Doxycycl hyc 100mg side effects

Contents

Doxycycline

Easy-to-read medicine information about doxycycline – what it is, how to take doxycycline safely and possible side effects.

Type of medicine Also called
  • Antibiotic (to treat infections)
  • Tetracycline antibiotic
  • Doxine
  • Doxy
  • Doxylin

What is doxycycline?

Doxycycline is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections, such as of the chest, sinus, eye and pelvic infections. It may be chosen if you are allergic to penicillins. Doxycycline is also used to treat skin conditions such as acne and for malaria prevention when travelling to some countries.
Doxycycline belongs to a group of antibiotics called tetracyclines. Like all antibiotics, doxycycline is not effective against infections caused by viruses. In New Zealand, doxycycline is available as tablets (50 mg and 100 mg).

Dose

  • The dose of doxycycline will be different for different people depending on the type of infection.
  • The usual dose of doxycycline is 100 mg once or two times a day.
  • Your doctor will advise you how long to take doxycycline for.
  • Always take your doxycycline exactly as your doctor has told you. The pharmacy label on your medicine will tell you how much to take, how often to take it, and any special instructions.
  • Note: doxycycline is not usually given to children because it can affect growing teeth and bones.

How to take doxycycline

  • Swallow your doxycycline tablets with a large glass of water.
    • Doxycycline can cause severe indigestion and problems with your throat and oesophagus (gut) if the tablets are not swallowed properly.
    • Take doxycycline with food and a large glass of water to wash them down.
    • Remain upright for at least 30 minutes after taking doxycycline. Do not lie down for at least 30 minutes after taking doxycycline or do not take it just before bed.
    • Swallow the tablets whole – do not crush or chew them.
  • If you forget to take your dose, take it as soon as you remember. But, if it is nearly time for your next dose, just take it at the right time; do not take double the dose.
  • It is important to take the whole course of antibiotics for the number of days your doctor has told you to. Do not stop taking it, even if you feel your infection has cleared up. Talk to your doctor first.

Precautions – while taking doxycycline

Sun protection

Doxycycline can make your skin more sensitive to the sun. You can get a burning, tingling feeling on your skin when you are in the sun, or you may notice a darker tan, or redness. When outside, protect your skin and eyes by using a good sunscreen (at least SPF30+). a sunhat and clothing that protects you from the sun, and wearing sunglasses.

Taking other medicines

Taking some medicines such as antacids and iron preparations at the same time as doxcycline can reduce its effect in fighting infection. Do not take indigestion remedies, iron or calcium preparations within 2 hours of taking doxycycline.

Precautions – before starting doxycycline

  • Are you pregnant, planning a pregnancy or breastfeeding?
  • Do you have liver or kidney problems?
  • Do you have lupus or myasthenia gravis?
  • Are taking any other medicines? This includes any medicines you are taking which you can buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.

If so, it’s important that you tell your doctor or pharmacist before you start doxycycline. Sometimes a medicine isn’t suitable for a person with certain conditions, or it can only be used with extra care.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, doxycycline can cause side effects, although not everyone gets them. Often side effects improve as your body gets used to the new medicine.

Side effects What should I do?
  • Nausea (feeling sick) or vomiting
  • Tummy upset
  • Indigestion
  • Take doxycycline with or straight after food.
  • Tell your doctor if troublesome.
  • Diarrhoea (loose, watery stools)
  • This may go away with time.
  • Tell your doctor if troublesome.
  • Vaginal itching, soreness or discharge (thrush)
  • Tell your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Painful throat or stomach or trouble swallowing
  • Tell your doctor immediately or ring HealthLine 0800 611 116
  • Headache or problems with your eyesight
  • Tell your doctor immediately or ring HealthLine 0800 611 116
  • Allergic reaction such as skin rash, itching, swelling of the lips, face, and mouth or difficulty breathing
  • Tell your doctor immediately or ring HealthLine 0800 611 116

Interactions

Doxycycline interacts with some medicines and herbal supplements, so check with your doctor or pharmacist before starting doxycycline.

Learn more

Medsafe Consumer Information Sheet: Doxine
New Zealand Formulary Patient Information: Doxycycline

  1. Doxycycline New Zealand Formulary
  2. Antibiotics: choices for common infections BPAC, 2017

Does Doxycycline Hyclate Interact with other Medications?

Severe Interactions

These medications are not usually taken together. Consult your healthcare professional (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) for more in formation.

  • ORAL TETRACYCLINES/STRONTIUM RANELATE
  • TETRACYCLINES/SELECTED RETINOIDS (SYSTEMIC)
  • ANTIMICROBIALS/LIVE TYPHOID VACCINE

Serious Interactions

These medications may interact and cause very harmful effects. Consult your healthcare professional (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) for more in formation.

  • TETRACYCLINES/DIVALENT & TRIVALENT CATIONS
  • MISC ANTIBIOTICS/NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING AGENTS
  • SELECTED PHOTOSENSITIZERS/AMINOLEVULINIC ACID
  • SELECTED ANTIBIOTICS/CHOLERA VACCINE LIVE
  • TETRACYCLINES/TOPICAL TRETINOIN
  • TETRACYCLINES/METHOXYFLURANE

Moderate Interactions

These medications may cause some risk when taken together. Consult your healthcare professional (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) for more in formation.

  • DOXYCYCLINE/CYP3A4 INDUCERS
  • TETRACYCLINES/COUMARIN ANTICOAGULANTS
  • TETRACYCLINES/DIGOXIN, ORAL
  • TETRACYCLINES; TIGECYCLINE/CONTRACEPTIVES
  • TETRACYCLINES/PENICILLINS

Esophagitis is when your esophagus, the part of your throat that leads to your stomach, gets injured and irritated. It can feel like chest pain behind your sternum, heartburn, pain with swallowing, or like food is stuck in your throat. Medications, especially certain antibiotics and osteoporosis drugs, are common culprits.

These 10 medications cause direct injury to the lining of the esophagus.

1) Doxycycline

Doxycycline is an old antibiotic used for numerous conditions including rosacea, acne and Lyme disease. Doxycycline directly irritates the esophagus, often causing pain within hours of taking it.

One important thing to know is that doxycycline hyclate causes more problems than doxycycline monohydrate—and both are cheap generics with similar effectiveness. Ask your doctor to substitute doxycycline monohydrate for doxycycline hyclate to prevent irritation of your esophagus.

2) Tetracycline

Tetracycline is another antibiotic that is well-known to directly irritate the esophagus. It causes an injury that’s similar to a local acid burn. Tetracycline is very acidic (pH less than 3) when dissolved in saliva or water.

3) Clindamycin

Clindamycin is another antibiotic that can cause a directly irritating effect on the esophagus. It’s often used to treat Staph skin infections and tooth infections.

4) Aspirin

Many people take daily aspirin for stroke and heart disease prevention, but it causes esophagitis by disrupting how prostaglandins protect the esophagus. Prostaglandins are molecules that travel all around your body and help heal injuries.

Lower doses of aspirin carry a lower risk for esophagitis. But know this: The “safety coating” on aspirin pills may not matter in terms of preventing bleeding from the esophagus or stomach.

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5) NSAIDs

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), including ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Aleve), can cause severe esophagitis and bleeding.

What can you do if you have symptoms of esophagitis while taking an NSAID?

  • Use a protective agent like a proton pump inhibitor—omeprazole (Prilosec), pantoprazole (Protonix), esomeprazole (Nexium)—at the same time.
  • Instead of your NSAID, ask your doctor about using a COX-2 inhibitor like celecoxib (Celebrex), which is safer on the esophagus and stomach.

6) Alendronate (Fosamax)

Alendronate (Fosamax) causes more damage and results in more extreme narrowing of the esophagus (esophageal stricture) than any other pill. Alendronate is a medication that’s taken once a week and belongs to a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which treat osteoporosis.

You can lower your risk for esophagitis if you take alendronate properly. Take it with a full glass of water and don’t lie down for an hour.

7) Ibandronate (Boniva)

Ibandronate (Boniva) is similar to alendronate and is used for osteoporosis. Compared to alendronate, ibandronate is only taken once a month and has a lower risk for causing esophagitis, esophageal ulcers and esophageal narrowing.

8) Risedronate (Actonel)

Risedronate (Actonel) is another osteoporosis medication. It has fewer gastrointestinal side effects compared to alendronate, but it does carry some risk. Again, take it with a full glass of water and don’t lie down for an hour after taking it.

9) Potassium chloride supplements

Potassium chloride supplements are for patients with low potassium levels, from diuretics or other causes. These supplements are a well-documented cause of medication-related esophagitis.

10) Iron supplements

Ferrous sulfate, found in most over-the-counter iron supplements, is similar to tetracycline in that it can cause a local burn injury on the esophagus. When dissolved in saliva, ferrous sulfate is very acidic (pH less than 3).

Iron supplement options that are easier on the gut are Pur-Absorb iron packets, Feosol natural release, or those containing ferrous fumarate instead.

– – –

Here are general tips to protect the gastrointestinal tract when taking these meds:

  • Don’t quickly lie down after taking them. You should stand or sit upright for at least 30 minutes after taking them, and eat a meal if you can.
  • Make sure you get enough fluids when you take the medication. It’s recommended that you take your pills with about half a cup of water (100 mL), not 25 mL as most folks do. In fact, meds should ideally be taken with a full cup of water (240 mL or 8 oz) to minimize the risk of the pill getting stuck in your esophagus and causing damage.

Dr O.

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  • Oracea

    WARNINGS

    Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

    PRECAUTIONS

    Teratogenic Effects

    ORACEA should not be used during pregnancy. Doxycycline, like other tetracycline-class antibiotics, can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. If any tetracycline is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking these drugs, the patient should be informed of the potential hazard to the fetus and treatment stopped immediately.

    The use of drugs of the tetracycline-class during tooth development (last half of pregnancy, infancy, and childhood up to the age of 8 years) may cause permanent discoloration of the teeth (yellow-gray-brown). This adverse reaction is more common during long-term use of the drug but has been observed following repeated short-term courses. Enamel hypoplasia has also been reported. Tetracycline drugs, therefore, should not be used during tooth development unless other drugs are not likely to be effective or are contraindicated.

    All tetracyclines form a stable calcium complex in any bone-forming tissue. A decrease in fibula growth rate has been observed in premature human infants given oral tetracycline in doses of 25 mg/kg every 6 hours. This reaction was shown to be reversible when the drug was discontinued. Results of animal studies indicate that tetracyclines cross the placenta, are found in fetal tissues, and can cause retardation of skeletal development on the developing fetus. Evidence of embryotoxicity has been noted in animals treated early in pregnancy.

    Pseudomembranous Colitis

    Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including doxycycline, and may range in severity from mild to fatal colitis.

    Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

    C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

    If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

    Metabolic Effects

    The anti-anabolic action of the tetracyclines may cause an increase in BUN. While this is not a problem in those with normal renal function, in patients with significantly impaired function, higher serum levels of tetracycline-class antibiotics may lead to azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and acidosis. If renal impairment exists, even usual oral or parenteral doses may lead to excessive systemic accumulations of the drug and possible liver toxicity. Under such conditions, lower than usual total doses are indicated, and if therapy is prolonged, serum level determinations of the drug may be advisable.

    Photosensitivity

    Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines. Although this was not observed during the duration of the clinical studies with ORACEA, patients should minimize or avoid exposure to natural or artificial sunlight (tanning beds or UVA/B treatment) while using ORACEA. If patients need to be outdoors while using ORACEA, they should wear loose-fitting clothes that protect skin from sun exposure and discuss other sun protection measures with their physician.

    Autoimmune Syndromes

    Tetracyclines have been associated with the development of autoimmune syndromes. Symptoms may be manifested by fever, rash, arthralgia, and malaise. In symptomatic patients, liver function tests, ANA, CBC, and other appropriate tests should be performed to evaluate the patients. Use of all tetracycline-class drugs should be discontinued immediately.

    Tissue Hyperpigmentation

    Tetracycline-class drugs are known to cause hyperpigmentation. Tetracycline therapy may induce hyperpigmentation in many organs, including nails, bone, skin, eyes, thyroid, visceral tissue, oral cavity (teeth, mucosa, alveolar bone), sclerae and heart valves. Skin and oral pigmentation has been reported to occur independently of time or amount of drug administration, whereas other pigmentation has been reported to occur upon prolonged administration. Skin pigmentation includes diffuse pigmentation as well as over sites of scars or injury.

    Pseudotumor cerebri

    Pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension) in adults has been associated with the use of tetracyclines. The usual clinical manifestations are headache and blurred vision. Bulging fontanels have been associated with the use of tetracyclines in infants. While both of these conditions and related symptoms usually resolve after discontinuation of the tetracycline, the possibility for permanent sequelae exists. Patients should be questioned for visual disturbances prior to initiation of treatment with tetracyclines and should be routinely checked for papiledema while on treatment.

    Development of Drug Resistant Bacteria

    Bacterial resistance to tetracyclines may develop in patients using ORACEA. Because of the potential for drug-resistant bacteria to develop during the use of ORACEA, it should only be used as indicated.

    Superinfection

    As with other antibiotic preparations, use of ORACEA may result in overgrowth of non-susceptible microorganisms, including fungi. If superinfection occurs, ORACEA should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Although not observed in clinical trials with ORACEA, the use of tetracyclines may increase the incidence of vaginal candidiasis. ORACEA should be used with caution in patients with a history of or predisposition to Candida overgrowth.

    Laboratory Monitoring

    Periodic laboratory evaluations of organ systems, including hematopoietic, renal and hepatic studies should be performed. Appropriate tests for autoimmune syndromes should be performed as indicated.

    Patient Counseling Information

    See FDA-approved patient labeling (PATIENT INFORMATION)

    Patients taking ORACEA Capsules 40 mg should receive the following information and instructions:

    • It is recommended that ORACEA not be used by individuals of either gender who are attempting to conceive a child
    • It is recommended that ORACEA not be used by pregnant or breast feeding women
    • Patients should be advised that pseudomembranous colitis can occur with doxycycline therapy. If patients develop watery or bloody stools, they should seek medical attention.
    • Patients should be advised that pseudotumor cerebri can occur with doxycycline therapy. If patients experience headache or blurred vision they should seek medical attention.
    • Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines, including doxycycline. Patients should minimize or avoid exposure to natural or artificial sunlight (tanning beds or UVA/B treatment) while using doxycycline. If patients need to be outdoors while using doxycycline, they should wear loose-fitting clothes that protect skin from sun exposure and discuss other sun protection measures with their physician. Treatment should be discontinued at the first evidence of sunburn.
    • Concurrent use of doxycycline may render oral contraceptives less effective.
    • Autoimmune syndromes, including drug-induced lupus-like syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis, vasculitis and serum sickness have been observed with tetracycline-class drugs, including doxycycline. Symptoms may be manifested by arthralgia, fever, rash and malaise. Patients who experience such symptoms should be cautioned to stop the drug immediately and seek medical help.
    • Patients should be counseled about discoloration of skin, scars, teeth or gums that can arise from doxycycline therapy.
    • Take ORACEA exactly as directed. Increasing doses beyond 40 mg every morning may increase the likelihood that bacteria will develop resistance and will not be treatable by other antibacterial drugs in the future.

    Nonclinical Toxicology

    Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

    Doxycycline was assessed for potential to induce carcinogenesis in a study in which the compound was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage at dosages of 20, 75, and 200 mg/kg/day for two years. An increased incidence of uterine polyps was observed in female rats that received 200 mg/kg/day, a dosage that resulted in a systemic exposure to doxycycline approximately 12.2 times that observed in female humans who use ORACEA . No impact upon tumor incidence was observed in male rats up to at 200 mg/kg/day, or in females at the lower dosages studied.

    Doxycyline was assessed for potential to induce carcinogenesis in CD-1 mice by gavage at dosages 20, 75, and 150 mg/kg/day in males and at dosages of 20, 100, and 300 mg/kg/day in females. No impact upon tumor incidence was observed in male and female mice at systemic exposures approximately 4.2 and 8.3 times that observed in humans, respectively.

    Doxycycline demonstrated no potential to cause genetic toxicity in an in vitro point mutation study with mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT forward mutation assay) or in an in vivo micronucleus assay conducted in CD-1 mice. However, data from an in vitro mammalian chromosomal aberration assay conducted with CHO cells suggest that doxycycline is a weak clastogen. Oral administration of doxycycline to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats adversely affected fertility and reproductive performance, as evidenced by increased time for mating to occur, reduced sperm motility, velocity, and concentration, abnormal sperm morphology, and increased pre-and post-implantation losses. Doxycycline induced reproductive toxicity at all dosages that were examined in this study, as even the lowest dosage tested (50 mg/kg/day) induced a statistically significant reduction in sperm velocity. Note that 50 mg/kg/day is approximately 3.6 times the amount of doxycycline contained in the recommended daily dose of ORACEA when compared on the basis of AUC estimates. Although doxycycline impairs the fertility of rats when administered at sufficient dosage, the effect of ORACEA on human fertility is unknown.

    Use In Specific Populations

    Pregnancy

    Pregnancy Category D . Results from animal studies indicate that doxycycline crosses the placenta and is found in fetal tissues.

    Nursing Mothers

    Tetracyclines are excreted in human milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in infants from doxycycline, ORACEA should not be used in mothers who breastfeed.

    Pediatric Use

    ORACEA should not be used in infants and children less than 8 years of age . ORACEA has not been studied in children of any age with regard to safety or efficacy, therefore use in children is not recommended.

    Geriatric Use

    Clinical studies of ORACEA did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

    Generic Name: doxycycline (DOX i SYE kleen)
    Brand Names: Acticlate, Adoxa CK, Adoxa Pak, Adoxa TT, Alodox, Avidoxy, Doryx, Mondoxyne NL, Monodox, Morgidox, Oracea, Oraxyl, Periostat Targadox, Vibramycin calcium, Vibramycin Hyclate, Vibramycin monohydrate, Vibra-Tabs

    Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD Last updated on Jul 1, 2019.

    • Overview
    • Side Effects
    • Dosage
    • Professional
    • Tips
    • Interactions
    • More

    Doxycycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body.

    Doxycycline is used to treat many different bacterial infections, such as acne, urinary tract infections, intestinal infections, respiratory infections, eye infections, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, periodontitis (gum disease), and others.

    Doxycycline is also used to treat blemishes, bumps, and acne-like lesions caused by rosacea. It will not treat facial redness caused by rosacea.

    Some forms of doxycycline are used to prevent malaria, to treat anthrax, or to treat infections caused by mites, ticks, or lice.

    Important information

    You should not take doxycycline if you are allergic to any tetracycline antibiotic.

    Children younger than 8 years old should use doxycycline only in cases of severe or life-threatening conditions. This medicine can cause permanent yellowing or graying of the teeth in children.

    Using doxycycline during pregnancy could harm the unborn baby or cause permanent tooth discoloration later in the baby’s life.

    Before taking this medicine

    You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to doxycycline or other tetracycline antibiotics such as demeclocycline, minocycline, tetracycline, or tigecycline.

    To make sure doxycycline is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

    • liver disease;

    • kidney disease;

    • asthma or sulfite allergy;

    • increased pressure inside your skull; or

    • if you also take isotretinoin, seizure medicine, or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

    If you are using doxycycline to treat chlamydia, your doctor may test you to make sure you do not also have gonorrhea, another sexually transmitted disease.

    Taking this medicine during pregnancy may affect tooth and bone development in the unborn baby. Taking doxycycline during the last half of pregnancy can cause permanent tooth discoloration later in the baby’s life. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you become pregnant while using this medicine.

    Doxycycline can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormonal birth control (condom, diaphragm with spermicide) to prevent pregnancy.

    Doxycycline can pass into breast milk and may affect bone and tooth development in a nursing infant. The extent of absorption is unknown. Do not breast-feed while you are taking this medicine.

    Children should not use this medicine. Doxycycline can cause permanent yellowing or graying of the teeth in children younger than 8 years old.

    Children should use doxycycline only in cases of severe or life-threatening conditions such as anthrax or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The benefit of treating a serious condition may outweigh any risks to the child’s tooth development.

    How should I take doxycycline?

    Take doxycycline exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

    Take doxycycline with a full glass of water. Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking this medicine.

    Most brands of doxycyline may be taken with food or milk if the medicine upsets your stomach. Different brands of doxycycline may have different instructions about taking them with or without food.

    Take Oracea on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

    You may open a regular capsule or break up a regular tablet and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Drink a full glass (8 ounces) of cool water right away.

    Do not crush, break, or open a delayed-release capsule or tablet. Swallow the pill whole.

    You may need to split a doxycycline tablet to get the correct dose. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

    Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

    If you take doxycycline to prevent malaria: Start taking the medicine 1 or 2 days before entering an area where malaria is common. Continue taking the medicine every day during your stay and for at least 4 weeks after you leave the area. Use protective clothing, insect repellents, and mosquito netting around your bed to further prevent mosquito bites that could cause malaria.

    Doxycycline is usually given by injection only if you are unable to take the medicine by mouth. A healthcare provider will give you this injection as an infusion into a vein.

    Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Doxycycline will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

    If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using doxycycline.

    Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat and light.

    Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date on the label has passed. Using expired doxycycline can cause damage to your kidneys.

    What happens if I miss a dose?

    Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

    What happens if I overdose?

    Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

    What should I avoid while taking doxycycline?

    Do not take iron supplements, multivitamins, calcium supplements, antacids, or laxatives within 2 hours before or after taking doxycycline.

    Avoid taking any other antibiotics with doxycycline unless your doctor has told you to.

    Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Doxycycline can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

    Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

    Doxycycline side effects

    Get emergency medical help if you have any signs of an allergic reaction to doxycycline: (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

    Seek medical treatment if you have a serious drug reaction that can affect many parts of your body. Symptoms may include: skin rash, fever, swollen glands, flu-like symptoms, muscle aches, severe weakness, unusual bruising, or yellowing of your skin or eyes. This reaction may occur several weeks after you began using doxycycline.

    Call your doctor at once if you have:

    • severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

    • throat irritation, trouble swallowing;

    • chest pain, irregular heart rhythm, feeling short of breath;

    • little or no urination;

    • low white blood cell counts – fever, chills, swollen glands, body aches, weakness, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding;

    • severe headaches, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes;

    • loss of appetite, upper stomach pain (that may spread to your back), tiredness, nausea or vomiting, fast heart rate, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

    Common doxycycline side effects may include:

    • nausea, vomiting, upset stomach, loss of appetite;

    • mild diarrhea;

    • skin rash or itching;

    • darkened skin color; or

    • vaginal itching or discharge.

    This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

    What other drugs will affect doxycycline?

    Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

    Other drugs may interact with doxycycline, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

    Further information

    Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

    Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

    Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 21.02.

    Related questions

    • How long does doxycycline stay in your body after you finish your prescribed amount?
    • Can I take doxycycline if I am allergic to penicillin?
    • What is doxycycline hyclate used for?
    • Is doxycycline hydrochloride 100mg a sulfa based drug?
    • Can you smoke cigarettes or marijuana while on doxycycline hyclate 100mg?
    • Can I take doxycycline hyclate for strep throat?
    • Will it be harmful to take doxycycline with iron supplements?
    • Can taking doxycycline for acne worsen my skin?
    • What is the best antibiotic to treat a sinus infection?
    • What antibiotics are used to treat pneumonia?
    • How long after stopping doxycycline can I drink alcohol?

    Medical Disclaimer

    More about doxycycline

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    • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
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    Interactions

    Possible Interactions with: Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

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    Table of Contents > Supplement Interactions > Possible Interactions with: Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

    If you are being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin C supplements without first talking to your health care provider.

    Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — Both aspirin and NSAIDs can lower the amount of vitamin C in the body because they cause more of the vitamin to be lost in urine. In addition, high doses of vitamin C can cause more of these drugs to stay in the body, raising the levels in your blood. Some very early research suggests that vitamin C might help protect against stomach upset that aspirin and NSAIDs can cause. If you regularly take aspirin or NSAIDs, talk to your doctor before taking more than the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C.

    Acetaminophen (Tylenol) — High doses of vitamin C may lower the amount of acetaminophen passed in urine, which could cause the levels of this drug in your blood to rise.

    Aluminum-containing antacids — Vitamin C can increase the amount of aluminum your body absorbs, which could cause the side effects of these medications to be worse. Aluminum-containing antacids include Maalox and Gaviscon.

    Barbiturates — Barbiturates may decrease the effects of vitamin C. These drugs include phenobarbital (Luminal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), and seconobarbital (Seconal).

    Chemotherapy drugs — As an antioxidant, vitamin C may interfere with the effects of some drugs taken for chemotherapy; however, some researchers speculate that vitamin C might help make chemotherapy more effective. If you are undergoing chemotherapy, do not take vitamin C or any other supplement without talking to your oncologist.

    Nitrate medications for heart disease — The combination of vitamin C with nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate (Isordil), or isosorbide mononitrate (Ismo) reduces the body’s tendency to build up a tolerance to these medications so that they no longer work. If you take nitrate medications, talk to your doctor about whether you should take vitamin C.

    Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) — Vitamin C can cause a rise in estrogen levels when taken with these drugs, particularly if you are deficient in vitamin C to begin with and start taking supplements. Oral estrogens can also decrease the effects of vitamin C in the body.

    Protease inhibitors — Vitamin C appears to slightly lower levels of indinavir (Crixivan), a medication used to treat HIV and AIDS.

    Tetracycline — Some evidence suggests that taking vitamin C with the antibiotic tetracycline may increase the levels of this medication; it may also decrease the effects of vitamin C in the body. Other antibiotics in the same family include minocycline (Minocin) and doxycycline (Vibramycin).

    Warfarin (Coumadin) — There have been rare reports of vitamin C interfering with the effectiveness of this blood thinning medication. In recent follow-up studies, no effect was found with doses of vitamin C up to 1,000 mg per day. However, if you take warfarin or another blood thinner, talk to your doctor before taking vitamin C or any other supplement.

    Don’t eat this if you’re taking that

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    Dear Savvy Senior:If the prescription label says “take with meals,” does it matter what you eat? I currently take eight different medications for various health problems and would like to know if there are any foods I need to avoid. — Over Medicated

    Dear Over: It depends on the medication. Many meds should be taken with food – any food – to increase their absorption and reduce the risk of side effects. But some foods and medications can interact, reducing the medications’ effectiveness or increasing the risk of harmful side effects.

    Last week: How to (peacefully) divvy up your family belongings

    To stay safe, you should always talk to your doctor or pharmacist to learn the ins and outs of your prescriptions, along with what foods and beverages to avoid while you’re on it. In the meantime, here are some foods you should stay away from for some commonly prescribed drugs.

    • Cholesterol Medications: If you take a certain statin drug to control high cholesterol like Liptor, Zocor, Altoprev, Mevacor, or generics atorvastatin, simvastatin or lovastatin, you should avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can raise the level of the drug in your bloodstream and increase the risk of side effects, especially leg pain.

    • Blood Pressure Medicine: If you take an ACE inhibitor drug like Capoten, Vasotec, Monopril, Zestril and others to lower your blood pressure, you should limit food that contain potassium like bananas, oranges, tomatoes, spinach and other leafy greens, sweet potatoes, and salt substitutes that contain potassium. ACE inhibitors raise the body’s potassium levels. Eating too many potassium rich-foods while taking an ACE inhibitor can cause an irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations.

    • Blood Thinning Medications: If you are taking Coumadin, Jantoven, or the generic warfarin, you should limit kale and other greens, including broccoli, cabbage, spinach, and brussels sprouts that contain vitamin K. These foods can block the effects of these blood-thinning medications putting you at risk for developing blood clots. You also need to watch out for garlic, ginger, vitamin E and fish oil supplements because they can increase these medications blood-thinning abilities putting you at risk for excessive bleeding.

    • Antidepressants: If you take a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) antidepressant like Marplan, Nardil, Emsam, Parnate, or generic isocarboxazid, phenelzine, selegiline or tranylcypromine, avoid aged cheeses, chocolate, cured meats and alcoholic drinks. These contain tyramine, which can raise blood pressure. Normally, the body controls tyramine levels with an enzyme called monoamine oxidase, but the MAOI antidepressant block that enzyme.

    • Thyroid Medications: If you take a medication for hypothyroidism like Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid or generic levothyroxine, you should avoid eating tofu and walnuts, and drinking soymilk. All these can prevent your body from absorbing this medicine.

    • Anti-Anxiety Medications: If you take medication for anxiety like Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, Ativan, or generic alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam or lorazepam, you should avoid alcohol. These medications act as sedatives, binding with the brain’s natural tranquilizers to calm you down. But when you mix these drugs with alcohol, the side effects intensify, and can cause you to feel lightheaded, sleepy and forgetful.

    • Antibiotics: If you’re taking an antibiotic like Sumycin, Dynacin, Monodox, or generic tetracycline, doxycycline or minocycline, you should avoid dairy – milk, yogurt, and cheese, and calcium supplements and fortified foods – for a couple hours before and after taking the medicine. Calcium in dairy products binds to the antibiotic and prevents your body from absorbing it, making it ineffective.

    To find more dietary guidance on the drugs you take, see reliable health sites like MedlinePlus.gov or MayoClinic.org, or consider the excellent new AARP book “Don’t Eat This If You’re Taking That: The Hidden Risks of Mixing Food and Medicine” available at Amazon.com and BN.com for $13.

    Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org.

    Doxycycline Hyclate

    SIDE EFFECTS

    Clinical Trial Experience

    The safety and efficacy of Doxycycline Hyclate Delayed-Release Tablets, 200 mg as a single daily dose was evaluated in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled study. Doxycycline Hyclate Delayed-Release Tablets 200 mg was given orally once-a-day for 7 days and compared to doxycycline hyclate capsules 100 mg given orally twice daily for 7 days for the treatment of men and women with uncomplicated urogenital C. trachomatis infection.

    Adverse events in the Safety Population were reported by 99 (40.2%) subjects in the Doxycycline Hyclate Delayed-Release Tablets, 200 mg treatment group and 132 (53.2%) subjects in the doxycyclinehyclate capsules reference treatment group. Most AEs were mild in intensity. The most commonly reported adverse events in both treatment groups were nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and bacterial vaginitis, Table 1.

    Table 1: Adverse Reactions Reported in Greater than or Equal to 2% of Subjects

    Because clinical trials are conducted under prescribed conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trial may not always reflect the rates observed in practice.

    Postmarketing Experience

    The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of doxycycline. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate a causal relationship to drug exposure.

    Due to oral doxycycline’s virtually complete absorption, side effects to the lower bowel, particularly diarrhea, have been infrequent. The following adverse reactions have been observed in patients receiving tetracyclines:

    Gastrointestinal: Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, glossitis, dysphagia, enterocolitis, and inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the anogenital region. Hepatotoxicity has been reported. These reactions have been caused by both the oral and parenteral administration of tetracyclines. Esophagitis and esophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients receiving capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline-class. Most of these patients took medications immediately before going to bed .

    Skin: Maculopapular and erythematous rashes, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, exfoliative dermatitis, and erythema multiforme have been reported. Photosensitivity is discussed above .

    Renal: Rise in BUN has been reported and is apparently dose-related .

    Hypersensitivity reactions: Urticaria, angioneurotic edema, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid purpura, serum sickness, pericarditis, and exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Blood: Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and eosinophilia have been reported.

    Intracranial Hypertension: Intracranial hypertension (IH, pseudotumor cerebri) has been associated with the use of tetracycline

    Thyroid Gland Changes: When given over prolonged periods, tetracyclines have been reported to produce brown-black microscopic discoloration of thyroid glands. No abnormalities of thyroid function are known to occur.

    Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Doxycycline Hyclate (Doxycycline Hyclate Delayed-release Tablets )

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