not different across treatment groups (8%, 7%, and 8%, respectively).

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Study

In a 12-week, double-blind, active-controlled study, 242 JRA patients 2 years to 17 years of age were treated with celecoxib or naproxen; 77 JRA patients were treated with celecoxib 3 mg/kg twice daily, 82 patients were treated with celecoxib 6 mg/kg twice daily, and 83 patients were treated with naproxen 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. The most commonly occurring (≥5%) adverse events in celecoxib treated patients were headache, fever (pyrexia), upper abdominal pain, cough, nasopharyngitis, abdominal pain, nausea, arthralgia, diarrhea and vomiting. The most commonly occurring (≥5%) adverse experiences for naproxen-treated patients were headache, nausea, vomiting, fever, upper abdominal pain, diarrhea, cough, abdominal pain, and dizziness (Table 2). Compared with naproxen, celecoxib at doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg twice daily had no observable deleterious effect on growth and development during the course of the 12-week double-blind study. There was no substantial difference in the number of clinical exacerbations of uveitis or systemic features of JRA among treatment groups.

In a 12-week, open-label extension of the double-blind study described above, 202 JRA patients were treated with celecoxib 6 mg/kg twice daily. The incidence of adverse events was similar to that observed during the double-blind study; no unexpected adverse events of clinical importance emerged.

Table 2: Adverse Events Occurring in ≥5% of JRA Patients in Any Treatment Group, by System Organ Class (% of patients with events)

System Organ Class
Preferred Term
All Doses Twice Daily
Celecoxib
3 mg/kg
N=77
Celecoxib
6 mg/kg
N=82
Naproxen
7.5 mg/kg
N=83
Any Event 64 70 72
Eye Disorders 5 5 5
Gastrointestinal 26 24 36
Abdominal pain NOS 4 7 7
Abdominal pain upper 8 6 10
Vomiting NOS 3 6 11
Diarrhea NOS 5 4 8
Nausea 7 4 11
General 13 11 18
Pyrexia 8 9 11
Infections 25 20 27
Nasopharyngitis 5 6 5
Injury and Poisoning 4 6 5
Investigations* 3 11 7
Musculoskeletal 8 10 17
Arthralgia 3 7 4
Nervous System 17 11 21
Headache NOS 13 10 16
Dizziness (excl vertigo) 1 1 7
Respiratory 8 15 15
Cough 7 7 8
Skin & Subcutaneous 10 7 18
* Abnormal laboratory tests, which include: Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, Bacteriuria NOS present, Blood creatine phosphokinase increased, Blood culture positive, Blood glucose increased, Blood pressure increased, Blood uric acid increased, Hematocrit decreased, Hematuria present, Hemoglobin decreased, Liver function tests NOS abnormal, Proteinuria present, Transaminase NOS increased, Urine analysis abnormal NOS

Other Pre-Approval Studies

Adverse Events from Ankylosing Spondylitis Studies

A total of 378 patients were treated with CELEBREX in placebo-and active-controlled AS studies. Doses up to 400 mg once daily were studied. The types of adverse events reported in the AS studies were similar to those reported in the OA/RA studies.

Adverse Events from Analgesia and Dysmenorrhea Studies

Approximately 1,700 patients were treated with CELEBREX in analgesia and dysmenorrhea studies. All patients in post-oral surgery pain studies received a single dose of study medication. Doses up to 600 mg/day of CELEBREX were studied in primary dysmenorrhea and post-orthopedic surgery pain studies. The types of adverse events in the analgesia and dysmenorrhea studies were similar to those reported in arthritis studies. The only additional adverse event reported was post-dental extraction alveolar osteitis (dry socket) in the post-oral surgery pain studies.

The APC And PreSAP Trials

Adverse Reactions From Long-term, Placebo-controlled Polyp Prevention Studies

Exposure to CELEBREX in the APC and PreSAP trials was 400 mg to 800 mg daily for up to 3 years .

Some adverse reactions occurred in higher percentages of patients than in the arthritis pre-marketing trials (treatment durations up to 12 weeks; see Adverse events from CELEBREX pre-marketing controlled arthritis trials, above). The adverse reactions for which these differences in patients treated with CELEBREX were greater as compared to the arthritis pre-marketing trials were as follows:

The following additional adverse reactions occurred in ≥0.1% and <1% of patients taking CELEBREX, at an incidence greater than placebo in the long-term polyp prevention studies, and were either not reported during the controlled arthritis pre-marketing trials or occurred with greater frequency in the long-term, placebo-controlled polyp prevention studies:

Nervous system disorders: Cerebral infarction

Eye disorders: Vitreous floaters, conjunctival hemorrhage

Ear and labyrinth: Labyrinthitis

Cardiac disorders: Angina unstable, aortic valve incompetence, coronary artery atherosclerosis, sinus bradycardia, ventricular hypertrophy

Vascular disorders: Deep vein thrombosis

Reproductive system and breast disorders: Ovarian cyst

Investigations: Blood potassium increased, blood sodium increased, blood testosterone decreased

Injury, poisoning, and procedural complications: Epicondylitis, tendon rupture

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of CELEBREX. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure

Cardiovascular: Vasculitis, deep venous thrombosis

General: Anaphylactoid reaction, angioedema

Liver and biliary: Liver necrosis, hepatitis, jaundice, hepatic failure

Hemic and lymphatic: Agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, leucopenia

Metabolic: Hypoglycemia, hyponatremia

Nervous: Aseptic meningitis, ageusia, anosmia, fatal intracranial hemorrhage

Renal: Interstitial nephritis

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Celebrex (Celecoxib)

Generic Name: celecoxib
Product Name: Celebrex

Indication: What Celebrex is used for

Celebrex is used to relieve the symptoms of joint pain, tenderness, swelling and stiffness in:

  • Osteoarthritis;
  • Rheumatoid arthritis;
  • Ankylosing spondylitis, a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorder that primarily affects, but is not limited to, the spine.

Celebrex also provides short-term pain relief in conditions such as:

  • Menstrual cramps or period pain;
  • After surgery;
  • Muscle and joint injuries.

Although Celebrex can relieve the symptoms of pain and inflammation, it will not cure your condition.

Your doctor, however, may have prescribed Celebrex for another purpose. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Celebrex has been prescribed for you.

Celebrex is not recommended for use in children or adolescents under 18 years of age.

This medicine is only available with a doctor’s prescription.

Action: How Celebrex works

Celebrex contains celecoxib and belongs to a group of medicines called coxibs which are used to relieve pain and inflammation in a number of conditions.

The mechanism of action of celecoxib is believed to be due to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, primarily by inhibition of COX-2. COX-2 is induced in response to inflammatory stimuli. This leads to the synthesis and accumulation of inflammatory prostanoids, in particular prostaglandin E2, causing inflammation, oedema and pain.

The active ingredient in Celebrex is celecoxib. Celebrex 100 mg contains 100 mg celecoxib/capsule and Celebrex 200 mg contains 200 mg celecoxib/capsule.

It also contains other ingredients such as lactose monohydrate, sodium lauryl sulfate, povidone, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, gelatin, titanium dioxide, iron oxide yellow CI 77492 (200 mg capsule), and indigo carmine CI 73015 (100 mg capsule).

Celebrex does not contain sucrose, gluten, tartrazine or other azo dyes.

Dose advice: How to use Celebrex

Before you take Celebrex

When you must not take it

Do not take Celebrex if you:

  • Suffer from chest pains or angina and they occur even when you are resting and are becoming more frequent, severe, or lasting longer than usual;
  • Have or have had problems with your blood circulation;
  • Have or if your doctor has told you that severe heart or blood vessel disease affecting the circulation in your brain or limbs;
  • Have severe liver problems. Your doctor will decide if your condition is too severe to take this medicine;
  • Have problems with your kidney function;
  • Are undergoing cardiac surgery called coronary artery bypass graft (CABG);
  • Have had an attack of asthma, hives, itching, skin rash or a runny nose after taking aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, medicines used to treat pain and inflammation), including other coxib medicines. Many medicines used to treat headache, period pain and other aches and pains contain aspirin or an NSAID. If you are allergic to aspirin,
    NSAIDs, or other coxib medicines and take Celebrex, these symptoms may be severe;
  • Have an allergy to:
    • Celecoxib;
    • Any of the ingredients listed here;
    • Sulfonamides, a group of medicines which include, for example, certain antibiotics (if you are not sure if you are taking one of these medicines ask your pharmacist);
    • Symptoms of an allergic reaction to these medicines may include:
      • Asthma, wheezing or shortness of breath;
      • Swelling of the face, lips or tongue which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing;
      • Hives, itching or skin rash;
      • Fainting.
    • If you are allergic to sulfonamides or any of the capsule ingredients and take Celebrex, these symptoms may be severe.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if any of this applies to you. Celebrex may not be suitable for you if any of the conditions below apply to you. You:

  • Are already taking an NSAID;
  • Have an ulcer or gastric bleeding;
  • Have irritable bowel disease;
  • Have heart failure;
  • Have had a heart attack, a “mini” stroke or stroke or blood vessel disease affecting circulation of blood to your brain or limbs, especially in the last 3 months.

Do not take Celebrex if the expiry date printed on the packaging has passed, even though the capsules may look alright. If you take this medicine after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. Do not take Celebrex if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering.

If you are not sure if you should be taking Celebrex, talk to your doctor.

Before you start to take it

You must tell your doctor if you have any of the following health problems:

  • You currently have diabetes;
  • High blood pressure;
  • High cholesterol levels;
  • Heart failure or have a history of heart problems;
  • Stroke or problems with the circulation in your limbs;
  • You have any allergies to:
    • Any other medicines;
    • Any other substances such as foods, dyes or preservatives;
  • You are pregnant or intend to become pregnant:
    • NSAIDs, which are related medicines, have been associated with reversible infertility in some women;
    • Use of NSAIDs in early pregnancy can increase the risk of spontaneous abortion;
    • There is no information on the use of Celebrex during pregnancy;
    • Celebrex may affect your developing baby if taken during pregnancy;
    • Celebrex use is not recommended in pregnancy unless your doctor considers it essential. If you are taking Celebrex while pregnant, you may need to be closely monitored by your doctor. Discuss any questions you may have with your doctor;
  • You are breastfeeding or intend to breastfeed. Small amounts of celecoxib pass into breast milk, therefore taking Celebrex during breastfeeding should be discussed with your doctor;
  • You have any other health problems including:
    • Liver or kidney problems;
    • Asthma, hives, itching, skin rash or a runny nose;
    • High blood pressure;
    • Fluid retention or other medical conditions that can cause fluid retention;
    • Peptic ulcer (i.e. stomach or duodenal ulcer), a recent history of one, or have had peptic ulcers before;
    • Vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds;
    • Bleeding from the rectum (back passage), have black sticky bowel motions (stools) or bloody diarrhoea;
    • Bowel problems such as ulcerative colitis;
  • You are taking Celebrex together with any medicines used to treat high blood pressure and some other heart problems such as ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, beta blockers and diuretics (also called fluid or water tablets). When taken together these medicines can cause kidney problems;
  • You drink large amounts of alcohol;
  • You are a smoker;
  • You currently have an infection. If you are given Celebrex while you have an infection, it may hide some of the signs of an infection.

If you have not told your doctor or pharmacist about these things, tell them before you start taking Celebrex.

Taking other medicines

Tell your doctor or your pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including medicines you buy without a prescription from a pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.

Some medicines and Celebrex may interfere with each other. These include:

  • Any medicines used to treat high blood pressure and some other heart problems such as ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, beta blockers or diuretics (also called fluid or water tablets);
  • Digoxin, a medicine used to treat abnormal heartbeats and some other heart problems;
  • Fluconazole, an antifungal agent;
  • Lithium, a medicine used to treat some types of depression;
  • Warfarin or similar medicines including Eliquis (apixaban), Xarelto (rivaroxaban) or Pradaxa (dabigatran), medicines used to stop blood clots;
  • Aspirin or salicylates, medicines used to treat pain;
  • Antacids, medicines used to treat indigestion;
  • Dextromethorphan, a medicine used to treat dry coughs;
  • Some medicines used to treat diabetes;
  • Methotrexate, a medicine used to treat arthritis and some cancers;
  • Cyclosporin, a medicine used to suppress the immune system;
  • Corticosteroids such as prednisolone, medicines that are used to reduce inflammation;
  • Certain medicines used to treat pain and inflammation called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Your doctor may need to adjust the dosage of these medicines or provide additional advice if you are also taking Celebrex.

How to take Celebrex

Follow all directions given to you by your doctor and pharmacist carefully. They may differ from the information here.

If you do not understand the instructions on the label, ask your doctor or pharmacist for help.

How much to take

Osteoarthritis

200 mg once daily or 100 mg twice daily.

Rheumatoid arthritis

100 mg twice daily.

Your doctor may increase the dose to 200 mg twice a day for a short period of time if you have a flare up.

Ankylosing spondylitis

100 mg twice daily or 200 mg once daily.

Menstrual cramps or period pain

400 mg as a single dose on the first day and 200 mg twice daily on following days. You may take Celebrex for up to 5 days.

Muscle and joint injuries or after surgery

400 mg as a first dose followed by 200 mg once or twice daily as required. You may take Celebrex for up to 5 days.

How to take it

Swallow the capsules whole with a glass of fluid. Celebrex can be taken with or without food.

When to take it

Take your medicine at about the same time each day. Taking it at the same time each day will have the best effect. It will also help you remember when to take it.

If you need to take an antacid, take it at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after your dose of Celebrex.

How long to take it

Depending on your condition, you may need Celebrex for a few days or for longer periods.

Celebrex will not cure your condition but should help control pain, swelling and stiffness.

Keep taking Celebrex for as long as your doctor advises. Do not exceed the dose recommended by your doctor. Your risk of developing heart or blood vessel diseases (e.g. heart attack) may increase with dose and duration of use even if you don’t have a history of heart or blood vessel disease.

If you need to take Celebrex for a long time see your doctor for regular check-ups so that they can monitor your condition and treatment.

If you forget to take it

If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take your next dose when you are meant to. Otherwise, take it as soon as you remember, then go back to taking your capsules as you would normally.

Do not take a double dose to make up for the dose you missed.

If you take too much (overdose)

Immediately telephone your doctor or Poisons Information Centre (telephone 13 11 26) for advice, or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital if you think you or anyone else may have taken too much Celebrex. Do this even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning. You may need urgent medical attention.

If you take too much Celebrex, you may feel tired, drowsy, sick, vomit, and have stomach pain. You may also have difficulty breathing and feel faint.

While you are taking it

Things you must do

If you become pregnant while taking Celebrex, tell your doctor immediately.

If you are about to start any new medicines, tell your doctor and pharmacist that you are taking Celebrex.

Tell all doctors, dentists and pharmacists who are treating you that you are taking Celebrex.

If you develop any skin rash (e.g. hives, spots) while being treated with Celebrex, contact your doctor immediately. The onset of these events, if they occur, can occur at any time, but most often occur in the first month of treatment.

If you are about to have any blood tests, tell your doctor that you are taking this medicine.

Things you must not do

Do not give Celebrex to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms or condition as you.

Do not take Celebrex to treat any other complaints unless your doctor tells you to.

After taking Celebrex

Storage

Keep your capsules where young children cannot reach them. A locked cupboard at least one-and-a-half metres above the ground is a good place to store medicines.

Keep Celebrex in a cool, dry place where the temperature stays at or below 25°C. Do not store it, or any other medicine, in the bathroom or near a sink. Do not leave it in the car or on window sills. Heat and dampness can destroy some medicines.

Keep your capsules in their blister pack until it is time to take them. If you take the capsules out of their container they may not keep well.

Disposal

If your doctor tells you to stop taking Celebrex, or the capsules have passed their expiry date, ask your pharmacist what to do with any left over.

Schedule of Celebrex

Celebrex is a prescription only medicine (S4).

Side effects of Celebrex

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if you have any problems while taking Celebrex, even if you do not think the problems are connected with the medicine or are not listed here. Like other medicines, Celebrex can cause some side effects. If they occur, most are likely to be minor and temporary.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions you may have.

Tell your doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • Stomach pain, diarrhoea, indigestion, wind;
  • Swollen hands, ankles and feet, unexplained weight gain;
  • Dizziness;
  • Sore throat, runny nose, sinusitis, upper respiratory tract infection.

Tell your doctor immediately or go to the Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital if you notice any of the following:

  • Skin rash, including hives, raised red, itchy spots;
  • Blistering and bleeding in the lips, eyes, mouth, nose and genitals;
  • Swelling, blistering or peeling of the skin, which may be accompanied by fever, chills, headache, sore throat, diarrhoea, aching joints and muscles;
  • Muscles weakness;
  • Other signs of allergic reaction such as wheezing, swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing;
  • Collapse or fainting, shortness of breath or tiredness, irregular heartbeat, chest pain, swollen or sore leg veins;
  • Severe stomach or throat pain, vomiting blood or black sticky bowel motions;
  • Bleeding or bruising more than usual, reddish or purple blotches under the skin;
  • Nausea, lethargy, itchiness, flulike symptoms or yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice);
  • Signs of anaemia such as tiredness, being short of breath and looking pale;
  • Loss or deterioration of hearing;
  • Confusion;
  • Redness, irritation or watering of the eye(s);
  • Experience sensations with any of the senses (sight, sound, touch, taste or feel) which may not be real;
  • Severe or persistent headache, fever, stiff neck, sensitivity to light and vomiting;
  • Sudden severe headache, loss of consciousness, sudden tingling, numbness or paralysis on one side the face, arm, leg or body, difficulty speaking, understanding, reading or writing, loss of coordination or balance.

These are serious side effects. You may need urgent medical attention. Not all of these side effects have been reported with Celebrex but have been seen with similar medicines.

Other side effects not listed above may occur in some people.

Do not be alarmed by this list of possible side effects. You may not get any of them.

Tell your doctor if you notice anything else that is making you feel unwell, even if it is not on this list.

For further information talk to your doctor.

FDA Panel Affirms Safety Of Painkiller Celebrex

A panel of experts found Wednesday that Celebrex, or celecoxib, is no less safe than two other non-opioid painkillers. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A panel of experts found Wednesday that Celebrex, or celecoxib, is no less safe than two other non-opioid painkillers.

Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Updated at 1:54 p.m.

A prescription painkiller that has been under a cloud for more than a decade is apparently safer than previously believed, a Food and Drug Administration panel concluded Wednesday.

The drug celecoxib, which is sold by Pfizer under the brand name Celebrex, poses no greater risk for causing heart attacks and strokes than two other widely used pain relievers, the committee voted at the end of a two-day hearing. The vote was 15-5. One member abstained.

Based on the committee’s conclusion, the FDA may change the advice about the drug’s safety that it provides to doctors. The FDA doesn’t have to follow the advice of advisory committees advice but usually does.

The availability and safety of alternatives to opioid painkillers have become increasingly important as the nation grapples with the deadly epidemic.

For more than a decade, some doctors have been reluctant to prescribe celecoxib, which isn’t an opioid, because it is similar to Vioxx, a pain reliever that was withdrawn from the market in 2004 because of safety concerns. Both drugs are known as COX-2 inhibitors because they act by blocking an enzyme involved in inflammation.

After Vioxx was launched in 1999, it quickly became a blockbuster and was used by millions of people. It was designed to cause fewer gastrointestinal complications than existing pain relievers. But Vioxx was pulled from the market in 2004 after being linked to heart attacks and strokes.

A similar drug, called Bextra, was pulled from the market in 2005. The FDA allowed Celebrex to remain on the market but ordered Pfizer to conduct a large study to examine the drug’s safety. The medicine has since become available in generic forms.

The FDA’s committee’s conclusion is based on the results of that study, which involved more than 24,000 patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. One-third took celecoxib, which is only available by prescription. One-third took prescription doses of ibuprofen. The remaining third took prescription naproxen.

The study found no evidence that celecoxib poses any greater risk for causing heart attacks and strokes than ibuprofen or naproxen. Those medications are in category known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs.

Many of the committee members stressed that celecoxib isn’t completely safe. The study showed it can increase the chance of cardiovascular complications. But celecoxib doesn’t appear to boost those odds nearly as much as Vioxx did, or apparently even as much as prescription doses of ibuprofen and naproxen, which were thought to be safer.

The study found the risk of dying, suffering a stroke or having a heart attack among patients taking celecoxib was 2.3 percent during a 30-month period, compared with 2.5 percent for naproxen and 2.7 percent for ibuprofen

In fact, celecoxib was less likely to cause certain complications, such as gastrointestinal problems like ulcers and bleeding, as well as kidney problems such as kidney failure and the need for dialysis, according to the study. Some committee members questioned the significance of these findings, and the committee didn’t take a specific vote on these results.

Ibuprofen is sold over the counter in much lower doses as a generic and under a variety of brand names, including Advil and Motrin. Naproxen, also generic, is sold over the counter with various names, like Aleve and Naprosyn.

The maximum recommended over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen is typically 1,200 milligrams daily. The study used 600 milligrams of ibuprofen three times a day, or 1,800 milligrams daily. Naproxen tablets are sold over the counter at a dose of 220 milligrams and are taken twice a day. The study used doses between 375 and 500 milligrams taken twice a day.

The committee considered whether nonprescription doses of ibuprofen and naproxen can interfere with the ability of low-dose aspirin to protect people against heart attacks. Millions of people take low doses of aspirin daily to reduce their risk of having a heart attack.

The committee voted 12-7, with one member abstaining, in favor or warning patients taking aspirin about the possible risk of taking naproxen at the same time. Ibuprofen also carries a warning like that, and the committee voted 17-4 against adding any additional warnings.

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Celecoxib belongs to the group of medications called selective COX-2 inhibitors, which is a kind of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). NSAIDs work by reducing a substance in the body that leads to inflammation (swelling) and pain.

Celecoxib is used to treat the symptoms of osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and rheumatoid arthritis in adults.

It is also used to treat moderate-to-severe pain for a short-term period (less than 7 days), such as pain due to surgery, sprains, or tooth extractions.

Celecoxib will only treat symptoms and decrease inflammation as long as you are taking the medication. It will not change the progress of the disease causing the pain and inflammation.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

100 mg
Each white-to-off-white hard-gelatin capsule with blue ink band on body marked in white with “100” and with blue ink band on cap marked in white with “7767” contains 100 mg of celecoxib. Nonmedicinal ingredients: croscarmellose sodium, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, povidone, and sodium lauryl sulfate; shell: edible ink (indigotine ), gelatin, and titanium dioxide (E171).

200 mg
Each white-to-off-white hard-gelatin capsule with gold ink band on body marked in white with “200” and with gold ink band on cap marked in white with “7767” contains 200 mg of celecoxib. Nonmedicinal ingredients: croscarmellose sodium, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, povidone, and sodium lauryl sulfate; shell: edible ink (ferric oxide ), gelatin, and titanium dioxide (E171).

How should I use this medication?

The amount of celecoxib and how long it is taken varies according to the condition being treated. It should be used at the lowest dose possible for the shortest possible length of time to achieve pain relief.

Osteoarthritis: The usual recommended daily dose is 200 mg taken as a single dose or as 100 mg twice daily.

Ankylosing spondylitis: The usual recommended daily dose is 200 mg taken as a single dose or as 100 mg twice daily.

Rheumatoid arthritis: The usual recommended starting dose is 100 mg twice daily. This may be increased to 200 mg twice daily as directed by your doctor.

Moderate-to-severe pain: The usual recommended dose is 400 mg as a single dose on the first day, followed by 200 mg once daily. Treatment should not exceed 7 days. The maximum recommended dose is 400 mg a day.

Celecoxib may be taken with or without food.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important that this medication be taken exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to celecoxib or any ingredients of the medication
  • are allergic to sulfonamides (sulfa medications; e.g., sulfamethoxazole)
  • are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed
  • are in the third trimester of pregnancy (28 weeks or more)
  • are planning to have or recently have had heart surgery
  • have an active stomach or intestinal ulcer or active gastrointestinal (stomach and intestines) bleeding
  • have bleeding in the brain
  • have experienced asthma, hives, or allergic-type reactions after taking acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or other NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, meloxicam)
  • have high blood potassium levels
  • have inflammatory bowel disease
  • have severe, uncontrolled heart failure
  • have severely decreased kidney function or kidney function that is getting worse
  • have severely decreased liver function or active liver disease
  • have high levels of potassium in your blood

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • heartburn
  • increased sensitivity to sunlight
  • nausea

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • blurred vision or other vision changes
  • confusion
  • digestive system problems (e.g., vomiting, ongoing indigestion, nausea, stomach pain, or diarrhea)
  • fatigue
  • headaches or stiff neck
  • hearing changes
  • increased blood pressure
  • pain or difficulty urinating
  • signs of bleeding (e.g., unusual bruising or bleeding, bloody nose, blood in urine, coughing blood, cuts that won’t stop bleeding)
  • signs of depression (e.g., poor concentration, changes in weight, changes in sleep, decreased interest in activities, thoughts of suicide)
  • signs of lung inflammation (e.g., trouble breathing, dry cough, tiredness)
  • signs of kidney problems (e.g., increased urination at night, decreased urine production, blood in the urine)
  • skin rash
  • swelling of the legs or feet

symptoms of liver damage (e.g., yellow skin or eyes, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-coloured stools, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, or itching) Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (e.g., hives; difficulty breathing; or swelling of the lips, throat, or tongue)
  • symptoms of a severe skin reaction (e.g., high fever; rash, sores, or painful blisters on the skin, mouth, or eyes; or skin peeling off)
  • symptoms of bleeding in the stomach or intestines (e.g., dark and tarry stools, blood coming from rectum, vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds, fast heartbeat, weakness or fainting)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Allergy: Some people who are allergic to sulfonamide medications such as certain antibiotics also experience allergic reactions to celecoxib. Before you take celecoxib, inform your doctor about any previous adverse reactions you have had to medications, especially sulfonamides and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or other anti-inflammatories. Contact your doctor at once if you experience signs of an allergic reaction, such as skin rash, itching, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face and throat.

Blood counts: This medication can decrease the number of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell that helps fight infection), red blood cells (which carry oxygen), and platelets (which help your blood to clot). Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor this. Contact your doctor immediately if you notice an increased occurrence of signs of infection (e.g., fever, chills, or sore throat), feel unusually tired, lack energy, or experience unusual bleeding or bruising.

Drowsiness/reduced alertness: Celecoxib may cause drowsiness, dizziness or, sometimes, blurred vision. Avoid driving, operating machinery, or engaging in other activities that require alertness and coordination if you find that celecoxib affects you in this way.

Fertility: As with other NSAIDs, this medication may make it more difficult for a couple to conceive if the woman is taking celecoxib. Stopping the medication allows the body’s chemistry to return to normal which often resolves this issue.

Fluid retention: Celecoxib may cause fluid retention and swelling, possibly worsening high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, or decreased heart function. If you have any of these conditions, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Consult your doctor immediately if you develop shortness of breath, fatigue, excessive weight gain, chest pain, or swelling of the legs, feet, or ankles while taking this medication.

Heart attack and stroke: The use of selective COX-2 inhibitor NSAIDs, including celecoxib, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, similar to the risk associated with most traditional NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen). The risk is increased with higher total daily doses and when taking the medication over long periods of time. Due to this increased risk, people with the following conditions or risk factors should be closely monitored by their doctor if they use celecoxib:

  • congestive heart failure
  • diabetes
  • heart attack
  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • impaired kidney function
  • poor circulation
  • smoking
  • stroke

Kidney disease: Like other NSAIDs, celecoxib may cause decreased kidney function and is not recommended for people with advanced kidney disease. If you have kidney disease, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

If you experience signs of kidney problems, such as blood in your urine or decreased urine production, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

Liver function: Celecoxib may worsen liver disease. If you have liver disease or decreased liver function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Contact your doctor immediately if you experience symptoms of liver problems such as fatigue, feeling unwell, loss of appetite, nausea, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools, abdominal pain or swelling, and itchy skin.

Meningitis: On rare occasions, people taking NSAIDs such as celecoxib experience symptoms of inflammation of the tissues surrounding the brain (meningitis). This appears to be more likely for people who have an autoimmune disorder. If you experience symptoms of meningitis not caused by infection, such as stiff neck, severe headache, nausea, vomiting, or changes in consciousness and awareness, contact your doctor immediately.

Potassium levels: Celecoxib may increase the risk of high potassium levels in the blood, especially for seniors, people who have conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure, or people taking certain other types of medications. Your doctor may order blood tests periodically during long-term treatment to monitor the amount of potassium in your blood. People who have been diagnosed with having high potassium levels in their blood should not take this medication.

Stomach problems: Celecoxib may cause stomach problems such as ulcers or bleeding. If you have stomach problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Call your doctor immediately if you notice signs such as stomach or abdominal pain, black tarry stools, or vomiting blood. Using acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) at the same time as celecoxib increases the risk of stomach ulcers and bleeding.

Urinary tract problems: Some people experience ongoing symptoms of urinary problems. If you experience bladder pain, pain when urinating, or increased frequency of urination, stop taking this medication and contact your doctor.

Pregnancy: The safety of using this medication during pregnancy has not been established. This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks, and it should be avoided during the last trimester of pregnancy (after 28 weeks of pregnancy). Using celecoxib, as with any NSAID, late in pregnancy may cause labour to be prolonged. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: This medication may pass into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking celecoxib, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children and adolescents under 18 years old.

Seniors: Seniors are more likely to experience side effects of celecoxib. Discuss the risks and benefits of using this medication with your doctor.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between celecoxib and any of the following:

  • abiraterone
  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and other salicylate medications
  • alcohol
  • aliskiren
  • aluminum- and magnesium-containing antacids
  • aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin)
  • amiodarone
  • angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs; e.g., captopril, enalapril, ramipril)
  • angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs; e.g., losartan, irbesartan)
  • aprepitant
  • atomoxetine
  • “azole” antifungals (e.g., itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)
  • barbiturates (e.g., butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital)
  • beta-adrenergic blockers (e.g., atenolol, propranolol, sotalol)
  • bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate, etidronate)
  • bosentan
  • capecitabine
  • carbamazepine
  • chloroquine
  • chlorpheniramine
  • chlorpromazine
  • cholestyramine
  • codeine
  • colesevelam
  • colestipol
  • corticosteroids taken by mouth (e.g., dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone)
  • clopidogrel
  • cyclosporine
  • dabigatran
  • deferasirox
  • delavirdine
  • desmopressin
  • dextromethorphan
  • digoxin
  • diuretics (water pills; e.g., furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, triamterene)
  • doxepin
  • enzalutamide
  • eplerenone
  • estrogens (e.g., conjugated estrogen, estradiol, ethinyl estradiol)
  • etravirine
  • evening primrose
  • fenofibric acid
  • feverfew
  • flecainide
  • fluorouracil
  • garlic
  • gemfibrozil
  • ginger
  • green tea
  • heparin
  • hydralazine
  • lithium
  • low-molecular-weight heparins (e.g., dalteparin, enoxaparin, tinzaparin)
  • methamphetamine
  • methotrexate
  • mexiletine
  • mifepristone
  • milk thistle
  • mirtazapine
  • nefazodone
  • other NSAID medications (e.g., diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketorolac, naproxen)
  • omeprazole
  • peginterferon alfa-2b
  • phenytoin
  • pioglitazone
  • porfimer
  • primidone
  • probenecid
  • procainamide
  • pyrimethamine
  • quinine
  • quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin)
  • repaglinide
  • rifampin
  • rivaroxaban
  • risperidone
  • rosiglitazone
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, e.g., citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
  • sodium phosphate
  • sulfonamide antibiotics (“sulfas”; e.g., sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole)
  • tacrolimus
  • tamoxifen
  • tenofovir
  • thioridazine
  • ticagrelor
  • ticlopidine
  • tolterodine
  • tramadol
  • tretinoin
  • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, clomipramine, desipramine, trimipramine)
  • trimethoprim
  • venlafaxine
  • warfarin
  • zafirlukast
  • zopiclone

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Celebrex

Celebrex (celecoxib) Drug Interactions

A total of 352 drugs are known to interact with Celebrex (celecoxib).

  • 41 major drug interactions
  • 307 moderate drug interactions
  • 4 minor drug interactions

Show all medications in the database that may interact with Celebrex (celecoxib).

Check for interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interactions with Celebrex (celecoxib).

Most frequently checked interactions

View interaction reports for Celebrex (celecoxib) and the medicines listed below.

  • Advil (ibuprofen)
  • Aleve (naproxen)
  • amlodipine
  • aspirin
  • aspirin
  • Coumadin (warfarin)
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine)
  • Eliquis (apixaban)
  • Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine)
  • gabapentin
  • hydrochlorothiazide
  • ibuprofen
  • levothyroxine
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin)
  • lisinopril
  • Lyrica (pregabalin)
  • metformin
  • Motrin (ibuprofen)
  • naproxen
  • Nexium (esomeprazole)
  • Norco (acetaminophen / hydrocodone)
  • omeprazole
  • oxycodone
  • oxycodone
  • prednisone
  • prednisone
  • simvastatin
  • Synthroid (levothyroxine)
  • tramadol
  • tramadol
  • trazodone
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen)
  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol)
  • warfarin
  • Xarelto (rivaroxaban)

Celebrex (celecoxib) alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Celebrex (celecoxib)

Celebrex (celecoxib) disease interactions

There are 8 disease interactions with Celebrex (celecoxib) which include:

  • asthma
  • fluid retention
  • GI toxicity
  • rash
  • renal toxicities
  • thrombosis
  • anemia
  • hepatotoxicity

More about Celebrex (celecoxib)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 167 Reviews
  • Generic Availability
  • Drug class: cox-2 inhibitors
  • FDA Alerts (5)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • … +4 more

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major

Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.

Moderate

Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.

Minor

Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Unknown

No interaction information available.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *