How long does it take for a rocephin shot to work?

Rocephin

Rocephin is the brand name of ceftriaxone sodium, a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic that’s used to fight bacteria in your body.

It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1984. Rocephin is manufactured by Roche, and several companies manufacturer the generic form.

Rocephin is administered through a vein (IV) or through a shot (muscle injection).

Your doctor may use Rocephin to treat severe or life-threatening forms of bacterial infections such as meningitis.

It might also be prescribed to treat lower respiratory tract or urinary tract infections, as well as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), uncomplicated gonorrhea, and ear or skin infections.

Your physician may also rely on it to treat bacterial septicemia, bone, and joint infections, and intra-abdominal infections.

In addition, it is sometimes given to surgical patients to prevent serious infections during an operation.

It’s possible your doctor could prescribe Rocephin to treat other conditions not listed here. However, Rocephin can’t be used to treat the common cold, flu, or any other viral infection.

Rocephin Warnings

Never give any calcium-containing products by vein to a newborn under one month of age if the infant is also being given Rocephin. Doing so could cause serious damage to the baby’s vital organs.

Rocephin is also not recommended for newborns with high bilirubin levels.

Before starting Rocephin, it’s key that you determine whether you might be allergic to it or similar antibiotics including:

If you’re allergic to penicillin, it’s possible that you will have an allergic reaction to Rocephin.

Never use this medication if there is any chance of an allergic reaction without speaking to your doctor or pharmacist first.

A few months after you receive the last shot of Rocephin you may get diarrhea or colitis.

If you get diarrhea while taking this medicine and you notice that it is watery or contains blood, call your doctor right away. Do not stop taking any medication without first speaking to your physician.

You might also develop hemolytic anemia, which destroys your red blood cells and could affect your blood’s clotting time. Your doctor may monitor your blood clotting time while you’re using this drug.

Taking Rocephin could also cause gallbladder problems, which are usually temporary and reverse once treatment ends. Your pancreas might also become inflamed (pancreatitis), especially in you have underlying biliary problems.

Never stop taking Rocephin until you have completed your entire dosing regimen. Quitting or stopping prematurely could put you at risk of a serious or life-threatening infection that might be resistant to antibiotics.

To help your doctor decide if Rocephin is right for you, it’s key that you give him/her a complete medical history, including the following conditions:

  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Diabetes
  • Stomach or intestinal disorder
  • Colitis
  • Inflamed colon
  • Anemia

You should also tell your doctor about any blood clotting problems as well as whether you are malnourished.

Rocephin and Pregnancy

It’s unknown how Rocephin affects pregnant women, so it’s extremely important that you let your doctor know if you’re pregnant or might become pregnant while on this medication.

If you take this medication while breastfeeding it will pass into your breast milk, so be sure to let your doctor know if you plan to breastfeed while using Rocephin.

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Ceftriaxone belongs to the family of antibiotics known as cephalosporins. It is used to prevent or treat certain infections caused by bacteria. It is given by injection only into a muscle or vein.

Ceftriaxone is often used to treat infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, abdomen, bone, joint, and lining of the brain (meningitis), depending on the bacteria causing them. It can also be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted infection).

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Rocephin is no longer being manufactured for sale in Canada. For brands that may still be available, search under ceftriaxone. This article is being kept available for reference purposes only. If you are using this medication, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for information about your treatment options.

How should I use this medication?

To treat bacterial infections, the recommended dose and dosing schedule of ceftriaxone varies according to the specific infection being treated, the response to therapy, and other medications or treatments being used. The dose administered is also based on age, body size, and kidney and liver function. For moderate to severe infections in adults, the dose ranges from 1 g to 2 g daily given once every 24 hours or divided into 2 equal doses and given every 12 hours.

For uncomplicated gonorrhea in adults, one dose of 250 mg is injected into a muscle.

For children 12 years of age and under, the dose is based on body weight and is given every 12 hours. The maximum daily dose for adults and children is 4 g. The duration of treatment depends on the type of infection and usually ranges from 4 to 14 days. Some infections require only one dose while others require treatment for several weeks.

Ceftriaxone is injected into a vein or into a muscle by a health care professional under the supervision of your doctor.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Store this medication (as unmixed vials) at room temperature, protect it from light, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not use this medication if you:

  • are allergic to ceftriaxone or any ingredients of this medication
  • are allergic to other cephalosporins (e.g., cephalexin) or penicillins (e.g., penicillin, amoxicillin)
    • the risk of developing a reaction to ceftriaxone given a history of cephalosporin or penicillin allergy is relatively low, but check with your health care provider before starting treatment

Do not give this medication to a newborn or premature infant who has high amounts of bilirubin in their blood.

Do not give this medication to a newborn who is receiving (or expected to receive) calcium-containing intravenous solutions (calcium-containing solutions should not be given within 5 days of ceftriaxone in infants up to 10 weeks of age).

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • dizziness
  • headache
  • mild diarrhea

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • chills
  • fever
  • pain, redness, and swelling at site of injection
  • rash

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • severe, persistent diarrhea
  • symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, e.g.:
    • difficulty breathing
    • hives
    • swelling of the mouth, throat, or tongue

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Allergic reactions: Ceftriaxone can cause severe allergic reactions. If you develop symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of the mouth, tongue, or throat), get immediate medical attention.

Anemia: Although rare, certain drugs can cause a blood condition called hemolytic anemia, where people have low red blood cells due to premature destruction of this type of blood cell. If you have a history of cephalosporin-related hemolytic anemia, you should talk to your doctor before starting treatment.

Blood tests: Depending on various factors, including how long you will be receiving treatment, your doctor may order blood tests while you are taking ceftriaxone.

Calcium-containing solutions: The interaction with calcium-containing solutions has only been reported for newborns. For all other people, ceftriaxone can be administered before or after calcium-containing solutions provided that the infusion lines are flushed well in between the solutions. In newborns, calcium-containing solutions should not be given within 5 days for infants up to 10 weeks of age.

Gallbladder disease: If you have gallbladder disease, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Kidney problems: Ceftriaxone may cause kidney stones. If you have high calcium levels in your urine or a history of kidney stones, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Low vitamin K: People with impaired vitamin K synthesis or low vitamin K stores (e.g., chronic liver disease and malnutrition) may require monitoring of blood clotting during treatment, as ceftriaxone may decrease clotting ability.

Overgrowth of organisms: Treatment with this antibiotic may allow normal fungus or types of bacteria not killed by the antibiotic to overgrow, causing unwanted infections.

Stomach and bowel disorders: If you have stomach and bowel problems (especially colitis), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: Ceftriaxone passes into breast milk in small amounts. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking ceftriaxone, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: Newborn and premature infants (up to the age of 10 weeks) should not receive calcium-containing solutions within 5 days of receiving ceftriaxone.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between ceftriaxone and any of the following:

  • anticoagulant medications (e.g., warfarin)
  • solutions injected into a vein that contain calcium
  • typhoid vaccine

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Rocephin

Ear Infection Shots

Question

My 9-month-old gets ear infections all the time. The problem is he won’t take antibiotics. He can recognize medicine a mile off. Right now we’re trying to give him Septra, but he completely refuses. What do you think of the new shot for ear infections? Does it really work? What are the side effects?

Answer

Ear infection diagnosis in children continues to get more common each year. And more antibiotics are given to children for ear infections than for any other reason.

In January 1998, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Rocephin (ceftriaxone) as the first single-dose injection for the treatment of ear infections. But does Rocephin work?

Rocephin isn’t a new antibiotic. For years it has been the most common injectable antibiotic used in doctors’ offices. This very effective, very broad-spectrum antibiotic is the one we often turn to for seriously ill children (such as those with sepsis or meningitis, which can be life-threatening), or when the bacteria are resistant to oral antibiotics.

Although one early study found a single dose of Rocephin to be less effective than oral antibiotics, later studies have found it to be equally effective. One dose of Rocephin is equivalent to 30 doses of amoxicillin.

The common short-term side effects of Rocephin are relatively minor. Diarrhea, diaper rash, and allergic reactions could happen with any antibiotic. Worse side effects are uncommon.

But my grave misgivings about the overuse of this powerful drug concern the hidden, long-term effects — specifically the development of antibiotic resistance.

We know that a child who has received two or three courses of antibiotics is seven times more likely to become infected with resistant bacteria. This problem is much worse when the child has been on a broad-spectrum antibiotic (an antibiotic that’s effective against a wide range of bacterial species). Whenever antibiotics are used, the most sensitive bacteria die first, and the most resistant live to reproduce. When broad-spectrum antibiotics are misused, very resistant strains of bacteria can be bred.

This is even more likely with Rocephin. A single dose of this powerful drug is enough to kill most of the weaker bacteria in your child’s body, yet still allow the stronger ones to survive. The likelihood of your child’s getting a subsequent, worse ear infection only increases after this treatment.

The indiscriminate use of Rocephin will also increase the prevalence of resistant bacteria in your community. Soon, it will rob us of one of the most effective tools we have against serious infections. Already, resistance to this last line of defense is being reported.

Rocephin may be a good choice for a child who needs an antibiotic and is unable to take one orally. Still, I would only use it reluctantly. Rocephin is one of my favorite medicines, but I recommend it only when other alternatives don’t make more sense. Its primary use should be for serious, systemic infections.

If Rocephin is to be used for an ear infection, I believe the best course of action is to follow it with an oral antibiotic or to give the injection daily for three days, so that the entire infection is wiped out — not just the weaker bacteria.

Before allowing your child to receive Rocephin for an ear infection, first be sure that the ear infection really needs an antibiotic — many don’t.

Then I would recommend, if possible, choosing an oral antibiotic that’s palatable (Augmentin and Cefzil, for instance, taste much better than Septra and are much more effective) or is given less often (once a day for Suprax or Cedax) or for a shorter duration (five days, once a day for Zithromax). Try mixing the medicine with pleasant, strong-tasting foods or liquids. You might also try squirting the medicine just inside the cheek — outside the gums — to avoid the taste buds on the tongue.

A single dose of Rocephin appears to be a wonderful, modern convenience. But used incorrectly it could create a health nightmare — problems far worse than those it solves.

All content here, including advice from doctors and other health professionals, should be considered as opinion only. Always seek the direct advice of your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.

  • By Alan Greene, MD, FAAP

American Baby

Rocephin Injection

Generic Name: ceftriaxone (injection) (SEF trye AX one)
Brand Names: Rocephin

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 20, 2020.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

The Rocephin brand name has been discontinued in the U.S. If generic versions of this product have been approved by the FDA, there may be generic equivalents available.

What is Rocephin?

Rocephin (ceftriaxone) is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It works by fighting bacteria in your body.

Rocephin is used to treat many kinds of bacterial infections, including severe or life-threatening forms such as meningitis.

Rocephin is also used to prevent infection in people having certain types of surgery.

Important Information

You should not use Rocephin if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any type of cephalosporin antibiotic (Omnicef, Keflex, and others).

Do not use Rocephin in a child without a doctor’s advice. Ceftriaxone should never be used in a premature baby, or in any newborn baby who has jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Before taking this medicine

Do not use Rocephin in a child without a doctor’s advice, and never give more than the child’s prescribed dose. Rocephin injection can be dangerous when given to a newborn baby with any intravenous medicines that contain calcium, including total parental nutrition (TPN). Rocephin should never be used in a premature baby, or in any newborn baby who has jaundice.

You should not use this medicine if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to ceftriaxone or any other cephalosporin antibiotic, such as:

To make sure Rocephin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • an allergy to penicillin;

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

  • liver disease;

  • diabetes;

  • gallbladder disease;

  • a stomach or intestinal disorder such as colitis;

  • poor nutrition; or

  • a condition for which you take a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven).

Rocephin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Ceftriaxone can pass into breast milk, but effects on the nursing baby are not known. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How should I use Rocephin?

Use Rocephin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Rocephin is injected into a muscle, or into a vein through an IV.

A healthcare provider will give you this injection when Rocephin is used to prevent infection from surgery.

You may be shown how to use an IV at home to treat an infection. Do not give yourself this medicine if you do not understand how to use the injection and properly dispose of needles, IV tubing, and other items used.

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

You may need to mix Rocephin with a liquid (diluent) before using it. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medication. Use only the diluent your doctor has recommended.

Do not mix ceftriaxone in the same injection with other antibiotics, or with any diluent that contains calcium, including a TPN (total parenteral nutrition) solution.

After mixing your medicine, you will need to use it within a certain number of hours or days. This will depend on the diluent and how you store the mixture (at room temperature, in a refrigerator, or frozen). Carefully follow the mixing and storage instructions provided with your medicine. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions.

If you use other injectable medications, be sure to flush your intravenous catheter between injections of each medication.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Rocephin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Rocephin can cause unusual results with certain lab tests for glucose (sugar) in the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Store unmixed Rocephin powder at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light.

If your medicine was provided in a frozen form or was frozen after mixing, thaw it in a refrigerator or at room temperature. Do not warm in a microwave or boiling water. Use the medicine as soon as possible after thawing it. Do not refreeze.

Use a disposable needle and syringe only once. Follow any state or local laws about throwing away used needles and syringes. Use a puncture-proof “sharps” disposal container (ask your pharmacist where to get one and how to throw it away). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of Rocephin.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using Rocephin?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Rocephin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Rocephin (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a seizure (convulsions);

  • severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

  • sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, cold or flu symptoms, mouth sores;

  • pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine;

  • severe pain in your upper stomach that comes and goes or spreads to your back;

  • a blood cell disorder – skin rash or tight feeling, severe tingling or numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or

  • kidney or bladder problems – pain in your side or lower back spreading to your groin, blood in your urine, painful or difficult urination, little or no urine.

Common Rocephin side effects may include:

  • mild diarrhea;

  • warmth, tight feeling, or a hard lump where the injection was given;

  • vaginal itching or discharge;

  • rash; or

  • abnormal liver function tests.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Rocephin?

Other drugs may interact with ceftriaxone, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Rocephin only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01.

Related questions

  • Pregnancy – is it safe to take ceftriaxone during pregnancy?

Medical Disclaimer

More about Rocephin (ceftriaxone)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • En Español
  • 96 Reviews
  • Drug class: third generation cephalosporins
  • FDA Alerts (3)

Consumer resources

  • Rocephin (Advanced Reading)

Professional resources

  • Rocephin (FDA)
  • … +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Bacteremia
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention
  • Bone infection
  • … +40 more

Ceftriaxone

Important: The information below refers to products available in the United States that contain ceftriaxone.

Product(s) containing ceftriaxone:

ceftriaxone systemic

Brand names: Rocephin
Drug class(es): third generation cephalosporins
Ceftriaxone systemic is used in the treatment of:

  • Bacteremia
  • Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Bone infection
  • Bronchitis
  • Chancroid
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Endocarditis
  • Endometritis
  • Epididymitis, Non-Specific
  • Epididymitis, Sexually Transmitted
  • Epiglottitis
  • Eye Conditions
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Gonococcal Infection, Disseminated
  • Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated
  • Intraabdominal Infection
  • Joint Infection
  • Kidney Infections
  • Lyme Disease
  • Lyme Disease, Arthritis
  • Lyme Disease, Carditis
  • Lyme Disease, Neurologic
  • Meningitis
  • Meningococcal Meningitis Prophylaxis
  • Neurosyphilis
  • Otitis Media
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Peritonitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Proctitis
  • Prostatitis
  • Salmonella Enteric Fever
  • Salmonella Gastroenteritis
  • Sepsis
  • Septicemia
  • Shigellosis
  • Skin and Structure Infection
  • Skin or Soft Tissue Infection
  • STD Prophylaxis
  • Surgical Prophylaxis
  • Syphilis, Early
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Urinary Tract Infection

Multi-ingredient medications containing ceftriaxone:

ceftriaxone/lidocaine systemic

Brand names: Rocephin IM Convenience Kit
Drug class(es): third generation cephalosporins

See Also

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

SIDE EFFECTS

Rocephin is generally well tolerated. In clinical trials, the following adverse reactions, which were considered to be related to Rocephin therapy or of uncertain etiology, were observed:

Local Reactions – pain, induration and tenderness was 1% overall. Phlebitis was reported in <1% after IV administration. The incidence of warmth, tightness or induration was 17% (3/17) after IM administration of 350 mg/mL and 5% (1/20) after IM administration of 250 mg/mL.

General Disorders And Administration Site Conditions – injection site pain (0.6%).

Hypersensitivity – rash (1.7%). Less frequently reported (<1%) were pruritus, fever or chills.

Infections And Infestations – genital fungal infection (0.1%).

Blood And Lymphatic Disorders – granulocytopenia (0.9%), coagulopathy (0.4%).

Gastrointestinal – diarrhea/loose stools (2.7%). Less frequently reported (<1%) were nausea or vomiting, and dysgeusia. The onset of pseudomembranous colitis symptoms may occur during or after antibacterial treatment (see WARNINGS).

Central Nervous System – headache or dizziness were reported occasionally (<1%).

Genitourinary – moniliasis or vaginitis were reported occasionally (<1%).

Miscellaneous – diaphoresis and flushing were reported occasionally (<1%).

Investigations – blood creatinine increased (0.6%).

Other rarely observed adverse reactions (<0.1%) include abdominal pain, agranulocytosis, allergic pneumonitis, anaphylaxis, basophilia, biliary lithiasis, bronchospasm, colitis, dyspepsia, epistaxis, flatulence, gallbladder sludge, glycosuria, hematuria, jaundice, leukocytosis, lymphocytosis, monocytosis, nephrolithiasis, palpitations, a decrease in the prothrombin time, renal precipitations, seizures, and serum sickness.

Postmarketing Experience

In addition to the adverse reactions reported during clinical trials, the following adverse experiences have been reported during clinical practice in patients treated with Rocephin. Data are generally insufficient to allow an estimate of incidence or to establish causation.

A small number of cases of fatal outcomes in which a crystalline material was observed in the lungs and kidneys at autopsy have been reported in neonates receiving Rocephin and calcium-containing fluids. In some of these cases, the same intravenous infusion line was used for both Rocephin and calcium-containing fluids and in some a precipitate was observed in the intravenous infusion line. At least one fatality has been reported in a neonate in whom Rocephin and calcium-containing fluids were administered at different time points via different intravenous lines; no crystalline material was observed at autopsy in this neonate. There have been no similar reports in patients other than neonates.

Gastrointestinal – pancreatitis, stomatitis and glossitis.

Genitourinary – oliguria, ureteric obstruction, post-renal acute renal failure.

Dermatologic – exanthema, allergic dermatitis, urticaria, edema; acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and isolated cases of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or Lyell’s syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) have been reported.

Hematological Changes

Isolated cases of agranulocytosis (< 500/mm3) have been reported, most of them after 10 days of treatment and following total doses of 20 g or more.

Nervous System Disorders

convulsion

Other, Adverse Reactions

symptomatic precipitation of ceftriaxone calcium salt in the gallbladder, kernicterus, oliguria, and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions.

Cephalosporin Class Adverse Reactions

In addition to the adverse reactions listed above which have been observed in patients treated with ceftriaxone, the following adverse reactions and altered laboratory test results have been reported for cephalosporin class antibiotics:

Adverse Reactions

Allergic reactions, drug fever, serum sickness-like reaction, renal dysfunction, toxic nephropathy, reversible hyperactivity, hypertonia, hepatic dysfunction including cholestasis, aplastic anemia, hemorrhage, and superinfection.

Altered Laboratory Tests

Positive direct Coombs’ test, false-positive test for urinary glucose, and elevated LDH (see PRECAUTIONS).

Several cephalosporins have been implicated in triggering seizures, particularly in patients with renal impairment when the dosage was not reduced (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). If seizures associated with drug therapy occur, the drug should be discontinued. Anticonvulsant therapy can be given if clinically indicated.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Rocephin (Ceftriaxone)

Are you currently using Rocephin injection?

This medication is given by injection into a muscle or vein as directed by your doctor, usually once or twice daily. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Drink plenty of fluids while using this medication unless your doctor directs you otherwise.

If you are using this medication at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Avoid mixing ceftriaxone with IV fluids that have calcium in them (such as Ringer’s solution, Hartmann’s solution, parenteral nutrition-TPN/PPN). Consult your pharmacist for details about the safe use of IV calcium products in infants, children, and adults (see Precautions section). Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

If you are using the frozen pre-mixed solution, thaw the bag at room temperature or in the refrigerator. If the bag is thawed in the refrigerator, let it sit at room temperature at least 1 hour before using. Do not thaw by putting in a water bath or microwaving. After thawing, shake well and squeeze the bag to check for leaks. Discard solution if the bag leaks. Do not re-freeze the solution after thawing.

For the best effect, use this antibiotic at evenly spaced times. To help you remember, use this medication at the same time(s) every day.

Continue to use this medication for the full time prescribed, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may result in a return of the infection.

Tell your doctor if your condition lasts or gets worse.

ceftriaxone (injection)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using ceftriaxone?

Do not use ceftriaxone in a child without a doctor’s advice, and never give more than the child’s prescribed dose. Ceftriaxone injection can be dangerous when given to a newborn baby with any intravenous medicines that contain calcium, including total parental nutrition (TPN). Ceftriaxone should never be used in a premature baby, or in any newborn baby who has jaundice.

You should not use this medicine if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to ceftriaxone or any other cephalosporin antibiotic, such as:

To make sure ceftriaxone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • an allergy to penicillin;
  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • liver disease;
  • diabetes;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • a stomach or intestinal disorder such as colitis;
  • poor nutrition; or
  • a condition for which you take a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven).

Ceftriaxone is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Ceftriaxone can pass into breast milk, but effects on the nursing baby are not known. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How should I use ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone is injected into a muscle, or into a vein through an IV.

A healthcare provider will give you this injection when ceftriaxone is used to prevent infection from surgery.

You may be shown how to use an IV at home to treat an infection. Do not give yourself this medicine if you do not understand how to use the injection and properly dispose of needles, IV tubing, and other items used.

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

You may need to mix ceftriaxone with a liquid (diluent) before using it. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medication. Use only the diluent your doctor has recommended.

Do not mix ceftriaxone in the same injection with other antibiotics, or with any diluent that contains calcium, including a TPN (total parenteral nutrition) solution.

After mixing your medicine, you will need to use it within a certain number of hours or days. This will depend on the diluent and how you store the mixture (at room temperature, in a refrigerator, or frozen). Carefully follow the mixing and storage instructions provided with your medicine. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions.

If you use other injectable medications, be sure to flush your intravenous catheter between injections of each medication.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Ceftriaxone will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Ceftriaxone can cause unusual results with certain lab tests for glucose (sugar) in the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Store unmixed ceftriaxone powder at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light.

If your medicine was provided in a frozen form or was frozen after mixing, thaw it in a refrigerator or at room temperature. Do not warm in a microwave or boiling water. Use the medicine as soon as possible after thawing it. Do not refreeze.

Use a disposable needle and syringe only once. Follow any state or local laws about throwing away used needles and syringes. Use a puncture-proof “sharps” disposal container (ask your pharmacist where to get one and how to throw it away). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

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