How long does it take for cefuroxime to work?

What is cefuroxime used for?

Cefuroxime is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used to treat various types of bacterial infection, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and infections of skin and soft tissue. It’s also prescribed to treat urinary tract infections and Lyme disease.

More serious infections like septicaemia may be treated with cefuroxime injections.

If you are having a surgical procedure in hospital you may be given cefuroxime injections to help prevent infection.

How does cefuroxime work?

Cefuroxime is a type of antibiotic known as cephalosporin. It works by interfering with the formation of the bacterial cell walls. Cefuroxime impairs the bonds that hold the bacterial cell wall together, which allows holes to appear in the cell walls. This kills off the bacteria causing the infection.

To make sure the bacteria causing an infection are susceptible to cefuroxime your doctor may take a swab from the infected area, or a urine, sputum or blood sample.

Key facts about cefuroxime

  • Cefuroxime is suitable for adults, children and pregnant women.
  • It should not be used if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a penicillin or cephalosporin antibiotic.
  • Zinnat and Zinacef are brand names for cefuroxime.
  • Cefuroxime tablets and liquid should be taken with food. Always complete the course.
  • The most common side effects of cefuroxime are stomach ache, diarrhoea, feeling or being sick, headache, dizziness and thrush infections.
  • See a doctor as soon as possible if you get diarrhoea that is severe, persistent or contains blood/mucus.
  • It’s generally OK to drink alcohol in moderation while taking cefuroxime. See below.

Who shouldn’t take cefuroxime?

Cefuroxime is not suitable for:

  • People who have ever had an allergic reaction to penicillin or cephalosporin-type antibiotics. Make sure your doctor knows if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic.
  • People who are allergic to any ingredients in the tablets or suspension of cefuroxime. Check the ingredients listed in the leaflet that comes with your medicine if you know you have specific allergies.

People with kidney problems may need a lower cefuroxime dose or extra monitoring.

Can cefuroxime be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding?

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding make sure your doctor knows before you start treatment with this antibiotic.

Cefuroxime is not known to be harmful if used during pregnancy, but it will only be prescribed if your doctor thinks it is essential to treat your infection.

Cefuroxime passes into breast milk in small amounts that are unlikely to be harmful to a nursing baby if you’re taking a typical course of this antibiotic. However if you’re taking a particularly high dose or long course of cefuroxime your doctor might ask you to monitor your baby for any signs of stomach upset or thrush infection.

How do I take cefuroxime?

The dose of cefuroxime and how long you need to take it for will depend on the type of infection you have, your age and your kidney function. Always follow the instructions given by your doctor.

Cefuroxime is usually taken twice a day, with or after food. Swallow the tablets whole with a drink – do not chew, crush or break them.

If you forget to take a dose of cefuroxime, take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s nearly time for your next dose. In this case just leave out the missed dose and take your next dose as usual. Do not take a double dose to make up for the missed dose.

As with all antibiotics it is important to finish the prescribed course of cefuroxime, even if you feel better or the infection seems to have cleared up.

Can I drink alcohol while taking cefuroxime?

There is no ‘do not drink alcohol’ warning that applies to taking cefuroxime because it doesn’t specifically affect the medicine itself.

However, if you feel unwell with your infection or if you find cefuroxime gives you a headache or upset stomach then drinking alcohol could make this worse.

What are the side effects of cefuroxime?

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects known to be associated with cefuroxime. Just because a side effect is stated here doesn’t mean that all people taking this antibiotic will experience that or any side effect.

Common (affect between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people)

  • Diarrhoea.
  • Feeling sick.
  • Stomach ache.
  • Headache.
  • Dizziness.
  • Overgrowth of the yeast Candida, which may cause infections such as thrush. Ask your pharmacist for advice if you think you’ve developed thrush, or any other new infection, while taking cefuroxime.

Other possible side effects

  • Skin reactions, such as rash, hives, itching. See your doctor if you get a rash.
  • Inflammation of the bowel (colitis). Tell your doctor if you get diarrhoea that is severe, persistent or contains blood or mucus.
  • Liver problems. Tell your doctor if you experience yellow skin or eyes (jaundice).
  • Problems with your blood cells. Tell your doctor if you experience unexplained bruising, sore throat, fever or infections.
  • Inflammation of the liver or kidneys.

Read the leaflet that comes with the medicine or talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you want any more information about the possible side effects of cefuroxime. If you think you have experienced a side effect, did you know you can report it using the yellow card website?

Can I take other medicines with cefuroxime?

Before you take cefuroxime, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you’re already taking any medicines, including those bought without a prescription and herbal medicines. Similarly, always check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any new medicines while you’re taking cefuroxime. Some key points are:

Painkillers

If you need to take a painkiller while you’re taking cefuroxime it’s fine to take paracetamol.

Contraception

Cefuroxime doesn’t affect hormonal contraceptives such as the pill. However, if you experience vomiting or diarrhoea while taking this antibiotic, this can potentially make your pill less effective at preventing pregnancy. If this happens to you, follow the instructions for vomiting and diarrhoea described in the leaflet provided with your pills.

Anticoagulants

Cefuroxime may rarely increase the anti-blood-clotting effects of warfarin. If you’re taking warfarin your doctor may want to check your blood clotting time (INR) after you start and finish treatment with cefuroxime.

Vaccines

The oral typhoid vaccine (Vivotif) should not be taken until at least three days after you have finished a course of this antibiotic, because the antibiotic could make this vaccine less effective.

Last updated 05.06.2018

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism Of Action

CEFTIN is an antibacterial drug .

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

After oral administration, cefuroxime axetil is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and rapidly hydrolyzed by nonspecific esterases in the intestinal mucosa and blood to cefuroxime. Serum pharmacokinetic parameters for cefuroxime following administration of CEFTIN tablets to adults are shown in Table 8.

Table 8: Pharmacokinetics of Cefuroxime Administered in the Postprandial State as CEFTIN Tablets to Adultsa

Food Effect

Absorption of the tablet is greater when taken after food (absolute bioavailability increases from 37% to 52%). Despite this difference in absorption, the clinical and bacteriologic responses of subjects were independent of food intake at the time of tablet administration in 2 trials where this was assessed.

All pharmacokinetic and clinical effectiveness and safety trials in pediatric subjects using the suspension formulation were conducted in the fed state. No data are available on the absorption kinetics of the suspension formulation when administered to fasted pediatric subjects.

Lack Of Bioequivalence

Oral suspension was not bioequivalent to tablets when tested in healthy adults. The tablet and oral suspension formulations are NOT substitutable on a milligram-permilligram basis. The area under the curve for the suspension averaged 91% of that for the tablet, and the peak plasma concentration for the suspension averaged 71% of the peak plasma concentration of the tablets. Therefore, the safety and effectiveness of both the tablet and oral suspension formulations were established in separate clinical trials.

Distribution

Cefuroxime is distributed throughout the extracellular fluids. Approximately 50% of serum cefuroxime is bound to protein.

Metabolism

The axetil moiety is metabolized to acetaldehyde and acetic acid.

Excretion

Cefuroxime is excreted unchanged in the urine; in adults, approximately 50% of the administered dose is recovered in the urine within 12 hours. The pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime in pediatric subjects have not been studied. Until further data are available, the renal elimination of cefuroxime axetil established in adults should not be extrapolated to pediatric subjects.

Specific Populations

Renal Impairment

In a trial of 28 adults with normal renal function or severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min), the elimination half-life was prolonged in relation to severity of renal impairment. Prolongation of the dosage interval is recommended in adult patients with creatinine clearance <30 mL/min .

Pediatric Patients

Serum pharmacokinetic parameters for cefuroxime in pediatric subjects administered CEFTIN for oral suspension are shown in Table 9.

Table 9: Pharmacokinetics of Cefuroxime Administered in the Postprandial State as CEFTIN for Oral Suspension to Pediatric Subjectsa

Geriatric Patients

In a trial of 20 elderly subjects (mean age = 83.9 years) having a mean creatinine clearance of 34.9 mL/min, the mean serum elimination half-life was prolonged to 3.5 hours; however, despite the lower elimination of cefuroxime in geriatric patients, dosage adjustment based on age is not necessary .

Drug Interactions

Concomitant administration of probenecid with cefuroxime axetil tablets increases the cefuroxime area under the serum concentration versus time curve and maximum serum concentration by 50% and 21%, respectively.

Microbiology

Cefuroxime axetil is a bactericidal agent that acts by inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. Cefuroxime axetil has activity in the presence of some β-lactamases, both penicillinases and cephalosporinases, of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

Mechanism Of Resistance

Resistance to cefuroxime axetil is primarily through hydrolysis by β-lactamase, alteration of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), decreased permeability, and the presence of bacterial efflux pumps.

Susceptibility to cefuroxime axetil will vary with geography and time; local susceptibility data should be consulted, if available. Beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) isolates of H. influenzae should be considered resistant to cefuroxime axetil.

Cefuroxime axetil has been shown to be active against most isolates of the following bacteria, both in vitro and in clinical infections :

Gram-Positive Bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible isolates only)
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Streptococcus pyogenes

Gram-Negative Bacteria

Escherichia colia
Klebsiella pneumoniaea
Haemophilus influenzae
Haemophilus parainfluenzae
Moraxella catarrhalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
a Most extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and carbapenemase-producing isolates are resistant to cefuroxime axetil.
Spirochetes
Borrelia Burgdorferi

The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. At least 90 percent of the following microorganisms exhibit an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) less than or equal to the susceptible breakpoint for cefuroxime axetil of 1 mcg/mL. However, the efficacy of cefuroxime axetil in treating clinical infections due to these microorganisms has not been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials.

Staphylococcus epidermidis (methicillin-susceptible isolates only)
Staphylococcus saprophyticus (methicillin-susceptible isolates only)
Streptococcus agalactiae

Morganella morganii
Proteus inconstans
Proteus mirabilis
Providencia rettgeri
Anaerobic Bacteria
Peptococcus niger

Susceptibility Test Methods

When available, the clinical microbiology laboratory should provide the results of in vitro susceptibility tests for antimicrobial drug products used in local hospitals and practice areas to the physician as periodic reports that describe the susceptibility profile of nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. These reports should aid the physician in selecting an antibacterial drug product for treatment.

Dilution Techniques

Quantitative methods are used to determine antimicrobial MICs. These MICs provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The MICs should be determined using a standardized test method (broth or agar).1, 2 The MIC values should be interpreted according to criteria provided in Table 10.2,3

Diffusion Techniques

Quantitative methods that require measurement of zone diameters also provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The zone size provides an estimate of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The zone size should be determined using a standardized test method.4 This procedure uses paper disks impregnated with 30 mcg cefuroxime axetil to test the susceptibility of microorganisms to cefuroxime axetil. The disk diffusion interpretive criteria are provided in Table 10.3

Table 10: Susceptibility Test Interpretive Criteria for Cefuroxime Axetil

Pathogen Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (mcg/mL) Disk Diffusion Zone Diameters (mm)
(S) Susceptible (I) Intermediate (R) Resistant (S) Susceptible (I) Intermediate (R) Resistant
Enterobacteriaceaea ≤4 8 – 16 ≥32 ≥23 15 – 22 ≤14
Haemophilus spp.a,b ≤4 8 ≥16 ≥20 17 – 19 ≤16
Moraxella catarrhalisa ≤4 8 ≥16
Streptococcus pneumoniae ≤1 2 ≥4
a For Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Moraxella catarrhalis, susceptibility interpretive criteria are based on a dose of 500 mg every 12 hours in patients with normal renal function.
b Haemophilus spp. includes only isolates of H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae.

Susceptibility of staphylococci to cefuroxime may be deduced from testing only penicillin and either cefoxitin or oxacillin.

Susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes may be deduced from testing penicillin.3

A report of “Susceptible” indicates that the antimicrobial drug is likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial drug reaches the concentration usually achievable at the site of infection. A report of “Intermediate” indicates that the result should be considered equivocal, and if the microorganism is not fully susceptible to alternative, clinically feasible drugs, the test should be repeated. This category implies possible clinical applicability in body sites where the drug is physiologically concentrated or in situations where a high dosage of drug can be used. This category also provides a buffer zone that prevents small uncontrolled technical factors from causing major discrepancies in interpretation. A report of “Resistant” indicates that the antimicrobial drug is not likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial drug reaches the concentrations usually achievable at the infection site; other therapy should be selected.

Quality Control

Standardized susceptibility test procedures require the use of laboratory controls to monitor and ensure the accuracy and precision of supplies and reagents used in the assay, and the techniques of the individual performing the test.1,2,4 The QC ranges for MIC and disk diffusion testing using the 30-mcg disk are provided in Table 11.3

Table 11: Acceptable Quality Control (QC) Ranges for Cefuroxime Axetil

QC Strain Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (mcg/mL) Disk Diffusion Zone Diameters (mm)
Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 2 to 8 20 to 26
Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 27 to 35
Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 0.5 to 2
Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619 0.25 to 1
Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 49766 0.25 to 1 28 to 36
Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 0.25 to 1 33 to 41
ATCC = American Type Culture Collection.

Clinical Studies

Acute Bacterial Maxillary Sinusitis

One adequate and well-controlled trial was performed in subjects with acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis. In this trial, each subject had a maxillary sinus aspirate collected by sinus puncture before treatment was initiated for presumptive acute bacterial sinusitis. All subjects had radiographic and clinical evidence of acute maxillary sinusitis. In the trial, the clinical effectiveness of CEFTIN in treating acute maxillary sinusitis was comparable to an oral antimicrobial agent containing a specific β-lactamase inhibitor. However, microbiology data demonstrated CEFTIN to be effective in treating acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis due only to Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae. Insufficient numbers of β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were obtained in this trial to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of CEFTIN in treating acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis due to these 2 organisms.

This trial randomized 317 adult subjects, 132 subjects in the U.S. and 185 subjects in South America. Table 12 shows the results of the intent-to-treat analysis.

Table 12: Clinical Effectiveness of CEFTIN Tablets in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Maxillary Sinusitis

In this trial and in a supporting maxillary puncture trial, 15 evaluable subjects had non- β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae as the identified pathogen. Of these, 67% (10/15) had this pathogen eradicated. Eighteen (18) evaluable subjects had Streptococcus pneumoniae as the identified pathogen. Of these, 83% (15/18) had this pathogen eradicated.

Early Lyme Disease

Two adequate and well-controlled trials were performed in subjects with early Lyme disease. All subjects presented with physician-documented erythema migrans, with or without systemic manifestations of infection. Subjects were assessed at 1 month posttreatment for success in treating early Lyme disease (Part I) and at 1 year posttreatment for success in preventing the progression to the sequelae of late Lyme disease (Part II).

A total of 355 adult subjects (181 treated with cefuroxime axetil and 174 treated with doxycycline) were randomized in the 2 trials, with diagnosis of early Lyme disease confirmed in 79% (281/355). The clinical diagnosis of early Lyme disease in these subjects was validated by 1) blinded expert reading of photographs, when available, of the pretreatment erythema migrans skin lesion, and 2) serologic confirmation (using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot assay ) of the presence of antibodies specific to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. The efficacy data in Table 13 are specific to this “validated” patient subset, while the safety data below reflect the entire patient population for the 2 trials. Clinical data for evaluable subjects in the “validated” patient subset are shown in Table 13.

Table 13: Clinical Effectiveness of CEFTIN Tablets Compared with Doxycycline in the Treatment of Early Lyme Disease

CEFTIN and doxycycline were effective in prevention of the development of sequelae of late Lyme disease.

While the incidence of drug-related gastrointestinal adverse reactions was similar in the 2 treatment groups (cefuroxime axetil – 13%; doxycycline – 11%), the incidence of drug-related diarrhea was higher in the cefuroxime axetil arm versus the doxycycline arm (11% versus 3%, respectively).

1. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria that Grow Aerobically; Approved Standard – Tenth Edition. 2015. CLSI document M07-A10, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

2. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Methods for Antimicrobial Dilution and Disk Susceptibility Testing for Infrequently Isolated or Fastidious Bacteria: Approved Guidelines – Second Edition. 2010. CLSI document M45-A2, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

3. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing; Twenty-fifth Informational Supplement. 2015. CLSI document M100- S25, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

4. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Diffusion Susceptibility Tests; Approved Standard – Twelfth Edition. 2015. CLSI document M02-A12, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087, USA.

Cefuroxime, Oral Tablet

This dosage information is for cefuroxime oral tablet. All possible dosages and drug forms may not be included here. Your dosage, drug form, and how often you take the drug will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

Forms and strengths

Generic: Cefuroxime

  • Form: oral tablet
  • Strengths: 125 mg, 250 mg, 500 mg

Brand: Ceftin

  • Form: oral tablet
  • Strengths: 250 mg, 500 mg

Dosage for pharyngitis/tonsillitis (mild to moderate)

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Warnings

  • Cefuroxime tablets and suspension cannot be interchanged on a milligram-per-milligram basis. (This means you can’t substitute equal doses of one for the other.)
  • Children who can’t swallow cefuroxime tablets should be given the suspension instead. Don’t give them a crushed tablet. The tablet has a strong, long-lasting bitter taste when crushed.

Dosage for acute otitis media

Child dosage (ages 14 to 17 years):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 13 years who can swallow tablets whole):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For people on hemodialysis: A single additional standard dose should be given at the end of each dialysis session.

Warnings

  • Cefuroxime tablets and suspension cannot be interchanged on a milligram-per-milligram basis. (This means you can’t substitute equal doses of one for the other.)
  • Children who can’t swallow cefuroxime tablets should be given the suspension instead. Don’t give them a crushed tablet. The tablet has a strong, long-lasting bitter taste when crushed.

Dosage for acute sinusitis (mild to moderate)

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years of age):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.

Warnings

  • Cefuroxime tablets and suspension cannot be interchanged on a milligram-per-milligram basis. (This means you can’t substitute equal doses of one for the other.)
  • Children who can’t swallow cefuroxime tablets should be given the suspension instead. Don’t give them a crushed tablet. The tablet has a strong, long-lasting bitter taste when crushed.

Dosage for acute bronchitis (mild to moderate)

  • Acute bronchitis (mild to moderate):
    • Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older): The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.
    • Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years of age): The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.
    • Child dosage (ages 0 to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole): This medication should not be used in children younger than 13 years for this condition.
  • Secondary infection of acute bronchitis (mild to moderate):
    • Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older): The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 5–10 days.
    • Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years of age): The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 5–10 days.
    • Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole): The typical dosage is 250 mg twice daily for 10 days.
    • Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months): Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for uncomplicated infections of the skin or below the skin

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years of age):

The typical dosage is 250 or 500 mg every 12 hours for 10 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

This medication shouldn’t be used in children younger than 13 years for this condition.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Dosage for uncomplicated urinary tract infections

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 7–10 days.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years of age):

The typical dosage is 250 mg every 12 hours for 7–10 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

No dosage information is available. This condition is not typical in children of this age range.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

For uncomplicated gonorrhea

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 1,000 mg as a single dose.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years):

The typical dosage is 1,000 mg as a single dose.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

No dosage information is available. This condition is not typical in children of this age range.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

For early Lyme disease

Adult dosage (ages 18 years and older):

The typical dosage is 500 mg every 12 hours for 20 days.

Child dosage (ages 13 to 17 years):

The typical dosage is 500 mg every 12 hours for 20 days.

Child dosage (ages 3 months to 12 years who can swallow tablets whole):

This medication shouldn’t be used in children younger than 13 years for this condition.

Child dosage (ages 0 to 2 months):

Cefuroxime should not be used in children younger than 3 months of age.

Special considerations

  • For people with kidney disease: Your dosage of cefuroxime may need to be adjusted if you have a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min. Creatinine clearance is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. A lower number suggests reduced kidney function.
  • For seniors (ages 65 years and older): The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause the body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.

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