Does glucosamine thin blood

Glucosamine & Chondroitin with (MSM)

Generic Name: chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) (kon DROI tin, gloo KOSE a meen, and METH il sul FON il METH ane)
Brand Name: Glucosamine & Chondroitin with MSM, Glucosamine Chondroitin Advanced, Osteo Bi-Flex Advanced, Osteo Bi-Flex Plus MSM

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Jun 7, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

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What is Glucosamine & Chondroitin with?

Chondroitin is a naturally occurring substance formed of sugar chains. Chondroitin is believed to help the body maintain fluid and flexibility in the joints.

Glucosamine is a naturally occurring substance that is believed to help develop and renew cartilage (the hard connective tissue mainly located on bones near joints in the body), and keep it lubricated for better joint movement and flexibility.

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring form of sulfur that helps support muscles and tendons in the body.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM is a combination medicine that has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in treating osteoarthritis, muscle damage caused by exercise, and other inflammatory joint disorders.

It is not certain whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. This product should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this product if you are allergic to chondroitin, glucosamine, or methylsulfonylmethane.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

  • diabetes;

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia;

  • asthma or allergies;

  • prostate cancer;

  • high cholesterol; or

  • high blood pressure.

It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice.

How should I take chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

It may take up several weeks before your symptoms improve. Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM does not improve after a few weeks of treatment, or if your condition gets worse while using this product.

Glucosamine may increase the glucose (sugar) levels in your blood. If you have diabetes, you may need to check your blood sugar more often while taking this medication. You may also need to adjust your insulin dosage. If you need surgery, you may need to stop taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM at least 2 weeks ahead of time. Do not change your dose or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM?

Avoid taking chitosan (usually marketed as a weight-loss product) while you are taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM. Chitosan can make it harder for your body to absorb chondroitin.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common side effects may include:

  • gas, bloating, heartburn, stomach cramps, nausea;

  • headache, drowsiness;

  • diarrhea, constipation;

  • swelling in your ankles or feet;

  • itching, skin irritation; or

  • puffy eyelids.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM?

Do not take this product without medical advice if you are using any of the following medications:

  • a blood thinner–warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); or

  • cancer medicine–doxorubicin, etoposide.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this product guide.

Further information

  • Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.03.

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More about chondroitin / glucosamine / methylsulfonylmethane

  • Side Effects
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  • 6 Reviews
  • Drug class: nutraceutical products

Consumer resources

  • Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane MSM

Other brands: Osteo Bi-Flex Advanced

Related treatment guides

  • Dietary Supplementation
  • Osteoarthritis

PMC

Literature review

For this review, the focus has been limited to the use of glucosamine HCl preparations for symptomatic relief of OA in humans. A Medline search was undertaken utilizing the search terms “glucosamine hydrochloride” and “osteoarthritis”. Secondary search terms were “human trials” and “ages 45 and older”. Studies were found that specified the use of glucosamine HCl in humans were included. Other studies were reviewed and discarded because they focused on alternate preparations of glucosamine.

The most recent and largest randomized controlled trial (RCT) was a multi-center trial supported by the National Institute of Health, called the Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT). This study sought to evaluate glucosamine HCl, chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine HCl combined with chondroitin sulfate, celecoxib, or placebo for the pain associated with knee OA for a duration of 24 weeks. This study enrolled 1583 patients. Enrollees had to be at least 40 years of age, have suffered with knee pain for at least 6 months, and have radiographic evidence of OA. The five regimens studied were: 1) Glucosamine HCl 500 mg three times a day, 2) Chondroitin sulfate 400 mg three times a day, 3) Glucosamine HCl 500 mg plus chondroitin sulfate 400 mg three times a day, 4) celecoxib 200 mg daily, or 5) placebo. Each of the five groups had over 300 persons assigned and had a mean age of 59 years and a mean body mass index of 32. Most of the participants, 64%, were women. Participants could take up to 4000 mg of acetaminophen as rescue medication per day, excluding the 24 hour period prior to clinical evaluation at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks.

The primary outcome measurement was a 20% decrease in the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis (WOMAC), score from baseline to week 24, but secondary assessments included evaluation by the patient and evaluator of disease state and therapy response, changes in pain scores using the visual analog scale (VAS), quality of life assessed by the SF-46 General Health Survey, and rescue medication use. The WOMAC Index is a 24 question validated survey assessing pain, function, and mobility. The VAS is a self-assessment of pain and function. Unlike other studies, the compounds used in this study were analyzed and certified by the Food and Drug Administration. There was a withdrawal rate of about 20% among all groups.

Overall, there was no difference among the treatment groups compared with placebo in a combined analysis for the primary outcome measure. Sub-group analysis was also performed. In the 78% of those with mild OA, there was no significant change when compared with placebo for the 4 therapy groups. Treatment effects ranged from a low of 63% response rate in the glucosamine HCl and chondroitin combination group to a high of 70% in the celecoxib group. None of these approached significance however. In the moderate-to-severe OA group (22% of participants), there was improvement in the primary outcome measure, the WOMAC score, in the glucosamine HCl plus chondroitin sulfate treatment group at a P value of 0.002 when compared with placebo but there was no significant improvement noted in the other therapy groups. Acetaminophen use was low among all groups. All groups had gradual improvement in pain over the 24 weeks but the celecoxib group had the fastest improvement at 4 weeks. The numbers of participants in the moderate-to-severe OA group was small (Clegg et al 2006).

An earlier study included 50 volunteers, ages 20 to 70 years of age, experiencing knee pain and functional disability and evaluated glucosamine HCl in dosages of 2,000 mg per day compared with placebo over a 90 day period. Knee pain was assessed using The Knee Pain Scale and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score which have been designed to quantify knee pain and mobility. A complete history was taken from each participant regarding knee pain along with any prior evaluations and treatments received that might suggest cartilage degeneration. There were 46 subjects completing the study, 24 in the glucosamine group and 22 in the placebo group. The participants underwent four assessment sessions and each time completed the two questionnaires, underwent joint line palpation, performed a “duck walk”, and climbed 32 stairs for 5 rotations. Of note, there were 15 people in the placebo arm that had greater than 10 years of symptoms and only 7 in the glucosamine arm that had symptoms for more that 10 years. Otherwise the two groups were fairly evenly divided along gender and age lines. Prescription and anti-inflammatory medications were allowed and recorded by the participants. Only 4 participants used anti-inflammatory medications, one on a regular basis and 3 as rescue medications only. At week eight, those receiving glucosamine HCl had significant improvement in pain and mobility (P = 0.004). By week twelve, 88% felt their pain had improved compared with only 17% of the placebo group. No significant improvement between the groups was demonstrated with joint line palpation, “duck walk”, or stair-climbing. Although subjective improvement was noted in this study, its significance is questionable due to the small number of participants (Braham et al 2003).

Another study utilizing glucosamine HCl focused on patients with OA of the knee. The primary end point was a change in the WOMAC Index. A Likert Pain Scale was also administered to participants. Volunteers for the study were solicited via newspaper advertisements with 1100 responding and 118 meeting criteria for participation. Participants had to describe at least moderate knee pain for 6 months and have radiographic changes consistent with OA. They could not have used glucosamine previously or oral steroids. Subjects were given glucosamine HCl 500 mg to take three times a day which was provided by the manufacturer. Rescue medication was also permitted in the form of acetaminophen 500 mg that could be taken to a maximum of 4000 mg per day. One hundred one subjects completed the 8 week trial. Although improvements were seen in the glucosamine group in 23 of the 24 questions of the WOMAC, this was not statistically significant from the placebo group. Improvements were suggested however during the knee examination and documented in daily diaries by those given glucosamine. No differences were noted between the groups in acetaminophen use or side effect profiles (Houpt et al 1999).

An internet-based study was conducted by McAlindon and colleagues (2004) to evaluate the effectiveness of glucosamine for control of symptoms resulting from knee OA. The solicitation, interview, and selection of participants were entirely conducted over the internet. Participants had to be at least 45 years of age and have radiographic documentation consistent with joint space loss. Exclusion criteria included those using glucosamine, having a knee injection within 60 days, history of arthroplasty, or allergy to shellfish. Initially the glucosamine utilized was a sulfate preparation. However during the trial, the manufacturer withdrew the supply and the preparation was changed to glucosamine HCl obtained from another pharmaceutical company. Two hundred five participants were divided between the glucosamine and the placebo groups. There was an overall reduction in pain scores during the study among both groups but no significant difference between the groups. Notably, there was a larger change in pain scored with the glucosamine HCl group than the glucosamine sulfate group but neither of the preparations significantly improved pain when compared with placebo. Even though assignment to groups was not standardized for gender, weight, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use; the placebo group had more women, heavier participants as indicated by a higher body mass index, and used more NSAIDs; there remained no difference among the study groups when adjustments were made for these variables. Two important aspects of this study that may have affected the outcome have to do with it being solely internet based and utilization of two different compounds of glucosamine (McAlindon et al 2004).

Another study sought to determine the effectiveness of glucosamine in the reduction of pain in OA of the knee. Participants had to have a history of OA and radiographic findings consistent with the disease. Ninety eight people ages 34 to 81 were evenly assigned to the glucosamine and the placebo groups. Therapy consisted of glucosamine (preparation not specified) 500 mg three times a day for 60 days. Other analgesics could be continued by participants as needed. Pain was assessed using the VAS while at rest and then while walking. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of pain intensity between the two groups at rest or walking at 30 or 60 days. Glucosamine was found to be no more effective than placebo for relieving knee pain in this RCT (Rindone et al 2000).

Two RCTs evaluated the effect of a combination product in degenerative joint disease (DJD) and OA of the knee and one also included DJD of the back. This combination included 1500 mg of glucosamine HCl, 1200 mg of chondroitin sulfate, and 228 mg of manganese ascorbate. In one of these RCTs, 34 male military personnel with knee or low back pain for 3 months and radiographic evidence of OA were included. Of the 21 knee participants, 20 met criteria for OA. This placebo-controlled crossover study was for a period of 16 weeks with only acetaminophen permitted as additional medication for pain. There was significant improvement in knee symptoms. This was demonstrated by improvement in pain assessed by the VAS recorded at clinic visits and recorded in diaries, personal assessment of treatment, and overall physical examination scores, but not the individual parameters of tenderness, effusion, swelling, and warmth. There was no significant change noted between the medication and placebo arms in any of the other measured parameters of acetaminophen use, running, stair-climbing, and range of motion (Leffler et al 1999).

In the other RCT, the same combination of nutraceuticals was used for the treatment of participants with knee OA, but the dosage was 2000 mg of glucosamine HCl, 1600 mg of chondroitin sulfate, and 304 mg of manganese ascorbate per day in divided doses. Participants were followed for 6 months and evaluated every two months using the validated Lequesne questionnaire of disease severity, with a 25% decrease in this measurement as the primary outcome. Secondary measures were the WOMAC questionnaire and the patient’s own global assessment of their OA using the visual analog scale. Rescue medications allowed included NSAIDs and acetaminophen. Eligible participants were 45–75 years of age and 93 were accepted for inclusion. There were 46 in the treatment arm and 47 received placebos. Mild or moderate OA was present in 33 of those receiving medication and 39 receiving placebo and severe OA in 13 and 8 in treatment and placebo arms respectively. There was improvement noted in those with mild and moderate OA with treatment intervention at 52% compared with 28% with placebo at four and six months only. There was no difference with intervention or placebo in those with severe knee OA, either group when assessed with the WOMAC questionnaire for assessment of pain, function, and joint stiffness, or patients’ assessments of response. The reduction in acetaminophen use from 2 to 6 months approached but did not reach significance. Of note, this study was sponsored in part by the manufacturer of the glucosamine, chondroitin, and manganese ascorbate product (Das and Hammad 2000).

Glucosamine

A review article of 18 trials investigating the effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate in treating osteoarthritis was published in 2005. A further four trials published since 2007 evaluated the effect of glucosamine sulphate in the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis. A second review article compared the clinical effectiveness and safety of glucosamine sulphate with those of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Review article (2005)

The number of participants in the RCTs included in this article ranged from 30 to 319. The trials lasted from three weeks to three years.

  • Seven trials out of 13 which compared glucosamine sulphate to a placebo found that the glucosamine sulphate was significantly better than the placebo in relieving pain.
  • In all 13 RCTs, the number and severity of side-effects reported by participants who were given glucosamine sulphate weren’t significantly different from those reported by participants who got the placebo.
  • Three trials out of five found that glucosamine sulphate was significantly better than the placebo in improving problems associated with walking and other daily activities.
  • No trials found that glucosamine sulphate was significantly effective, as compared to a placebo, in improving all the main osteoarthritis-related symptoms (pain, disability and joint stiffness).
  • Trials that used one company’s (Rotta Pharm) supplement showed a positive effect for pain and function while those that used other brands didn’t.
  • Trials that used the best methods to make sure participants didn’t know which treatment they were getting didn’t show significant benefits in pain relief and improved physical function in those who received glucosamine sulphate.

Trial 1

The first trial involved 222 people over two years. The supplement didn’t show any beneficial effects, compared to a placebo, in relieving pain and improving function.

Trial 2

In this six-month trial, which included 318 participants, glucosamine had a clear significant benefit over a placebo and an even stronger effect than paracetamol in improving both pain and function.

Trial 3‡

The 64 participants with osteoarthritis of the knee in this study received either 500 mg glucosamine sulphate three times a day or 400 mg vitamin E made from palm oil once a day for six months. Both groups improved in pain and function, but there was no difference between them.

Trial 4

60 participants with primary osteoarthritis in either one or both knees were randomised to receive a 1500 mg sachet of glucosamine sulphate or a placebo. After 12 weeks, there were no improvements in the placebo group but those who received glucosamine reported significant improvements in resting and moving pain, overall pain, stiffness and function. The improvements in these final three measures lasted for 20 weeks. In the treatment group, reported side-effects were heartburn and an all-over itch.

Review article

This review article summarised results of four trials:

  • Two trials out of three found that glucosamine sulphate was significantly more effective than NSAIDs in reducing pain, while the third found that both treatments had similar effects.
  • One trial out of two found that glucosamine sulphate was significantly better than NSAIDs in improving physical function, while the second trial found that both medications had similar effects.
  • Three trials out of four found that the number and severity of side-effects reported by participants taking glucosamine sulphate were significantly less than those reported by participants who were given NSAIDs.

‡ A trial of low quality. Results of this trial were given a lower weighting when we came to our conclusion about the compound.

Over-the-counter drug may work well for arthritis

(Reuters Health) – Three daily doses of glucosamine and chondroitin may provide the same relief as a smaller dose of prescription celecoxib for people with severe pain from osteoarthritis, according to a randomized trial in four European countries.

In the U.S., glucosamine and chondroitin are available as over-the-counter supplements so their formulations are not regulated like the prescription European version.

“The Europeans have an advantage on us in this regard as glucosamine, chondroitin and the combination are all available as medications,” said Dr. Allen Sawitzke of the Rheumatology Division at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, a coauthor of the new study.

“As such, their reliable composition and chemistry are more like assured,” he told Reuters Health by email.

The U.S. supplement versions are less reliable in quality and quantity, Sawitzke said.

The new trial included 606 patients over age 40 with moderate to severe pain from knee osteoarthritis living in France, Germany, Poland or Spain.

Osteoarthritis, or wear and tear of the joints, affects more than a third of adults over age 65 in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There is no cure. Treatments include physical therapy, medication and joint replacement.

The study participants were randomly divided into two groups, one taking a daily combination of 400 milligrams chondroitin sulfate and 500 mg glucosamine hydrochloride (Droglican, made by Bioiberica S.A.). The other group took 200 mg of celecoxib (marketed by Pfizer as Celebrex, Celebra, Onsenal and others) every day.

After six months, both groups had knee pain about half as severe as when they started, and similar reductions in joint swelling and stiffness and increased function, according to results in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

In U.S. drugstores, a three-month supply of glucosamine and chondroitin supplement costs around $30. Prescription celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever, can cost $130 per month, much more expensive than over-the-counter pain relievers, according to Consumer Reports.

Both glucosamine and chondroitin are available by prescription in Europe, but some advise against using them for osteoarthritis due to lack of evidence, the authors note.

But the new study suggests that in combination they can be effective for osteoarthritis patients, especially for people with heart or gastrointestinal problems who may not be able to take an NSAID like celecoxib, the authors write.

Celecoxib can cause serious side effects like high fever, noted coauthor Dr. Yves Henrotin, head of the Bone and Cartilage Research Unit at the University of Liège in Belgium. It can also cause ulcers and bleeding, according to the National Institutes of Health.

“My recommendation is to consider a patient’s (other diseases) before treatment,” Henrotin told Reuters Health by phone.

“For countries where the prescription preparations are available, the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate appears to be as effective and at least as safe so might be the preferred way to start,” Sawitzke said. It may be considered in other countries as well, but will have to be monitored closely through the first months of use, he said.

However, the prescription glucosamine and chondroitin formulation in this European study cannot be generalized to the dietary supplement versions available in the U.S. and U.K., they emphasize.

“I think many U.S. providers have quit recommending a trial of the glucosamine and chondroitin to patients affected by osteoarthritis as strong support was not available,” Sawitzke said. “In distinction, the European market has remained strong and the guidelines actually recommend their use.”

“We still have to consider financial constraints, a given patient’s adverse events risks, and the risks of the unknown in the over-the-counter market,” he said.

SOURCE: bmj.co/16pfwMO Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, online January 14, 2015.

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Generic Name: glucosamine (glue KOE sah meen)
Brand Name: Genicin, Optiflex-G

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Mar 7, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is glucosamine?

Glucosamine is sugar protein that helps your body build cartilage (the hard connective tissue located mainly on the bones near your joints).

Glucosamine is a naturally occurring substance found in bones, bone marrow, shellfish and fungus.

Glucosamine has been used in alternative medicine as an aid to relieving joint pain, swelling, and stiffness caused by arthritis.

Not all uses for glucosamine have been approved by the FDA. Glucosamine should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Glucosamine is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Glucosamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

You should not use this product if you are allergic to glucosamine.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

  • diabetes;

  • high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood);

  • cancer;

  • liver disease;

  • asthma or other breathing disorder;

  • if you are allergic to shellfish; or

  • if you take a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven).

It is not known whether glucosamine will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

Glucosamine may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice.

How should I take glucosamine?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use glucosamine, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Do not use different formulations of glucosamine at the same time without medical advice. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of glucosamine.

glucosamine can cause unusual results with a blood glucose (sugar) test. Do not use this product without a doctor’s advice if you are diabetic.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using glucosamine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

It may take up to 8 weeks before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using glucosamine as directed.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using glucosamine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra glucosamine to make up the missed dose.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking glucosamine?

Some glucosamine products also contain manganese. Taking too much of this combination can cause a manganese overdose. Do not take more than directed on the medicine label.

Glucosamine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;

  • diarrhea, constipation; or

  • heartburn.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect glucosamine?

Other drugs may interact with glucosamine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

More about glucosamine

  • Side Effects
  • Breastfeeding
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • En Español
  • 5 Reviews
  • Drug class: nutraceutical products

Other brands: Genicin, Optiflex-G

Professional resources

  • Glucosamine (Advanced Reading)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia

Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate Side Effects

Preliminary studies show glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate to be safe and well tolerated. Common side effects may include:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Gastrointestinal upset.

These side effects are reported in a small portion of patients. However, even substances that are found naturally in the body can have unpredictable results when taken in higher than normal quantities and in different formulations. This is particularly true with patients who are taking multiple medications or who have other diagnosed illnesses. For example:

    Studies suggest that glucosamine sulfate may increase insulin resistance. For this reason, diabetic patients should use glucosamine sulfate with caution and only under medical supervision.

In This Article:

  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate Supplements for Osteoarthritis
  • How Glucosamine and Chondroitin Help with Osteoarthritis
  • Summary of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Studies
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate Side Effects

Patients on blood thinners (anticoagulants) should use chondroitin sulfate only after discussing and receiving approval from their physician.

In most human studies, glucosamine sulfate has shown to be well tolerated for 30 to 90 days of treatment, while chondroitin sulfate can be well tolerated for up to three years.

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