Fsa blood pressure monitor

10 Ways to Spend Your FSA Before It Disappears

1) Take care of your teeth. While you can’t use the dollars for teeth whitening, you can pay for an extra teeth cleaning with the funds. If you have dentures, you could use the money to invest in a new set.

2) Bling out your medicine cabinet. Reorganize your medicine cabinet with pill dispensers. Depending on what you pick, you can limit the rattling noise pill bottles necessitate or increase the protections on your drugs. Another handy item — the pill chopper for limiting the amount of medicine your child (or you) takes in one dose.

3) Stock up on standard medicines. Certain over-the-counter medications are eligible for FSA, including Pepto-Bismol, Tums and even certain acne medications, like Clearasil. One good resource to make sure it’s FSA-eligible is the online FSA store, where everything offered is eligible.

4) Try out some alternative treatments. Your FSA money can cover the cost of going to a chiropractor or acupuncturist, if your insurance doesn’t already cover it. Start the new year off right by getting more in tune with your body.

5) Update your first aid kits. The supplies of any standard first aid kit — bandages, anti-bacterial creams, joint braces, and more — are likely eligible FSA products. Make a kit for your home and a to-go kit for your car or tote bag.

6) Manage your diabetes. Both insulin and blood sugar testing kits can be purchased with FSA bucks.

7) Go for a stylish pair of glasses. You can spend FSA money on little things, like contact cases or stocking up on solution. You can also invest in a new pair of glasses or prescription sunglasses — it could be a fun way to spend your last dollars. If you’ve got a lot of money to burn, you can even apply it to Lasik surgery.

8) Play doctor. You can also purchase more serious medical equipment, like a stethoscope or blood pressure monitor with your FSA money.

9) Prepare for an upcoming trip. If you’re planning a Caribbean vacation this winter, chances are you’re going to need to take plenty of sunscreen to protect your sweater-covered skin. That’s an eligible expense!

10) Treat yourself. Help out any aches and pains you’re currently battling (or prevent them from coming on in the first place) with heat packs. A therapy eye mask is also an excellent way to relax.

Use Tax-Free FSA Dollars to Buy Adventure Medical Products


Did you know that Adventure Medical Kits are covered by a Flexible Spending Account (FSA)?

What is a Flexible Spending Account?

If you’re curious, a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) can be a great option to help you save on healthcare expenses. These employer-sponsored accounts are not only pre-tax, but the money can be used for lots of different medical expenses. You can use an FSA to cover co-pays at the doctor’s office, dental and eye care, and thousands of healthcare products such as first-aid kits! By using an FSA, you effectively reduce taxable income, and can cover expenses that you’d pay for out of pocket.
Among available FSA eligible expenses are Adventure Medical Kits products, which offer a great and convenient way to explore the great outdoors while quickly remedying distractions like cuts, bites and scrapes.

How do I use an FSA? Are there important deadlines I need to be aware of?

Often, you’ll hear about FSA plans around open enrollment at work, and wonder how you can sign up and starting using these benefits. Before you enroll, you’ll have to decide how much money you want to set aside for the upcoming plan year. Many employers allow for the maximum contribution of $2,550 per year, but it varies. Once you decide your contribution, it will be evenly taken out of your paycheck on a pre-tax basis during the year. If you didn’t have an FSA, you would pay out of pocket, but after taxes had been deducted. You can use your FSA for qualified healthcare costs ranging from medical services to healthcare products, including Adventure Medical Kits!
There are certain spending deadlines by which you must use the money in your FSA. These deadlines vary per plan, so it’s best to ask your FSA administrator for specific details, but you could have a few options available to you – either a Carryover or Grace Period, which your administrator will be able to discuss with you.

How can I use my FSA for Adventure Medical Kits products?

Using your FSA for these products is simple and convenient! You can shop for them at FSAstore.com, the only e-commerce site that exclusively carries products covered by an FSA. At FSA Store, you can use an FSA debit card to pay for these expenses or shop without an FSA card and submit paperwork or receipts for FSA reimbursement.

Pre-Tax Spending Using your Flexible Spending Account (FSA) $ave on Items you need!

Questions? Call (800) 933-8495

What is a Flexible Spending Account?
What Qualifies for FSA Spending?

Here are some answers:

Flexible Spending Accounts / Flexible Savings Accounts (FSA): A Flexible Spending Arrangement (FSA), or Flexible Spending Account, as they are commonly called, is one of a number of tax-advantaged financial accounts that can be set up through a cafeteria plan of an employer in the United States. An FSA allows an employee to set aside a portion of his or her earnings to pay for qualified expenses as established in the cafeteria plan, most commonly for medical expenses but often for dependent care or other expenses. Money deducted from an employee’s pay into an FSA is not subject to payroll taxes, resulting in a substantial payroll tax savings.

While many individuals use these Tax Free Dollars for Gift Giving and Pre-Tax Holiday Shopping, the intent of FSA Spending is to purchase these items for yourself or your Dependents.

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More answers:
The most common FSA, the medical expense FSA (also medical FSA or health FSA), is similar to a health savings account (HSA) or a health reimbursement account (HRA). However, while HSAs and HRAs are almost exclusively used as components of a consumer driven health care plan, medical FSAs are commonly offered with more traditional health plans as well. An FSA may be utilized by paper claims or an FSA debit card also known as a Flexcard.

A Flexible Spending Account (also called an FSA) offers a way to save money for qualified expenses: You direct a part of your pay into a special, tax-free account that you use to reimburse yourself for eligible out-of-pocket health care, dependent care and transportation expenses. A Flexible Spending Account (FSA) allows consumers to deduct pre-tax dollars from their paychecks and deposit those funds in employer-sponsored accounts to pay for medical expenses – including over-the-counter, prescription, and vision health essentials. Consumers then submit expense receipts to healthcare administrators for reimbursement. As a rule of thumb, any product that is FSA-eligible is also HSA-eligible.

Use It or LOSE It:

Most FSA’s require that you use the FSA funds during the calendar year or lose the Tax Savings. Some will allow you to “back-pedal” as you can with some IRA contributions, and spend the funds through April 15 for credit in the previous calendar year. Either way, you will want to be sure to keep track of you fund usage so that you don’t take a “Hit” at year end.

Over-The-Counter (Non-Prescription) Items:

Over-the-counter health products are reimbursable if they are used to alleviate or treat personal injuries or sickness and are generally accepted as falling within the category of medicine or drugs. Examples include:

  • Cough, cold, and allergy products
  • Antacids
  • Antifungals
  • Pain relievers
  • First-aid kits & First Aid Products

Note: Although the IRS sets guidelines for FSA programs, individual employers have the final determination of which expenses are covered by their FSA programs. For more information about Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs), contact your employer.

A Flexible Spending Account, or FSA, is a special account that allows you to set aside part of your pre-tax wages to pay for certain healthcare expenses for you and your family. Eligible expenses include prescriptions, contact lenses and over-the-counter products.

How will an FSA save me money? Because the money you contribute to a flexible spending account is taken out of your paycheck before taxes are taken out, you lower your taxable income, so you’ll pay less during tax time! You are allowed to use these pre-tax funds to pay for qualified healthcare expenses that are not covered by your health plan, such as doctor visit co-pays, deductibles, prescriptions, dental and vision care expenses, and more!

THAT really Qualifies for Pre-Tax Spending with my FSA funds? In addition to standard healthcare expenses, you can buy aspirin, cough medicine, allergy medication, antacids and many other things that you typically keep on hand for treating what ails you! First Aid Kits Qualify! for items that QUALIFY FOR PRE-TAX FSA SPENDING.

How do I pay with my FSA funds? You can buy First Aid Kits, aspirin, cough medicine, allergy medication, antacids and many other things that you typically keep on hand or as gifts for yourself and your dependents online here FirstAidProduct.com You will receive a detailed receipt via email upon checkout, as well as a detailed packing slip upon product delivery – Submit these via your Company Policy to your FSA or HSA Administrator for reimbursement from your pre-tax funds for your purchases! for items that QUALIFY FOR PRE-TAX FSA SPENDING. Also…if you like, we are happy to run you a Year-End report of your FSA qualifying expenditures made FirstAidProduct.com How easy is THAT?

*Your specific savings will depend on your personal circumstances, such as your income, how much you contribute into the FSA, your health, etc. Generally, participants save 15% – 30% on eligible items purchased using their FSA dollars. Source: fsaandyou.com

DO THESE ITEMS QUALIFY FOR FSA SPENDING? YES!

Expense:
A.E.D. for Home Use

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
In order for an expense to be eligible under a health FSA, the expense must be for medical care. Medical care is defined as “for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease or for the purpose of affecting any structure of function of the body….” This type of medical expense would qualify as it is considered for the treatment and prevention of disease.

Expense:
Antacids

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Antihistamines

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
AntifungalMedications and Creams

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):

Expense:
Aspirin

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Bandages

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Bandages are considered medical care under.

Expense:
Cold Medicines

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Drugs / Medicines

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Drugs / Medicines

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Prescription and legal non-prescription drugs to treat a medical condition are eligible. The drug must be legal under federal law and generally not for a cosmetic purpose. For prescription medications, the Prescription name and RX number are required on the receipt.

Expense:
Ear Plugs

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Ear Plugs are reimbursable if prescribed by a physician for a specific medical condition. A medical practitioner’s note outlining what the specific medical condition is that exists would be required.

Expense:
Eye Drops

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
First Aid Kits

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Medicated Rubs and Muscle Creams

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Medicines

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Prescription and legal non-prescription drugs to treat a medical condition are eligible. The drug must be legal under federal law and generally not for a cosmetic purpose. For prescription medications, the Prescription name and RX number are required on the receipt.

Expense:
Nasal Sprays and Decongestants

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Oxygen

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Oxygen, including the expense for the oxygen, and the equipment required for breathing problems caused by a medical condition is reimbursable.

Expense:
Pain relievers

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Examples include but are not limited to acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, naproxen

Expense:
Petroleum Jelly (Medicated Lubricants)

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
N/A

Expense:
Supplies to Treat Medical Conditions

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Items must be purchased specifically to aid in the healing of or treatment of a medical illness and not for personal comfort reasons. Examples include, but are not limited to, bandages, gauze, alcohol swabs, etc.

Expense:
Sunscreens

Reimbursable:
Under Certain Conditions

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
Sunscreen with a high SPF (i.e. 30 or 45) may be reimbursable under a health FSA as it is generally used to prevent sunburns. Face lotions that contain a small amount of SPF sunscreen will not qualify and it would generally be considered a toiletry or cosmetic.

Expense:
Thermometer

Reimbursable:
Yes

Explanation and Conditions (Dr’s Note Required?):
The cost of a thermometer will qualify as reimbursable under a health FSA since this expense is used to diagnose a medical condition to determine if an individual has a fever.

The above is an excerpt from a list of common medical expenses and whether or not they are eligible for reimbursement under Paychex Section 125 plans (“Plan”). This is not an exhaustive list. Paychex reserves the right to modify this list at any time to be in compliance with federal law. Paychex, along with the Plan Administrator, may deem it necessary to render decisions based on the facts and circumstances of certain individual claims an in accordance with the provisions of the Plan.

Note: As outlined below, some expenses require a note from a medical practitioner outlining the specific medical condition(s) that exist for each individual item, and that the item(s) that the participant is requesting to be reimbursed is medically necessary to treat the condition. This is to substantiate the expense as eligible under the health FSA

FROM THE IRS: Sept. 3, 2003

WASHINGTON — Today, the Treasury Department and the IRS announced over-the-counter drugs can be paid for with pre-tax dollars through health care flexible spending accounts. Treasury and IRS issued guidance clarifying that reimbursements for nonprescription drugs by an employer health plan are excluded from income. Thus, reimbursements by health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs) and other employer health plans for the cost of over-the-counter drugs available without prescription are not subject to tax if properly substantiated by the employee.

“Flexible Spending Accounts are an important tool in helping people meet their health care costs,” stated Treasury Secretary John Snow. “Since many prescription drugs have moved to the over-the-counter market, this action today makes paying for them a little bit easier to swallow.”

“Flexible Spending Accounts were established under the tax code to provide incentives for better health care,” said IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson. “This action is a sensible expansion and simplification of the program consistent with existing law.”

Drugs are increasingly becoming available over-the-counter without prescription. Many health plans no longer cover the cost of these drugs as over-the-counter. While an over-the-counter drug is less expensive than the prescription drug, the cost to many consumers increases because the price paid by the consumer for the over-the-counter drug is greater than the co-payment by the consumer when the drug was covered by insurance. This is especially an issue for individuals who remedy chronic health problems by regularly taking an over-the-counter medicine.

Revenue Ruling 2003-102 explains that the statutory exclusion for reimbursements of employee health expenses is broader than the itemized deduction for medical expenses (which does not apply to nonprescription drugs). Thus, the guidance clarifies that employer reimbursements of employee health expenses that are nonprescription drugs, including reimbursements through health FSAs and Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs), are excluded from income like other employer reimbursements of employee health expenses. This will result in savings to consumers with access to employer plans who may purchase nonprescription drugs.

However, for purposes of the itemized medical expenses deduction, the cost of such over-the-counter drugs continues to be non-deductible. In addition, the cost of dietary supplements that are merely beneficial to the employee’s health are not excluded from income.

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What is a Health Savings Account (HSA)?

A Health Savings Account (HSA) allows individuals and/or employers to contribute pretax dollars to pay for medical expenses – including over-the-counter, prescription, and vision health essentials – not covered by insurance policies. Unlike a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), unused funds do not disappear at year-end. HSA dollars roll-over year-over-year, which means that account holders build up balances to pay for medical expenses.

Account holders submit expense deductions on Schedule A, Form 1040 to the IRS. For more information on submitting deductions, go to the Internal Revenue Service Website.

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HEALTHY HEART BLOG

If your current employer offers a health plan with the option to enroll in a FSA or HSA account, you might be curious about what the benefits are and how to use it. You are not alone, more than 40 million Americans are estimated to have a FSA or HSA account with many great benefits you should know about.
What is a FSA or HSA debit card?
FSA and HSA accounts are both tax-advantaged accounts that allow their holders to save money on qualified medical expenses. Although they differ in many way, they both have debit cards their holder can use to pay for medical expenses including many products and services.
“Medical care” expenses as defined by IRS Code, Section 213(d) includes amounts paid for the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease, and for treatments affecting any part or function of the body. The expenses must be to alleviate or prevent a physical defect or illness. Expenses that are merely beneficial to one’s general health (for example, vacations) are not expenses for medical care.
What can I purchase with a FSA/HSA debit card?
Although you should always consult your health coverage provider or the IRS for the most up to date list of eligible items, many allow you to reimburse yourself not only for items for you but also for your spouse and children. In general, both include common expenses to treat and prevent illness such as cold and allergy medicine, pain killers and blood pressure monitors.
What Qardio devices can I purchase using a FSA/HSA card?
The QardioArm Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor is fully reimbursable through an FSA, HSA or HRA. Not only does your FSA or HSA account let you purchase it with your pre-tax dollar, QardioArm makes it easy to share your BP history with your doctor via email or the QardioMD platform, further saving you co-pay money and time by eliminating the need for frequent doctor’s visits.

The QardioBase Smart Scale and Body Analyzer is not FSA eligible, but if a doctor recommends the use of this scale to assist in the treatment for a legitimate medical condition such as obesity, it could be eligible with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LMN) from a physician. This letter must outline how an account holder’s needs for help relates to their medical condition, necessitates the use of a smart scale and how the item will be used to alleviate the issue.
If you have a FSA account, don’t forget it’s “use it or lose” perk: the unused balance is forfeited at the end of the year and cannot be carried forward. See how QardioArm could benefit you or your spouse and don’t wait the last minute to start looking after what matters the most: your health.
Source:
Health Insurance

Blood Pressure Monitors

Whether you have high blood pressure or just want to keep track of your progress, at-home blood pressure monitors can be an excellent way to help ensure your levels remain healthy. From electronic monitors to manual styles, there are plenty of different types of monitors available on the market today. At CVS, you’ll discover an assortment of blood pressure monitors, blood pressure cuffs, and more.

Monitoring Your Blood Pressure at Home

Before you decide to keep track of your blood pressure, it’s essential to know the different numbers and what they mean. Blood pressure is presented as two numbers: systolic and diastolic. These two numbers will typically indicate whether or not your blood pressure is at a healthy level. Generally, numbers equal or less than 120 systolic and 80 diastolic are considered normal. As these numbers increase, your risk for problems like heart attack or stroke is increased. Additionally, blood pressures lower than 90/60 warrant seeing your physician or health care provider.

Tips for Taking Your Blood Pressure

Before you use your monitor, make sure you have not recently consumed any caffeine, as this can raise your blood pressure unexpectedly. Sit still with your feet flat on the floor and be sure to place the arm you’re using on a table or pillow. Make sure the cuff of your monitor is wrapped tightly around your upper arm before you begin. Follow the instructions that came with your monitor and allow the test to complete before recording your numbers. It’s always a good idea to write down or log your blood pressure daily if it’s a concern so you can talk to your doctor and give them accurate information.

Choosing the Right Blood Pressure Monitor

With so many different types of monitors available, it’s essential that you choose the right one for your needs. Blood pressure cuffs that fit around the upper arm generally provide the most accurate reading. Digital monitors make it easier to read and see the numbers. Some models will store these numbers so you can easily refer to them later. There are even wireless monitors that can send data directly to an app on your smartphone.

Using Blood Pressure Monitors Effectively

When it comes to recording and reading your blood pressure numbers, checking daily is the best practice. Be sure to try and monitor your blood pressure at the same time each day for the most consistency. Those with diabetes or kidney disease should be vigilant when it comes to checking blood pressure. If you take it frequently and record the numbers regularly, your doctor will have a better understanding of your condition and can make better decisions on treatment or medication.

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