Gelatin for joint pain

Sept. 25, 2000 — Those who have survived years of school lunches may get weak in the knees at the prospect of having to eat still more gelatin. But a new study reported at a meeting of the American Academy of Family Physicians in Dallas last week suggests that adding a special gelatin supplement to the diet could provide some relief to people with mild osteoarthritis of the knee.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, or inflammation and swelling of the joints. It occurs as a consequence of aging and the thousand natural shocks that weight-bearing joints or frequently used joints — such as the knees, fingers, and wrists — are exposed to. Just as the knees in a favorite pair of jeans wear out over time, wear-and-tear on cartilage, the tissue that coats and helps to lubricate the ends of bones where they meet in joints, can eventually cause osteoarthritis. Symptoms of the condition include pain, stiffness, and limited mobility of the affected joint.

In the study, 175 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were randomly assigned to receive either a daily gelatin supplement or a placebo. Those who ate a supplement containing 10 grams of gelatin plus calcium and vitamin C had significant improvements across the board in pain, stiffness, and mobility measures.

“This suggests that gelatin supplementation has the potential to improve knee function during activities that cause high amounts of stress on the joint,” according to Sean S. McCarthy, MS, from the Center for Clinical and Lifestyle Research in Shrewsbury, Mass.

But before you hobble out to the grocery store to stock up on some gelatin, you should know that gelatin could be getting the credit for a job done by good old vitamin C. “If gelatin was protective, there’d be less osteoarthritis in this country and not more, because it’s widely contained in foods,” says Timothy McAlindon, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and a staff member in the Arthritis Center at Boston University Medical Center.

McAlindon, who treats patients with osteoarthritis, previously conducted a study looking at the role of diet in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, “and found an apparent strong protective effect of high vitamin C intake on knee osteoarthritis progression. So vitamin C might play a role: It is an antioxidant and has other effects which might be considered beneficial,” he tells WebMD.

Contents

Gelatin

Fletcher, A. G., Hardy, J. D., Riegel, C., and Koop, C. E. GELATIN AS A PLASMA SUBSTITUTE: THE EFFECTS OF INTRAVENOUS INFUSION OF GELATIN ON CARDIAC OUTPUT AND OTHER ASPECTS OF THE CIRCULATION OF NORMAL PERSONS, OF CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS, AND OF NORMAL VOLUNTEERS SUBJECTED TO LARGE HEMORRHAGE. J Clin.Invest 1945;24(4):405-415. View abstract.

Kawahara H, Tanaka K Iikura Y Akasawa A Saito H. The incidence of gelatin allergy among atopic children in Japan. J Allergy Clin.Immunol. 1998;103:321-325.

McWilliams, M. Foods- Experimental Perspectives (4th ed). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall;2001.

Miller, L. G. Observations on the distribution and ecology of Clostridium botulinum type E in Alaska. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 1982;21(920):926.

Morganti P, Randazzo S Bruno C. Effect of gelatin/cystine diet on human hair growth. J Soc Cosmetic Chem (England) 1982;33:95-96.

Morganti, P and Fanrizi, G. Effects of gelatin-glycine on oxidative stress. Cosmetics and Toiletries (USA) 2000;115:47-56.

Nakayama, T., Aizawa, C., and Kuno-Sakai, H. A clinical analysis of gelatin allergy and determination of its causal relationship to the previous administration of gelatin-containing acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. J Allergy Clin.Immunol. 1999;103(2 Pt 1):321-325. View abstract.

No authors listed. A randomized trial comparing the effect of prophylactic intravenous fresh frozen plasma, gelatin or glucose on early mortality and morbidity in preterm babies. The Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative Trial Group. Eur J Pediatr. 1996;155(7):580-588. View abstract.

Unknown author. Clinical trial finds Knox NutraJoint has benefits in mild osteoarthritis. 10-1-2000.

Vine, R. E. Harkness T. Browning and C. Wagner. Winemaking from Grape Growing to Market Place. Gaithersburg: Aspen;1999.

Brown KE, Leong K, Huang CH, et al. Gelatin/chondroitin 6-sulfate microspheres for the delivery of therapeutic proteins to the joint. Arthritis Rheum 1998;41:2185-95. View abstract.

Kakimoto K, Kojima Y, Ishii K, et al. The suppressive effect of gelatin-conjugated superoxide dismutase on disease development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Clin Exp Immunol 1993;94:241-6. View abstract.

Kelso JM. The gelatin story. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:200-2. View abstract.

Lewis CJ. Letter to reiterate certain public health and safety concerns to firms manufacturing or importing dietary supplements that contain specific bovine tissues. FDA. Available at: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/dspltr05.html.

Moskowitz RW. Role of collagen hydrolysate in bone and joint disease.Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000;30:87-99. View abstract.

Nakayama T, Aizawa C, Kuno-Sakai H. A clinical analysis of gelatin allergy and determination of its causal relationship to the previous administration of gelatin-containing acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:321-5.

Oesser S, Seifert J. Stimulation of type II collagen biosynthesis and secretion in bovine chondrocytes cultured with degraded collagen. Cell Tissue Res 2003;311:393-9.. View abstract.

PDR Electronic Library. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc., 2001.

Sakaguchi M, Inouye S. Anaphylaxis to gelatin-containing rectal suppositories. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2001;108:1033-4. View abstract.

Schwick HG, Heide K. Immunochemistry and immunology of collagen and gelatin. Bibl Haematol 1969;33:111-25. View abstract.

Blog

In the year 2000, a study was released that showed that patients suffering from osteoarthritis could benefit from a special supplement consisting of gelatin, vitamin C and calcium. The success of this study led to a flurry of cure-all gelatin recipes to be published on the Internet.

What happened in the study?

In this study, patients suffering from osteoarthritis in the knee were randomly picked to receive the special gelatin supplement or a placebo. The supplement consisted of 10 grams of gelatin and other ingredients. Patients who received the supplement showed a marked improvement in their pain, mobility and stiffness over the patients who received the placebo.

Can gelatin really help osteoarthritis?

Although the patients did show an improvement, it’s uncertain whether or not the gelatin was the cause of the improvement. Some theorize that the vitamin C could have been responsible for the reduction in pain and improvement in mobility. In fact, studies have shown that consumption of vitamin C can prevent the spread and worsening of osteoarthritis.

Perhaps the only way to know for sure whether or not gelatin has the ability to curb or reverse the effects of osteoarthritis is to try consuming a diet of gelatin for yourself. The following recipe is said to have a positive effect on people suffering from osteoarthritis:

Ingredients

  • Gelatin powder
  • Water

Process

  1. Measure two teaspoons of gelatin powder and mix it together with 1/4 water.
  2. Stir the gelatin and water mixture.
  3. Leave the gelatin and water solution to sit overnight on the counter. Do not put the mixture into your fridge.

Drink the mixture in the morning before breakfast. You can make the mixture taste better by adding in your own flavor supplement (this might be juice, honey or yogurt). Follow this recipe every day for a month. It’s said that drinking gelatin can improvement your current condition and prevent your osteoarthritis from worsening.

If you’d like to cover your bases, you can also try taking a vitamin C and calcium supplement at the same time that you’re taking the gelatin supplement. After all, vitamin C is an antioxidant, which means that it’s already known to have many positive effects on the body.

Of course, there are many ways that you can treat osteoarthritis. Exercises, chiropractic adjustments, massage and other treatments can all have a positive effect on osteoarthritis. To find out more about how you can improve your condition and control your pain without medications, see a chiropractor. If you live in the Pittsburgh area, contact Choice Chiropractic and Wellness Center today. We treat our patients using a variety of chiropractic methods. Make an appointment for a consultation and we can discuss your condition as well as your treatment plan.

Everybody knows WD-40 is the product for silencing squeaks, displacing moisture, preventing rust, and loosening stuck parts. You probably have a can sitting in your garage right now. What you probably didn’t realize though is that WD-40 can help people with arthritis, too.

WD-40 was created for the space program by the Rocket Chemical Company in 1953. It took 40 attempts for the company to work out the ideal water displacement formula, and the name WD-40 comes from that process. It stands for “water displacement, formulation successful in 40th attempt.” In 1969, the company’s name was changed to the WD-40 Company — a stroke of genius. The company says that surveys show that WD-40 can be found in as many as 80 percent of American homes and that it has at least 2,000 uses, discovered by the users themselves.

WD-40 can be used for a variety of applications. While generally considered safe, there are a few things to be aware of when using it. First of all, WD-40 is petroleum-based, so it is crucial to be aware that it is highly flammable. Also, understand that it can be very harmful if swallowed and can aggravate respiratory issues if not used in a well-ventilated area. Furthermore, it can irritate skin, so ignore any advice to use it on your skin to “lubricate” your joints. WD-40 comes with a long assortment of uses – just be sure to utilize it safely.

For those with arthritis, WD-40 can be a helping hand for many every day activities. Below are just some of the ways to use it if your hands are hurting or you just need something to ease the way:

  • Helps open rusty locks
  • Helps sliding doors glide easier
  • Unsticks difficult to open windows
  • Keeps scissors working smoothly
  • Keeps garden tools moving smoothly and reduces rust.
  • Lubricates sticky drawers
  • Lubricates sewing needles to make sewing heavy fabrics easier – hint: use very little to avoid staining
  • Fixes squeaky hinges
  • Removes crayon from wallpaper
  • Removes stains from clothes and carpets
  • Cleans oily films from car windows
  • Removes tape from a glass surface
  • Removes oil spots from concrete driveway
  • Untangle jewelry chains
  • Unfreeze car doors
  • Prevents silver from tarnishing
  • Removes permanent ink from most items
  • Keeps mud from sticking to cleats
  • Prevent grass clippings from clogging up a lawn mower
  • Prevent squirrels from climbing into a birdhouse
  • Spray on fishing bait to attract fish

After you discover WD-40’s many uses and you won’t think it’s just for rusty bike chains ever again!

Our blogs are presented for informational purposes only and are not to be considered medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic intervention. We are happy to answer questions or comments pertaining to any products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

WD-40 Myths & Fun Facts | Facts About WD-40 Degreaser Products

WD-40: THE SECRET FORMULA

Myth: Our secret formula isn’t such a secret.
Fact: Sorry folks, the over 60-year-old formulation of WD-40® Multi-Use Product remains a secret today. Any information that you may encounter alleging the disclosure of the “secret sauce” is inaccurate.

One thing we must do is correct any misinformation that may be harmful to either our consumers or our good name. Specifically, the listing of incorrect and poorly defined ingredients and safety information.

Duct Tape & WD-40®: You often hear it said, “You only need two things in life: Duct Tape and WD-40®. If it moves and shouldn’t, use Duct Tape, if it doesn’t move and should, use WD-40®.” Surely there is a reason for that.

A QUESTION OF LUBRICATION

Myth: WD-40® Multi-Use Product is not really a lubricant.
Fact: While the “W-D” in WD-40® stands for Water Displacement, WD-40® Multi-Use Product is a unique, special blend of lubricants. The product’s formulation also contains anti-corrosion agents and ingredients for penetration, water displacement and soil removal.

WHAT’S STODDARD SOLVENT?

Myth: WD-40® contains Stoddard Solvent.
Fact: Over the past few decades, the name Stoddard Solvent was synonymous with all mineral spirits. Today, the mineral spirits found in products like ours are more refined and processed (see hydrogenation, hydrotreating and distillation techniques) providing mixtures with varying boiling points, cleaning ability, and chemical composition.

The catchall phrase “Stoddard Solvent” is no longer adequate to tell the proper story. WD-40® does indeed have 50% mineral spirits, but they are refined and purified for specific characteristics needed to meet today’s performance, regulatory and safety requirements.

BIKE FRIENDLY

Myth: WD-40® Multi-Use Product should not be used on bike chains.
Fact: While WD-40® Multi-Use Product it is not a grease, it is formulated with strong lubricating oils and other ingredients, and is a terrific product to use for bike maintenance. It does not attract dirt or moisture to metal surfaces – just be sure to wipe off any excess WD-40® Multi-Use Product before riding.

For long-term lubrication and other specialized bicycle maintenance needs, check out WD-40® BIKE. Developed specifically for cyclists and mechanics, this high-performance line of bicycle care products is sure to become a mainstay in the toolboxes of bike mechanics for decades.

WHO’S BEHIND IT ALL?

Myth: Ken East is WD-40®’s original founder.
Fact: While Ken East is often referred to as one of WD-40® ’s original founders, he used to say, “Heck, I ain’t that old.” Ken was the facility manager at WD-40 Company’s San Diego headquarters and was affectionately known as “The Brewmaster.” He mixed up batches of our secret sauce for over 15 years and was often heard to proudly proclaim, “I absolutely LOVE my job!” Ken happily retired in 2009.

As mentioned in our corporate and brand history, Norm Larsen, founder of Rocket Chemical Company, is considered the original founder of WD-40®. Read the real story behind WD-40®.

WHAT A FISH STORY!

Myth: WD-40® contains fish oil.
Fact: Consumers have told us over the years that they have caught some of the biggest fish ever after protecting their fish hooks and lures with WD-40®. We believe this legend came from folks assuming that the product must contain fish oil since it appears to attract fish. Sorry Charlie®, it just ain’t so.

WD-40 Company has taken steps to respect and conserve the environment, and encourages its users to do the same. While WD-40® can be used to help protect fishing equipment from rust and corrosion, WD-40 Company does not recommend using WD-40® to attract fish.

“WD-40® CURES ARTHRITIS!” NO WAY.

Myth: WD-40® cures arthritis.
Fact: This popular headline, appearing at least once a year in the tabloids, is completely FALSE. WD-40 Company does not recommend the use of WD-40® for medical purposes, and knows no reason why WD-40® would be effective for arthritis pain relief. WD-40® contains petroleum distillates and should be handled with the same precautions for any product containing this type of material.

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Myth: Typical consumers need to look beyond the label.
Fact: For the general consumer, the product label provides the key safety and usage information derived from our Material Safety Data Sheet and referred to for the general use of our product can be misleading. MSDS information is for the workplace and not primarily intended for the general consumer. For the general consumer, the product label provides the key safety and usage information.

MORE FUN FACTS ABOUT WD-40®

  • A bus driver in Asia used WD-40® to remove a python, which had coiled itself around the undercarriage of his bus.
  • Police officers used WD-40® to remove a naked burglar trapped in an air conditioning vent.
  • Crayola® Stain Removal Tips recommends using WD-40® to remove (regular) crayon marks from a variety of surfaces.
  • The WD-40® Book, featuring many user testimonials and the wacky humor of Jim & Tim, The Duct Tape GuysTM, was published in 1997. The familiar blue and yellow can has been featured in other books ranging from The Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness (General Publishing 1997) Polish Your Furniture With Pantyhose (Hyperion 1995) to WD-40® for the Soul: A Guide To Mending Everything
  • Leslie Nielsen portrayed agent Dick Steele (a.k.a., Agent WD-40®) in the 1996 movie Spy Hard
  • As The Duct Tape Guys say, “You only need two tools in life, Duct Tape® and WD-40®. If it’s not stuck and it’s supposed to be, Duct Tape it. If it’s stuck and it’s not supposed to be, WD-40® it.”

So, keep using your WD-40®. You can find a list of over 2,000 uses from our loyal users here. If you find a new use, please let us know. And, if you really need the secret formula, you can find it……written on a single notepad……locked in a vault……somewhere in California……if you can get in.

Collagen and Gelatin: What’s the Difference?

September 24th, 2019

• Free eBook: 35 Gut Recovery Recipes

Two of the trendiest items in the Paleo, AIP (Autoimmune Protocol), and natural food worlds are gelatin and collagen. These popular staples line the shelves of grocery and health food stores alike, and you can find them in countless recipes (including some in The Autoimmune Solution Cookbook!).

And for good reason! They are both packed with amino acids that provide tons of health benefits. Our ancestors got plenty of these key amino acids by eating the connective tissues, tendons, and other odds and ends of animals. However, we mostly lacking these foods in our modern diets. This is why adding gelatin and collagen into our foods and drinks is so helpful. It’s also why we’re seeing so many new gelatin and collagen products on the market.

I am often asked, “Does your gut know the difference?” and “Are they used the same way?”

Those are two great questions. They are actually used in very different ways. (Hint: All of you dessert and baked goods lovers are going to really love gelatin!)

First, let me explain why they’re so beneficial to your health. Then I’ll tackle the differences and show you how you can use them.

(I also went live on my Facebook page to do a cooking demonstration as well as explain the differences between gelatin and collagen that you can watch here:)

How are Gelatin & Collagen Different?

When it comes to the health benefits of gelatin and collagen, they are actually identical. That’s because gelatin is the cooked form of collagen. the cooking gives it a very different texture and is what gives them different uses. More on that below.

Collagen is the most important and abundant structural protein in your body. Think of collagen as the ‘glue’ that holds your body together. Your skin, gut barrier, bones, connective tissue, cartilage, and joints all depend on ample collagen to be healthy, strong and flexible. You actually have more collagen in your body than any other type of protein. Gram for gram it’s stronger than steel!

Starting at about age 35, your collagen production naturally begins to slow. By age 40, collagen begins to deplete faster than your body can reproduce it. By age 60, over ½ of your body’s collagen has been depleted. In addition to aging, other factors impact collagen levels, including genetics, smoking, pollution, excessive sun exposure, and nutritional deficiencies.

Health Benefits of Gelatin & Collagen

The reason I love collagen and gelatin is that they help repair a leaky gut! Nearly 80% of your immune system is located in your gut and leaky gut is a precursor to autoimmunity. This makes repairing your gut the very first step in reversing autoimmunity.

Collagen and gelatin are so important in leaky gut because they are the basic building blocks of your intestinal wall. The microscopic folds or “villi” in the intestines are built of collagen. The amino acids in collagen heal these damaged cells and build new tissue.

Along with repairing a leaky gut, collagen and gelatin strengthen hair, skin, and nails. They can help prevent joint pain, support weight management, protect your heart, support bone repair, and positively impact liver function.

How to Use Gelatin

Gelatin is a culinary superstar for many reasons. It’s completely flavorless and can be added to tons of different recipes. First, it functions as a binder in any recipe in place of eggs, which contain inflammatory proteins. Now you can bake delicious sweet and savory foods without eggs and easily adapt your favorite dishes to be autoimmune-approved!

Another culinary benefit of gelatin is that it serves to “gel” substances it is added to. It’s perfect for thickening sauces and soups. Just make sure you slowly add it to hot liquids and allow it to work its magic, making sauces and soups richer and thicker.

And of course, you can use it to make gummies, homemade marshmallows, and other gelatin-based treats!

The Myers Way® Gelatin is featured in some of the breakfast and dessert recipes in my new cookbook, The Autoimmune Solution Cookbook!

How to Use Collagen

Hydrolyzed collagen is the uncooked form of collagen. It is also completely flavorless and can be added to any liquid. Unlike gelatin, however, it dissolves instantly in hot or cold liquids and does not change the texture. It’s great for making smoothies, juices, tea, and even water.

I used The Myers Way® Collagen in The Autoimmune Solution Cookbook to add a gut-repairing boost to many of the delicious recipes!

How to Choose High-Quality Gelatin and Collagen

Thanks to the rise in popularity of both gelatin and collagen, the market has been flooded with tons of new products. However, there are some low-quality options out there, so here’s are the keys to choosing a gelatin or collagen product:

  • Choose gelatin and collagen from grass-fed, pasture-raised animals only
  • Make sure the animals were never given GMO feed, hormones, or antibiotics
  • Avoid options with additives, preservatives, or other unnecessary ingredients

I use both gelatin and collagen on a daily basis. They impact gut health; hair, skin, and nails; healthy joints and bones; optimal weight management; and detox support. That’s why it’s so important that the products are exceptionally high quality. And why I decided to make my own!

The Myers Way® Gelatin and The Myers Way® Collagen both come from grass-fed cows that are never given antibiotics, hormones, or GMO feed. They contain only pure gelatin and collagen, without any added ingredients.

And when you purchase my gelatin or collagen from my store, you will receive a FREE recipe eBook. You’ll be able to easily experience their amazing health benefits right away!

Health Benefits of Gelatin

I have always had a good amount of gelatin in my diet. I like it in your typical Jello form but also in my favorite candies, other desserts and even soups. It wasn’t till I looked at my diet closer that I found exactly how much gelatin I usually consume, and how often.
I had seen a mention on an Instagram photo about the benefits of eating gelatin. The photo claimed it was a diet food and was good for hair, skin, nails and joints. I decided to research it.
I found so many amazing benefits that I decided to give myself a challenge. I decided that I would eat gelatin in some form every single day for 3 months and then assess my results. I was pretty impressed after 3 months, but my 5th month just finished and I am absolutely in love with the results!

What is gelatin?

Gelatin or gelatine (from Latin: gelatus meaning “stiff”, “frozen”) is a translucent, colorless, brittle (when dry), flavorless foodstuff, derived from collagen obtained from various animal by-products. It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, pharmaceuticals, photography, and cosmetic manufacturing.
Gelatin is an irreversibly hydrolyzed form of collagen. (source: Wikipedia) According to WebMD:
Gelatin is used for weight loss and for treating osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and brittle bones (osteoporosis). Some people also use it for strengthening bones, joints, and fingernails. Gelatin is also used for improving hair quality and to shorten recovery after exercise and sports-related injury.
“My” main reasons for consuming gelatin daily for this challenge:

Digestion:

Gelatin absorbs water so it keeps things moving through the gut and helps with digestion and constipation. Reduces inflammation and helps repair the intestinal lining. Gelatin can also help with leaky gut.

Healthy joints:

You read that part about gelatin being derived from collagen, right? We know joints need collagen to be healthy and this is a great source of it! Athletes have used gelatin for joint pain relief and as an anti-inflammatory.

Skin & Hair:

Speaking of collagen….those anti aging creams they sell aren’t as effective as a daily serving of gelatin, and it’s cheaper. Gelatin also contains keratin which is essential for healthy nails, hair, teeth and skin.

Sleep:

Gelatin contains glycine and consuming it before bed helps induce sleep.

Nutrition:

Gelatin contains 6 grams of protein per tablespoon. 1/2 of your essential amino acids. Glycine, which helps your liver release toxins.
Now this is by no means a complete list on benefits. I’d be writing for the next 2 days if I compiled one of those! That is the list of why I decided to challenge myself to eat more gelatin. Now for my results:
* My nails are longer and stronger. Finally!
* My joints quit hurting all the time and when they do bother me, it seems to be a much shorter episode.
* My hair is growing in much healthier, even with dying it last week.
* My skin looks a bit less dry and aged & I’ve been sleeping much better.
* My digestion issues have cleared up a lot and it continues to improve.
* I lost a few pounds. I didn’t really expect it and wasn’t trying, but there it went!
I’m very happy with these results!

How to Add Gelatin to your Diet

How did I do it? I bought plain gelatin and mixed my own “jello style” every 2 days. I have an extreme sweet tooth so this worked great for me. Especially for those after dinner cravings!
1 large ‘table’ spoon full of unflavored gelatin. I added 1 1/2 – 2 cups boiling water and stirred gently till absorbed. Then I add 1 packet sugar free jello style dessert mix. Mix thoroughly then chill and cut into squares.

I ate 1/4 of this mixture each day consuming most of it after dinner. That’s 1/2 cup a day, less if you only used 1.5 cups of water. Yes, I used commercial flavored, chemical crap. Yes…it was good! 😂 I did find that Walmart brand ‘Jello’ is the cheapest and it tastes the same.

Different ways to eat gelatin

I also experimented with adding my own juices and flavorings but have yet to settle on a fail-proof recipe, so I’ll work on that! I did find a strawberry jello cup recipe from Attainable Sustainable that is A-Mazing though…so check that out in the meantime.
I also made homemade marshmallows a few times. They were so good and even the kids loved them. I’ll post that recipe soon.
Also, a few days a month I make a bone broth which is rich in gelatin. Bone broth is awesome because you can eat it alone or use it to flavor rices, vegetable dishes or as a soup/stew base. It’s easy to set & forget in the crock pot, so very little work. It can also be canned so a big batch can last a long time!
Here is an excellent post on using a turkey to make Bone Broth by Back To Our Roots.
I started by buying bulk gelatin from the Amish store by me, however I have found a grass fed beef gelatin that I really like. This one by Great Lakes is very similar to Knox or the stuff I bought. (the first gelatin I bought tended to smell a little like wet dog when I mixed it up, the Great Lakes was much better in that department!)

Speaking of which you could buy Knox at your local store, but it’s more expensive than a bulk version. Great Lakes also has this one with the green label and it is cold water soluble! That one is great for smoothies and adding to other drinks and recipes. It doesn’t thicken the same so it’s practically unnoticeable once mixed in, which makes it very easy to drink gelatin every day.
I have a lot more experimenting that I want to do with recipes and different ways to add gelatin to my diet. These last few months have convinced me that adding gelatin to my diet daily has made a huge improvement and now I’m just searching for ways to simplify it for the long run!
Since writing this post I have found so many great resources for information on why and how to add gelatin to your daily diet including Martha Stewart’s recipe for homemade marshmallows.
Many other common foods have health benefits too! Check out these articles: The many health benefits of ginger, there are 13 reasons why parsley might be the healthiest thing in your kitchen and did you know that there are 12 Reasons why you should brew up some catnip tea? Try it!
~L
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I am not a doctor or other health care professional nor do I claim to be. I am not trained in any medical field. I am simply passing on information that has worked for me. This information is for entertainment purposes only and is not meant to treat or diagnose any medical condition. see a Dr if you are ill. .
(This post contains affiliate links. If you chose to purchase something through the link, I will get a small payment from Amazon. It will not affect your purchase price. .)

MonaMakela/iStock/GettyImages

Knox gelatin is used as a natural remedy to cure pain caused by arthritis. The gelatin is similar to the collagen type 2 which makes up connective tissues in the body. These connective tissues include cartilage which when working properly allows the bones to joints to slide against each other as your bones move. With arthritis the cartilage becomes roughened and joints can not move as they once did. Knox is said to help the cartilage repair itself back to its smooth state. Adding Knox gelatin to your diet is also shown to help with those who suffer from insomnia, back pain, and even bone spurs.

Purchase a Knox drink mix such as NutraJoint or NutraJoint plus Glucosamine. Glucosamine is said to help protect your cartilage. Knox is also available in individual packets sold as Knox gelatin or in larger canisters on grocery store shelves.

Begin a daily ritual of consuming Knox for pain relief. Use of Knox gelatin is said to help with arthritis pain, back pain, bone spurs, knee pain, and insomnia by replacing calcium lost from diets. It prevents calcium deficiencies.

Pour six to eight ounces of your favorite non-carbonated beverage into a glass and add a heaping scoop of NutraJoint or a packet of Knox gelatin. If you purchased a canister of Knox measure out 2.5 teaspoons and add it to your beverage.

Sprinkle Knox gelatin on your favorite food. Use the recommended daily dosage and mix into soup, macaroni and cheese, or even pasta.

Tips

  • Knox can be added to your daily coffee. Knox is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Knox can help those who suffer from insomnia, bone spurs, kidney stones and lower back pain. Knox can be used by athletes to increase flexibility of joints.

GELATIN

  • Morganti P, Randazzo S Bruno C. Effect of gelatin/cystine diet on human hair growth. J Soc Cosmetic Chem (England) 1982;33:95-96.
  • Morganti, P and Fanrizi, G. Effects of gelatin-glycine on oxidative stress. Cosmetics and Toiletries (USA) 2000;115:47-56.
  • No authors listed. A randomized trial comparing the effect of prophylactic intravenous fresh frozen plasma, gelatin or glucose on early mortality and morbidity in preterm babies. The Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative Trial Group. Eur J Pediatr. 1996;155(7):580-588. View abstract.
  • Unknown author. Clinical trial finds Knox NutraJoint has benefits in mild osteoarthritis. 10-1-2000.
  • Benito-Ruiz P, Camacho-Zambrano MM, Carrillo-Arcentales JN, et al. A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy and safety of a food ingredient, collagen hydrolysate, for improving joint comfort. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2009;60 Suppl 2:99-113. View abstract.
  • Bernardo MLR, Azarcon Jr, AC. A randomized controlled trial on the effects of oral collagen treatment on the medial knee joint space and functional outcome among veterans memorial medical center patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee. PARM Proceedings 2012;4(1):1-8.
  • Brown KE, Leong K, Huang CH, et al. Gelatin/chondroitin 6-sulfate microspheres for the delivery of therapeutic proteins to the joint. Arthritis Rheum 1998;41:2185-95. View abstract.
  • Bruyère O, Zegels B, Leonori L, et al. Effect of collagen hydrolysate in articular pain: a 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Complement Ther Med. 2012 Jun;20(3):124-30. View abstract.
  • de la Fuente Tornero E, Vega Castro A, de Sierra Hernández PÁ, et al. Kounis syndrome during anesthesia: Presentation of indolent systemic mastocytosis: A case report. A Case Rep. 2017;8(9):226-228. View abstract.
  • Djagny VB, Wang Z, Xu S. Gelatin: a valuable protein for food and pharmaceutical industries: review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2001;41(6):481-92. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 — Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Gelatin Manufacturers Institute of America. Gelatin Handbook. 2012. Available at: http://www.gelatin-gmia.com/gelatinhandbook.html. Accessed September 9, 2016.
  • Inoue N, Sugihara F, Wang X. Ingestion of bioactive collagen hydrolysates enhance facial skin moisture and elasticity and reduce facial ageing signs in a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study. J Sci Food Agric. 2016;96(12):4077-81. View abstract.
  • Kakimoto K, Kojima Y, Ishii K, et al. The suppressive effect of gelatin-conjugated superoxide dismutase on disease development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Clin Exp Immunol 1993;94:241-6. View abstract.
  • Kelso JM. The gelatin story. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:200-2. View abstract.
  • Lewis CJ. Letter to reiterate certain public health and safety concerns to firms manufacturing or importing dietary supplements that contain specific bovine tissues. FDA. Available at: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/dspltr05.html.
  • Li Y, He H, Yang L, Li X, Li D, Luo S. Therapeutic effect of Colla corii asini on improving anemia and hemoglobin compositions in pregnant women with thalassemia. Int J Hematol. 2016;104(5):559-565. View abstract.
  • Moskowitz RW. Role of collagen hydrolysate in bone and joint disease.Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000;30:87-99. View abstract.
  • Nakayama T, Aizawa C, Kuno-Sakai H. A clinical analysis of gelatin allergy and determination of its causal relationship to the previous administration of gelatin-containing acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:321-5.
  • Oesser S, Seifert J. Stimulation of type II collagen biosynthesis and secretion in bovine chondrocytes cultured with degraded collagen. Cell Tissue Res 2003;311:393-9.. View abstract.
  • PDR Electronic Library. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc., 2001.
  • Sakaguchi M, Inouye S. Anaphylaxis to gelatin-containing rectal suppositories. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2001;108:1033-4. View abstract.
  • Schwick HG, Heide K. Immunochemistry and immunology of collagen and gelatin. Bibl Haematol 1969;33:111-25. View abstract.
  • Su K, Wang C. Recent advances in the use of gelatin in biomedical research. Biotechnol Lett 2015;37(11):2139-45. View abstract.
  • Ventura Spagnolo E, Calapai G, Minciullo PL, Mannucci C, Asmundo A, Gangemi S. Lethal anaphylactic reaction to intravenous gelatin in the course of surgery. Am J Ther. 2016;23(6):e1344-e1346. View abstract.
  • Zdzieblik D, Oesser S, Gollhofer A, König D. Improvement of activity-related knee joint discomfort following supplementation of specific collagen peptides. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2017;42(6):588-595. View abstract.

If you’ve ever had Jell-O before, you’ve come into contact with gelatin whether you realize it or not. What might surprise you is that it’s a lot more than just a creative way to make your dessert jiggle — it’s also a source of important nutrients.

A type of protein derived from partial hydrolysis of collagen, gelatin is found in animal parts that provide us with important amino acids, the “building blocks” of proteins. In fact, its unique amino acid profile is the reason for many of its health benefits, which you’ll read about below.

Related: How to Get More Collagen Into Your Diet for Skin and Gut Health

Top Gelatin Benefits and Gelatin Uses

So what is gelatin exactly? In the case of food manufacturing, gelatin is made into a dried powder that’s created from isolating and dehydrating parts of animals, including skin, bones and tissue. This might not sound too appetizing, but you likely won’t even know your eating it when you have it because it’s virtually colorless and tasteless.

The reason it’s used in food preparation and as the basis of many jellies, desserts and candies is because it acts like a sticky adhesive, similar to a natural glue. The gelatinous quality of gelatin is actually one of the things that makes it beneficial when we consume it, because this is what allows gelatin to help form strong cartilage or connective tissue that gives parts of our bodies elasticity. (1)

Thankfully, we can consume gelatin by eating a lot more than just processed desserts. You might have noticed an increase of popularity of bone broth lately. Did you know that this is actually a rich source of naturally occurring gelatin? Bone broth is often used to help clear up food allergies or intolerances, digestive issues, leaky gut syndrome, autoimmune disorders, and more.

One of the reasons is because gelatin provides amino acids like glycine that strengthen the gut lining and therefore lower inflammation. Glycine is used by doctors to help improve digestive, joint, cardiovascular, cognitive and skin health.

In addition, gelatin benefits include the following:

1. Improves Gut Health and Digestion

Similarly to collagen, gelatin is beneficial for preventing intestinal damage and improving the lining of the digestive tract, thereby preventing permeability and leaky gut syndrome. (2) You can think of the gut lining as one of the body’s most important lines of defense, since it keeps particles from food, bacteria and yeast inside the digestive system where they belong and prevents leakage into the bloodstream, which triggers inflammation.

Gelatin can improve your ability to produce adequate gastric acid secretions that are needed for proper digestion and nutrient absorption. Glycine from gelatin is important for restoring a healthy mucosal lining in the stomach and facilitating with the balance of digestive enzymes and stomach acid. When you don’t make the proper amount of enzymes/stomach acid, you can experience common digestive problems like nutrient deficiencies, acid reflux, bloating, indigestion, as well as anemia. Older people often experience more digestive problems because vital digestive juices are lowered during the aging process and worsened by increased stress.

Finally, gelatin is capable of absorbing water and fluids, which helps prevent fluid retention and bloated stomach while improving constipation.

2. Protects Joints and Lowers Joint Pain

Collagen and gelatin have gained notoriety for easing symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is common in older people and considered the leading cause of frequent joint pains. As people age, they tend to develop more stiffness, aches and limited mobility that worsen over time since collagen continues to break down and erode. Gelatin and collagen help stall chronic inflammatory responses, which reduces pain and stops progressive disease that lead to impairments in joint function, such as degenerative joint disease.

Research shows that people with osteoarthritis, joint pain, bone-related problems like osteoporosis, and exercise-related soreness or injuries can all benefit from supplementing with gelatin. (3) In clinical trials, people taking gelatin (around two grams daily) tend to experience less inflammation, less pain in the joints or muscles, better recovery, and even improved athletic abilities compared to people taking a placebo.

3. Helps Improve Sleep Quality

Certain studies have shown that gelatin helps people who continuously experience trouble falling asleep, can’t sleep or who have general unsatisfactory sleep if they take three grams before bedtime. Researchers investigated the effects of gelatin on subjective sleep quality and found that it improved daytime sleepiness, daytime cognitive functions, sleep quality and sleep efficacy (sleep time/in-bed time), plus it shortened the time it took to fall asleep and improved slow-wave sleep without changes in the normal/healthy sleep architecture.

Glycine also seems to improve sleep in a different way than traditional sleep medications or hypnotic drugs, which normally means less drowsiness and side effects the following day are experienced. (4)

4. Lifts Your Mood and Improves Cognitive Abilities

The amino acid glycine is considered an “inhibitory neurotransmitter,” which means it acts similarly to some anti-anxiety or antidepressant medications, only without the unwanted complications and side effects. People use glycine and other forms of amino acid therapy to naturally boost mental clarity and calmness because certain amino acids help lower “stress hormones” like norepinephrine and increase “happy hormones” like GABA.

About half of the inhibitory synapses in the spinal cord use glycine, and research shows that when glycine is not properly metabolized it can result in an increased risk for developmental problems, lethargy, seizures and mental retardation. (5)

5. Improves Skin Health

Worried about your skin developing wrinkles, sun damage, stretch marks and other signs of aging? Here’s some good news: Consuming gelatin (and taking collagen directly) can help improve your appearance thanks to its positive effects on skin health and cellular rejuvenation. Collagen is considered a primary building block for skin and is partially what gives skin a youthful, healthy appearance.

Gelatin is important for the process of renewing skin cells and can also help block your skin from UV light damage, therefore protecting you from free radical damage, wrinkles and potentially skin cancer. One of the reasons we develop signs of aging is because of collagen depletion, which for most of us usually starts when we are in our 20s or early 30s and only continues to accelerate. As we continue to lose collagen, we can develop cellulite, loose skin and fine lines as a result of skin losing its firmness. (6)

The older we get and the more we put our bodies through, the more we could use extra collagen to to buffer the effects of environmental stress we all face. Consuming more gelatin is a smart natural skin care habit because it helps stimulate new and non-fragmented collagen, not only restoring skin’s durability, but also helping you maintain strong hair, nails and teeth.

6. Helps Maintain Heart Health

One of the most beneficial roles that gelatin plays in the body is neutralizing chemical compounds that we acquire from eating meat. Animal products, including meat from chicken, beef, turkey, etc., along with eggs, are high in a type of amino acid called methionine.

While methionine has some beneficial roles in the body, in excess it also raises your risk for heart problems and other ailments because it increases the amount of homocysteine in your blood. (7) The more methionine we consume, the more we require other nutrients that help lower homocysteine’s negative effects. High blood levels of homocysteine have been linked with increased inflammation levels and diseases like arteriosclerosis, other forms of cardiovascular disease, stroke, weakened bones and impairments in cognitive functions.

It’s not that you need to cut out all animal products in order to become healthier; rather you need to make sure you balance out the types of nutrients you get from your diet. If you have a diet that’s high in meat/eggs or low in animal products in general (you’re a vegetarian), you want to consume substances like gelatin to make sure you get a range of important amino acids in healthy amounts.

7. Maintains Strong Bones

Our bones require a steady supply of nutrients to maintain their density and strength. Gelatin is rich is nutrients like calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon and sulfur, which help form bones and prevent fractures or bone loss. Those nutrients are also great for bone healing. Researchers now believe that gelatin (collagen hydrolysate) can act like a safe, therapeutic agent for treating osteoarthritis and osteoporosis, even when used long term in chronic disorders. (8)

8. Helps You Feel Full

Just like protein foods and other sources of protein, certain studies have found that taking gelatin supplements (up to about 20 grams) helps increase satiety and control hunger hormones. (9) While it has’t been proven to be a helpful weight loss tool, it seems capable of increasing satiety hormones like leptin and lowering appetite hormones like ghrelin in obese adults.

Collagen vs. Gelatin: What’s the Difference?

Gelatin is a form of hydrolyzed collagen, which means it’s essentially a part of broken-down collagen. Collagen is “the most abundant protein in the animal kingdom” and the major component of connective tissue in the human body, amazingly making up about a quarter of our total body mass. (10)

Collagen is a key builder of healthy skin, muscle, tendons, joints, bones and other tissue in both humans and animals, so when we don’t produce enough it’s no wonder our health suffers big time. Within the body, collagen goes through a series of steps to break down its long-chain proteins into its original amino acids, which are then absorbed and used for collagen synthesis throughout the body.

Collagen and gelatin are similar in terms of their benefits because they contain the same amino acids, but their uses are slightly different and some people digest gelatin a bit more easily. Cooking collagen helps isolate gelatin, and gelatin only dissolves in hot water. It forms a noticeably gel-like substance when mixed with water, but collagen does not. This means gelatin might have more practical uses when cooking, such as making your own jellies or thickening sauces.

To convert collagen from animal parts into gelatin, several processes are used that break down collagen’s intermolecular bonds and release certain amino acids. Extraction of gelatin in food manufacturing is usually done using hot water and acid solutions to hydrolyze collagen into gelatin. Then certain filtration, clarification and sterilization processes usually take place to form the dried, final product, depending on how it’s sold.

Like with most foods or supplements, the less processing it goes through the better it is for you when you consume it. Gelatin degradation is minimized most by deriving gelatin at the lowest temperature possible, which allows it to hold on to its natural peptide structure that provides its benefits.

Gelatin’s Unique Amino Acid Profile

Once isolated from collagen, gelatin is made up of about 98 percent to 99 percent protein by dry weight. It’s considered “unusually high in amino acids glycine and proline,” which are “non-essential” (or conditional) because the body makes some of them on its own. The amino acid composition of gelatin is approximately:

  • 21 percent glycine
  • 12 percent proline
  • 12 percent hydroxyproline
  • 10 percent glutamic acid
  • 9 percent alanine
  • 8 percent arginine
  • 6 percent aspartic acid
  • 4 percent lysine

One of the most valuable amino acids we get from gelatin is glycine. Glycine, in addition to other amino acids like proline, is what comprises collagen, which is critical for giving connective tissue throughout the body its strength and durability. Glycine is also important for our ability to naturally detoxify ourselves of heavy metal chemicals or toxic substances we come into contact with through our diet and environment.

Consuming plenty of glycine has been tied to better glutathione production, which is one the of the most important liver-cleansing detoxifiers we have, helping clean our blood and usher harmful substance out of the body.

In addition to supplying glycine, gelatin contains proline, which has some of the following benefits: (11)

  • works with glycine to form collagen and connective tissues
  • assists in the breakdown of other proteins in the body
  • helps with the formation of new cells
  • helps with proper muscle tissue maintenance
  • protects the digestive system from permeability
  • prevents decrease of muscle mass in endurance runners and athletes

Why We Need Gelatin

Wondering if you actually need to supplement with gelatin or add more to your diet purposefully? For most people, the answer is yes. Traditional diets of our ancestors typically included higher amounts of gelatin, since a “nose-to-tail” eating approach of animals was popular.

But today, the average person runs low on gelatin (and other animal-derived compounds like collagen) since many edible animal parts are often discarded. It’s not chicken breast or filet mignon that supplies gelatin naturally; it’s the “gelatinous” parts of the animals that aren’t usually consumed nowadays, including the animal’s skin, bone marrow and tendons.

While we can make some of the amino acids on our own, we might require more as we age and if we have high levels of inflammation, compromised digestion, weak joints or damaged bones.

Another group likely running very low in gelatin is vegetarians. Considering vegetarians and vegans don’t eat most or all animal products, they have no exposure to it on a normal basis, instead opting for gelatin substitutes like agar agar. A mostly vegetarian diet might be healthy if done carefully, but it raises your risk for being low in all essential amino acids the human body requires since it eliminates “complete proteins” like meat, fish, and sometimes eggs and dairy.

Besides chicken or grass-fed beef gelatin, there are some other surprising products gelatin is hiding in that vegans and vegetarians should be aware of, including:

  • marshmellows
  • certain wheat cereals, like Mini Wheats
  • Jell-O
  • Candies and gummies
  • Peeps
  • Yogurts
  • Frozen bagged vegetables
  • Icing/frosting
  • Cream cheese
  • Sour cream
  • Cough drops

How to Add More Gelatin to Your Diet

Gelatin is used throughout the world. The word is derived from Latin gelatus, and it’s also known as gelantine, gelatina in Spanish and gélatine in French. Gelatin is even used in Norwegian Nynorsk and Bokmål dialects.

The best way to consume gelatin is to eat animals “nose to tail,” meaning you don’t discard the bones and connective tissue but rather make them into broth or soup. You can do this by simply brewing some bone broth at home using this Bone Broth Recipe.

While eating parts of animals that contain collagen and consuming bone broth are both ideal ways to obtain gelatin and collagen, this isn’t always easy or possible. As an alternative, you can use powdered gelatin, which takes much less time to prepare. This way allows you to make a fast, simple substitute for bone broth and gives you another way to acquire beneficial amino acids.

Hydrolyzed gelatin powder can be mixed into any type of liquid, including soups, broths and stews. Some people even use it in cold water like smoothies or juices. When looking to buy it in grocery stores or online, you’ll likely come across gelatin in the form of sheets, granules or powder. You can use instant types in recipes (which usually need to be soaked in water to absorb the fluid and become a gel), but make sure you get the most beneficial kind possible.

Keep in mind that the overall health of an animal impacts the quality of the collagen and gelatin it stores inside its body. It’s important to consume quality animal products, including meat, skin, eggs and collagen, because properly raised animals store more minerals in their bodies, have more beneficial fatty acid profiles (more omega-3s and less omega-6s) and are less contaminated.

I recommend purchasing gelatin and collagen products from animals that have been grass-fed or pasture-raised, since these animals are healthier overall and are not raised using artificial hormones or antibiotics. Going one step further, look for organic gelatin whenever possible to ensure the animals did not eat a diet that consisted of GMO grains or crops sprayed with chemicals. You also want to be careful about where you get your gelatin products from, especially beef gelatin, because you don’t want to be exposed to spongiform encephalopathy, aka mad cow disease.

Final Thoughts

  • A type of protein derived from collagen, gelatin is found in animal parts that provide us with important amino acids, the “building blocks” of proteins.
  • Bone broth — often used to clear up food allergies or intolerances, digestive issues, leaky gut syndrome, autoimmune disorders, and more — is a rich source of naturally occurring gelatin.
  • Gelatin improves gut health and digestion, protects joints and lowers joint pain, helps improve sleep quality, lifts mood and improves cognitive abilities, improves skin health, helps maintain heart health, maintains strong bones, and helps you feel full.
  • It is made up of about 98 percent to 99 percent protein by dry weight. It’s considered unusually high in amino acids glycine and proline.
  • Most people don’t consume enough gelatin nowadays because it’s most prevalent in animal parts we no longer consume: skin, marrow, tendons.

Read Next: Fish Collagen — The Anti-Aging Protein with the Best Bioavailability

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