Do you put orajel on tooth or gum

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Orajel

Orajel is the brand name of the topical numbing medicine benzocaine.

It’s used to reduce pain caused by teething, cold sores, canker sores, and toothaches.

The drug is in class of medicines known as local anesthetics. It works by blocking nerve signals in the body.

Orajel comes in a variety of over-the-counter (OTC) formulations for adults and children, which include tablets, gels, rinses, swabs, liquids, ointments, and creams.

The medicine is manufactured by Church & Dwight Co., Inc.

Orajel Warnings

Medicines that contain benzocaine may cause a life-threatening condition known as methemoglobinemia, which causes the amount of oxygen in your blood to become dangerously low.

In 2011, the FDA issued a warning about the risk of this condition in young children.

Don’t use Orajel with benzocaine in a child younger than two years old without talking to your doctor.

Some formulations of children’s Orajel contain benzocaine, while others don’t. Check your product labels carefully.

Don’t use Orajel that contains benzocaine if you’ve ever had methemoglobinemia.

Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms while using Orajel:

  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Feeling tired
  • Fast heart rate
  • Feeling lightheaded or short of breath with a pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails

Be sure to only use the recommended amount of Orajel. Taking too much of a numbing medicine can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if it’s absorbed through your skin and into your blood.

Don’t use large amounts of Orajel or apply to large areas of the body.

Stop using this medicine and contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms don’t improve or worsen after seven days.

Talk to a doctor before using this medicine if you have or have ever had:

  • Heart disease
  • A breathing disorder such as asthma, bronchitis, or emphysema
  • A genetic enzyme deficiency

Also, tell your physician if you smoke before using Orajel.

Pregnancy and Orajel

It’s not known whether Orajel will harm an unborn baby.

Don’t use this medicine while pregnant without first talking to your doctor.

It’s also not known whether the drug passes into breast milk or could harm a breastfeeding baby.

Talk to your doctor before using Orajel if you’re breastfeeding.

Generic Name: benzocaine topical (BENZ oh kane TOP ik al)
Brand Names: Orajel

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jun 24, 2019.

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What is Orajel?

Orajel contains benzocaine, a local anesthetic (numbing medication). It works by blocking nerve signals in your body.

Orajel numbs the skin or surfaces inside the mouth and used for the temporary relief of pain from sore throat, canker sores, cold sores, fever blisters, minor irritation or injury of the mouth and gums.

Orajel is also use for temporary relief of sore gums due to teething in children 2 years of age and older.

Important Information

Orajel used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). Do not use this medicine if you have ever had methemoglobinemia.

GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE SYMPTOMS OF METHEMOGLOBINEMIA: headache, tired feeling, confusion, fast heart rate, and feeling light-headed or short of breath, with a pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

An overdose of benzocaine can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. Use the smallest amount needed.

Do not use Orajel on a child younger than 2 years old.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use Orajel if you have ever had methemoglobinemia in the past.

Do not use Orajel on a child younger than 2 years old.

An overdose of benzocaine can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. This can happen if you apply more than the recommended dose.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if this medicine is safe to use if you have:

  • a personal or family history of methemoglobinemia, or any genetic (inherited) enzyme deficiency;

  • asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, or other breathing disorder;

  • heart disease; or

  • if you smoke.

Ask a doctor before using Orajel if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

If you apply Orajel to your chest, avoid areas that may come into contact with the baby’s mouth.

How should I use Orajel?

Use Orajel exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Read all medication guides or instruction sheets.

Your body may absorb more benzocaine if you use too much, if you apply it over large skin areas.

Use the smallest amount needed to numb the skin or relieve pain. Do not use large amounts of Orajel. Do not cover treated skin areas with plastic wrap without medical advice.

Do not use Orajel to treat large skin areas or deep puncture wounds. Avoid using the medicine on skin that is raw or blistered, such as a severe burn or abrasion.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse within the first 7 days of using Orajel. Also call your doctor if your symptoms had cleared up but then came back.

If you are treating a sore throat, call your doctor if the pain is severe or lasts longer than 2 days, especially if you also develop a fever, headache, skin rash, swelling, nausea, vomiting, cough, or breathing problems.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Orajel is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. Skip any missed dose if it’s almost time for your next dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of benzocaine topical applied to the skin can cause life-threatening side effects such as uneven heartbeats, seizure (convulsions), coma, slowed breathing, or respiratory failure (breathing stops).

What should I avoid while using Orajel?

Avoid eating within 1 hour after using Orajel on your gums or inside your mouth.

Avoid getting Orajel in your eyes. Avoid swallowing the gel while applying it to your gums or the inside of your mouth.

Orajel side effects

Orajel used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). This condition may occur after only one use of benzocaine or after several uses.

Signs and symptoms may occur within minutes or up to 2 hours after using Orajel in the mouth or throat. GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE:

  • a headache, tiredness, confusion;

  • fast heartbeats;

  • feeling light-headed or short of breath; and

  • pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Orajel: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe burning, stinging, or sensitivity where the medicine is applied;

  • swelling, warmth, or redness; or

  • oozing, blistering, or any signs of infection.

Common Orajel side effects may include:

  • mild stinging, burning, or itching where the medicine is applied;

  • skin tenderness or redness; or

  • dry white flakes where the medicine was applied.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Orajel?

Medicine used on the skin is not likely to be affected by other drugs you use. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Orajel only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.01.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Orajel (benzocaine topical)

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What to Do for Pain and a Broken Tooth

A broken tooth doesn’t always hurt, or the pain may come and go. But if you have exposed nerves or tooth dentin, your tooth may be very sensitive (especially to cold drinks).

If a broken tooth leaves a sharp edge it may also cut your tongue and cheek.

Until you can see a dentist, there are ways to treat pain from a broken tooth at home. These treatments will make you more comfortable temporarily, but should never replace seeing a doctor or dentist.

Rinse to clean your mouth

Gently rinse your mouth each time you eat to clear debris from around the broken tooth. You can use plain, warm water, or saline water, or a rinse made of equal parts water and hydrogen peroxide.

Just don’t swish too hard. This can help to avoid infection and more pain.

Ice to reduce swelling

If your face is swelling, apply ice in 15-minute intervals as long as you need.

Cover ice cubes or a cold pack with a towel and hold it to the part of your face that’s swollen. If your broken tooth is the result of a sports impact or injury, it could take days for swelling and bruising to improve.

Use gauze for blood

Reduce bleeding by placing clean gauze inside the mouth near the affected area. Replace gauze whenever it fills with blood.

Be careful with what you eat

A broken tooth might have exposed nerve that’s extra sensitive to certain foods and temperatures.

Avoid:

  • acidic soda, alcohol, and coffee
  • cold beverages, which can cause painful zinging in exposed nerve
  • nuts and celery, which can get stuck in the tiny cracks in the tooth
  • anything too chewy that puts pressure on the tooth, such as steak, jerky, gum, and candy
  • fruits with seeds in them, like strawberries and raspberries
  • extremely sugary foods, as sugar gives organisms in your mouth more to feed on and can increase decay in your teeth

Instead, try eating soft nutritious food such as smoothies, roasted vegetables, and soup.

Chew on the other side of your mouth

Chew food in parts of your mouth that avoid putting too much pressure on the broken tooth.

Use pain medication

Following label directions or as advised by a doctor, ease pain and swelling with anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen or naproxen. You may also use acetaminophen for pain relief.

Never apply pain medication directly on your gums as it could burn the tissue. And never give products containing benzocaine to children under 2 years old.

Over-the-counter tooth repair

If your tooth is broken and sharp against your tongue, you can find temporary tooth fillings at the pharmacy to soften the edge. Brands such as Temptooth, DenTek, and Dentemp make repair kits you can use at home.

Remember, this is just a temporary, short-term solution. If your tooth has been broken due to extreme trauma or injury, seek immediate medical attention.

If you want to know more about home remedies, we discuss 10 remedies for toothache pain here. For more on a broken tooth specifically, keep reading below.

Americaine

Brand Names: Americaine, Americaine Anesthetic Lubricant, Americaine Hemorrhoidal, Anacaine, Anbesol Baby, Anbesol Cold Sore Therapy, Anbesol Gel, Anbesol Liquid, Anbesol Liquid Cool Mint, Anbesol Maximum Strength, Babee Teething Lotion, Benz-O-Sthetic, Benzodent, Boil Ease Pain Relieving, Cepacol Dual Relief Sore Throat Cherry, Cepacol Dual Relief Sore Throat Mint, Cepacol Fizzlers, Cepacol Ultra, Dent-O-Kain, Dermoplast, Detane, Foille Plus, Hurricaine, Hurricaine Kit, Hurricaine Snap-n-Go, Kank-a, Lanacane, Lanacane Maximum Strength, LolliCaine, Medicone Maximum Strength, Num-Zit, Numzident, Orabase, Orabase Baby Teething Gel, Orabase Gel-B, Orabase Lip Healer, Orabase with Benzocaine, Orajel, Orajel Baby, Orajel Baby Nighttime, Orajel D, Orajel Denture Plus, Orajel Maximum Strength, Orajel Maximum Strength PM, Orajel Mouth Aid, Orajel Mouth Sore Medicine, Orajel Mouth-Aid, Orajel Severe Pain Formula, Oral Pain Relief, OraMagic Plus

Generic Name: benzocaine topical

  • What is benzocaine topical?
  • What are the possible side effects of benzocaine topical?
  • What is the most important information I should know about benzocaine topical?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using benzocaine topical?
  • How should I use benzocaine topical?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while using benzocaine topical?
  • What other drugs will affect benzocaine topical?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is benzocaine topical?

Benzocaine is a local anesthetic (numbing medication). It works by blocking nerve signals in your body.

Benzocaine topical is used to reduce pain or discomfort caused by minor skin irritations, sore throat, sunburn, vaginal or rectal irritation, ingrown toenails, hemorrhoids, and many other sources of minor pain on a surface of the body. Benzocaine is also used to numb the skin or surfaces inside the mouth, nose, throat, vagina, or rectum to lessen the pain of inserting a medical instrument such as a tube or speculum.

Benzocaine topical should not be used to treat teething pain in infants, and is not approved for use in a child younger than 2 years old. There are many brands and forms of benzocaine topical available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Benzocaine topical may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of benzocaine topical?

Benzocaine topical used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). This condition may occur after only one use of benzocaine or after several uses.

Signs and symptoms may occur within minutes or up to 2 hours after using benzocaine topical in the mouth or throat. GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE:

  • a headache, tiredness, confusion;
  • fast heartbeats;
  • feeling light-headed or short of breath; and
  • pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using benzocaine topical and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe burning, stinging, or sensitivity where the medicine is applied;
  • swelling, warmth, or redness; or
  • oozing, blistering, or any signs of infection.

Common side effects may include:

  • mild stinging, burning, or itching where the medicine is applied;
  • skin tenderness or redness; or
  • dry white flakes where the medicine was applied.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about benzocaine topical?

Benzocaine topical used in the mouth may cause a condition in which the oxygen in your body tissues can become dangerously low. This is a potentially fatal condition called methemoglobinemia (met-HEEM-oh glo-bin-EE-mee-a). Do not use benzocaine topical if you have ever had methemoglobinemia.

GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP IF YOU HAVE SYMPTOMS OF METHEMOGLOBINEMIA: headache, tired feeling, confusion, fast heart rate, and feeling light-headed or short of breath, with a pale, blue, or gray appearance of your skin, lips, or fingernails.

An overdose of numbing medication can cause fatal side effects if too much of the medicine is absorbed through your skin and into your blood. Use the smallest amount needed.

Do not use this medicine on a child younger than 2 years old.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that over-the-counter (OTC) oral drug products containing benzocaine should not be used to treat infants and children younger than 2 years. We are also warning that benzocaine oral drug products should only be used in adults and children 2 years and older if they contain certain warnings on the drug label. These products carry serious risks and provide little to no benefits for treating oral pain, including sore gums in infants due to teething. Benzocaine, a local anesthetic, can cause a condition in which the amount of oxygen carried through the blood is greatly reduced. This condition, called methemoglobinemia, can be life-threatening and result in death.

Due to the significant safety risk of methemoglobinemia, we have urged manufacturers that they should stop marketing OTC oral drug products for treating teething in infants and children younger than 2 years. If companies do not comply, we will take action to remove these products from the market. We have also urged manufacturers of OTC oral drug products containing benzocaine for adults and children 2 years and older to make the following changes to the labels of their products:

  • Adding a warning about methemoglobinemia;
  • Adding contraindications, FDA’s strongest warnings, directing parents and caregivers not to use the product for teething and not to use in infants and children younger than 2 years; and
  • Revising the directions to direct parents and caregivers not to use the product in infants and children younger than 2 years.

We continue to monitor the safety and effectiveness of OTC benzocaine products and intend to take additional actions in the future as needed. We will notify the public about any updates. In addition to our recent actions regarding OTC benzocaine products, we are also requiring a standardized methemoglobinemia warning to be included in the prescribing information of all prescription local anesthetics.

Parents and caregivers should follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations for treating teething pain:1

  • Gently rub or massage the child’s gums with one of your fingers.
  • Use a firm rubber teething ring.

Topical pain relievers and medications that are rubbed on the gums are not useful because they wash out of a baby’s mouth within minutes. FDA has previously cautioned parents and caregivers to not give certain homeopathic teething tablets to children.

Alternative treatments for adults who experience mouth pain may include dilute salt water mouth rinse and OTC pain relief medications. Adults should follow the American Dental Association’s recommendations for mouth sores and spots:

  • Schedule regular oral health checkups
  • Keep a diary of what you eat and drink
  • Keep a list of oral hygiene products you have been using
  • Avoid all tobacco products
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation
  • See your dentist if you notice any change in your mouth

Consumers using benzocaine products to treat mouth pain should seek medical attention immediately for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia. These include pale, gray or blue-colored skin, lips, and nail beds; shortness of breath; fatigue; confusion; headache; lightheadedness; and fast heart rate. Signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia may appear within minutes to one to two hours after using benzocaine. Symptoms may occur after using benzocaine for the first time, as well as after prior uses.

Health care professionals should warn patients of the possibility of methemoglobinemia and advise them of the signs and symptoms when recommending or prescribing local anesthetic products. Some patients are at greater risk for complications related to methemoglobinemia. This includes those with breathing problems such as asthma, bronchitis, or emphysema; heart disease, and the elderly. Health care professionals using local anesthetics during medical procedures should take steps to minimize the risk for methemoglobinemia. These include monitoring patients for signs and symptoms suggestive of methemoglobinemia; using co-oximetry when possible; and having resuscitation equipment and medications readily available, including methylene blue.

Benzocaine is a local anesthetic contained in some OTC products for the temporary relief of pain due to minor irritation, soreness, or injury of the mouth and throat. Benzocaine products are marketed as gels, sprays, ointments, solutions, and lozenges under brand names such as Anbesol, Orabase, Orajel, Baby Orajel, Hurricaine, and Topex, as well as store brands and generics. Prescription local anesthetics include articaine, bupivacaine, chloroprocaine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, prilocaine, ropivacaine, and tetracaine.

We have been closely monitoring the risk of methemoglobinemia with the use of OTC and prescription local anesthetics and previously communicated about this risk in 2014, 2011, and 2006. We estimate that more than 400 cases of benzocaine-associated methemoglobinemia have been reported to FDA* or published in the medical literature since 1971. There are likely additional cases about which we are unaware.

As part of our continued monitoring of this safety risk, we recently evaluated 119 cases of benzocaine-associated methemoglobinemia reported to FDA and identified in the medical literature in the 8½ years between February 2009 and October 2017. We have continued to receive cases even after our 2014 communication. Most of the 119 cases were serious and required treatment. Twenty-two cases occurred in patients younger than 18 years, and 11 of these were in children younger than 2 years. Four patients died among the 119 patients, including one infant. We also conducted a study comparing the relative ability of the two local anesthetics benzocaine and lidocaine to make methemoglobin. The study showed that benzocaine generated much more methemoglobin than lidocaine in a red blood cell model.2

We urge patients, consumers, and health care professionals to report side effects involving benzocaine, prescription local anesthetics, or other medicines to the FDA MedWatch program, using the information in the “Contact FDA” box at the bottom of the page.

*The cases were reported to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

Alice Langford, Rebecca Gaines and Anna E. Mazzucco, PhD, National Center for Health Research

Teething is the appearance of an infant’s first set of teeth (or “baby teeth”). This process can begin as early as three months of age, and may not be complete until the child is three years old. Although some children may not be affected by teething, others may show signs of discomfort such as fussiness, trouble sleeping, loss of appetite, and excessive drooling. For these reasons, the teething period can be challenging for children and their parents!

Teething can last for months and has the same symptoms as other infant challenges, making it tough to know for sure what is bothering the child. The American Dental Association does not consider fever, diarrhea, or rashes to be signs of teething. One simple way to identify teething is to gently feel your child’s gums for swollen areas or an emerging tooth. If in doubt, and your child seems uncomfortable, you can always check with your pediatrician.

If your child is teething, it can be tough to sort through all the children’s products on the market. Here are some tips on how to make teething as safe and comfortable as possible.

Just Say No to Orajel (Benzocaine) for Teething

Many parents reach for Orajel or Baby Orajel, which are teething gels that contain benzocaine and are designed to soothe sore gums. Benzocaine products have been used for years, but in May 2018, the FDA declared that over-the-counter (OTC) benzocaine products are a serious risk to children and infants and said that these products should be taken off the market. They warned parents that benzocaine should not be used on infants and young children to soothe teething pain. The FDA is taking action against the use of benzocaine products because they have the potential to cause a condition called methemoglobinemia.

Methemoglobinemia is a potentially deadly condition that causes blood to carry less oxygen. Signs of methemoglobinemia may show either minutes or 1-2 hours after the use of lidocaine products. Symptoms include:

  • Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips and nail beds
  • Trouble breathing
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Lightheadedness
  • Racing heartbeat

If any of these symptoms appear after the use of benzocaine products, seek immediate medical care. Products that contain benzocaine include: Anbesol, Baby Orajel, Cepacol, Chloraseptic, Hurricaine, Orabase, Orajel and Topex.

Lidocaine and Other Medications for Relieving Teething Pain? Proceed with Caution.

Are there any other medications for teething? Some parents have used topical lidocaine to numb their child’s gums. However, in June 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned parents that lidocaine should not be used on infants and young children to soothe teething pain.

The FDA now requires a black box warning, which is the FDA’s most serious warning, for lidocaine solution. Lidocaine is a common painkiller that the FDA has never approved to treat teething pain but that parents sometimes used. The FDA now realizes that the risks of lidocaine are greater than its benefits for young children. The agency has received 22 reports of “serious adverse reactions,” including six deaths and 11 hospital admissions.

Why is lidocaine dangerous, and why did it take so many years to realize it? The answer is simple: It is too easy for an adult or child taking care of an infant to give too much lidocaine, which can cause seizures, brain injury, or heart problems.

What about more traditional pain medication? Most experts believe that teething should not require medication, but some doctors may advise using a very low dose of acetaminophen (Tylenot) or ibuprofen (Advil) to relieve teething discomfort. Be sure to ask your child’s doctor before deciding to use any medication for teething. And, be sure to measure any medications very carefully, and don’t use them often, because infants can be harmed even by “over the counter” medications. Products containing aspirin should never be given to children unless instructed by your healthcare provider.

What Can I Do to Help with Teething?

Fortunately, there are safe, non-toxic ways to treat teething. A simple do-it-yourself option is to wet one end of a washcloth or burp cloth and briefly freeze it before offering it to your baby to chew on. Commercial cloth products using natural fabrics are also available, including organic cotton varieties.

If a baby has started eating solid foods, offering a chilled puree or yogurt (as appropriate) can offer relief. For an added bonus, refrigerate the spoon first. If a child is old enough for a sippy cup, you can also serve them cool water to ease the pain.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) also suggests using clean fingers to gently massage gums, or using a chilled teething ring. However, there are safety concerns about plastic teething rings. A 2015 study found endocrine-disrupting chemicals, which can affect the child’s hormones, in several types of plastic baby teethers. For this reason, it makes sense to avoid using teethers.

The Bottom Line

Teething pain should not require medical treatment. If your child is experiencing extreme pain or has a high fever, teething is probably not the cause and you should contact a medical professional. Additionally, don’t assume that products sold in your local drug store or online are safe.

Simple teething pain relief methods such as massaging the gums or offering a chilled washcloth, food, or water are effective home remedies which don’t rely on teethers. And a final thing to keep in mind: Teething children may also stick other objects in their mouths in an effort to soothe their gums themselves, so watch out for potential choking hazards!

All articles are reviewed and approved by Dr. Diana Zuckerman and other senior staff.

Blog

If your baby is around 6 months of age and is keeping you up at night, they are probably experiencing teething pain. Classic signs of the impending arrival of new teeth include sore or tender gums, drooling, chewing on hard objects and irritability.

As a parent, you want to do whatever you can to help relieve the pain and soothe your baby. After all, a sleepless, cranky baby affects the whole family. Here are some tips to soothe sore gums:

  • Gently rub or massage the baby’s gums with your finger
  • Give the child a firm rubber teething ring chilled in the refrigerator
  • Offer a cold washcloth
  • If your baby eats solid food, try hard foods that your baby can gnaw on such as carrots or cucumber but beware of pieces that might break off and act as a choking hazard
  • Over the counter pain medications such as Tylenol or Motrin can be used

Do not give your child any medication that contains the pain reliever benzocaine. Benzocaine is a local anesthetic and can be found in such over-the-counter products as Anbesol, Hurricaine, Orajel, Baby Orajel, and Orabase. The use of benzocaine gels and liquids for mouth and gum pain can lead to a rare but serious—and sometimes fatal—condition called methemoglobinemia, a disorder in which the amount of oxygen carried through the blood stream is greatly reduced.

to read the full consumer update from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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