Cimetidine 400 for warts

Contents

Tagamet

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 10/30/2018

Tagamet (cimetidine) is a histamine receptor antagonist used to treat and prevent certain types of ulcer, and to treat conditions that cause the stomach to produce too much acid. Tagamet is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus and causes heartburn. Tagamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Tagamet include:

  • headache,
  • dizziness,
  • drowsiness,
  • depression,
  • agitation,
  • breast swelling or tenderness (in men),
  • joint or muscle pain,
  • skin rash,
  • diarrhea,
  • nausea, or
  • constipation.

Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects of Tagamet including:

  • mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, hallucinations),
  • trouble urinating, or
  • decreased sexual ability (with very high doses).

Dose of Tagamet depends on the condition being treated and the patient’s response to the medication. Tagamet may interact with blood thinners, clopidogrel, phenytoin, nifedipine, metronidazole, propranolol, chlordiazepoxide, lidocaine, diazepam, theophylline, depression or anxiety medications. Tell your doctor all medications you use. Tagamet should be used only when prescribed during pregnancy. This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Tagamet (cimetidine) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Overview

Cimetidine (Tagamet) was the first of a new class of ulcer drugs, called “H2 antagonists.”

It works by suppressing the secretion of stomach acid, so it is also used to treat conditions of abnormal acidity such as serious heartburn as well as helping ulcers clear up rapidly.

Although it was initially a prescription medication, once the company took it over the counter, cimetidine has been used less often for ulcers and more often for heartburn or indigestion.

Sometimes cimetidine is taken to get rid of persistent warts, although the research on this use is equivocal (The Journal of Dermatological Treatment, Feb., 2012).

Cimetidine Side Effects and Interactions

Side effects associated with cimetidine are not common. However, headache, drowsiness, dizziness and diarrhea have been reported.

Older patients may experience mental confusion or even hallucinations. Long-term use can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency, which could contribute to confusion or even masquerade as dementia in an older person.

Other adverse reactions that have been reported include impotence, breast enlargement in men, rash, hair loss, pneumonia, changes in heart rhythm, liver problems and blood alterations. Report any symptoms to your physician promptly.

Interactions

Cimetidine can interact with many other drugs. The blood thinner Coumadin may become far more potent in the presence of Tagamet and can lead to dangerous bleeding. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any unusual bruising, bleeding, reddish urine or blackened stools.

Drugs That Interact Badly with Cimetidine

  • ACE inhibitors such as captopril or fosinopril
  • Anti-anxiety drugs such as chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, clorazepate, diazepam, flurazepam or triazolam
  • Antibiotics such as cefditoren, cefpodoxime or cefuroxime,
  • Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, amoxapine, desipramine, doxepin, imipramine, nortriptyline or trimipramine
  • Antifungal medicines such as ketoconazole or terbinafine
  • Beta blockers such as acebutolol, atenolol, betaxolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, esmolol, labetolol, metoprolol, nadolol, nebivolol, penbutolol, pindolol, propranolol or timolol
  • Calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem and verapamil
  • Cancer drugs such as dasatinib, erlotinib or pazopanib,
  • Clopidogrel
  • Drugs for HIV such as atazanavir (Reyataz) or nevirapine
  • Metformin
  • Methylphenidate
  • NSAIDs such as naproxen,
  • Quinidine
  • Sirolimus

Nonprescription drugs that interact with Tagamet include antacids, alcohol, caffeine and cigarettes. Cimetidine may interfere with absorption of iron supplements, since stomach acid enhances absorption.

Caffeine may have more impact on people taking this medicine, while cigarette smoking may tend to counteract its anti-ulcer benefits.

People taking acid-suppressing drugs such as Tagamet should not take enteric-coated peppermint oil. The enteric coating is designed to keep the oil from being absorbed until it reaches the more alkaline lower intestine. But when there is very little stomach acid, the enteric coating may dissolve prematurely, releasing the oil into the stomach.

Check with your pharmacist and physician before taking any other medication or herb in combination with Tagamet.

Special Precautions

Perhaps because Tagamet is so effective at reducing stomach acid concentrations, patients taking this medicine have higher levels of certain microorganisms in their stomachs than would normally survive there. Scientists do not yet know whether these bacteria have negative long-term consequences.

Regular supplementation with vitamins C and E might in theory provide protection against possible adverse consequences.

People with liver or kidney trouble may not be able to tolerate the usual dose of Tagamet. Ask your doctor to monitor you as you begin this medicine.

Taking the Medicine

Tagamet may be taken with food, especially if it upsets your stomach.

If antacids are needed for relief of ulcer pain, they should generally be taken at a different time.

Oral cimetidine as the treatment of common warts

Clinical question

What is the effectiveness of the oral cimetidine as treatment of common warts?

What does the research evidence say?

Step 1: The Cochrane Library

No Cochrane systematic review exists for the question. However, the Cochrane Library search engine very helpfully listed 18 matches to the search term “cimetidine warts” from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials.

Step 2: TripDatabase

I conducted a search using the TripDatabase PICO search tool (Participant: “wart”, Intervention: “cimetidine”, Comparator: “placebo”, Outcomes: blank). The only useful response was a post published in April 2016 in the BMJ EBM Spotlight blog by Geoffrey Modest, which looked at a study that was a retrospective analysis of the use of cimetidine for plantar warts . The blog author’s conclusion “with some trepidation” was that cimetidine “might be worth considering”.

Step 3: Selecting a paper to review

I had some issues with the approach in the blog post – for instance, the study reviewed had no control group in the context where several (admittedly problematic) randomised trials exist. After reviewing the list from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, I will examine Yilmaz et al. (1996) published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. I will also consider the data from Rogers et al. (1999) which was a randomised trial in adults , and Ardabili and Majid (2014) which was a randomised trial comparing cimetidine to placebo in addition to cryotherapy .

Critical appraisal

I will use the randomised controlled trial appraisal sheet from the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine .

PICO

Participants: who was studied?

70 people (children and adults) with at least 5 warts, who had received no topical or systemic treatment for at least 4 weeks. The setting of the study is not described but the authors were academic dermatologists in Turkey. The mean age was about 15 years, with the mean duration of warts roughly 2.5 years.

Important exclusions: pregnant and lactating women, renal and hepatic disease, and males aged over 16 years (cimetidine was not specifically approved for use in men in Turkey).

Intervention: what was the exposure?

intervention group: cimetidine 25 to 40 mg/kg daily, in 3 or 4 divided doses for up to three months. The treatment was discontinued if the lesions disappeared.

Comparator: what was the control/alternative?

placebo group: identical looking placebo, divided into 3 or 4 doses

Outcomes: what was measured?

Primary outcome: not explicitly stated, but it appears that “complete cure” as defined by monthly clinical examinations was the outcome of interest

Internal validity: are the trial results valid?

Randomised patient assignment?

Yes. However, no description of how this was undertaken is given.

Groups similar at the start?

Yes. There were no obvious differences between the intervention and placebo groups.

Groups treated equally apart from assigned treatment?

Yes.

All patients accounted for?

No. The investigators did not undertake an “intention-to-treat” analysis, with approximately 23% of participants not included in analyses.

Measures objective? Or patients and clinicians kept blinded?

Probably. The presence or absence of warts is a reasonably objective outcome. The study is described as double-blinded but little further detail is described.

What were the results?

Primary outcomes – complete cure rate at 3 months of treatment:

Discussion and conclusion

On its own, this small study cannot be considered as providing strong evidence (for or against) the efficacy of cimetidine on warts. That being noted, this study is consistent with the notion that cimetidine may be of placebo value in the treatment of warts as no meaningful difference was identified. In both groups, approximately one-third of participants had had complete cure by the end of treatment.

There have been some suggestions that cimetidine is more effective in younger children . However, this is not strongly supported by the limited randomised trial data, and it should be recognised that younger children have higher/quicker wart resolution rates regardless of therapy. A possible alternative hypothesis is that the impression of greater efficacy in children is simply due to association biases.

For adults, Rogers et al. (1999) similarly didn’t find a benefit from cimetidine compared to placebo . As a treatment in addition to cryotherapy, cimetidine did not appear to provide benefit either . Cimetidine is typically considered to be a fairly benign treatment, though a fifth reported side-effects in the Rogers et al. study .

My interpretation of the research evidence is that it does not support the use of cimetidine as a treatment for warts. I recognise that there are anecdotes of seemingly miraculous responses for warts that have been present for a long period. It is important to reflect that the placebo group in this study had a one-third completely cure rate, where the mean duration of warts was over two years. Cimetidine should not be used as routine treatment of common warts in primary care.

Stat Facts

95% confidence intervals

In rough conceptual terms, the 95% confidence interval is the range of values that are still mathematically consistent with the estimate of effect found. In other words, it tells us something about the degree of imprecision of the result. Confidence intervals are sometimes not reported for proportions, and this can be misleading, especially for small sample sizes where the imprecision can be large. For instance, imagine if this study demonstrated that the cimetidine group had a 40% response rate. Naively, this might seem a large proportionate difference, but is well within the uncertainty of the estimate.

  1. Mullen BR, Guiliana JV, Nesheiwat F. Cimetidine as a First-Line Therapy for Pedal Verruca. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 2005;95(3):229-34.
  2. Yilmaz E, Alpsoy E, Basaran E. Cimetidine therapy for warts: a placebo-controlled, double-blind study. J Am Acad Dermatol 1996 Jun;34(6):1005-7.
  3. Rogers CJ, Gibney MD, Siegfried EC, Harrison BR, Glaser DA. Cimetidine therapy for recalcitrant warts in adults: is it any better than placebo? J Am Acad Dermatol 1999 Jul;41(1):123-7.
  4. Ardabili NS, Majid RM. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of cimetidine and cryotherapy with placebo and cryotherapy in treatment of warts. Journal of Pakistan Association of Dermatologists 2014;24(3):251-5.
  5. Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Critical Appraisal tools. 2014 ; Available from: http://www.cebm.net/critical-appraisal/

How to Get Rid of a Wart with Tagamet

Warts can affect almost anyone. For reasons that are not clear children seem especially susceptible. But adults can also develop warts. Sometimes a single wart on the sole of the foot multiplies and turns into what is called a mosaic wart (see photo). Getting rid of a wart like this can be challenging, as this reader relates:

Q. I’m 38. I have a plantar wart that turned into a mosaic wart.

This was very painful to walk on, so I went to the podiatrist. He prescribed Aldara, which only caused the warts to spread. We tried freezing and cutting the warts off without success.

Then I started taking Tagamet (OTC) twice a day. I’ve done this for three weeks, filing the dead skin away a few times a week. As of today the mosaic wart is almost gone!

I’ve spent thousands of dollars trying to get rid of a wart. Who knew Tagamet would work so well?

Studies Are Mixed on Taking Cimetidine to Get Rid of a Wart:

A. Dermatologists started using cimetidine (Tagamet) for resistant warts back in the early 1990s, when Tagamet was available only by prescription. There were many skeptics. One termed this treatment to get rid of a wart “snake oil for the 21st century” (Archives of Dermatology, Dec., 1998).

There are many case reports in the medical literature of success treating warts with cimetidine, but the few placebo-controlled trials that have been done are not encouraging (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, July, 1999).

Presumably, cimetidine and imiquimod (Aldara) both work by stimulating the immune system to reject the wart (Indian Dermatology Online Journal, Sep-Oct., 2016). The difference is that Aldara is an expensive topical treatment for skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma). Side effects can include burning, pain, redness, swelling, itching and peeling skin. Some people also report dizziness, headache, diarrhea, indigestion and flu-like symptoms.

War Stories About Warts:

Readers of our newspaper column have reported some pretty amazing wart stories. It never fails to amaze us what people will do to get rid of a wart:

DWD cautions not to try his dumb trick:

“As a kid I remember hearing about people who could ‘talk’ warts off or to use stump water collected from a hollow stump at midnight. I never had any so I never found out if it worked or not.

“Later in college and after, I had success with Compound W.

“The stupidest thing I ever did was pull one off. NEVER DO THIS! Especially without medical supervision like I did. It was on my arm and dragged on shirt sleeves. I soused it with alcohol. I cut around the base with the clippers, grabbed the darn thing and twisted and pulled. The wart came off. It make a crater that looked deep but was probably only 1/8 inch but it bled a copious amount of blood for what seemed like forever (but was probably was only 15 minutes).

“I applied a large piece of gauze and taped it down. It was tender for a day or so, but the wart never came back, but I NEVER tried that remedy again.

“I guess about that time we found The People’s Pharmacy in the newspaper and used the duct tape remedy after that.

“Later I had one plantar’s wart removed by a podiatrist that never came back. Gimping around on one foot was uncomfortable for a week or so.”

MEK discovered Tagamet on her own:

“I suddenly began to get flat white warts on my forehead and legs, I’ve had these for several months.

“I began having problems with stomach acid a few weeks ago and began taking Tagamet in its regular dose for acid suppression. Within a few days the warts began to get smaller; some of the little ones disappeared altogether. I doubled the dose and now the warts are completely gone. It took about a month for them all to disappear.”

M.N. offers another serendipity reaction:

“Many years ago, when these heartburn drugs first came out, my husband was taking one of them on a continuing basis. I noticed the life-long warts on his hands had vanished, and they have never come back. It was later I had read somewhere that this drug might have been the cure.”

Be Wary of Interactions:

People using this approach should check in with their pharmacists about potential interactions with other drugs they may be taking. Cimetidine does not combine well with certain other medicines.

Not everyone with hard-to-treat warts will respond to Tagamet. It has been our experience that certain remedies work great for some people but not for others. Of course that is true about medications as well. Anyone who would like to learn more about a variety of other remedies to get rid of warts may find our book, The People’s Pharmacy Quick & Handy Home Remedies worthwhile.

What is Tagamet?

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For cimetidine:
    • For oral dosage forms (solution and tablets):
      • To treat duodenal or gastric ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—300 milligrams (mg) four times a day, with meals and at bedtime. Some people may take 400 or 600 mg two times a day, on waking up and at bedtime. Others may take 800 mg at bedtime.
        • Children—20 to 40 mg per kilogram (kg) (9.1 to 18.2 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into four doses, taken with meals and at bedtime.
      • To prevent duodenal ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—300 mg two times a day, on waking up and at bedtime. Instead some people may take 400 mg at bedtime.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—100 to 200 mg with water when symptoms start. The dose may be repeated once in twenty-four hours. Do not take more than 400 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—100 to 200 mg with water up to one hour before eating food or drinking beverages you expect to cause symptoms. Do not take more than 400 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Adults—300 mg four times a day, with meals and at bedtime. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat gastroesophageal reflux disease:
        • Adults—800 to 1600 mg a day, divided into smaller doses. Treatment usually lasts for 12 weeks.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For injection dosage form:
      • To treat duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers or conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—300 mg injected into muscle, every six to eight hours. Or, 300 mg injected slowly into a vein every six to eight hours. Instead, 900 mg may be injected slowly into a vein around the clock at the rate of 37.5 mg per hour. Some people may need 150 mg at first, before beginning the around-the-clock treatment.
        • Children—5 to 10 mg per kg (2.3 to 4.5 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a vein or muscle, every six to eight hours.
      • To prevent stress-related bleeding:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—50 mg per hour injected slowly into a vein around the clock for up to 7 days.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For famotidine:
    • For oral dosage forms (suspension, tablets, chewable tablets, and oral disintegrating tablets):
      • To treat duodenal ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—40 milligrams (mg) once a day at bedtime. Some people may take 20 mg two times a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent duodenal ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—20 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat gastric ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—40 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—10 mg with water when symptoms start. The dose may be repeated once in twenty-four hours. Do not take more than 20 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—10 mg taken one hour before eating a meal you expect to cause symptoms. The dose may be repeated once in twenty-four hours. Do not take more than 20 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Older adults, adults, and children—20 mg every six hours. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat gastroesophageal reflux disease:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—20 mg two times a day, usually for up to 6 weeks.
        • Children weighing more than 10 kg (22 pounds)—1 to 2 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.5 to 0.9 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.
        • Children weighing less than 10 kg (22 pounds)—1 to 2 mg per kg (0.5 to 0.9 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into three doses.
    • For injection dosage form:
      • To treat duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, or conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—20 mg injected into a vein, every twelve hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For nizatidine:
    • For oral dosage forms (capsules and oral solution):
      • To treat duodenal or gastric ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—300 milligrams (mg) once a day at bedtime. Some people may take 150 mg two times a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent duodenal ulcers:
        • Adults and teenagers—150 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—75 mg taken thirty to sixty minutes before eating a meal you expect to cause symptoms. The dose may be repeated once in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat gastroesophageal reflux disease:
        • Adults and teenagers—150 mg two times a day.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For ranitidine:
    • For oral dosage forms (syrup, tablets, effervescent tablets):
      • To treat active duodenal ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 milligrams (mg) two times a day. Some people may take 300 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children and infants—2 to 4 mg per kilogram (kg) (1 to 2 mg per pound) of body weight twice a day. However, the total dose will not be more than 300 mg a day.
      • To maintain healing of duodenal ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children and infants—2 to 4 mg per kg (1 to 2 mg per pound) of body weight once a day. However, the total dose will not be more than 150 mg a day.
      • To treat erosive esophagitis:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg four times a day
        • Children and infants—5 to 10 mg per kg (2.3 to 4.6 mg per pound) of body weight per day, usually divided and given in two doses during the day.
      • To maintain healing of erosive esophagitis:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg twice a day
        • Children and infants—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat benign gastric ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg two times a day.
        • Children and infants—2 to 4 mg per kg (1 to 2 mg per pound) of body weight twice a day. However, the total dose will not be more than 300 mg a day.
      • To maintain healing of gastric ulcers:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg once a day at bedtime.
        • Children and infants—2 to 4 mg per kg (1 to 2 mg per pound) of body weight once a day. However, the total dose will not be more than 150 mg a day.
      • To treat heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—150 mg with water when symptoms start. The dose may be repeated once in twenty-four hours. Do not take more than 300 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To prevent heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach:
        • Adults and teenagers—150 mg with water taken thirty to sixty minutes before eating a meal or drinking beverages you expect to cause symptoms. Do not take more than 300 mg in twenty-four hours.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat some conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg two times a day. Your doctor may change the dose if needed.
        • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • To treat gastroesophageal reflux disease:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—150 mg two times a day. Your dose may be increased if needed.
        • Children and infants—5 to 10 mg per kg (2.3 to 4.6 mg per pound) of body weight per day, usually divided and given in two doses during the day.
    • For injection dosage form:
      • To treat duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, or conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid:
        • Older adults, adults, and teenagers—50 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle every six to eight hours. Or, 50 mg injected slowly into a vein every six to eight hours. Instead, you may receive 6.25 mg per hour injected slowly into a vein around the clock. However, most people will usually not need more than 400 mg a day.
      • To treat duodenal or gastric ulcers:
        • Children—2 to 4 mg per kilogram (kg) (1 to 2 mg per pound) of body weight per day, usually divided and injected slowly into a vein every six to eight hours. However the total dose will not be more than 50 mg every six to eight hours.

Tagamet HB

Generic Name: cimetidine (sye ME ti deen)
Brand Name: Tagamet HB

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on May 29, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Interactions
  • Pregnancy
  • More

What is Tagamet HB?

Tagamet HB is a stomach acid reducer that is used to treat and prevent certain types of stomach ulcer. This medicine is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus and causes heartburn.

Over-the-counter (nonprescription) Tagamet HB is used to treat heartburn with sour stomach and acid indigestion, or to prevent these conditions when caused by certain foods or beverages.

Tagamet HB may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel anxious or light-headed.

You should not use Tagamet HB if you are allergic to Tagamet HB or other stomach acid reducers (such as ranitidine, famotidine, Zantac, Axid, and others)

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if Tagamet HB is safe to use if you have:

  • stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting;

  • trouble swallowing;

  • frequent chest pain;

  • heartburn with wheezing;

  • unexplained weight loss;

  • heartburn lasting longer than 3 months; or

  • liver or kidney disease.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant.

You should not breastfeed while using Tagamet HB.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take Tagamet HB?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Tagamet HB is usually taken with meals or at bedtime.

To prevent heartburn from foods or beverages, take Tagamet HB within 30 minutes before eating or drinking.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

It may take up to 8 weeks for an ulcer to heal. Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve.

Your ulcer may take longer to heal if you smoke cigarettes.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse.

Do not take over-the-counter Tagamet HB for longer than 14 days without your doctor’s advice.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Tagamet HB?

Avoid taking other medications within 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take Tagamet HB. This medicine can make it harder for your body to absorb certain medicines you take by mouth.

Ask your doctor before using other stomach acid reducers or antacids, and use only the type your doctor recommends.

Tagamet HB side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

Stop using Tagamet HB and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • pain when swallowing;

  • bloody or tarry stools, cough with bloody mucus or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

  • changes in mood, anxiety, agitation;

  • confusion, hallucinations; or

  • breast swelling or tenderness.

Serious side effects may be more likely in older adults and those who are ill or debilitated.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache; or

  • diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Tagamet HB?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using Tagamet HB with any other medications, especially:

  • ketoconazole;

  • phenytoin;

  • theophylline;

  • an antidepressant; or

  • a blood thinner–warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven;

  • heart or blood pressure medicine–nifedipine, propranolol; or

  • a sedative–chlordiazepoxide, diazepam.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect Tagamet HB, or be made less effective when taken at the same time as this medicine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01.

Related questions

  • Can OTC wart medicine help stop molluscum contagiosum?

Medical Disclaimer

More about Tagamet HB (cimetidine)

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  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • Drug class: H2 antagonists

Professional resources

  • Cimetidine Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +1 more

Other Formulations

  • Tagamet

Related treatment guides

  • GERD
  • Duodenal Ulcer
  • Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis
  • Erosive Esophagitis
  • … +6 more

Are you currently using Tagamet oral?

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor.

The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to therapy. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully. If you are also taking antacids to relieve stomach pain as recommended by your doctor, separate them from this medication by at least 1 hour.

Take this medication regularly as prescribed in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than directed. Continue to take this medication for the prescribed length of treatment even if you are feeling better. Stopping treatment too early may delay the healing process.

If you are using nonprescription cimetidine for self-treatment of acid indigestion or heartburn, take 1 tablet by mouth with a glass of water as needed. To prevent heartburn, take 1 tablet by mouth with a glass of water right before or up to 30 minutes before eating food or drinking beverages that cause heartburn. Do not take more than 2 tablets in 24 hours unless directed by your doctor. Do not take for more than 14 days in a row without talking with your doctor.

Inform your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they worsen.

No longer a pain in the gut — how Tagamet led peptic ulcer treatments

Tagamet — an advertisement in The Journal in 1977

If one Googles Tagamania today the search engine will come up with sites featuring an American piebald horse of illustrious pedigree.

But 30 years ago, you would not have needed Google to know that Tagamania referred to the huge commercial success of the breakthrough peptic ulcer treatment, Tagamet (cimetidine).

The drug transformed the fortunes of Smith, Kline and French (SKF) — a US company with a pre-eminence in psychotropics which was being eroded by Swiss giant, Hoffman La Roche. The drug had a dramatic impact on the lives of millions of people with peptic ulcer disease.
“Before Tagamet, the only options were antacids or surgery. You needed to drink about 8L a month of antacids to get a better effect than placebo and you only offered people surgery when they were in so much pain that they wouldn’t mind the dumping , sweating and diarrhoea, which followed vagotomy with or without removal of the antrum,” recalls Roy Pounder, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of London.

“Ironically, there had just been improvements to make vagotomy highly selective, with less risk of side effects. But the operation was very demanding and, if it didn’t work, the ulcers came back,” he added.
Tagamet was launched in the UK in November 1976 as the first histamine (H2) antagonist. It emerged from a research programme started at SKF in 1964 when Sir James Black joined the company from ICI, fresh from his success with beta blockers.1

Antihistamines had been available for the treatment of allergic reactions since the 1940s but they did not block the action of histamine in all tissues. For example, they had no effect on histamine-mediated release of gastric acid from the parietal cells of the stomach.
In 1966, it was proposed that there were two histamine receptors — H1, antagonised by antihistamines such as mepyramine, and non-H1, which were not.2 SKF scientists therefore set about developing compounds that were structurally similar to histamine (unlike the antihistamines marketed at that time for allergies) and would compete with histamine at non-H1 receptors.
In the first four years of the programme around 200 compounds were synthesised, but none showed any evidence of antagonism at non-H1 receptors.1 After much chemical manipulation, a competitive antagonist of histamine in non-H1 tissue systems was developed, called burimamide, and classified as an H2 receptor antagonist.3
Unfortunately, it was not active enough in human studies and a second H2 antagonist, called metiamide, was synthesised. This was considerably more potent than burimamide and reduced excessive gastric acid secretion in human studies.

In initial trials, there were significant reductions in pain and antacid consumption compared with placebo, and improved ulcer healing,4, 5 but the use of metiamide was limited by reversible granulocytopenia in a small number of patients.
It was third-time lucky for SKF with the result of a final session in the chemistry laboratories being cimetidine. It inhibited gastric acid, passed toxicity tests and, in doses of 0.8–2g per day over three to four weeks, achieved 70 per cent ulcer healing rates.6

Major impact

“The first dose of Tagamet was the best because patients felt so much better when they started taking it. You did not need to be a gastroenterologist to prescribe Tagamet and when it was launched every doctor wanted to hear about it because they all had patients with dyspepsia whether they were gastroenterologists, orthopaedic surgeons or gynaecologists,” Professor Pounder explains.
Within weeks of its launch, Tagamet was having a major impact on ulcer disease, but it was no cure. Within six months of stopping treatment, 80 per cent of patients relapsed but maintenance studies soon showed that this could be reduced to less than 30 per cent with low-dose cimetidine.7

Before long, it was proposed that patients who responded to an initial course of treatment should follow this with maintenance therapy for six to 12 months and, depending on how soon they relapsed after this, have a further course of cimetidine or consider surgery.
Doctors were wary of putting patients on prolonged maintenance therapy in case of long-term toxicity and these concerns were fuelled by studies emerging at the end of the 1970s, which raised the spectre of stomach cancer. Low or absent levels of stomach acid were associated with bacterial overgrowth in the stomach and resulting bacterial conversion of exogenous nitrates to nitrites, leading, potentially, to the synthesis of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines.8

Increases in nitrites and N-nitrosamines were reported with cimetidine treatment,8 and controversial extrapolations to stomach cancer were made, although never subsequently confirmed.
Despite the rumbling safety debate about cimetidine, there was immense interest among other pharmaceutical companies in developing rival H2 antagonists. The reasons were obvious. In the UK alone, over a million patients were treated with Tagamet in the first five years after its launch.
Annual worldwide sales reached £150 million within two years of launch and around £300 million at the start of the 1980s. Before long, SKF was able to take over UK pharmaceutical company, Beecham, the name of which was synonymous with cough and cold remedies.

But Smith Kline Beecham (SKB) was, in turn, swallowed up by Glaxo, thanks partly to the profits it made from the second H2 antagonist, ranitidine (Zantac), which was launched in 1981 and went on to eclipse even Tagamet — becoming the world’s best-selling drug five years later.
Professor Pounder believes that the key to Zantac’s success — aside from the textbook marketing operation — was its easier dosing regimen compared with Tagamet and its lack of drug interactions.

“Tagamet had to be taken four times a day, but when Glaxo tested Zantac taken twice a day, the results were at least as good, partly because of the better compliance. So they launched using a twice daily regimen,” he explains.
Cimetidine (Tagamet) is an inhibitor of cytochrome p450 and interacts with a wide range of commonly used medicines, including some antiepileptic and anticoagulant drugs, so that dose changes are needed. It is also associated with male sexual dysfunction — another feature which it does not share with ranitidine.
The final nail in the coffin for Tagamet came with two large multicentre, head-to-head trials of night-time maintenance therapy that showed a 12-month relapse rate of 16–23 per cent for those taking Zantac compared with 37–43 per cent for those on Tagamet.9, 10
“British doctors were quite conservative about switching to Zantac, and Tagamet was invented in Britain, even though SKF was an American company. But the combination of a slightly better product and a more aggressive marketing campaign finally won the British over to Zantac,” says Professor Pounder.
The last challengers to enter the H2 antagonist market were famotidine (Pepcid PM) from Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited and nizatidine (Axid) from Lilly, both of which were launched in 1988 — over a decade after Tagamet’s original breakthrough.

They offered comparable ulcer healing rates to cimetidine and ranitidine, but without the drug interactions of cimetidine. Because they were priced at the higher level of Zantac, rather than the cheaper Tagamet, doctors were advised to stick with the products they already had.11
However, MSD did manage to steal ahead of its more established rivals in getting Pepcid AC on to the over-the-counter market for heartburn and dyspepsia six weeks ahead of SKB’s Tagamet 100 in 1994 and over a year ahead of Glaxo’s Zantac 75.
But the ink was barely dry on the licences of famotidine and nizatidine before the first proton-pump inhibitor burst on to the scene, promising even greater, more prolonged stomach-acid reduction than could be achieved with the H2 antagonists.

And, with the patents expiring on the drugs that had transformed two nice but dull companies into giants of the pharmaceutical industry, life moved on in the world of ulcer disease.

1. Brimblecombe RW, Duncan WAM, Durant GJ, Emmet JC, Ganellin CR, Leslie GB, et al. Characterization and development of cimetidine as a histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Gastroenterology 1978;74:339–47.
2. Ash AS, Schill HO. Receptors mediating some actions of histamine. British Journal of Pharmacology and Chemotherapy 1966;27:427–39.
3. Black JW, Duncan WAM, Durant GJ, Ganellin CR and Parsons ME. Definition and antagonism of histamine H2 receptors. Nature 1972;236:385–90.
4. Pounder RE, Williams JG, Milton-Thompson GJ, Misiewicz JJ. Relief of symptoms of duodenal ulceration by oral metiamide. BMJ 1975;2:307–9.
5. No authors listed. Treatment of duodenal ulcer by metiamide. A multicentre trial. Lancet 1975;2:1779–81.
6.Winship DH. Cimetidine in the treatment of duodenal ulcer: review and commentary. Gastroenterology 1978;74:402–6.
7. Gray GR, Smith IS, Mackenzie I, Gillespie G. Long-term cimetidine in the management of severe duodenal ulcer dyspepsia. Gastroenterology 1978;74:397–401.
8. Stockbrugger RW, Cotton PB, Eugenides TN, Bartholomew BA, Hill MJ, Walters CL. Intragastric nitrites, nitrosamines, and bacterial overgrowth during cimetidine treatment. Gut 1982;23:1048–54.
9. Gough KR, Korman MG, Bardhan KD, Lee FI, Crowe JP, Reed PI, et al. Ranitidine and cimetidine in prevention of duodenal ulcer relapse. A double-blind, randomised, multicentre, comparative trial. Lancet 1984;2:659–62.
10. Silvis SE. Final report on the United States Multicenter Trial comparing ranitidine to cimetidine as maintenance therapy following healing of duodenal ulcer. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 1985;7:482–7.
11. New H2-blockers: does more choice help? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1988;26:65–6.

Cimetidine tablets

What is this medicine?

CIMETIDINE (sye MET i deen) is a type of antihistamine that blocks the release of stomach acid. It is used to treat stomach or intestinal ulcers. It can relieve ulcer pain and discomfort, and the heartburn from acid reflux.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Acid Reducer, Major Acid Reducer, Tagamet, Tagamet HB

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • blood in your stools (black or tarry stools) or if you have blood in your vomit

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • pain or trouble trying to swallow food

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to cimetidine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets with a drink of water. If you only take this medicine once a day take it at bedtime. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take cimetidine if you take the following drugs:

  • cisapride

  • dofetilide

  • pimozide

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • caffeine

  • carbamazepine

  • carmustine

  • delavirdine

  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills

  • itraconazole

  • ketoconazole

  • medicines for heart rhythm problems

  • phenytoin

  • theophylline

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not start to get better or gets worse. You may need to take this medicine for several days before your symptoms get better. Finish the full course of tablets prescribed by your doctor or health care professional even if you feel better.

Do not take with aspirin, ibuprofen, or other antiinflammatory medicines unless directed to do so by your health care professional. These can make your condition worse.

Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol. These increase irritation in your stomach and can increase the time it will take for your ulcer to heal.

If you get black, tarry stools or vomit up what looks like coffee grounds, call your doctor or health care professional right away. You may have a bleeding ulcer.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • agitation, nervousness, depression, hallucinations

  • breast swelling, tenderness

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • dark urine

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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What is it used for?

  • Peptic ulcers.
  • Prevention, treatment and relief of symptoms of peptic ulcers or indigestion associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Preventing bleeding from stress ulceration in the gut in people who are critically ill in intensive care.
  • Gastro oesophageal reflux disease.
  • Persistant indigestion symptoms related to excess stomach acid.
  • Excessive secretion of stomach acid due to a tumour or enlargement of the pancreas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome).
  • Preventing inhalation of acid from the stomach (acid aspiration) whilst under general anaesthetic.
  • Preventing inhalation of acid from the stomach (acid aspiration) in pregnant women during labour.
  • Preventing the breakdown of pancreatic enzyme supplements (pancreatin) given in the treatment of conditions such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis.
  • Preventing malabsorption and fluid loss in short bowel syndrome.

How does it work?

Tagamet tablets and syrup contain the active ingredient cimetidine, which is a type of medicine called an H2 receptor antagonist. (NB. Cimetidine is also available without a brand name, ie as the generic medicine.) Cimetidine acts in the stomach to decrease the production of stomach acid.

Cimetidine works by blocking H2 receptors that are found on the cells in the stomach lining. A natural body chemical called histamine normally binds to these receptors, causing the cells to produce stomach acid. By blocking the H2 receptors, cimetidine prevents histamine from binding to them. This stops the cells from producing stomach acid.

Stomach acid is produced in the stomach as a normal part of the digestive process. Normally the linings of the stomach and duodenum (an area of the intestine directly after the stomach) are protected by a layer that resists acid attack. However, if this layer is damaged, or large amounts of stomach acid are formed, an ulcer can develop on the lining of the stomach or duodenum. This is called a peptic ulcer.

Acid produced in the stomach can also sometimes flow back into the food pipe (oesophagus). This is called gastro-oesophageal reflux, and can cause pain and a burning sensation known as heartburn. It can also irritate and damage the lining of the oesophagus, causing a condition called reflux oesophagitis.

By reducing the production of stomach acid cimetidine can be used to treat all these and other conditions. It stops excess acid flowing back into the foodpipe and can be used to relieve heartburn symptoms associated with acid reflux. It also allows the oesophagus to heal in reflux oesophagitis.

By reducing the amount of acid in the stomach and duodenum cimetidine also allows peptic ulcers to heal, and prevents them from recurring. It also relieves the symptoms of indigestion caused by excess stomach acid.

Cimetidine can be used to prevent and treat peptic ulcers that can occur as a side effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as diclofenac. In addition it can relieve side effects such as indigestion that can be associated with these medicines.

Cimetidine is also used to depress stomach acid production in various other conditions. It is used in varying doses and for varying lengths of time depending on the condition being treated.

Warning!

  • Stomach cancer can have similar symptoms to stomach ulcers, and these symptoms can be relieved by cimetidine. For this reason, if it is suspected that you have a stomach ulcer, your doctor should exclude the possibility of stomach cancer before you start treatment with this medicine. Otherwise, this medicine could mask the symptoms of stomach cancer and therefore delay diagnosis of this condition. This is particularly important if you are middle aged or older and have new or recently changed symptoms.
  • A large study has recently suggested that elderly people and people with diabetes, chronic lung disease, or an underactive immune system (for example due to treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or diseases such as HIV) may have a higher risk of developing pneumonia while they are taking H2 receptor antagonist medicines such as this one. Ask your doctor for more information. While you are taking this medicine you should tell your doctor if you develop a cough or chest infection.

Use with caution in

  • Decreased kidney function.

Not to be used in

  • Allergy to any ingredient.

This medicine should not be used if you are allergic to one or any of its ingredients. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you have previously experienced such an allergy.

If you feel you have experienced an allergic reaction, stop using this medicine and inform your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Certain medicines should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding. However, other medicines may be safely used in pregnancy or breastfeeding providing the benefits to the mother outweigh the risks to the unborn baby. Always inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, before using any medicine.

  • The manufacturer recommends that this medicine should be avoided during pregnancy unless considered essential by your doctor. Seek medical advice.
  • This medicine passes into breast milk. The manufacturer recommends that it should not be used by breastfeeding mothers unless considered essential by your doctor.

Side effects

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Just because a side effect is stated here does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect.

  • Diarrhoea.
  • Dizziness.
  • Rash.
  • Tiredness.
  • Abnormal enlargement of breasts in men (gynaecomastia).
  • Depression.
  • Confusion.
  • Headache.
  • Pain in the muscles or joints.
  • Acute pancreatitis.
  • Disturbances in the normal numbers of blood cells in the blood.
  • Liver disorders.

The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the medicine’s manufacturer.

For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist.

How can this medicine affect other medicines?

Cimetidine can increase the blood levels of various other medicines by slowing their breakdown by the liver. You should tell your doctor or pharmacist what medicines you are taking, including those bought without a prescription and herbal medicines, before you start treatment with this medicine. This is particularly important if you taking any of the medicines mentioned below, because your doctor may need to monitor your treatment or alter your medicine doses. Similarly, you should check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any new medicines during treatment with this one, to ensure that the combination is safe.

Cimetidine increases the blood levels of the following medicines and may therefore increase the risk of their side effects:

  • acenocoumarol
  • aminophylline
  • amiodarone
  • benzodiazepines such as diazepam, flurazepam or nitrazepam
  • beta-blockers such as labetolol, metoprolol, propanolol
  • carbamazepine
  • chloroquine
  • ciclosporin
  • cilostazol
  • co-artemether (artemether and lumefantrine)
  • diltiazem
  • epirubicin
  • ergotamine
  • erythromycin
  • flecainide
  • fluorouracil
  • hydroxychloroquine
  • intravenous lidocaine
  • isradipine
  • methysergide
  • mirtazepine
  • moclobemide
  • nifedipine
  • phenindione
  • phenytoin
  • pramipexole
  • procainamide
  • quinidine
  • quinine
  • sertindole
  • sildenafil
  • sirolimus
  • SSRI antidepressants such as citalopram, escitalopram, paroxetine, sertraline
  • tacrine
  • theophylline
  • tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline or imipramine
  • warfarin
  • zaleplon
  • zolmitriptan.

Due to its effect on the acidity in the stomach, cimetidine may reduce the absorption of the following antifungal medicines from the stomach, which could make them less effective at treating infection:

  • itraconazole
  • ketoconazole
  • posaconazole.

If you are prescribed a course of one of these antifungals while taking regular cimetidine, it is recommended that you take each dose of the antifungal with an acidic drink such as cola, as this will help the antifungal to be absorbed.

Cimetidine may also reduce the absorption of the anti-HIV medicine atazanavir from the gut. The manufacturer of atazanavir recommends that it should be taken two hours before, or at least ten hours after taking cimetidine.

The anti-HIV medicine amprenavir may increase the blood level of cimetidine and may therefore increase the risk of its side effects.

Other medicines containing the same active ingredient

Cimetidine tablets and oral solution are also available without a brand name, ie as the generic medicine.

Last updated 17.11.2008

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