Dilated eyes side effects

Contents

GENERIC NAME: ATROPINE SULFATE – OPHTHALMIC (AT-roe-peen SUL-fate)

BRAND NAME(S): Isopto Atropine

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: This medication is used before eye examinations (e.g., refraction) and to treat certain eye conditions (e.g., uveitis). It belongs to a class of drugs known as anticholinergics. Atropine works by widening (dilating) the pupil of the eye.

HOW TO USE: To apply eye drops, wash your hands first. To avoid contamination, do not touch the dropper tip or let it touch your eye or any other surface.If you are wearing contact lenses, remove them before using eye drops. Wait at least 15 minutes before replacing your contact lenses.Tilt your head back, look upward, and pull down the lower eyelid to make a pouch. Hold the dropper directly over your eye and place one drop into the pouch. Look downward and gently close your eyes for 1-2 minutes. Place one finger at the corner of your eye (near the nose) and apply gentle pressure for 2 to 3 minutes. This will prevent the medication from draining out. Try not to blink and do not rub your eye. Repeat these steps for your other eye if so directed or if your dose is for more than 1 drop. If you are using this medication on a regular schedule, apply it usually 2 to 4 times daily or as directed by your doctor.Do not rinse the dropper. Replace the dropper cap after each use. Do not use the solution if it turns brown or cloudy or if it contains particles.If you are using another kind of eye medication (e.g., drops or ointments), wait at least 5-10 minutes before applying other medications. Use eye drops before eye ointments to allow the drops to enter the eye.If you are using this medication on a regular schedule, you can get the most benefit from it by not missing any doses. To help you remember, use it at the same times each day. Continue using it for the full time prescribed.Inform your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

SIDE EFFECTS: Burning/stinging/redness of the eye, eye irritation, or temporary blurred vision may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: dizziness, fainting, new or increased eye pressure/pain/swelling/discharge.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: slow/shallow breathing, mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, agitation), fast/irregular heartbeat.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Atropt

Generic Name: atropine sulphate
Product Name: Atropt

Indication: What Atropt is used for

Atropt Eye Drops are used in eye examinations as well as other circumstances when the pupil is to be widened and/or the accommodation frozen.

Your doctor, however, may have prescribed Atropt Eye Drops for another purpose. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Atropt Eye Drops have been prescribed for you.

If you have any concerns, you should discuss this with your doctor or in their absence with your pharmacist.

Atropt Eye Drops are available only on a doctor’s prescription.

Atropt Eye Drops are for use in the eyes only. They should not be taken by mouth.

Action: How Atropt works

Atropt widens the pupil of the eye and blocks the ability to change the focus of the eye.

Atropine is a belladonna alkaloid. Atropine sulphate acts in the eye to block the action of acetylcholine, relaxing the cholinergically innervated sphincter muscle of the iris. This results in dilation of the pupil (mydriasis). The cholinergic stimulation of the accommodative ciliary muscle of the lens is also blocked. This results in paralysis of accommodation (cycloplegia).

Atropt Eye Drops contain atropine sulphate in a sterile aqueous base thickened with hypromellose.

The excipients or non-active ingredients are disodium edetate, benzalkonium chloride, hypromellose, boric acid and freshly distilled water.

Dose advice: How to use Atropt

Before you use it

When you must not use it

Do not use Atropt Eye Drops if you are allergic to:

  • Atropine or any of the ingredients listed here;

Do not use Atropt Eye Drops if you have angle-closure glaucoma or a family history of glaucoma.

Atropt like all medicines, should not be used during pregnancy unless your doctor specifically tells you to.

Do not use Atropt Eye Drops after the expiry date printed on the pack. If you use it after the expiry date has passed, it may have no effect at all, or worse, there may be an entirely unexpected effect.

Do not purchase or use Atropt Eye Drops if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering.

Before you start to take it

You must tell your doctor if you are:

  • Allergic to any other medicines or any foods, dyes or preservatives;
  • Have glaucoma or a family history of glaucoma;
  • Wearing contact lenses.

Taking other medicines

Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medication, including medicines, creams, ointments or lotions that you buy without a prescription from a pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.

Do not use in children unless specifically directed to by your doctor.

Your doctor or pharmacist has information on medicines to be careful with or avoid while using Atropt.

How to use it

Gently pull out the lower eyelid to form a sac. Allow one drop to fall into the sac without touching the eye with the dropper end of the bottle.

To minimise absorption of the drug other than into the eye, apply gentle pressure to the tear duct for approximately one minute immediately after application.

When to use Atropt Eye Drops

Use as directed by your doctor. Do not use more than the number of drops they advise or use them more frequently than directed.

It is important to use Atropt Eye Drops exactly as directed. If you use less than you should, it may not work as well and your medical condition may not improve. Using it more frequently than you should may not improve your condition any faster and may cause or increase side effects.

If you forget to use Atropt Eye Drops at the required time

Use it as soon as you remember and then return to your normal dosing time. If your next dose is almost due, leave using Atropt Eye Drops until that time.

Do not try to make up for missed doses by using more than one dose at a time. This may increase the chance of getting an unwanted side effect.

If you have trouble remembering when to use Atropt Eye Drops, ask your pharmacist for some hints.

If you accidentally swallow it

Immediately phone your doctor or Poisons Information Centre (telephone 13 11 26) for advice, or go to casualty at your nearest hospital, if you think you or anyone else may have swallowed Atropt. Do this even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning. Also, report any other medicine or alcohol which has been taken. You may need urgent medical attention. Keep telephone numbers for these places handy.

While you are using it

Things you must do

Tell your doctor if you feel Atropt Eye Drops are not helping your condition.

Tell your doctor if, for any reason, you have not used your Atropt Eye Drops as prescribed. Otherwise, your doctor may think that it was not effective and change your treatment unnecessarily.

Always discuss with your doctor any problems or difficulties during or after using Atropt Eye Drops.

Things you must not do

Do not give Atropt Eye Drops to anyone else even though their symptoms seem similar to yours.

Do not use Atropt for other conditions unless your doctor tells you. Atropt Eye Drops have been prescribed for you for a specific condition. If you use it for another condition, it may not work or may make the condition worse.

Do not give Atropt Eye Drops to small children.

Things to be careful of

The pupil dilation will last for up to 12 days. This can make driving or using machinery difficult and possibly hazardous. While the pupil is dilated you will experience distorted vision, lack of tolerance to bright light or sunlight and possible distortion of your balance. Special care is needed at these times.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about the length of time you have used Atropt Eye Drops.

After using it

Storage

Keep Atropt where children cannot reach it. A locked cupboard at least one and a half metres above the floor is a good place to store medicines.

Keep Atropt Eye Drops in a cool, dry place where the temperature stays below 25°C and protect from light. Do not freeze or refrigerate. Do not store it or any other medicines in a bathroom or near a sink. Do not leave Atropt Eye Drops in the car or on windowsills.

Discard any of the drops still left after 4 weeks from first using them.

Disposal

If your doctor tells you to stop using Atropt Eye Drops, or they pass their expiry date, ask your pharmacist what to do with any left over.

Schedule of Atropt

Atropt is a Schedule 4 (prescription only) medicine.

Side effects of Atropt

Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you do not feel well while using Atropt Eye Drops.

Atropt Eye Drops helps most people with medical conditions listed here but it may have unwanted side effects in some people.

All medicines have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the time they are not. You may need medical treatment if you get some of the side effects.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions you may have.

Common side effects

The most common side effects of Atropt Eye Drops are:

  • Temporary blurred vision;
  • Burning, stinging, redness or watering of the eyes.

There is a possibility of systemic absorption of Atropt Eye Drops. If this occurs you may experience flushing, dryness of the skin, rapid and irregular pulse, fever, mental aberrations and loss of neuromuscular coordination.

Atropt Eye Drops may cause other side effects, check with your doctor.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if you have any problems while using Atropt Eye Drops even if you do not think the problems are connected with the medicine or are not listed here.

Do not be alarmed by the list of side effects or their discussion. You may not experience any of them.

For further information talk to your doctor.

AK-Dilate Side Effects

Generic Name: phenylephrine ophthalmic

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 10, 2018.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • More

Note: This document contains side effect information about phenylephrine ophthalmic. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name AK-Dilate.

For the Consumer

Applies to phenylephrine ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

Along with its needed effects, phenylephrine ophthalmic (the active ingredient contained in AK-Dilate) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur while taking phenylephrine ophthalmic:

Symptoms of too much medicine being absorbed into the body

– Less common with 10% solution; rare with 2.5% or weaker solution

  • Dizziness
  • fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat
  • increased sweating
  • increase in blood pressure
  • paleness
  • trembling

Some side effects of phenylephrine ophthalmic may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common with 2.5 or 10% solution

  • Burning or stinging of eyes
  • headache or browache
  • sensitivity of eyes to light
  • watering of eyes

Less common

  • Eye irritation not present before use of this medicine

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to phenylephrine ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

General

The more commonly reported adverse reactions have included eye pain and stinging on instillation, temporary blurred vision and photophobia.

Cardiovascular

There have been reports of serious cardiovascular reactions including ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial infarctions. Fatalities have been reported. Significant blood pressure elevations have been reported with recommended doses of 10% ophthalmic solution.

Frequency not reported: Ventricular arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, hypertension, syncope, tachycardia, arrhythmia, palpitations, extrasystoles, reflex bradycardia, coronary artery spasm

Ocular

Periorbital pallor has been reported in preterm patients.

Frequency not reported: Eye pain and stinging on instillation, temporary blurred vision, photophobia, conjunctival allergy, reactive hyperemia, transient punctuate keratitis, lacrimation, corneal edema, pigmented aqueous floaters, rebound conjunctival vasoconstriction, rebound miosis, periorbital pallor

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Hypersensitivity

Dermatologic

Frequency not reported: Blanching of skin, increased perspiration

Nervous system

Frequency not reported: Subarachnoid hemorrhage, headache, tremor or trembling, aneurisms

1. “Product Information. Phenylephrine Ophthalmic (phenylephrine ophthalmic).” Akorn Inc, Buffalo Grove, IL.

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

3. “Product Information. Neo-Synephrine (phenylephrine ophthalmic)” Sanofi Winthrop Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about AK-Dilate (phenylephrine ophthalmic)

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • Drug class: mydriatics

Consumer resources

Other brands: Mydfrin, Altafrin, Neofrin, Ocu-Phrin, Prefrin

Professional resources

  • Phenylephrine Ophthalmic Solution (FDA)

Related treatment guides

  • Eye Redness
  • Pupillary Dilation

AK-Dilate (Eye Drops 10%)

Generic Name: Phenylephrine Eye Drops 10% (fen il EF rin)
Brand Name: AK-Dilate, Neofrin

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on May 2, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • More

Uses of AK-Dilate:

  • It makes the eye pupils larger.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take AK-Dilate?

  • If you have an allergy to phenylephrine or any other part of AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Heart disease, high blood pressure, or thyroid disease.
  • If you have taken certain drugs for depression or Parkinson’s disease in the last 14 days. This includes isocarboxazid, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, selegiline, or rasagiline. Very high blood pressure may happen.
  • If your child is younger than 1 year of age. Do not give AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%) to a child younger than 1 year of age.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take AK-Dilate?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for clear eyesight while your pupils are dilated.
  • If you are allergic to sulfites, talk with your doctor. Some products have sulfites.
  • Very bad heart problems like abnormal heartbeats and heart attack have happened with the 10% strength of AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%). Most of the time, these heart problems happened in people who had heart disease. Sometimes, they were deadly. If you have questions, talk with the doctor.
  • Use with care in children younger than 5 years old. They may have more risk of high blood pressure.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%) while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

How is this medicine (AK-Dilate) best taken?

Use AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%) as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • For the eye only.
  • Your doctor will give AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%).

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of high blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • Chest pain or pressure or a fast heartbeat.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Weakness on 1 side of the body, trouble speaking or thinking, change in balance, drooping on one side of the face, or blurred eyesight.

What are some other side effects of AK-Dilate?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Stinging.
  • Eye pain.
  • Eye irritation.
  • Blurred eyesight.
  • Bright lights may bother you. Wear sunglasses.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out AK-Dilate?

  • If you need to store AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%) at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

Consumer information use

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about AK-Dilate (phenylephrine eye drops 10%), please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • Drug class: mydriatics
  • AK-Dilate
  • AK-Dilate (Phenylephrine Eye Drops 2.5%)
  • AK-Dilate Ophthalmic (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Mydfrin, Altafrin, Neofrin, Ocu-Phrin, Prefrin

  • Phenylephrine Ophthalmic Solution (FDA)
  • Eye Redness
  • Pupillary Dilation

Is It Love? Dilated Pupils and 7 Other Signs to Watch For

You may not be able to rely solely on pupil size to know if someone’s into you, but there are several other nonverbal clues you can watch for.

Mutual eye contact

We all love a little eye candy and can’t help but stare when someone catches our interest.

But did you know that making prolonged eye contact with someone can make you more appealing?

One 2006 study found that a person’s attractiveness is boosted when they make eye contact and direct interest your way.

And, according to older research, the longer you engage in mutual eye contact, the stronger your feelings of love and affection become.

Eye contact may be just as important once you’re in a relationship.

The amount of eye contact you and your partner share may be indicative of just how in love you are.

Older research suggests that couples who are deeply in love make more eye contact than those who aren’t.

Leaning or tilting

The way a person sits or stands in your presence says a lot about their interest. Someone who’s interested or flirting with you will often lean or tilt your way.

Examples of this are leaning forward and bringing their upper body toward you, or moving closer to the edge of their seat when talking to you.

On the flipside, a person who leans back or tilts their body away from you is probably just not that into you.

Feet pointing

Without having to give it any real thought or effort, a person’s feet will generally point in the direction they want to go.

If you’re speaking to someone and their feet are pointing toward you, then they’re where they want to be.

If their feet are pointing away from you or even at someone else, take it as a sign they may rather be elsewhere.

Mirroring

Mirroring has long been thought to be a nonverbal sign of interest.

Mirroring is the mimicking — subconscious or otherwise — of another person’s actions and behaviors.

When two people are genuinely engaged in conversation, they tend to mirror each other without even realizing it.

It’s also believed that a person will mimic your actions when they want to build a rapport with you.

Aligning their actions encourages closeness and creates a bond.

So, if you happen to notice that the person you’re chatting up is holding their hand in the same position you are, they’re probably interested.

Touching

Subtle motions, such as grazing your arm or leg during an animated conversation, may be a sign of interest.

Also take note of how they interact with themselves when speaking to you.

Running their hand along their arm or through their hair while looking at or speaking to you may be another sign of attraction.

Flushing or blushing

Your face becomes flushed when you get a rush of adrenaline. This causes your heart to race and your blood vessels to dilate.

It can result from any type of emotion, whether that’s stress or embarrassment or anger.

But in terms of mating, it’s a good indicator that you’ve managed to get someone excited.

Blushing has long been thought of as a sign of attraction and attractiveness.

Sweaty palms

The same adrenaline rush that can cause you to blush at the mere sight of someone you’re attracted to can also cause your palms to sweat.

The eye is a beautiful organ, and it is the only place in the human body where a doctor can see a part of the central nervous system, the optic nerve. The observation of that nerve is a crucial part of a comprehensive eye examination.

Both the dilated and the undilated eye exams provide important information to an eye doctor. Let’s explore the undilated exam first.

The Undilated Eye Exam

One of the first parts of a comprehensive eye exam is a test of your vision, and perhaps a measurement to determine an eyeglass prescription, both of which require that your eyes remain undilated.

In addition, eye doctors will examine your pupils’ responses to light prior to dilation. This can be important for determining whether the visual pathways for each eye are functioning properly.

There is also an examination, called gonioscopy, which allows the doctor to examine your eye’s drainage angle with a special mirrored lens. The “angle” that is being referred to is the angle between the iris, which makes up the colored part of your eye, and the cornea, which is the clear window front part of your eye. When the angle is open, your ophthalmologist can see most, if not all, of your eye’s drainage system. When the angle is narrow, only portions of the drainage angle are visible, and in acute angle-closure glaucoma, none of it is visible.

Part of a glaucoma examination is formal visual field testing, where your peripheral, or side vision, is tested. Ideally, your eyes are not dilated during this test.

Finally, there are other parts of the front of the eye, the iris for example, which should be examined when your eyes are not dilated.

The Dilated Eye Exam

The view to the back of the eye is limited when the pupil is not dilated. When your pupil is small, an eye doctor can see your optic nerve and macula but the view is limited. In order to see the entire retina, the pupil must be dilated. This is achieved through the use of eye drops.

How Long Does it Take for the Eyes to Fully Dilate?

The medication typically take about 15-30 minutes to fully dilate the pupils, depending the person’s response to the medication.

How Long Do the Eyes Remain Dilated?

The pupil dilation typically take 4-6 hours to wear off.

Managing Blurry Vision and Light Sensitivity

Once your eyes are dilated, there is an increase in light sensitivity because the pupil is large and more light is coming through, so bring your sunglasses, or your ophthalmologist may provide some disposable shades for your use. You may also experience blurry vision, particularly if you are trying to read. Some patients feel a “tightening” or different sensation in their eyelids. If it is your first time having your eyes dilated or you know your vision is too impaired for driving after dilation, bring a friend or companion to drive you home from your examination. While in the past there were some eye drops that could reverse the dilation, these are no longer available, so you will have to wait the 4-6 hours before the drops completely wear off.

What Conditions are Diagnosed with a Dilated Eye Exam?

Glaucoma

The optic nerve can be seen through an undilated pupil, but for optimum viewing a dilated pupil is required. This is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma, as well as other diseases of the optic nerve. Learn about what to expect during a glaucoma eye exam.

Macular Degeneration

Two very common retinal diseases, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), are diagnosed and monitored by examining the retina through a dilated pupil. Learn about what to expect during a macular degeneration eye exam.

Other Conditions

In addition to macular degeneration and glaucoma, there are many other conditions that require pupil dilation, such as detection of a retinal tear or detachment, or an ocular tumor, just to name a few.

How Frequently Should You Have a Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exam?

  • The National Eye Institute generally recommends that starting at age 60 everyone should have an annual, comprehensive, dilated eye examination.
  • If you are African-American, the recommended age of having a dilated eye exam is 40 years old, because of the higher risk of glaucoma.
  • The American Academy of Ophthalmology has specific recommendations for diabetic patients.
    • It is recommended that Type 1 diabetics have their first eye exam within five years of diagnosis.
    • Type 2 diabetics, should have their eye exam at the time of diagnosis.
    • If you are a diabetic woman considering pregnancy, it is recommended to have an exam prior to conception or early in the first trimester.

Summary

As part of a comprehensive eye examination, pupil dilation is very important at revealing the status of your optic nerve and retina, and is critical to preventing and treating eye conditions that could potentially lead to vision loss.

Resources:

  • Glaucoma Toolkit (Information to Help You Understand and Manage Glaucoma)
  • Expert Information on Glaucoma (Articles)
  • National Glaucoma Research Report (Newsletters)
  • The Glaucoma Eye Exam (Article)
  • Macular Degeneration Toolkit (Information to Help You Understand and Manage Macular Degeneration)
  • Expert Information on Macular Degeneration (Articles)
  • The Macular Degeneration Eye Exam (Article)

What Happens To Your Eyes When You’re Attracted To Someone

If you think that you’re not good at flirting or that you send mixed messages on a date, worry not — turns out there’s a very obvious sign. New research from the University of Kent found that eye dilation — when your pupils become larger — happens when you’re looking at the sex or sexes you’re attracted to. No surprise there. But the interesting bit was that there was an equal dilation response whether the subject they were looking at was clothed… or stark naked. Normally the level of sexual explicitness (like nudity) would dictate the level of physiological response with something like say, genital response. But not so with eye dilation. Researcher Dr Janice Attard-Johnson said when heterosexual men and women saw people of the opposite sex, their eyes dilated, but it didn’t matter what they were wearing.

To be honest, eye contact is useful for a whole lot of reasons when it comes to sex and dating. “Locking eyes with someone, especially when you’re constantly looking down at your phone, can feel intimidating and requires confidence,” Millennial Love Expert Samantha Burns, a licensed mental health counselor, relationship counselor, and dating coach, tells Bustle. “Eye contact allows you to determine if someone is safe, attractive, and whether you want this person to approach you. If you spot someone you’d like to chat with, make sure to glance over and make eye contact three times and flash a smile, which gives the green light signal that you’re interested.” There’s a lot to be gained by locking eyes with someone and trying to read the cues and this study shows that there’s some strong science behind it.

The Bad News?

Giphy

So what’s the downside to all of this? Well, you can’t hide it. Think about it — if your eyes dilate just as much when you’re looking at someone you’re crushing on when they’re clothed as if they were completely naked, then there’s nowhere to hide how you’re feeling, which is bad if that’s exactly what you want to be doing. I mean, you can’t control your pupil dilation. It’s just a fact of life.

Plus, the research suggests that you may need a lower level of arousal for your pupils to dilate than you would for other physiology measures, so not only will they give you away— they’ll give you away first. So if we’re talking about that girl in the office that you have a crush on, it’s only a matter of time before she can tell.

The truth is, we already knew that they eyes could give your whole game away in terms of flirting and attraction. But it’s fascinating that they have the same response to someone you’re attracted to clothed as they would if you had your crush totally naked with a bowl of whipped cream and strawberries. But hey — either way, at least you know where to look.

Atropine Solution

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 10/24/2018

Atropine (atropine sulfate) Ophthalmic Solution is topical anticholinergic for ophthalmic use indicated for cycloplegia, mydriasis, and penalization of the healthy eye in the treatment of amblyopia. Common side effects of Atropine Ophthalmic Solution include

  • eye sensitivity to light,
  • increased blood pressure,
  • eye pain and stinging upon instillation of drops,
  • blurred vision,
  • eye inflammation (superficial keratitis) and decreased tearing,
  • conjunctivitis,
  • contact dermatitis,
  • eyelid swelling,
  • skin dryness,
  • dry mouth and throat,
  • restlessness,
  • irritability,
  • delirium from stimulation of the central nervous system,
  • fast heart rate, and
  • flushed skin of the face and neck.

In individuals from three (3) months of age or greater, the dose of Atropine Ophthalmic Solution is 1 drop applied topically to the cul-de-sac of the conjunctiva, forty minutes prior to the intended maximal dilation time. In individuals 3 years of age or greater, doses may be repeated up to twice daily as needed. Atropine Ophthalmic Solution may interact with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy Atropine Ophthalmic Solution should be used only if prescribed; it is unknown if it would affect a fetus. Traces of Atropine Ophthalmic Solution pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Atropine (atropine sulfate) Ophthalmic Solution Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Atropine Eye Drops

Generic Name: Atropine Eye Drops (A tro peen)
Brand Name: Atropin-Care

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jul 8, 2019.

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  • Side Effects
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Uses of Atropine Eye Drops:

  • It is used to widen the pupil before an eye exam or eye surgery.
  • It is used to treat eye swelling.
  • It is used to treat lazy eye (amblyopia).

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Atropine Eye Drops?

For all patients taking this medicine (atropine eye drops):

  • If you have an allergy to atropine or any other part of this medicine (atropine eye drops).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have glaucoma.

Children:

  • If your child has had a bad reaction to this medicine (atropine eye drops) in the past.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this medicine (atropine eye drops).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine (atropine eye drops) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Atropine Eye Drops?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (atropine eye drops). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for clear eyesight while your pupils are dilated.
  • Bright lights may bother you for some time after using this medicine (atropine eye drops). Wear sunglasses for as long as you were told by your doctor.
  • This medicine may cause harm if swallowed. If this medicine (atropine eye drops) is swallowed, call a doctor or poison control center right away.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this medicine (atropine eye drops) with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Use with care in children. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this medicine (atropine eye drops) while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.
  • Do not give this medicine (atropine eye drops) to a child younger than 3 months of age.

How is this medicine (Atropine Eye Drops) best taken?

Use this medicine (atropine eye drops) as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • For the eye only.
  • Wash your hands before and after use.
  • Do not touch the container tip to the eye, lid, or other skin.
  • Tilt your head back and drop drug into the eye.
  • After use, keep your eyes closed. Put pressure on the inside corner of the eye. Do this for 1 to 2 minutes. This keeps the drug in your eye.
  • Take out contact lenses before using this medicine (atropine eye drops). Talk with your doctor to see when lenses may be put back in after this medicine (atropine eye drops) is given. Do not put contacts back in if your eyes are irritated or infected.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Use a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not use 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are some other side effects of Atropine Eye Drops?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Blurred eyesight.
  • Stinging.
  • Eye irritation.
  • Feeling sleepy.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

How do I store and/or throw out Atropine Eye Drops?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Protect from heat.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about atropine ophthalmic

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • Drug class: mydriatics
  • Atropine ophthalmic
  • Atropine Eye Ointment
  • Atropine sulfate Ophthalmic (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Isopto Atropine, Atropine-Care, Atropisol, Ocu-Tropine

  • Atropine Sulfate eent (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +3 more
  • Pupillary Dilation
  • Refraction, Assessment
  • Uveitis

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