Garlic oil pills benefits

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How to Make Garlic Oil for Natural Remedies: 9 Amazing Ways to Use it

Garlic, scientifically known as the Allium satvium, is a relative of the onion family and one of the most commonly used ingredients across the globe. Cultivated mostly in the tropical regions, garlic packs both, culinary benefits for its distinctly pungent flavour as well as a multitude of health and medicinal benefits. According to the book Healing Foods by DK Publishing House, two of the most beneficial components of garlic are allicin and diallyl sulfides, which are sulphorous compounds that are antibacterial and antifungal in nature. The book further notes, “Garlic is universally recognised for its health promoting benefits: aiding the circulatory and digestive systems, boosting the immune system, lowering blood pressure, and fighting heart disease. Even helps eliminate toxins.” Garlic can be consumed in many forms or even made into oil. Garlic oil has been proved to bring down the risk of cardiovascular diseases by regulating blood pressure and high cholesterol. But it can be used as a remedy for a host of your regular day to day woes too. Here are a couple of them –

Here are 9 amazing ways you can put the garlic oil into use –

1. Treats Acne
Garlic oil can serve as a great remedy to treat acne. Garlic contains selenium, allicin, vitamin C, copper and zinc, all of which can boost your skin health. Zinc especially has abilities to control sebum production, which is a major contributor to acne. The anti-inflammatory properties of garlic further relaxes the skin. Just combine a few drops of garlic oil to a mud pack. Apply the smooth paste on your face. Let it rest for 10 minutes and rinse it off with cold water.

(Also read: Home-Remedies for Acne and Acne Scars)

How to make garlic oil: Garlic oil can serve as a great remedy to treat acne
2. Immunity Booster
According to the book Healing Foods, garlic oil is antibiotic in nature and can be used to treat cold and cough. In India especially, garlic oil has been long used to treat infections and fever. Rich in immunity-boosting nutrients like vitamins C, B1, and B6, allicin, iron, and phosphorous, garlic oil is a great remedy to boost overall health. Have home-made garlic oil or garlic oil capsules as per the recommended dosage and see the wonders for yourself.

How to make garlic oil: garlic oil is antibiotic in nature and can be used to treat cold and cough

3. Relieves Ear Infection
Garlic oil for ear infections is another traditional remedy your mothers and grandmothers would vouch for. And they have a good reason for it too. The strong antibacterial and antiseptic properties fight against bacterial infection, while also easing the pain caused by the nasty infection. Mix a few drops of garlic oil with a few drops of olive or mustard oil and warm it on low heat. Let it cool, and store the concoction in a small bottle. Carefully dab your cotton in the oil, just a bit, or you can also sprinkle a few drops on the cotton ball and place it inside your ears for some time. Remove the cotton ball immediately if the pain persists, or is worsening the infection.
(Also Read: Home Remedies for Ear Pain)

How to make garlic oil: Garlic oil for ear infections is another traditional remedy

4. Natural Mosquito Repellent
Fed up of mosquitoes hovering around your house? Most market-based repellents fail to do their job efficiently, which is why it is best to make your own home-based natural mosquito repellent. You need just some drops of garlic oil and a cotton pad. Rub the cotton pad on your skin and walk free without the fear of mosquitoes running after your blood. Garlic oil works very well to keep the nasty mosquitoes at bay due to its smell. You can also spray it around to ward off mosquitoes. A patch test on your skin is recommended to avoid any allergic reaction.
(Also read: 8 Genius Home Remedies for Mosquito Bites That Really Work!)

How to make garlic oil: You need just some drops of garlic oil and a cotton pad
5. Relieves Toothache
Toothaches can be quite nasty. You can’t eat anything or even sit in peace because of the excruciating pain that refuses to fade away. Here again garlic oil can help. The active compound allicin helps reduce tooth pain and inflammation and also bacterial activity thereby prevents tooth decay. Sprinkle a few drops of garlic oil on a cotton ball, and press it in the affected toot area for about 15-20 minutes. This should ease your pain instantly.
(Also read:4 Natural Home Remedies for Toothache)

How to make garlic oil: Toothaches can be quite nasty
6. Prevents Hair Loss
Rich in sulphur, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and vitamin B1, garlic oil can not only prevent hair loss and damage but also strengthen hair roots and follicles, boosting faster hair growth. Regular oiling of your hair and scalp with garlic oil can improve blood circulation in the scalp area, further boosting hair health and preventing hair breakage and loss. For best result, massage your hair and scalp with garlic oil and leave it on overnight. Rinse it away with mild shampoo and water the next day.

(Also Read: Home Remedies For Your Hair Woes)

How to make garlic oil: garlic oil can not only prevent hair loss and damage but also strengthen hair roots and follicles
7. Treats Dandruff
Dandruff is nothing but the dry flakes of your scalp chipping away due to high inflammation under your scalp. Garlic oil with its high anti-inflammatory properties and sulphur helps calm inflamed skin, and prevents itchiness caused by dandruff. Massage your scalp thoroughly with garlic oil. Leave it overnight and rinse it off with cold water and shampoo the following day.

(Also Read: 5 Effective Home Remedies To Get Rid Of Dandruff)How to make garlic oil: Dandruff is nothing but the dry flakes of your scalp chipping away due to high inflammation

8. Treats Itchy Skin Ailments
Garlic oil can be applied on the skin to treat a multitude of skin ailments. Due to its high anti-fungal properties, fungal infections, warts and corns can be kept at bay. Fungal infections like ringworm and athlete’s foot can also be treated with garlic oil. Soak your feet in warm water bath and crushed garlic to get rid of the infection. For its high anti-inflammatory properties, it can also relieve itchy psoriasis outbreaks on your skin. Psoriasis is a condition in which skin cells combine and form scales and itchy, dry patches on the skin. Just dab and rub a little garlic oil on the affected areas and see the result for yourself.

(Also Read: Home Remedies for Dry Itchy Skin) How to make garlic oil: Garlic oil can be applied on the skin to treat a multitude of skin ailments

9. Natural Pesticides for Garden Pests
Fond of gardening? Protect your beloved plants from pesky garden pests with the help of garlic oil. Garden pests cannot stand the smell of garlic. Try making a home-made, all natural pesticide by combining garlic oil, water, liquid soap and mineral oil. Spray some of the concoction on your plants to keep the critters at bay. It is always good to make use your own pesticide so that you grow healthy plants. Ensure that you use the home-made pesticide every day.

How to make garlic oil: Protect your beloved plants from pesky garden pests with the help of garlic oil
One oil and so many benefits! Incredible, isn’t it? Make some garlic oil at home today and reap its benefits.

How to Make Garlic Oil

You would need 1 clove of garlic, and 1/4th cup of olive oil. Peel the clove of garlic and mince it. Transfer the minced garlic to a medium pan and add oil. Warm the oil slightly on the stove. Make sure you don’t overheat the oil, else you will end up burning it. Collect the oil in a small container with a lid. Let the oil and garlic infuse overnight .

About Sushmita SenguptaSharing a strong penchant for food, Sushmita loves all things good, cheesy and greasy. Her other favourite pastime activities other than discussing food includes, reading, watching movies and binge-watching TV shows.

What Is Garlic Oil? How Can You Use It To Get Maximum Health Benefits? Swathi Handoo Hyderabd040-395603080 November 27, 2019

Before the advent of modern medicine, our ancestors relied on nature’s wonders to stay healthy. One of the most popular traditional medicines is garlic. Garlic is renowned for its remarkable ability to fight numerous diseases. But, have you ever heard about its extract called garlic oil?

At a small scale, garlic oil is made by crushing and soaking garlic cloves in vegetable oil. For large scale preps, it is produced by steam distillation. Like its source, garlic oil also has high therapeutic value. To know more about its health benefits and ways to use it, keep scrolling!

Table Of Contents

Garlic Oil: Origin And Importance

Garlic (Allium sativum L.) originated in Central Asia. Its plant has been used as a flavoring agent and traditional medicine since time immemorial. It is known not only for its flavor but also for its digestive properties (1).

Garlic is used as a diuretic, diaphoretic, expectorant, and stimulant. The plant has been used to treat tuberculosis, cough, and cold in ancient medicine. Extracts of garlic have shown broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal activity as well (1).

In this article, we’ll be focussing on garlic oil. The essential oils of garlic have high amounts of sulfur-containing compounds. The medicinal properties of garlic have been attributed to its abundance of sulfur-containing compounds (1).

Additionally, garlic oil is known for its antifungal, antibacterial, antiparasitic, antiviral, and insecticidal properties (1).

Check out the long list of health benefits you can reap from this oil in the next section.

10 Benefits Of Garlic Oil For Health And Wellness

From clearing up a chronic ear infection to boosting your immunity, garlic oil offers many benefits. It can control hypertension and relieve toothache too. Find out how and why below.

1. Protects And Manages Heart Health

Garlic oil has been found to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Its active component, diallyl disulfide, is responsible for its anti-atherosclerotic effects. It increases the fibrinolytic activity (prevents blood clots) in patients and healthy individuals (2).

Platelet aggregation is one of the first steps in the formation of blood clots. When these clots occur in your coronary or cerebral arteries, it can lead to myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. A garlic-rich diet can prevent platelet aggregation or thrombosis (3).

Garlic oil also increases the elasticity of blood vessels and circulation. Hence, it is considered to lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) (2), (4).

2. Heals Fungal Infection And Diseases

Experimental studies have shown that garlic oil has excellent antifungal activity. It inhibits the growth of fungal species like Candida albicans and Penicillium funiculosum (5).

Garlic oil can penetrate the membranes of fungal organelles. Microscopic observations have revealed how garlic oil damages fungal mitochondria and vacuoles. It alters the expression of certain essential genes that are involved in basic regulatory functions and pathogenicity of fungi (5).

Garlic oil and other garlic formulations can be used to treat candidiasis. Other fungal diseases, like tinea pedis (foot infection), superficial mycoses (skin infection), and otomycosis (ear infection), can also be addressed with this oil or extract (5), (6), (7).

3. Effective Remedy For Skin Diseases And Wounds

The oil and extracts of garlic have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, fibrinolytic, and wound healing properties that may substitute for classic antibiotics and antiseptics (8).

Administering garlic oil to female rats reduced postoperative inflammation. The sulfur-containing compounds in garlic extracts accelerate the formation of new tissue on and activate blood supply to open wounds (6).

Garlic extracts are also effective in healing a variety of skin conditions like atopic dermatitis, acne, psoriasis, fungal infections, scars, wrinkles, and other signs of aging (6).

4. Has Immunity-boosting And Anti-inflammatory Effects

Garlic oil and other derivatives of garlic exhibit anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. It can suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cellular messengers like nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins, and interleukins. Its sulfur compounds act on the immune system cells that trigger the production of such molecules (9).

Arachidonic acid is a precursor of several anti-inflammatory compounds like prostaglandins. Garlic oil has been proven to be a potent inhibitor of arachidonic acid. It may also inhibit the enzymes involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins and other eicosanoids (10).

Animal studies have proven the immunomodulatory effects of garlic oil. Treatment with this oil reportedly shifts the balance of Th1 and Th2 cells towards Th2 cells.

While Th1 cells are responsible for the production of inflammatory compounds,

the Th2 cells subset trigger the immune response (humoral or body) to douse the inflammation. This step involves antibodies and designated cells and brings about the anti-inflammatory effect (11).

5. Prevents Neurodegenerative Diseases And Improves Brain Health

Distilled garlic oil contains various sulfur compounds like diallyl disulfide (DADS) and diallyl trisulfide (DAT). These organic compounds prevent the oxidation and accumulation of cholesterol (12).

It is proven that lipid peroxidation is one of the critical factors behind aging. Excess cholesterol/lipids can get oxidized and form amyloid plaques or clots in the brain, heart, and bloodstream (12).

Amyloid plaques can narrow blood vessels and cause blood clots, which may ultimately cause neuron degeneration. Rapid neuronal cell death leads to memory loss or dementia. In later stages, such dementia can result in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular dementia, and atherosclerosis as well (12).

6. Induces Hair Growth And Strength

Alopecia or hair loss can arise due to multiple reasons. Genetic tendencies, environmental triggers, exposure to chemicals, medicines, oxidative stress, and prolonged illness are a few of them.

One trigger of alopecia that can be corrected is nutritional deficiency (13).

Minerals like zinc, calcium, iron, copper, chromium, iodine, and magnesium are necessary for building hair fiber. Biotin, vitamin B (folic acid, pyridoxine, and pantothenic acid), vitamin A, and vitamin E maintain the scalp and root health (13).

Supplementing them in your diet is the easiest way to stimulate hair growth. Spinach, broccoli, and garlic pods are rich in these micronutrients. Thus, eating garlic or applying garlic oil can prevent hair loss (13), (14).

Aromatherapy with garlic oil is also a good option. It can improve blood circulation in your scalp. Due to its phytochemical composition, garlic oil exerts antibacterial activity as well. You can apply it directly to your scalp or crush a few garlic pods and mix with yogurt to use as a mask (14).

7. Calms Toothaches And Mouth Sores

Garlic is commonly used as a spice because of its medicinal properties. Chewing garlic pods releases the essential oils and phytochemicals into the oral cavity. These active elements can heal mouth sores, oral ulcers, sore gums, and toothache (15).

Garlic has broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Directly applying a paste made from garlic bulb on affected teeth can relieve gingivitis (15).

It can also prevent the formation of dental plaque by inhibiting oral bacteria (Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. Salivarius,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Lactobacillus spp.) (15)

8. Eliminates Enteric (Gut) Pathogens

Garlic oil demonstrates wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity against gut (enteric) pathogens. It can inhibit enteric bacteria that cause food poisoning too (16).

The allicin and other organosulfur compounds found in this oil are identified as the active ingredients that show inhibitory effects against Helicobacter pylori – gut pathogens that cause gastric cancer and several gastrointestinal (GI) disorders (16).

However, the antimicrobial activity might be reduced in the acidic enteric environment. This is probably why this property of garlic oil is not well-researched or documented (16).

9. Possesses Antiviral Activity

Garlic extracts have antiviral activity as well. Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), influenza B virus, Herpes simplex virus type 1, Herpes simplex virus type 2, Parainfluenza virus type 3, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and human Rhinovirus type 2 are a few viruses that are sensitive to these extracts (17).

Experiments have also proven that allicin-containing supplements can prevent bouts of common cold. Ajoene, allicin, and allitridin are a few antiviral compounds found in garlic extracts.

They enhance the activity of NK-cell (Natural killer-cell). These immune system cells destroy virus-infected cells (17).

Garlic phytochemicals also inactivate critical viral genes and enhance the production of neutralizing antibodies in your blood (17).

10. Has Insecticidal And Acaricidal Properties

Garlic oil has been identified as a potent repellant. It shows an anti-feeding effect against blood-sucking parasites (hematophagous arthropods). By applying it topically on the skin, volunteers experienced about 97% protection from female feeding sandflies (Phlebotomus papatasi) bites (18).

In another experiment, all the Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae that were exposed to 5 ppm (parts per million, a unit of concentration) of diallyl disulfide in garlic oil were killed (100% mortality). However, some studies show garlic oil to be ineffective against adult mosquitoes (19).

Garlic oil also reduces the fecundity (ability to reproduce) of mites. Two-spotted spider mites, beetles, weevils, and other such species have been found to be susceptible to garlic oil. In fact, a few studies have proposed garlic oil to be a better acaricide than rosemary oil, jojoba oil, or a soybean-sunflower oil mix (19).

This section showed what an all-rounder can garlic oil be. Like other garlic extracts, this oil can also work as a herbicide, nematicide, molluscicide, and algicide.

Above all, garlic oil is affirmed Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) as a food ingredient, seasoning, or flavoring by the US FDA (19).

In short, you can use garlic oil for cooking. It is proven to work as a skin conditioner, hair tonic, antiviral and antibacterial agent, and pesticide as well.

Did You Know?

The source of garlic odor is the result of the conversion of the phytochemical alliin to allicin. This conversion is brought about by the enzyme allinase.

This enzymatic conversion takes place only upon cutting or crushing the garlic pods.

Due to the intermediate step of enzymatic conversion, biochemists tend not to regard garlic oil as an ‘essential’ oil.

You must have come across many side effects of garlic. Does garlic oil have side effects as well? Let’s find out!

Does Garlic Oil Have Side Effects?

Though a lot of research has been done on the side effects of garlic, not a lot has been written or studied about the disadvantages of using garlic oil.

We certainly cannot presume it is entirely safe for us either. This is because garlic oil contains phytochemicals like allicin that are harmful to your liver (hepatotoxic) in large doses (19).

Evidence shows acute human health effects caused by these bioactive ingredients. A few of the symptoms include:

  • Dermatitis
  • Halitosis
  • Asthma
  • Coagulation dysfunction
  • Cardiovascular disease or discomfort
  • Gastrointestinal dysfunction
  • Eczema
  • Irritation to open wounds

Consuming whole garlic pods may also trigger such adverse effects.

However, garlic or garlic oil are categorized as non-toxic substances. They are non-toxic to humans and repellent targets like birds and insects too.

Also, garlic and garlic oil are not identified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

This indicates that we can all (well, most of us) use garlic oil.

But, the question remains: how do we use it so that it doesn’t elicit an adverse reaction?

Find out the recommended dosage of garlic oil and tips to use it in the next section.

How To Use Garlic Oil? How Much Of It Is Recommended?

There is no particular set or recommended dose for using garlic oil. The safest option would be to consult a healthcare professional.

Discuss why you wish to use this oil. Weigh out the benefits and risks. Then, follow the dosage set by them for best results.

Pure garlic oil is a product of the steam distillation of garlic. Although edible, it is regarded as unpalatable.

And, don’t forget its characteristic pungent odor!

Despite all this, if you wish to use garlic oil, you can get a bottle of it here. Garlic oil capsules are also a fuss-free and odor-free option. They are user-friendly and effective too. Buy these softgels here.

If you want to make garlic oil at home, that is possible too. But, it is going to be a crude prep.

More importantly, you might end up with ‘garlic-infused’ oil and not proper garlic oil.

Here’s a recipe for the DIY buff in you!

How To Make Garlic Oil At Home

  1. Crush four cloves of garlic directly in a heated saucepan.
  2. Pour in half a cup (120 ml) of olive oil.
  3. Squeeze the cloves of garlic through a garlic press or a ladle directly into the pan. (You don’t need to peel the garlic before putting it in the press. The peel will remain in the press while you squeeze it.)
  4. Stir the garlic and olive oil together, so the garlic is evenly distributed in the pan.
  5. Heat the mixture over medium-low heat for 3 to 5 minutes.
  6. Cook the mixture, stirring it occasionally until the garlic is light brown and slightly crispy.
  7. Don’t let the oil come to a boil. A light simmer is enough. (Avoid overcooking the garlic. If it turns very dark, you’ve cooked it too long, and the oil will be bitter.)
  8. Remove the pan from the heat and pour the mixture into a container.
  9. Let the mixture cool down completely.
  10. If you don’t want tiny bits of garlic in your oil, you can strain it through a colander or sieve as you pour the mixture into the container. Leaving the garlic pieces in the oil will create a stronger flavor as it continues to infuse over time.
  11. Transfer the contents into an airtight container and seal it tightly.
  12. Keep the oil in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  13. Shake the container now and then to mix up the flavors.

You can also prepare garlic oil without cooking/roasting. It will take a little longer, though. This is what you need to do:

  1. Crush 8-10 medium-sized garlic cloves with the back of your knife.
  2. Peel the crushed pods. Use your hands to do so to minimize the loss of oils.
  3. Transfer the crushed pods to a 0.5 to 1 liter glass jar with an airtight lid.
  4. Add about two cups (450-500 ml) of olive oil. (You can replace olive oil with an oil of your choice. You can also add herbs like rosemary, thyme, and parsley along with the garlic cloves for added aroma.)
  5. Seal the jar tightly and store it in the refrigerator for 2-5 days.

That makes a bottle of garlic-infused herb oil!

Caution!

  • Throw homemade garlic oil away after five days if you haven’t used it to be safe and avoid ingesting dangerous bacteria.
  • Freeze the garlic oil for up to one year if you want it to last longer.
  • Never store garlic oil at room temperature. It can cause botulism, a rather fatal form of food poisoning.
  • Soak garlic and herbs in 3% citric acid at room temperature for 24 hours. This way, the acid fully penetrates the ingredients and creates an unsuitable environment for the growth of botulism bacteria (20).

Keep reading for more tips on storing these oils.

How To Store Garlic Infused Oil

All vegetable oils retain quality better at cold temperatures and away from light.

Oils infused with herbs like basil, garlic, oregano, and rosemary can be safely stored at room temperature. However, oil flavor is maintained for a longer time if you store it in a refrigerator or freezer (20).

It is also best to protect infused oils from light. Store them in dark or amber-colored bottles. Make sure the bottles are clean and food grade (20).

In Conclusion…

Garlic and its oil have exceptional therapeutic value. Diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, ajoene, alliin, allicin, methyl allyl trisulfide, allyl sulfide, citral, geraniol, linalool, α– and β-phellandrene are the predominant constituents of garlic oil.

They are responsible for the long list of benefits that garlic oil offers. Since it is considered to be non-toxic, garlic oil can be used for ingestion and topical application. It is also of great use in public health and agriculture.

Meet your doctor right away and figure out ways to incorporate this versatile oil into your diet. We can also help you get answers to your queries. Post them along with your feedback or suggestions in the comments section below.

  1. “The Chemical Compositions of the Volatile Oils…” Foods, US National Library of Medicine.
  2. “Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects” Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, US National Library of Medicine.
  3. “Garlic and Organosulfur Compounds” Micronutrient Information Center, Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University.
  4. “A randomized trial of the effects of garlic oil upon” Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis, US National Library of Medicine.
  5. “Antifungal activity, kinetics and molecular mechanism…” Scientific Reports, US National Library of Medicine.
  6. “Garlic in dermatology” Dermatology Reports, US National Library of Medicine.
  7. “Antifungal effects of Allium sativum (garlic) extract…” Letters in Applied Microbiology, US National Library of Medicine.
  8. “Effect of intraabdominal administration of Allium sativum…” European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, US National Library of Medicine.
  9. “The Immunomodulation and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Garlic…” Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, US National Library of Medicine.
  10. “Effect of Garlic Oil on Hepatic Arachidonic Acid Content…” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Academia.
  11. “Immunomodulation and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Garlic Compounds” Journal of Immunology Research, US National Library of Medicine.
  12. “Neuroprotective Effects of Garlic A Review Libyan Journal of Medicine, US National Library of Medicine.
  13. “ALOPECIA: HERBAL REMEDIES” International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research.
  14. Ethnopharmacological survey of home remedies…” Research Article, BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.
  15. “Ethnomedicinal Plants Used by Traditional Healers to Treat…” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, US National Library of Medicine.
  16. “Antimicrobial Properties of Garlic Oil against Human Enteric…” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, US National Library of Medicine.
  17. “Therapeutic Uses and Pharmacological Properties of Garlic…” Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences, US National Library of Medicine.
  18. “[Evaluation of repellent and anti-feeding effect of…” Annali dell’Istituto superiore di sanita., US National Library of Medicine.
  19. “Garlic and Garlic Oil Profile” New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension.
  20. Making Garlic- and Herb-Infused Oils At Home” PNW 664, University of Idaho.

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Swathi Handoo

Swathi holds a Master’s degree in Biotechnology and has worked in places where actual science and research happen. Blending her love for writing with science, Swathi writes for Health and Wellness and simplifies complex topics for readers from all walks of life.And on the days she doesn’t write, she learns and performs Kathak, sings Carnatic music compositions, makes plans to travel, and obsesses over cleanliness.

10 Incredible Benefits of Garlic Oil

Benefits of garlic oil include its ability to aid in weight loss efforts, soothe headaches, reduce inflammation, stimulate circulation, optimize digestion, and boost cognitive function and the immune system. Other benefits include relief from congestion, lower cholesterol levels, and normal blood sugar levels.

What is Garlic Oil?

Garlic oil is made through steam distillation of fresh garlic cloves or by soaking the cloves in a carrier oil and allowing the active components of the garlic to be leached into the oil. Garlic is scientifically known as Allium sativum and is known as one of the healthiest foods you can add to your diet.

Garlic oil can be used in culinary applications and is also widely applied in natural medicine practices. The oil is also widely available in oral tablet or capsule form, although this delivers a far less concentrated dose of garlic’s active ingredients. The majority of the health benefits acquired through garlic oil are attributed to its high content of allicin, sulfide compounds, key amino acids, and enzymes, as well as ajoene and other antioxidant compounds.

Benefits of Garlic Oil

Using garlic oil is popular for people struggling with obesity, metabolic disorders, diabetes, high blood pressure, indigestion, a weak immune system, anemia, arthritis, congestion, colds, flu, headaches, diarrhea, constipation, and poor nutrient uptake, among others.

Improves Digestion

Garlic juice can be a very effective remedy for constipation and inflammation in the gut, given its high antioxidant content and stimulating nature. It can help improve digestion and stimulate peristaltic motion, and even reduce the risk of various gastrointestinal issues.

Reduces Inflammation

Allicin, found in significant levels in garlic oil, makes it valuable for topical remedies and internal use for soothing inflammatory conditions. Allicin is a very powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound that can ease tissue irritation and reduce pain in joints and localized areas.

Treats Metabolic Disorder

Many people use garlic oil for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, which tends to be accompanied by high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and obesity. The antioxidants in this oil can directly impact this syndrome, lessening all of those risk factors and optimizing metabolic activity.

Relieves Headaches

Anecdotal evidence suggests that applying small amounts of garlic oil to the temples, or consuming a small amount of this concentrated oil, can quickly relieve inflammation in the temples and capillaries. This may reduce the occurrence of migraines and headaches.

Powerful Antioxidants

Allicin is not only one of the most versatile and powerful antioxidants that we know of but is also found in extremely high concentrations in garlic oil. Antioxidants are linked with decreasing oxidative stress, preventing premature aging and also reducing the risk of various diseases.

Regulates Diabetes

The hypoglycemic nature of garlic oil is well known, as it can help to regulate insulin production and energy consumption by the body. This oil is ideal for optimizing metabolic activity and help prevent glucose spikes and drops. According to an animal study by the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, garlic oil boosts glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes.

Prevents Obesity

The use of garlic oil is known to kick-start the metabolism, which equates to passive fat burning, in addition to the cholesterol-lowering power of this oil. Garlic can also help suppress the appetite, while the sulfide compounds can create a feeling of fullness, which will reduce overeating and snacking between meals.

Maintains Respiratory Health

Inhaling garlic oil, similar to eating garlic, can quickly clear the sinuses and relieve pressure. Beyond that, however, garlic oil can also reduce allergic sensitivity, helping minimize asthmatic episodes and clear congestion.

Strengthens Immune System

Not only is garlic oil packed with antioxidants but it also has clear antibacterial, antiviral, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties. This makes it ideal for treating topical ailments on the skin, while also boosting digestive health and wiping out bacterial infections growing in your gut.

Stimulates Nutrient Uptake

The sulfide compounds and antioxidants found in garlic oil can stimulate more efficient nutrient uptake in the digestive system, including the absorption of calcium, iron, and potassium. For people struggling with anemia or other nutrient deficiencies, garlic oil is an excellent base for their diet.

Performance Enhancer

Traditionally, garlic has been used by athletics in ancient Greece to enhance performance in the Olympics. It had also been used to reduce fatigue and build up the energy of laborers. Recent studies show that garlic oil can improve physical performance in people with heart disease.

Strengthen Bones

Preliminary studies show that the oil extract of garlic can minimize bone loss and prevent osteoarthritis by increasing estrogen levels in menopausal women.

Garlic Oil Side Effects

This powerful natural oil does come along with certain side effects, including dangerously low blood pressure and blood sugar, stomach issues, skin inflammation, excess bleeding, body odor, and bad breath. Responsible use of this oil, after consulting with your doctor, can often help you avoid the more serious side effects of this oil.

  • Bleeding: The active ingredients in garlic oil do have anticoagulant effects, which may be dangerous for people on blood-thinners, or those who are preparing for surgery in the near future.
  • Heart Problems: This oil may lead to a drop in blood pressure and cholesterol, and may cause dangerous levels of hypotension if taken in conjunction with blood pressure-lowering medications.
  • Odor Issues: Garlic is legendary for its potent smell, which can affect breath and body odor, as the aromatic compounds can emerge in one’s sweat. If you consume an excessive amount of garlic oil, you may experience bad breath and body odor, but this is a side effect difficult to avoid.
  • Skin Irritation: Due to the highly concentrated nature of the active ingredients of garlic oil, it is known to cause skin redness, irritation, swelling, and even hives when topically applied. This is more likely in people who are allergic to garlic but can also occur in people with sensitive skin.
  • Gastrointestinal Distress: When consumed in excessive amounts, garlic oil can have powerful effects on the gastrointestinal system, including diarrhea, cramping, bloating, vomiting, gas and heartburn. If you experience these side effects to a serious degree, discontinue use immediately and speak to your doctor about other options for less potent oils.

Garlic

Background

  • Garlic is the edible bulb from a plant in the lily family. It was traditionally used for health purposes by people in many parts of the world, including the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans.
  • Currently, garlic is used as a dietary supplement for many purposes, including high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, and the common cold, as well as in attempts to prevent cancer and other diseases.
  • Fresh garlic, garlic powder, and garlic oil are used to flavor foods. Garlic dietary supplements are sold as tablets or capsules. Garlic oil may be used topically (applied to the skin).

How Much Do We Know?

  • A great deal of research has been done on garlic, but much of it consists of small, preliminary, or low-quality studies.

What Have We Learned?

  • There’s conflicting evidence about whether garlic lowers blood cholesterol levels. If it does, the effect is small, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the so-called “bad” cholesterol that’s linked to increased heart disease risk) may not be reduced at all.
  • Garlic may be helpful for high blood pressure, but the evidence is weak.
  • Some studies indicate that certain groups of people who eat more garlic may be less likely to develop certain cancers, such as stomach and colon cancers. However, garlic in dietary supplement form has not been shown to help reduce the risk of these cancers. The National Cancer Institute recognizes garlic as one of several vegetables with potential anticancer properties but does not recommend using garlic dietary supplements for cancer prevention.
  • There’s not enough evidence to show whether garlic is helpful for the common cold.

What Do We Know About Safety?

  • Garlic is probably safe for most people in the amounts usually eaten in foods.
  • Side effects include breath and body odor, heartburn, and upset stomach. These side effects can be more noticeable with raw garlic. Some people have allergic reactions to garlic.
  • Taking garlic may increase the risk of bleeding. If you take an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin) or if you need surgery, tell your health care provider if you’re taking or planning to take garlic dietary supplements.
  • Garlic has been found to interfere with the effectiveness of some drugs, including saquinavir, a drug used to treat HIV infection.

Keep in Mind

  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Search the scientific literature for potential herb-drug interactions

Garlic

Generic Name: garlic (GAR lik)
Brand Name: Garlic Oil

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Feb 21, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is garlic?

Garlic is an herb also known as Ail, Ajo, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Allium sativum, Camphor of the Poor, Da Suan, Lasun, Lasuna, Nectar of the Gods, Poor Man’s Treacle, Rason, Rust Treacle, or Stinking Rose.

Garlic is a commonly used food and flavoring agent. When used as a food product, garlic is not likely to produce health benefits or side effects. When used as a medicinal product, garlic may produce both desired and unwanted effects on the body.

Garlic products sold as health supplements may vary widely in amount of allicin, the active ingredient in garlic. Allicin is unstable and can be reduced in garlic products that are aged to reduce odor. Odorless garlic may contain little to no allicin. The lower the amount of allicin, the less effective a garlic product might be.

Garlic taken orally (by mouth) has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in treating high blood pressure, coronary artery disease (hardened arteries), stomach cancer, colon cancer or rectal cancer, and in preventing tick bites. Garlic applied to the skin may also be possibly effective in treating fungal skin infections such as ringworm, jock itch, or athlete’s foot.

Garlic has also been used to treat high cholesterol, stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori, cancer, or circulation problems in the legs. However, research has shown that garlic may not be effective in treating these conditions.

Other uses not proven with research have included preventing the common cold, and improving urination problems caused by an enlarged prostate.

It is not certain whether garlic is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. Garlic should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Garlic is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Garlic may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use garlic if you are allergic to it.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

  • a stomach ulcer;

  • problems with digestion; or

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia.

The use of garlic as a flavoring agent in foods is considered safe during pregnancy. However, it is not known whether garlic used as medicine will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

Garlic can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using non hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm with spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking garlic.

Garlic may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice. Garlic taken by mouth in large doses may be harmful to children.

How should I take garlic?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use garlic, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Do not use different forms (cloves, tablets, oil, etc) of garlic at the same time without medical advice. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose.

Do not crush, chew, or break an enteric coated pill. Swallow it whole. The pill has a special coating to protect your stomach. Breaking the pill will damage this coating.

Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with garlic does not improve, or if it gets worse while using this product.

Garlic can affect blood-clotting and may increase your risk of bleeding. If you need surgery, dental work, or a medical procedure, stop taking garlic at least 2 weeks ahead of time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light, or as directed on the package.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra garlic to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking garlic?

Avoid taking fish oil or vitamin E while you are taking garlic.

Also avoid using garlic together with other herbal/health supplements that can also affect blood-clotting. This includes angelica (dong quai), capsicum, clove, danshen, ginger, ginkgo, horse chestnut, panax ginseng, poplar, red clover, turmeric, and willow.

Garlic side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Although not all side effects are known, garlic is thought to be possibly safe when taken for a short period of time.

Stop using garlic and call your healthcare provider at once if you have:

  • redness, swelling, or blistering (when applied to the skin); or

  • easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums).

Common side effects (especially when eating raw garlic) may include:

  • unpleasant breath or body odor;

  • heartburn, burning in your mouth or throat;

  • nausea, vomiting, gas or

  • diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect garlic?

Do not take garlic without medical advice if you are using any of the following medications:

Do not take garlic without medical advice if you are using a medication to treat any of the following conditions:

  • any type of infection (including HIV, malaria, or tuberculosis);

  • anxiety or depression;

  • asthma or allergies;

  • cancer;

  • erectile dysfunction;

  • heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD);

  • high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or a heart condition;

  • migraine headaches;

  • psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders;

  • a psychiatric disorder; or

  • seizures.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with garlic, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this product guide.

Further information

  • Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.02.

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  • Garlic (Advanced Reading)

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Benefits Of Garlic Oil Supplement

  1. It is a natural product- The supplement do not have any synthetic mixture and it is completely natural. You do not have to worry about the quality of the product because it comes in full package and in a protective seal. So, you can use this supplement as a natural item and you can have it orally without a second thought.
  2. Looks after the digestive system- Many people of today face digestive problem and that is why you need to check on the issue or else it can cause dangerous harm on your body. This supplement gives you a better control on your digestive system and you can live a healthy and fit life.
  3. Fight against allergies- If you are suffering from allergies, having the oil supplement is the best idea. It will control your allergies and you can stay without any rashes on your body. Some allergies can create havoc so it is better to check your allergies than to suffer in the long run.
  4. Strengthen the immunity- Garlic oil supplement helps you strengthen the immunity system. In a way, it will help you fight against all odd diseases. The Allicin present in the garlic protects you from all types of diseases and thereby controls your immune system.
  5. Reduce acidity- Acidity is a common problem these days. People suffering from acidity do not belong to particular age group and it can occur anytime and anywhere. Bad lifestyle and unhealthy food habit are the reasons of acidity. Prolong acidity is also very bad and it does affect your internal system of the body. Therefore. You should have this supplement and find out better solution for your acidity problems.
  6. Fights cholesterol- High cholesterol is a bad thing and you need to check the cholesterol level. Having a supplement under the guidance of the health care professional will not give you bad reaction rather you will get good support. Do not make too late and rather you need to work fast to check the cholesterol level.
  7. Stop Acne problems- Are you suffering from acne problems? If yes, then this supplement is your great solution. If you intake the supplement on a regular interval, then you can keep an eye on the acne problem and it will solve all your problems.

Side Effects Of Garlic Oil Supplement

There are no recorded side effects of the supplement. If you are allergic to garlic, then it is necessary that you consult with the health care professional and have a check on the side effects.

It is not safe for pregnant women and you must consult with expert and then any further decision on the intake of the supplement.

Dosage Of Garlic Oil Supplement

You should take the supplement one time after the meal. This supplement is easily available online. You can place the order online and you will get the packet.

The online purchase saves your time and money and gives you good advantage. You can buy the product without any problem and it is available at your doorstep. Grab this opportunity and you will definitely find a good way to stay healthy and fit in the long run.

Why Take a Garlic Supplement?

Katie October 26, 2012 Supplements , VitaBlog Email Print Twitter Pinterest Facebook

This post was most recently updated on December 3rd, 2016

It goes great with tomatoes and basil, makes a perfect addition to hummus and guacamole and is the easiest way to ward off vampires. But did you know that garlic may also provide benefits for your health?

If you’re not sure why or how to take a garlic supplement, read on to get acquainted with this aromatic plant:

What does garlic do? For centuries, garlic has been touted as a natural remedy. It contains several different vitamins and minerals, including potassium, iron and vitamin B6. It also contains several compounds (allicin and allin) that may support cardiovascular function, normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as prostate and colon health.

Will my breath stink? Eating mass quantities of cooked or raw garlic may lead to a mass exodus of your friends, family and co-workers, thanks to its sulfur-containing compounds. But luckily, odorless garlic supplements are available – they typically contain aged garlic that has little to any taste or odor.

Which supplement is best? If you’re worried about garlic breath, try an odorless or deodorized aged garlic supplement made from cold-pressed garlic (as mentioned above) – this method reduces or eliminates the pungent odor without compromising the nutritional value. Garlic supplements are available in capsule, softgel or tablet form, so choose the one that best suits your lifestyle.

Katie

Katie is the Content Manager (and a loyal customer) at Vitacost.com. In her spare time, she enjoys biking with her husband, playing with her pets and writing bios about herself.

Katie is the Content Manager (and a loyal customer) at Vitacost.com. In her spare time, she enjoys biking with her husband, playing with her pets and writing bios about herself.

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Introduction

Dietary factors play a key role in the development of various human diseases. Across cultures, there are many different dietary patterns which are believed to promote human health. Despite cultural differences, there are some shared characteristics of healthy dietary patterns. Perceiving plant foods as beneficial diet is advised by the folklore of many cultures over centuries.

Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has acquired a reputation in different traditions as a prophylactic as well as therapeutic medicinal plant. Garlic has played important dietary and medicinal roles throughout the history.Some of the earliest references to this medicinal plant were found in Avesta, a collection of Zoroastrian holy writings that was probably compiled during the sixth century BC (Dannesteter, 2003 ▶). Garlic has also played as an important medicine to Sumerian and the ancient Egyptians. There is some evidence that during the earliest Olympics in Greece, garlic was fed to the athletes for increasing stamina (Lawson and Bauer, 1998 ▶).

Ancient Chinese and Indian medicine recommended garlic to aid respiration and digestion and to treat leprosy and parasitic infestation (Rivlrn, 1998 ▶).In the medieval period, garlic was also played an important role in the treatment of different diseases. Avicenna (1988) ▶, in his well-known book, Al Qanoon Fil Tib (The Canon of Medicine), recommended garlic as a useful compound in treatment of arthritis, toothache, chronic cough, constipation, parasitic infestation, snake and insect bites, gynecologic diseases, as well as in infectious diseases (as antibiotic). With the onset of Renaissance, special attention was paid in Europe to the health benefits of garlic. Garlic has attracted particular attention of modern medicine because of widespread belief about its effects in maintaining good health. In some Western countries, the sale of garlic preparations ranks with those of leading prescription drugs. There is appreciable epidemiologic evidence that demonstrates therapeutic and preventive roles for garlic. Several experimental and clinical investigations suggest many favorable effects of garlic and its preparations. These effects have been largely attributed to i) reduction of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, ii) reduction of cancer risk, iii) antioxidant effect, iv) antimicrobial effect, and v) enhancement of detoxification foreign compound and hepatoprotection (Colín-González, 2012 ▶; Aviello, 2009 ▶). In this review, a survey on current experimental as well as clinical state of knowledge about the preventive and therapeutic effects of garlic in different diseases is given.

Garlic is a bulbous plant; grows up to 1.2 m in height. Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown in mild climates (Figure). There are different types or subspecies of garlic, most notably hardneck garlic and softneck garlic. Allicin (allyl 2-propenethiosulfinate or diallyl thiosulfinate) is the principal bioactive compound present in the aqueous extract of garlic or raw garlic homogenate. When garlic is chopped or crushed, allinase enzyme is activated and produce allicin from alliin (present in intact garlic). Other important compounds present in garlic homogenate are 1 -propenyl allyl thiosulfonate, allyl methyl thiosulfonate, (E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca- l,6,11-triene 9- oxide (ajoene), and y-L-glutamyl-S-alkyl- L-cysteine. The adenosine concentration increases several-fold as the homogenate is incubated at room temperature for several hours.

Another widely studied garlic preparation is aged garlic extract. Sliced draw garlic stored in 15-20% ethanol for more than 1.5 year is refereed to aged garlic extract. This whole process is supposed to cause considerable loss of allicin and increased activity of certain newer compounds, such as S-allylcysteine, sallylmercaptocysteine, allixin, N-0 -(Ideoxy- D-fructos- 1 -yl)-L-arginine, and selenium which are stable and significantly antioxidant. Medicinally used, garlic oil is mostly prepared by steam-distillation process. Steam-distilled garlic oil consists of the diallyl, allylmethyl, and dimethyl mono to hexa sulfides (Lawson and Bauer, 1998 ▶). Botanically, Allium sativum is a member of the Lillaceae family, along with onions, chives, and shallots (Iciek et al., 2009 ▶; Lanzotti, 2006 ▶).

Garlic bulbs

Effects of garlic on cardiovascular diseases

Garlic and its preparations have been widely recognized as agents for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The wealth of scientific literature supports the proposal that garlic consumption have significant effects on lowering blood pressure, prevention of atherosclerosis, reduction of serum cholesterol and triglyceride, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and increasing fibrinolytic activity (Chan et al., 2013 ▶). Both experimental and clinical studies on different garlic preparations demonstrate these favorable cardiovascular effects.

In in vivo animal experiments, intravenous administration of garlic extracts produced slight reductions in both systolic and diastolic pressures (Sial and Ahmed, 1982 ▶) and oral ingestion of garlic extract in hypertensive animals brought the blood pressure back to the normal level (Chandekar and Jain, 1973 ▶). Several clinical studies showed that garlic reduced blood pressure in more than 80% of patients suffering from high blood pressure (Auer et al., 1989 ▶; Konig and Scineider, 1986 ▶; Petkov, 1979 ▶; Omar, 2013 ▶; Stabler et al., 2012 ▶). In one trial, investigation on 47 hypertensive patients showed that garlic significantly decreased the mean systolic blood pressure by 12 mmHg and the mean supine diastolic blood pressure by 9 mmHg versus placebo. The authors stated that garlic was free from side effects and no serious complication was reported (Auer 1990 ▶).

In another study, 200 mg of garlic powder was given three times daily, in addition to hydrochlorothiazide-triamterene baseline therapy, produced a mean reduction of systolic blood pressure by 10-11 mmHg and of diastolic blood pressure by 6-8 mmHg versus placebo (Kandziora 1988 ▶). However, these data are insufficient to determine if garlic provides a therapeutic advantage versus placebo in terms of reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity in patients diagnosed with hypertension (Stabler et al., 2012 ▶).

It has been suggested that the mechanism of antihypertensive activity of garlic is due to its prostaglandin-like effects, which decrease peripheral vascular resistance (Rashid and Khan, 1985 ▶). Aged garlic extract was superior to placebo in lowering systolic blood pressure in patients suffering from uncontrolled hypertension. A dosage of 240-960 mg of aged garlic extract containing 0.6-2.4 of S-allylcysteine significantly lowered blood pressure by about 12 mmHg over 12 weeks (Ried et al., 2013a ▶).

Garlic administration in rats suffering from hypercholesterolemia, induced by a high-cholesterol diet, significantly reduced serum cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL, but there was no effect on serum HDL (Kamanna and Chandrasekhara, 1982 ▶). In in vitro experiments, garlic administration suppressed LDL oxidation and increased HDL, which may be one of the protective mechanisms of the beneficial effects of garlic in cardiovascular health (Rahman and Lowe, 2006 ▶) . Long term application of garlic and its preparations on experimental atherosclerosis induced by a high cholesterol diet, showed 50% reduction in atheromatous lesions, particularly in the aorta (Jain, 1977 ▶). Most of human studies on lipid lowering effects of garlic and garlic preparations described significant decrease in serum cholesterol and triglyceride (Gardner et al., 2001 ▶; Ziaei et al., 2001 ▶). A meta-analysis including 39 primary trials of the effect of 2 months administration of garlic preparations on total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides was performed (Ried et al., 2013b ▶). The results suggest garlic is effective in reduction of total serum cholesterol by 17±6 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 9 ± 6 mg/dL in subjects with elevated total cholesterol levels (>200 mg/dL). An 8% reduction in total serum cholesterol is of clinical relevance and is associated with a 38% reduction in risk of coronary events at 50 years of age. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels improved only slightly, and triglycerides were not influenced significantly. Garlic was highly tolerable in all trials and was associated with minimal side effects.

This meta-analysis study concluded that garlic should be considered as an alternative option with a higher safety profile than conventional cholesterol-lowering medications in patients with slightly elevated cholesterol (Ried et al., 2013b ▶). However, a few studies using garlic powder, having low allicin yields, failed to show any lipid lowering effects (Lutomski, 1984 ▶; Luley et al., 1986 ▶). It has been suggested that different people might have different responses to garlic, thus garlic may be more beneficial for some specific groups (Zeng et al., 2013).

Preventive effect of garlic on atherosclerosis has been attributed to its capacity to reduce lipid content in arterial membrane. Allicin, S-allyl cysteine, presented in aged garlic extract and diallyldi-sulfide, presented in garlic oil are the active compounds responsible for anti-atherosclerotic effect (Gebhardt and Beck, 1996 ▶; Yu-Yah and Liu, 2001 ▶). The plasma fibrinolytic activity in animals, which was decreased on cholesterol feeding, was considerably increased when this diet was supplemented with garlic (Mirhadi et al., 1993 ▶).

Several human studies on plasma fibrinolytic activity have found that garlic increased fibrinolytic activity in healthy individuals as well as in acute myocardial infarction patients (Bordia et al., 1998 ▶). It was shown that pre-treatment with garlic significantly inhibited intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, thromboxane-A2 (a potent platelet aggregator) synthesis and protected against thrombocytopenia induced by collagen or arachidonate application in rabbits.

These observations indicate that garlic may be beneficial in the prevention of thrombosis. Garlic has also been shown to inhibit platelet adhesion or aggregation in human investigations. It has been shown that the aged garlic extract inhibited the binding of ADP-activated platelets to immobilized fibrinogen. This suggested that aged garlic extract inhibited platelet aggregation via inhibition of the GPIIb/IIIa receptor and an increase in cAMP (Allison et al., 2012 ▶). Furthermore, it was reported that garlic decreases the risk of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases, plasma viscosity, and unstable angina and increases elastic property of blood vessels and capillary perfusion (Sumiyoshi and wargovich, 1990 ▶).

Seventy-eight patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease were randomized to receive garlic or a placebo medication. The dose of garlic was 400 mg oral standardized garlic powder twice daily. Both men and women aged 40 to 75 years were enrolled in the study. After twelve weeks of treatment, pain-free walking distance increased similarly whether receiving garlic or placebo. Similarly there was no difference in the changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and pressure differences between the ankle and brachial pressures. No severe side effects were observed although more people taking garlic (28%) than placebo (12%) complained of a noticeable garlic smell. This indicates that any improvements in symptoms of peripheral arterial occlusive disease with garlic may require longer-term treatment and follow up than in this study (Jepson et al., 2000 ▶).

Anti-tumor effect of garlic

Many in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested possible cancer-preventive effects of garlic preparations and their respective constituents. Garlic has been found to contain a large number of potent bioactive compounds with anticancer properties, largely allylsulfide derivatives. Different garlic derivatives have been reported to modulate an increasing number of molecular mechanisms in carcinogenesis, such as DNA adduct formation, mutagenesis, scavenging of free radicals, cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis. The growth rate of cancer cells is reduced by garlic, with cell cycle blockade that occurs in the G2/M phase (Capasso, 2013 ▶). In 1990, the U.S. National Cancer Institute initiated the Designer Food Program to determine which foods played an important role in cancer prevention (Dahanukar and Thatte, 1997 ▶). They concluded that garlic may be the most potent food having cancer preventive properties. Garlic has a variety of anti-tumor effects, including tumor cell growth inhibition and chemopreventive effects. In rodents, garlic and its constituents have been reported to inhibit the development of chemically induced tumors in the liver (Kweon et al., 2003 ▶), colon (Knowles and Milner, 2003 ▶), prostate (Hsing et al., 2002 ▶), bladder (Lau et al., 1986 ▶), mammary gland (Amagase and Milner, 1993 ▶), esophagus (Wargovich et al., 1988 ▶), lung (Sparnins et al., 1986 ▶), skin (Nishino et al., 1989 ▶), and stomach (Wattenberg et al., 1989 ▶) in both rodent and human studies. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), an organosulfur compound isolated from garlic, has been shown anticancer activity both in in vitro and in vivo investigations. The cytotoxicity of DATS toward prostate epithelial cells reduced as opposed to PC-3 cancer cells (Borkowska, 2013 ▶).

Possible anticarcinogenic mechanisms of garlic and its constituents may include the inhibition of carcinogen activation (Amagase and Milne, 1993 ▶), the enhancement of detoxification (Sumiyoshi and Wargovich, 1990 ▶), excretion (Tadi et al., 1991a ▶), and the protection of DNA from activated carcinogens (Tadi et al., 1991b ▶). Furthermore, DATS reduced tumor mass and number of mitotic cells within tumors. DATS reduced mitosis in tumors, decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased acetylation of H3 and H4, inhibited cell cycle progression, and decreased pro-tumor markers (survivin, Bcl-2, c-Myc, mTOR, EGFR, VEGF) (Wallace et al., 2013 ▶). Garlic components have been found to block covalent binding of carcinogens to DNA, enhance degradation of carcinogens, have anti-oxidative and free radical scavenging properties, and regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and immune responses. Ajoene, a garlic stable oil soluble sulfur rich compound and garlic-derived natural compound, have been shown to induce apoptosis in leukemic cells in addition to the other blood cells of leukemic patients. Ajoene induced apoptosis in human leukemic cells via stimulation of peroxide production, activation of caspase-3-like and caspase-8 activity. Garlic synergizes the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, a breast cancer suppressor, and antagonizes the effect of linoleic acid, a breast cancer enhancer (Tsubura et al., 2011 ▶).

Anti-proliferative activity of ajoene was demonstrated against a panel of human tumor cell lines (Li et al., 2002 ▶). Furthermore, allicin inhibits proliferation of human mammary endometrial and colon cancer cells. Growth inhibition is accompanied by an accumulation of the cells in WIG1 and G2lM phase of the cell cycle. Thus allicin is also responsible for the anti-proliferative effect of garlic derivatives. Diallyl sulfide and diallyl disulfide, inhibit arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity and 2-aminofluorene-DNA in human promyelocytic leukemia cells (Lin et al., 2002 ▶). Reduction of the risk of some malignancies by consumption of selenium-enriched plants, such as garlic was suggested (Finley, 2003 ▶). DATS inhibited cell growth of human melanoma A375 cells and basal cell carcinoma cells by enhancement of the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage and by inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis (Wang et al., 2012 ▶).

Diabetes mellitus

Although experimental studies demonstrated a clear hypoglycemic effect of garlic, the effect of garlic on human blood glucose is still controversial. Many studies showed that garlic can reduce blood glucose level in diabetic animals. Garlic was effective in reduction of blood glucose in streptozotocin- as well as alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in rats and mice (Sheela et al., 1995 ▶; Ohaeri, 2001 ▶). Short term benefits of garlic on dyslipidemia in diabetic patients were shown (Ashraf et al., 2005 ▶). Garlic significantly reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol and moderately raised HDL cholesterol as compared with placebo in diabetic patients (Ashraf et al., 2005 ▶). S-allyl cysteine, a bioactive component derived from garlic, restored erectile function in diabetic rats by preventing reactive oxygen species formation through modulation of NADPH oxidase subunit expression (Yang et al., 2013 ▶).

Metformin and Garlic treatment in diabetic patients for 12 weeks reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG), but the percentage of change in FBG was more substantial with metformin supplemented with garlic than with metformin alone (Kumar et al., 2013 ▶). Chronic feeding of garlic extracts showed significant decrease in blood glucose level. However, some other studies showed no change of blood glucose level after that in human. Therefore, the role of garlic in diabetic patients needs to be further investigated (Banejee and Maulik, 2002 ▶). The beneficial effect of garlic on diabetes mellitus is mainly attributed to the presence of volatile sulfur compounds, such as alliin, allicin, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, diallyl sulfide, S-allyl cysteine, ajoene, and allyl mercaptan. Garlic extracts have been reported to be effective in reducing insulin resistance (Padiya and Banerjee, 2013 ▶).

Effect of garlic on chemically-induced hepatotoxicity

Several studies showed that garlic can protect the liver cells from some toxic agents. Acetaminophen is a leading analgesic and antipyretic drug used in many countries. Overdose is known to cause hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in humans and rodents. Although more than 90% of acetaminophen is converted into sulfate and glucouronide conjugates and excreted in the urine, a small portion is metabolized by different liver enzymes (Patten et al., 1993 ▶). This can arylate critical cell proteins and cause toxicity. It is demonstrated that garlic protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Gentamycin also induces hepatic damage as revealed by elevation of liver damage marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase) and reduction in plasma albumin level. Dietary inclusion of garlic powder protects rats against gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity, improves antioxidant status, and modulates oxidative stress (Ademiluyi et al., 2013 ▶). In addition, garlic attenuated hepatotoxicity effect of nitrate in rats. Garlic extract may reduce lipid peroxidation and enhance antioxidant defense system (El-Kott, 2012 ▶).

Anti-microbial effect of garlic

Garlic has been used for centuries in various societies to combat infectious disease. Historically, it is believed that Louis Pasteur described the antibacterial effect of garlic in 1858 for the first time, although no reference is available. More recently, garlic has been proven to be effective against a plethora of gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid-fast bacteria. These include Salmonella, Escherichia coli (Adler and Beuchat, 2002 ▶), Pseudomonas, Proteus, Staphylococcus aureus (Cavallito, 1944 ▶), Escherichia coli, Salmonella (Johnson and Vaughn, 1969 ▶), Klebsiella (Jezowa and Rafinski, 1966 ▶), Micrococcus, Bacillus subtulis (Sharma et al., 1977 ▶), Clostridium (De Witt et al., 1979 ▶), Mycobacterium (Delaha and Garagusi, 1985 ▶), and Helicobacter (O’Gara et al., 2000 ▶). It has been documented that garlic exerts a differential inhibition between beneficial intestinal microflora and potentially harmful enterobacteria (Ress et al., 1993 ▶).

The antibacterial activity of garlic is widely attributed to allicin. It is known that allicin has sulfhydryl modifying activity (Wills, 1956 ▶) and is capable of inhibiting sulfhydryl enzymes. Cysteine and glutathione counteract the thiolation activity of allicin. Garlic extract and allicin have been shown to exert bacteriostatic effects on some vancomycin-resistant enterococci. An inhibitory synergism was observed when used in combination with vancomycin (Jonkers et al, 1999 ▶). It is thought that allicin modifies the sulfhydryl groups on the enzymes of the TN1546 transposon, which encodes vancomycin resistance, enhancing susceptibility to vancomycin.

The antibacterial effect of different concentrations of garlic extract against human dental plaque microbiota has been shown in in vitro study (Houshmand et al., 2013 ▶). The synergism between ciprofloxacin with garlic extract has been shown, but not between ampicillin and the garlic extracts (Zain al-abdeen et al., 2013 ▶). The cloves of garlic and rhizomes of ginger, extracted with 95% ethanol, suggested to have anti-bacterial activity against multi-drug clinical pathogens and can be used for prevention of drug resistant microbial diseases. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most sensitive germ to the mixture (Karuppiah and Rajaram, 2013 ▶). Garlic also suggested as a treatment for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (Dini et al., 2011 ▶).

Anti-protozoal properties

Several studies have shown that the extract was effective against a host of protozoa including Candida albicans (Lemar et al., 2002 ▶), Scedosporium prolificans (Davis et al., 2003 ▶), tinea pedis (Ledezma et al., 2000 ▶), Opalina ranarum, Balantidium entozoon, Entamoeba histolytica, Trypanosomes, Leishmania, Leptomonas, and Crithidia (Reuter et al., 1966 ▶).

Due to the occurrence of unpleasant side effects and increasing resistance to the synthetic pharmaceuticals, garlic was recommended for the treatment of giardiasis. Inhibitory activity of garlic on giardia was noted with crude extract at 25 pg/mlL and the lethal dosage was established as approximately 50 pg/mL. Encouraged by these results, a clinical trial was carried out on patients that had giardiasis (Soffar and Mokhtar, 1991 ▶). Garlic was established as an antigiardial, removing the symptoms from all patients within 24 h and completely removing any indication of giardiasis from the stool within 72 h at a dosage of 1 mg/mL twice daily aqueous extract or 0.6 mg/mL commercially prepared garlic capsules. No in vitro calculations were possible, as the workers could not culture the protozoa in vitro. It was suggested that allicin, ajoene, and organosulfides from garlic are effective antinrotozoals compounds.

Antifungal properties

Antifingal activity was first established in 1936 by Schmidt and Marquardt whilst working with epidermophyte cultures (Lemar et al., 2002 ▶). Many fungi are sensitive to garlic, including Candida (Yousuf, 2011 ▶), Torulopsis, Trichophyton, Cryptococcus (Fromtling and Bulmer, 1978), Aspergillus (Hitokoto et al., 1980 ▶), Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula (Tansey and Appleton, 1975 ▶). Garlic extracts have been shown to decrease the oxygen uptake (Szymona, 1952 ▶), reduce the growth of the organism, inhibit the synthesis of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (Adetumbi et al., 1986 ▶), and damage membranes (Ghannoum, 1988 ▶).

A sample of pure allicin was shown to be antifungal. Removal of the allicin from the reaction by solvent extraction decreased the antifungal activity (Hughes and Lawson, 1991 ▶). Activity has also been observed with the garlic constituents, diallyl trisulfide, against cryptococcal meningitis (Cai, 1991 ▶), ajoene, and against Aspergillus (Yoshida et al., 1987 ▶). Thiol reduced the activity, suggesting the blocking of thiol oxidation by allicin. Inhibition of respiratory activity is thought to be due to inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. The adhesion of Candida is also greatly reduced in the presence of garlic extract (Ghannoum, 1990 ▶). Again, this effect is diminished by the addition of thiol compounds. The addition of ajoene to some fungal growth mixtures, including Aspergillus niger, C. albicans, and Paracoccidiodes, has resulted in inhibition at concentrations lower than that experienced with allicin. Studies with aged garlic extract (with no allicin or allicin-derived constituents) showed no in vitro antifungal activity. However, when given to infected mice, the number of organisms that were seen was reduced by up to 80% (Tadi et al., 1991a ▶).

It has been reported that garlic exhibited antifungal effects on two species, the air-borne pathogen Botrytis cinerea and Trichoderma harzianum (Lanzotti et al., 2012 ▶). Greater satisfaction with the use of garlic rather than nystatin was reported by the patients with denture stomatitis (Bakhshi et al., 2012 ▶).

Antiviral properties

In comparison with the antibacterial action of garlic, very little work has been done to investigate its antiviral properties. The few studies have reported that garlic extract showed in vitro activity against influenza A and B (Fenwick and Hanley, 1985 ▶), cytomegalovirus (Meng et al., 1993 ▶; Nai-Lan et al., 1993 ▶), rhinovirus, HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (Tsai et al., 1985 ▶), herpes simplex virus 2 (Weber et al., 1992 ▶), viral pneumonia, and rotavirus. Allicin, diallyl trisulfide and ajoene have all been shown to be active (Hughes et al., 1989 ▶; Weber., 1992 ▶).

In the case of HIV, it is thought that ajoene acts by inhibiting the integrin dependent processes (Tatarintsev et al., 1992 ▶). Allyl alcohol and diallyl disulfide have also proven effective against HIV-infected cells (Shoji et al., 1993 ▶). No activity has been observed with allicin or S-allyl cysteine. It appears that only allicin and allicin-derived substances are active. Taken together, the beneficial effects of garlic extract make it useful in medicine. There are insufficient clinical trials regarding the effects of garlic in preventing or treating the common cold. A single trial suggested that garlic may prevent occurrences of the common cold, but more studies are needed to validate this finding. This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a daily garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo for 12 weeks.

The investigation revealed 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic group compared with 65 in the placebo group, resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group. However, claims of effectiveness of garlic on common cold appear to rely largely on poor quality evidence (Lissiman et al., 2012 ▶). Many countries have used garlic extract for clinical treatments, but the untoward actions of garlic following long-term administration should be fully noted. Even though many studies on garlic and its derivatives have been performed, the exact biological mechanism of garlic extract still remains to be elucidated.

19 Proven Health Benefits of Garlic

“Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.”

Those are famous words from the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates, often called the father of Western medicine.

He actually used to prescribe garlic to treat a variety of medical conditions.

Modern science has recently confirmed many of these beneficial health effects.

Here are 19 health benefits of garlic that are supported by human research.

  1. Garlic Contains Compounds With Potent Medicinal Properties
    Dried garlic – one of the most favorite spices of the whole world, without its impossible to cook almost any dish. The history of the origin of garlic dates back to BC, but then this vegetable used only for medical purposes. Real gourmets and lovers of this spicy and spicy seasoning can say that garlic not only surpasses all the other spices for aromatic and flavoring properties, but also contains a large number of minerals, vitamins and amino acids. Some people are confused by the smell of garlic that is present after eating, for dried garlic it is practically absent. But if a slight odor is present, then enough to eat a small amount of parsley or drink a little milk – and the smell will disappear completely. On the shelves you can see different types of dried garlic. It happens and granulated, and ground, and in the form of flakes. Everyone chooses the option that he likes best. The calorie content of this product is high enough, so not recommended to use it excessively, so as not to harm your health. According to the documentation the acting guest of dried garlic dates back to 1971 and since that time has not undergone any changes. The table below shows the main documented criteria for garlic in dried form.

Garlic is a plant in the Allium (onion) family.

It is closely related to onions, shallots and leeks. Each segment of a garlic bulb is called a clove. There are about 10–20 cloves in a single bulb, give or take. Garlic grows in many parts of the world and is a popular ingredient in cooking due to its strong smell and delicious taste. However, throughout ancient history, the main use of garlic was for its health and medicinal properties. Its use was well documented by many major civilizations, including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and Chinese. Scientists now know that most of its health benefits are caused by sulfur compounds formed when a garlic clove is chopped, crushed or chewed.

Perhaps the most famous of those is known as allicin. However, allicin is an unstable compound that is only briefly present in fresh garlic after it’s been cut or crushed. Other compounds that may play a role in garlic’s health benefits include diallyl disulfide and s-allyl cysteine. The sulfur compounds from garlic enter the body from the digestive tract and travel all over the body, where it exerts its potent biological effects.

SUMMARY Garlic is a plant in the onion family that’s grown for its distinctive taste and health benefits. It contains sulfur compounds, which are believed to bring some of the health benefits.

  1. Garlic Is Highly Nutritious But Has Very Few Calories

Calorie for calorie, garlic is incredibly nutritious.

A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of garlic contains:

  • Manganese: 23% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B6: 17% of the RDA
  • Vitamin C: 15% of the RDA
  • Selenium: 6% of the RDA
  • Fiber: 0.6 grams
  • Decent amounts of calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B1

Garlic also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients. In fact, it contains a little bit of almost everything you need. This comes with 42 calories, 1.8 grams of protein and 9 grams of carbs.

SUMMARY Garlic is low in calories and rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6 and manganese. It also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients.

  1. Garlic Can Combat Sickness, Including the Common Cold

Garlic supplements are known to boost the function of the immune system. One large, 12-week study found that a daily garlic supplement reduced the number of colds by 63% compared to a placebo. The average length of cold symptoms was also reduced by 70%, from 5 days in the placebo group to just 1.5 days in the garlic group. Another study found that a high dose of aged garlic extract (2.56 grams per day) reduced the number of days sick with cold or flu by 61% . However, one review concluded that the evidence is insufficient and more research is needed. Despite the lack of strong evidence, adding garlic to your diet may be worth trying if you often get colds.

SUMMARY Garlic supplements help prevent and reduce the severity of common illnesses like the flu and common cold.

  1. The Active Compounds in Garlic Can Reduce Blood Pressure

Cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes are the world’s biggest killers. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the most important drivers of these diseases. Human studies have found garlic supplements to have a significant impact on reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. In one study, 600–1,500 mg of aged garlic extract was just as effective as the drug Atenolol at reducing blood pressure over a 24-week period. Supplement doses must be fairly high to have the desired effects. The amount needed is equivalent to about four cloves of garlic per day.

SUMMARY High doses of garlic appear to improve blood pressure for those with known high blood pressure (hypertension). In some instances, supplements may be as effective as regular medications.

  1. Garlic Improves Cholesterol Levels, Which May Lower the Risk of Heart Disease

Garlic can lower total and LDL cholesterol. For those with high cholesterol, garlic supplements appear to reduce total and/or LDL cholesterol by about 10–15%. Looking at LDL (the “bad”) and HDL (the “good”) cholesterol specifically, garlic appears to lower LDL but has no reliable effect on HDL. High triglyceride levels are another known risk factor for heart disease, but garlic seems to have no significant effects on triglyceride levels.

SUMMARY Garlic supplements seem to reduce total and LDL cholesterol, particularly in those who have high cholesterol. HDL cholesterol and triglycerides do not seem to be affected.

  1. Garlic Contains Antioxidants That May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to the aging process. Garlic contains antioxidants that support the body’s protective mechanisms against oxidative damage. High doses of garlic supplements have been shown to increase antioxidant enzymes in humans, as well as significantly reduce oxidative stress in those with high blood pressure. The combined effects on reducing cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as the antioxidant properties, may reduce the risk of common brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

SUMMARY Garlic contains antioxidants that protect against cell damage and aging. It may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

  1. Garlic May Help You Live Longer

The potential effects of garlic on longevity are basically impossible to prove in humans. But given the beneficial effects on important risk factors like blood pressure, it makes sense that garlic could help you live longer. The fact that it can fight infectious disease is also an important factor, because these are common causes of death, especially in the elderly or people with dysfunctional immune systems.

SUMMARY Garlic has known beneficial effects on common causes of chronic disease, so it makes sense that it could also help you live longer.

  1. Athletic Performance Might Be Improved With Garlic Supplements

Garlic was one of the earliest “performance enhancing” substances. It was traditionally used in ancient cultures to reduce fatigue and enhance the work capacity of laborers. Most notably, it was given to Olympic athletes in ancient Greece. Rodent studies have shown that garlic helps with exercise performance, but very few human studies have been done. People with heart disease who took garlic oil for 6 weeks had a 12% reduction in peak heart rate and better exercise capacity. However, a study on nine competitive cyclists found no performance benefits. Other studies suggest that exercise-induced fatigue may be reduced with garlic.

SUMMARY Garlic may improve physical performance in lab animals and people with heart disease. Benefits in healthy people are not yet conclusive.

  1. Eating Garlic May Help Detoxify Heavy Metals in the Body

At high doses, the sulfur compounds in garlic have been shown to protect against organ damage from heavy metal toxicity. A four-week study in employees of a car battery plant (excessive exposure to lead) found that garlic reduced lead levels in the blood by 19%. It also reduced many clinical signs of toxicity, including headaches and blood pressure. Three doses of garlic each day even outperformed the drug D-penicillamine in reducing symptoms.

SUMMARY Garlic was shown to significantly reduce lead toxicity and related symptoms in one study.

  1. Garlic May Improve Bone Health

No human studies have measured the effects of garlic on bone loss. However, rodent studies have shown that it can minimize bone loss by increasing estrogen in females. One study in menopausal women found that a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equal to 2 grams of raw garlic) significantly decreased a marker of estrogen deficiency. This suggests that this supplement may have beneficial effects on bone health in women. Foods like garlic and onions may also have beneficial effects on osteoarthritis.

SUMMARY Garlic appears to have some benefits for bone health by increasing estrogen levels in females, but more human studies are needed.

  1. Garlic Is Easy to Include in Your Diet and Tastes Absolutely Delicious

The last one is not a health benefit, but is still important. Garlic is very easy (and delicious) to include in your current diet. It complements most savory dishes, particularly soups and sauces. The strong taste of garlic can also add a punch to otherwise bland recipes.

Garlic comes in several forms, from whole cloves and smooth pastes to powders and supplements like garlic extract and garlic oil. However, keep in mind that there are some downsides to garlic, such as bad breath. There are also some people who are allergic to it.

If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood-thinning medications, talk to your doctor before increasing your garlic intake. A common way to use garlic is to press a few cloves of fresh garlic with a garlic press, then mix it with extra virgin olive oil and a bit of salt. This a healthy and super satisfying dressing.

12. Garlic is incredibly toxic to dogs and cats, due to the high content of allyl propyl disulphide.

13. Hindus crane rarely consume garlic, because they believe that it negatively affects a person’s aura.

14. If you store garlic in raw form, in warmth or in vegetable oil, you will create all the conditions for the development of a botulism bacterium capable of killing a person.

15. Since 1998, there has been an annual charity Garlic Festival in the United States, all of which are being transferred to help local children with mental disorders.

16. Garlic is not used for food anywhere, in Japan it is exclusively a remedy and is used only in medicine.

17. Garlic is one of the few plants mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur’an.

18. Pilots are forbidden to consume garlic before flying. In 1950, studies were carried out that proved that garlic is able to reduce the reaction and reduce attention 3 times, this fact was revealed during the test tests

19. Black fermented garlic has a spicy-sweet aroma, it is hypoallergenic and positively affects the digestive, circulatory and cardiovascular system. After fermentation, the content of antioxidants and fructose increases significantly in garlic.

SUMMARY Garlic is delicious and easy to add to your diet. You can use it in savory dishes, soups, sauces, dressings and more.

For thousands of years, garlic was believed to have medicinal properties.

Science has now confirmed it.

Most recent

By Joe Leech

“Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.”

Those are famous words from the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates, often called the father of western medicine. He actually used to prescribe garlic to treat a variety of medical conditions. Well, modern science has recently confirmed many of these beneficial health effects.

Here are 11 health benefits of garlic that are supported by human research studies.

1. Garlic Contains a Compound Called Allicin, Which Has Potent Medicinal Properties

Garlic is a plant in the Allium (onion) family. It is closely related to onions, shallots and leeks.

It grows in many parts of the world and is a popular ingredient in cooking due to its strong smell and delicious taste. However, throughout ancient history, the main use of garlic was for its health and medicinal properties. Its use was well documented by all the major civilizations, including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and the Chinese.

The entire “head” is called a garlic bulb, while each segment is called a clove. There are about 10-20 cloves in a single bulb, give or take. We now know that most of the health effects are caused by one of the sulfur compounds formed when a garlic clove is chopped, crushed or chewed.

This compound is known as allicin, and is also responsible for the distinct garlic smell. Allicin enters the body from the digestive tract and travels all over the body, where it exerts its potent biological effects (which we’ll get to in a bit).

Bottom Line: Garlic is a plant in the onion family, grown for its cooking properties and health effects. It is high in a sulfur compound called allicin, which is believed to bring most of the health benefits.

2. Garlic Is Highly Nutritious, But Has Very Few Calories

Calorie for calorie, garlic is incredibly nutritious.

A 1 ounce (28 grams) serving of garlic contains:

  • Manganese: 23 percent of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B6: 17 percent of the RDA.
  • Vitamin C: 15 percent of the RDA.
  • Selenium: 6 percent of the RDA.
  • Fiber: 1 gram.
  • Decent amounts of calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and Vitamin B1.

Garlic also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients. In fact, it contains a little bit of almost everything we need.

This is coming with 42 calories, with 1.8 grams of protein and 9 grams of carbs.

Bottom Line: Garlic is low in calories and very rich in Vitamin C, Vitamin B6 and manganese. It also contains trace amounts of various other nutrients.

3. Garlic Can Combat Sickness, Including the Common Cold

Garlic supplementation is known to boost the function of the immune system.

One large 12-week study found that a daily garlic supplement reduced the number of colds by 63 percent compared with placebo. The average length of cold symptoms was also reduced by 70 percent, from five days in placebo to just 1.5 days in the garlic group.

Another study found that a high dose of garlic extract (2.56 grams per day) can reduce the number of days sick with cold or flu by 61 percent.

If you often get colds, then adding garlic to your diet could be incredibly helpful.

Bottom Line: Garlic supplementation helps to prevent and reduce the severity of common illnesses like the flu and common cold.

4. The Active Compounds in Garlic Can Reduce Blood Pressure

Cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes are the world’s biggest killers. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the most important drivers of these diseases.

Human studies have found garlic supplementation to have a significant impact on reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.

In one study, aged garlic extract at doses of 600-1,500 mg was just as effective as the drug Atenolol at reducing blood pressure over a 24 week period.

Supplement doses must be fairly high to have these desired effects. The amount of allicin needed is equivalent to about four cloves of garlic per day.

Bottom Line: High doses of garlic appear to improve blood pressure of those with known high blood pressure (hypertension). In some instances, supplementation can be as effective as regular medications.

Read page 1

5. Garlic Improves Cholesterol Levels, Which May Lower The Risk of Heart Disease

Garlic can lower total and LDL cholesterol. For those with high cholesterol, garlic supplementation appears to reduce total and/or LDL cholesterol by about 10-15 percent.

Looking at LDL (the “bad”) and HDL (the “good”) cholesterol specifically, garlic appears to lower LDL but has no reliable effect on HDL.

Garlic does not appear to lower triglyceride levels, another known risk factor for heart disease.

Bottom Line: Garlic supplementation seems to reduce total and LDL cholesterol, particularly in those who have high cholesterol. HDL cholesterol and triglycerides do not seem to be affected.

6. Garlic Contains Antioxidants That May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to the aging process. Garlic contains antioxidants that support the body’s protective mechanisms against oxidative damage.

High doses of garlic supplementation have been shown to increase antioxidant enzymes in humans, as well as significantly reduce oxidative stress in those with high blood pressure. The combined effects on reducing cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as the antioxidant properties, may help prevent common brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Bottom Line: Garlic contains antioxidants that protect against cell damage and aging. It may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

7. Garlic May Help You Live Longer

Effects on longevity are basically impossible to prove in humans. But given the beneficial effects on important risk factors like blood pressure, it makes sense that garlic could help you live longer.

The fact that it can fight infectious disease is also an important factor, because these are common causes of death, especially in the elderly or people with dysfunctional immune systems.

Bottom Line: Garlic has known beneficial effects on common causes of chronic disease, so it makes perfect sense that it could help you live longer.

8. Athletic Performance Can be Improved With Garlic Supplementation

Garlic was one of the earliest “performance enhancing” substances. It was traditionally used in ancient cultures to reduce fatigue and enhance the work capacity of labourers. Most notably, it was administered to Olympic athletes in ancient Greece.

Rodent studies have shown that garlic helps with exercise performance, but very few human studies have been done.

Subjects with heart disease who took garlic oil for six weeks had a reduction in peak heart rate of 12 percent and improved their exercise capacity. However, a study on nine competitive cyclists found no performance benefits.

Other studies suggest that exercise-induced fatigue may be reduced with garlic.

Bottom Line: Garlic can improve physical performance in lab animals and people with heart disease. Benefits in healthy people are not yet conclusive.

9. Eating Garlic Can Help Detoxify Heavy Metals in the Body

At high doses, the sulfur compounds in garlic have been shown to protect against organ damage from heavy metal toxicity.

A four week study in employees of a car battery plant (excessive exposure to lead) found that garlic reduced lead levels in the blood by 19 percent. It also reduced many clinical signs of toxicity, including headaches and blood pressure.

Three doses of garlic each day even outperformed the drug D-penicillamine in symptom reduction.

Bottom Line: Garlic was shown to significantly reduce lead toxicity and related symptoms in one study.

10. Garlic May Improve Bone Health

No human trials have measured the effects of garlic on bone loss. However, rodent studies have shown that it can minimize bone loss by increasing estrogen in females.

One study in menopausal women found that a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equal to 2 grams of raw garlic) significantly decreased a marker of estrogen deficiency. This suggests that this garlic may have beneficial effects on bone health in women.

Foods like garlic and onions have also been shown to have beneficial effects on osteoarthritis.

Bottom Line: Garlic appears to have some benefits for bone health by increasing estrogen levels in females, but more human studies are needed.

11. Garlic Is Easy to Include In Your Diet and Tastes Absolutely Delicious

The last one is not a health benefit, but still important.

It is the fact that it is very easy (and delicious) to include garlic in your current diet. It complements most savory dishes, particularly soups and sauces. The strong taste of garlic can also add a punch to otherwise bland recipes.

Garlic comes in several forms, from whole cloves and smooth pastes to powders and supplements like garlic extract and garlic oil.

The minimum effective dose for therapeutic effects is one clove eaten with meals, two or three times a day. However, keep in mind that there are some downsides to garlic, such as bad breath. There are also some people who are allergic to it.

If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood thinning medications, then talk to your doctor before increasing your garlic consumption.

The active compound allicin only forms when garlic is crushed or cleaved when it is raw. If you cook it before crushing it, then it won’t have the same health effects. Therefore, the best way to consume garlic is raw, or to crush and cut it and leave it out for a while before you add it to your recipes.

My favorite way to use garlic is to press a few cloves of fresh garlic with a garlic press, then mix with extra virgin olive oil and a bit of salt. This a healthy and super satisfying dressing.

For thousands of years, garlic was believed to have medicinal properties. We now have the science to confirm it.

This article was reposted with permission from our media associate Authority Nutrition.

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Garlic Essential Oil Uses and Benefits

Garlic Essential Oil Properties (Allium sativum)

Familar, extemely pungent, potent scent of garlic.

  • 100% Pure, Concentrated, Undiluted
  • Therapeutic Quality
  • Steam Distilled from Bulb
  • Country of Origin: China
  • Warning: VERY POTENT. Do not inhale from open bottle.

Garlic Essential Oil Packaged

Amber glass bottle with Euro dropper. Tamper proof safety seal. Shrink wrapped.

Background Information on Garlic Essential Oil

Garlic is native to Europe and Asia. The plant grows to a height of 1-3 feet. Dioscorides, the Greek physician, used garlic for intestinal worms. Pliny, the Roman herbalist, listed garlic as a treatment for sixty-one different ailments. Garlic was used for leprosy in the Middle Ages. Native Americans applied garlic to draw out poisons of insect stings and snakebites. During WWI and WWII, European doctors dressed wounds containing garlic to prevent gangrene.

Garlic Essential Oil Uses and Benefits

Documented properties of garlic essential oil include analgesic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antiviral, calmative, decongestant, disinfectant, diruetic, expectorant, hypotensor, insecticide, laxtive, stimulant, tonic, lymphatic toner, vasodilator.

Garlic essential oil is well known for lowering cholesterol and blood pressure.* It protects the heart and guards from respiratory tract infections.* Garlic essential oil is used for congestion and infections; it has many medicinal properties.

Garlic Essential Oil Uses and Benefits / Suggestions & Blends

  • Use to prevent infections and treat symptoms of bronchitis and cold. *
  • Release tiredness and rejuvenate your body with garlic essential oil.
  • Garlic essential oil can be used in detoxification alternative health protocols.
  • Garlic essential oil is known to reduce high blood pressure as well as high cholesterol.*

See our references at the bottom of this page for additional information.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to diagnose, treat, or prevent any disease.

Garlic Essential Oil Safety Tips

  • Do not use if taking anticoagulant medication, having major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, other bleeding disorders.
  • Do not use on hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin.
  • Do not use on children under 2 years of age.
  • For external use only this is considered toxic if taken internally. See our Safety Information page for further details when using essential oils.

Garlic Essential Oil Reviews

“The garlIic and onion oils are very potent. One drop goes a long way.” J. Carrell

Garlic Essential Oil Benefits

Garlic originates from the family of onion, leek, shallot, chive, rakko and is species of allium.

It originated from Central Asia and was mostly used in Mediterranean region, Africa, Europe, and Asia.

Garlic also known, as sativum is a herb or spice that flavors food and is also a curative in nature.

The spice has a distinctive aroma when cooked. Garlic grows underground as a bulb that contains about twenty cloves. These cloves when split they seem to be reddish, but on the smooth inside, it is pearly-white.

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For ages, the herb has been used as a medicine to treat various diseases. Some people use the bulb of the garlic while others use the garlic leaves.

Health Benefits of Garlic Essential Oil

Garlic is a seasoning that is very flexible that can be used for anything. The spice is crushed or pulverized to bring aromatic components during cooking. Some people consume garlic when raw.

Garlic supplements that are made from the herb’s clove have medicinal values. The cloves of garlic treat ailments related to heart and blood. Garlic is a natural remedy that curbs health disorders such as acne, bad breath, high blood pressure. The essential oil also boosts immune system and prevents flu viruses and common cold.

Garlic Essential Oil

The extraction of essential garlic oil is by the steam distillation process of crushed garlic. The process is pure and highly concentrated but also expensive one. This process is usually for commercial use.

Garlic essential oil can also be extracted through soaking chopped garlic in vegetable oil. Unlike extraction through steam distillation process, soaking in vegetable oil process is low concentrated. This is how to make garlic essential oil. This process is mostly used for homemade garlic essential oil.

How to Store Essential Garlic Oil

The garlic essential oil should be refrigerated and in a container that is airtight. To prevent botulism bacterial or salmonella infections. Garlic essential oil should be used within one to two weeks.

12 Benefits of Garlic Essential Oil

The herb Garlic is considered a superherb and the essential oil inherits many of the herbs amazing medicinal properties. Below you will find 12 of these superherb health benefits:

1. Boosts Immune System

The oil contains nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, iron, potassium, Vitamin C, protein, carbohydrates, B2, B5, B9, B1, and B3 that increases immunity. The nutrients also protect from aging problem that is because of free radicals.

The garlic essential oil also acts against the flu and cold viruses present in the air. The garlic aroma when inhaled, it improves white blood cells. That assist in fighting against diseases and hence improving immune system.

2. Garlic Oil Benefits/Skin

Skin Infection

Treats Skin Infection. The oil has anti-inflammatory and antifungal properties. That treat many skin diseases such as corns, psoriasis, warts, ringworm, and athlete’s foot.

Research has also shown that the antifungal properties contained in garlic oil, have the ability to fight against skin cancer. Take caution when you are using the garlic oil, you should not overheat it as it can burn your skin.

3. Treats Acne

Teenagers and pregnant mothers suffering from hormone fluctuation causing acne and breakouts can use garlic essential oil. The oil has the ability to remove blemishes. In addition, by ingesting garlic into the body, you reduce acne symptoms.

When garlic is ingested, you get benefit of clear skin. You should not apply garlic directly to the skin as it can cause swelling and redness.

4. Garlic Essential Oil for Hair Growth

Treats Dandruff and Prevents Hair Loss. The garlic oil can treat dandruff. The garlic essential oil is effective for treating baldness and hair lice. The oil has nutrients that improve hair texture and boost hair growth.

Prevents Hair Loss

When the oil is applied on the scalp, it enhances hair growth. Consult your doctor first before you use as you may feel side effects such as nausea, heartburn, and gas.

5. Treatment for High Blood Pressure

Cholesterol levels can be corrected by the daily intake of garlic supplements. The consumption of garlic reduces blood pressure(1) by minimizing blood-lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides and thinning the blood.

6. Fights Against Cancer

Apart from fighting against skin cancer, garlic oil also fights against stomach cancer and breast cancer(2). Through research, the garlic essential oil has been found to consist of the compound diallyl sulfides that inhibit formation of tumors. This compound assists the liver to detoxify chemicals that cause cancer.

cancer cell

Another study has shown that garlic contains bioflavonoids. Which are found in vegetables. Such as, cruciferous vegetable like Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage that fight cancer. You should stop using garlic oil one week before undergoing surgery as it lengthens bleeding.

7. Garlic Essential Oil for Ear Infections

Treats Ear Infections. Since ancient, garlic oil was used as a remedy for ear infection. The garlic essential oil has antiviral, antiseptic, and antibacterial properties. That make it effective for ear infection treatment. You should use two to three drops of the oil on the ear.

8. Fights Against Heart Diseases

Consumption of garlic assists in reducing blood pressure by thinning the blood. Thus, suppressing heart diseases such as heart attack and strokes. Garlic consists of the compound ajoene(3). That prevents clumping of sticky blood platelets, a coagulation which can lead to these diseases.

9. Acts as a Mosquito Repellent

The aroma of garlic overpowers mosquito making it unable to bite. Applying garlic oil on the skin, it acts as a natural mosquito repellent. You should test whether you are allergic to the oil before applying all over the exposed area. You can also use this as a insect repellent and as a spray to deter insects.

10. Improves Endurance During Exercise

The doctor recommends exercise for heart patient. Garlic oil enhances tolerance during exercise. Research has proven that garlic essential oil assists in reducing heart rate. When at the peak of exercise and this helps the patient with diseases of coronary artery to endure throughout the exercise.

11. Boost Bone Health in Women

Bones in women becomes weak after they reach a certain age or after surgical removal of one or both ovaries. Garlic oil aid in preventing bone tissue resorption. The study shows that garlic essential oil supplement prevents the bone density decrease.

12. Helps in Diabetes Management

Diabetes has become the health worry nowadays. However, the research has shown that garlic oil can help a great deal in preventing diabetes. Compounds in garlic such as S-allyl cysteine sulfoxide, allyl propyl disulfide, and allicin. Helps to raise the insulin levels in the blood ensuring the adequate levels. Garlic oil supplement control type 2 diabetes.

Other health benefits of Garlic Essential Oil

  • Helps to treat fungal infections
  • Treats deep wound
  • Fight against respiratory infections
  • Treats congestion
  • Helps to treats bronchitis
  • Treats pneumonia
  • Fights against tuberculosis
  • Therapeutic drug for rheumatic pains
  • Treats hype chronic diarrhea
  • Prevention against candida overgrowth
  • Treats genital herpes
  • Fights chronic sinus infection
  • Remedy for allergies
  • Treats toothaches
  • Prevents against impotence

Conclusion

Garlic essential oil has many benefits to our health and thus should be implemented into a diet for a healthy bodily system. In short, the Health benefits of Garlic are infinite, just consume it on a regular basis and make your life more healthy.

138 Shares Medical information provided is for information purposes only. Always get guidance about a medical condition from a health care professional.

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