Carbs in a watermelon

Contents

6 Fruits That Can Help You Lose (Or Maintain Your) Weight

Weighing your options: Are you making the best selections in the produce section?

According to the World Health Organization, eating at least five 80-gram serving portions of a variety of fruits and vegetables every day lowers the risk of serious health problems. Recent studies have also proven that eating certain fruits can help with weight loss.

These six amazing fruits can certainly help you lose those extra pounds:

1. Watermelon

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Because 90 percent of a watermelon’s weight is water, it’s one of the best fruits to eat if you’re trying to lose weight. A 100-gram serving contains only 30 calories. It’s also a great source of an amino acid called arginine, which helps burn fat quickly. In addition to helping the body stay hydrated, snacking on watermelon will help you feel full so you won’t have cravings between meals.

2. Guava

Guavas are a nutrient-packed, delicious, fiber-filled tropical fruit that help satisfy the appetite. They contain 0 cholesterol and have much less sugar compared to other fruits like apples, oranges and grapes. Packed with vitamins, reach for this low-calorie snack next time you are hungry.

3. Apple

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but it can also help you lose weight more quickly. The good news is that eating just one apple a day — with the skin on — gives the body and average of 4.4 grams of fiber, which is about one-fifth of our daily need. Apples are a rich source of a powerful fiber called pectin. Eating apples or pears before meals resulted in significant weight loss according to a study published in Nutrition Journal.

4. Grapefruit

This delicious fruit, which was first created by crossing a pomelo with an orange in the 18th century, is also a fantastic source of pectin. It contains a great amount of vitamin C, folic acid and potassium. Pink and red grapefruits are packed with vitamin A and lycopene, a phytochemical that protects arterial walls from oxidative damage. Eating half a grapefruit about a 30 minutes before daily meals will help you feel more satiated, which will result in less consumption of food and calories.

5. Banana

Considered the perfect pre- or post-workout snack, bananas are healthier than most energy bars, which often contain lots of sugar and chemicals. Although the average banana contains 27 grams of carbs, the fruit can help stop weight gain because it has only 105 calories and three grams of filling fiber. Bananas are also known to fight muscle cramps, keep blood pressure low and prevent acidity. Just try and stick to one banana a day.

6. Tomato

Let’s not forget that the tomato is a fruit and not a vegetable. This powerful red ally is full of antioxidants and can help reduce water retention. It also fights leptin resistance. (Leptin is a type of protein that prevents our body from losing weight.) Plus, tomatoes are very low in calories; an average-sized tomato is just 22 calories and a large one is 33 calories. Tomatoes are also considered an appetite-suppressant “high-volume” food, which means they have high amounts of water, air and fiber.

It should be evident, but you can’t just burn fat and shed weight by simply eating these six fruits alone. You will lose weight when you burn more calories than you consume. By exercising and substituting high-calorie food like cheese, meat or rice with low-calorie fruits like tomatoes, you will be able to achieve your ideal weight.

by Ramin Zahed

If you have questions about your weight or nutrition, be sure to schedule an appointment with one of our top physicians by calling (800) USC-CARE (800–872–2273) or by visiting https://www.keckmedicine.org/request-an-appointment/.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Watermelon

It’s a fruit AND a vegetable

Talk about an overachiever. Like most fruits, watermelon is the product of a seed-producing plant and has a signature sweet taste. But it can be traced back to the squash, pumpkin, and cucumber family known as Cucurbitaceae. Remember how you can eat the rind? The dual nature of watermelon makes it all edible, so there’s no excuse to leave any part behind.

RELATED: 20 Best Foods to Eat for Breakfast

It’s packed with, well, water

Now this is a food with some serious hydration power. Watermelon is 91.5% water, according to the USDA. That’s a big deal seeing as how being dehydrated is bad for your health. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that women with even mild dehydration experienced headaches, poor concentration, fatigue, and worse moods. More reason to whip up some watermelon recipes, stat.

RELATED: 23 Superfruits You Need Now

There’s a yellow variety

It’s hard to believe there’s a watermelon that’s NOT pink on the inside, but there’s another variety, known as Yellow Crimson, has a sunny interior and the flesh has a sweeter, honey-like taste. Thing is, the two are nearly identical on the outside, so unless you’re reading the signs at your grocery store or farmers’ market, it can be hard to tell which is which. If you want the regular pink watermelon, ask for a Crimson Sweet.

Just keep in mind that no one really knows what, if any, nutritional value the yellow variety offers. Most research has been done on the pink kind, Sass says, so best to stick with that or round up a good mix of both.

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quicklist: 3 category: What to Know About Watermelon title: It’s a fruit AND a vegetable url: text: Talk about an overachiever.

Like most fruits, watermelon is the product of a seed-producing plant and has a signature sweet taste. But it can be traced back to the squash, pumpkin, and cucumber family known as Cucurbitaceae. Remember how you can eat the rind? The dual nature of watermelon makes it all edible, so there’s no excuse to leave any part behind.

quicklist: 4 category: What to Know About Watermelon title: It’s packed with, well, water url: text: Now this is a food with some serious hydration power.

Watermelon is 91.5 percent water, according to the USDA. That’s a big deal seeing as how being dehydrated is bad for your health. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that women with even mild dehydration experienced headaches, poor concentration, fatigue, and worse moods.

quicklist: 5 category: What to Know About Watermelon title: There’s a yellow variety url: text: It’s hard to believe there’s a watermelon that’s NOT pink on the inside, but there’s another variety, known as Yellow Crimson, has a sunny interior and the flesh has a sweeter, honey-like taste. Thing is, the two are nearly identical on the outside, so unless you’re reading the signs at your grocery store or farmers’ market, it can be hard to tell which is which. If you want the regular pink watermelon, ask for a Crimson Sweet.

Just keep in mind that no one really knows what, if any, nutritional value the yellow variety offers. Most research has been done on the pink kind, Sass says, so best to stick with that or round up a good mix of both.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

Watermelon – calories, weight, nutrition Check glycemic index, dietary fiber and carbs

How much protein in watermelons?

Watermelons have 0.6 g protein per 100g.
Medium size watermelon (2300 g) has about 13.8 g of protein.

How much carbs in watermelons?

Watermelons have 7.6 g carbs (carbohydrates) per 100g.
Medium size watermelon (2300 g) has about 174.8 g of carbs.

How much does a watermelon weight? (what is weight of watermelon)

Medium size watermelon (edible part) weights about.2300g.

How much dietary fiber in watermelons?

Watermelons have about 0.4 g dietary fiber per 100g.
Medium size watermelon (2300 g) has about 9.2 g of dietary fiber. It is about 31% of daily dietary fiber intake for adult person with medium weight and medium activity. ?

Do watermelons have gluten?

Watermelons have no gluten. They can be consumed by people sensitive to gluten or diagnosed celiac disease.

How much vitaminium C does watermelon have?

Watermelons have 8.1 mg of vitaminium C per 100g.
Medium size watermelon (2300 g) has about 186.3 mg of vitaminium C. It is about 93% of daily vitaminium C intake for adult person with medium weight and medium activity. ?

How much magnessium does watermelon have?

Watermelons have 10 mg of magnessium per 100g.
Medium size watermelon (2300 g) has about 230 mg of magnessium. It is about 58% of daily magnessium intake for adult person with medium weight and medium activity. ?

Waht is glycemic index of watermelon?

Watermelons have high glycemic index. Glycemic index of watermelon is equal to 75.

List of the Best Low-Carb Fruits and Vegetables

Vegetables get less of a bad rap than fruits do when it comes to carbs. They generally contain less sugar, and thus fewer carbs than fruits.

Even when you’re limiting carbs, vegetables should be an important source of nutrition in your diet. They’re high in fiber and lower in overall calories per serving than any other food group. Also, they contain an array of healthy compounds, including phytochemicals, vitamins, and minerals.

In general, the higher the water content in a vegetable, the lower the carb content per standard serving.

These are the best low-carb choices.

1. Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a refreshing and nutritious addition to any salad — Greek or otherwise! Peeled, they contain just 2.16 g of carbs for every 100 g. If you prefer them with peel, that’s 3.63 g, which is still pretty low.

2. Iceberg lettuce

Perhaps one of the most popular — though least nutritious — vegetables, iceberg lettuce has only 2.97 g of carbohydrate per 100 g. Pair it with several other veggies on this list to get a low-carb salad with plenty of nutrients.

3. Celery

Celery has the same number of carbs as iceberg lettuce (2.97 g per 100 g). Enjoy this versatile veggie with salads or in casseroles, or filled with an unsweetened nut butter.

4. White mushrooms

Mushrooms contain only 3.26 g of carbs per 100 g. Add them to an egg white omelet for a healthy, low-carb breakfast.

5. Spinach

For every 100 g of spinach, you’ll get 3.63 g of carbohydrate. To put that in perspective, that’s only about 1 g per cup. So you can load up on spinach salads and top with lean chicken breasts and fresh strawberries.

6. Swiss chard

Another nutrient-dense leafy vegetable, Swiss chard packs only 3.74 g of carbs per 100 g. Swiss chard is great in soups and sautéed with garlic.

7. Broccoli

A nutrient-dense cruciferous vegetable, raw broccoli contains 6.64 g of carbs and 2.6 g of fiber, netting only 4.04 g of carbs per 100 g. Try it raw in a salad, lightly steamed, or in a stir-fry tossed with garlic, ginger, and a touch of olive oil.

8. Bell peppers

A light, crunchy snack when raw, or excellent sautéed with your other favorite vegetables, bell peppers have just 5.88 g of carbs per 100 g.

9. Zucchini

Zucchini can be “zoodled,” or turned into noodles with the help of a spiralizer or serrated peeler. This makes for a delicious and lower-carb alternative to pasta, at just 3.11 g of carbs per 100 g.

Or, try zucchini thinly sliced and grilled or roasted, and then layered with other vegetables and sauce for a low-carb “lasagna.”

10. Cauliflower

Cauliflower has just 4.97 g of carbs and 2.0 g of fiber, netting only 2.97 g of carbs per 100 g serving! In addition to enjoying its florets, you can turn it into a tasty and low-carb alternative to rice or other grains.

Just grate it using a food processor and then serve it, cooked or raw, either as a side dish or mixed in with other vegetables and protein, and topped with a dressing of your choice.

11. Asparagus

Asparagus has 3.88 g of carbs per 100 g. Try it steamed or brushed with a little olive oil and roasted in the oven or grill. Top it off with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

12. Alfalfa sprouts

Alfalfa sprouts, which are the sprouted seeds of alfalfa, have 2.1 g of carbs per 100 g. This nutritious veggie is a perfect salad topper.

13. Radishes

Radishes have just 3.4 g of carbs per 100 g, and are an often overlooked, but tasty and nutritious vegetable.

Sliced radishes make a great addition to salads, or enjoy whole radishes with a pinch of sea salt or dipped into your favorite spread or dressing.

14. Arugula

Arugula is a versatile leafy green that has just 3.65 g of carbs per 100 g. It’s flavorful, with a bit of a peppery-spicy quality, and is a particularly good source of vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin C, folate, and calcium.

Try it in salads mixed in with other greens, or cooked into sauces, soups, or stews.

15. Radicchio

Radicchio has just 4.48 g of carbs per 100 g, and its sturdy leaves can be used as lettuce wraps to fill with your choice of ingredients.

Radicchio can be enjoyed raw or cooked in a number of ways. It even holds up to grilling.

16. Tomatoes

Tomatoes have just 3.89 g of carbs and 1.2 g of fiber, netting only 2.69 g of carbs per 100 g serving!

Enjoy them raw as an easy, healthy snack with salt and pepper, as toppings on salads or sandwiches, or cooked into soups or used to make sauces.

Other vegetables

Pickled or fermented vegetables, from cucumber pickles to cabbage sauerkraut or kimchi, can be another low-carb option to vary your vegetable intake. Opt for fermented, not just pickled, vegetables, which contain gut healthy probiotics. Check the list of ingredients to make sure no sugar was added.

Vegetable nutrition chart

Below is a quick-and-easy guide of the nutritional value of low-carb vegetables — feel free to bring it with you on your next food shopping trip! Remember, these values are for raw vegetables (carbohydrate content can shift slightly during cooking).

For those interested in net carbs, those in this chart.

* Nutritional values as determined by the USDA for raw, uncooked vegetables.

Why Watermelon is the Perfect Summer Snack

If there’s one fruit that epitomizes summer, it’s watermelon. Not only is this fruit refreshing, crisp, and sweet, but it also packs a nutritious punch. One cup of watermelon contains 11g of carbs, so you’ll have to limit your consumption. If you’re on Atkins 20 Phases 3 or 4, or Atkins 40, set aside time to salute this summer superfood on National Watermelon Day, which falls on August 3rd.

Read on for the Atkins list of reasons why watermelon is the perfect summer snack.

Watermelon can help keep you hydrated.
Watermelon is aptly named because it’s nearly 92% water. The fruit’s juice is also full of electrolytes. A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that athletes who drank 16 ounces of watermelon juice an hour before exercise experienced less muscle soreness the following day. Bottoms up!

Watermelon has plenty of vitamins and minerals.
Watermelon contains high levels of vitamins A, B6, and C. Vitamin A helps maintain healthy skin and hair, while vitamin B6 promotes normal nerve function and the formation red blood cells. Vitamin C provides a boost to the immune system and offers protection from harmful free radicals that may accelerate aging.

Watermelon has been shown to protect against certain diseases.
Watermelon is packed with lycopene, an antioxidant linked to an array of health benefits. Studies have shown that lycopene can reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers, including prostate cancer.

Watermelon tastes best in summer.
Watermelon is in season for most of the warmer months: May through September. Be sure to sink your teeth into a refreshing slice on National Watermelon Day, August 3. When selecting a melon at the supermarket, go for one that’s heavy and makes a hollow noise when you knock on the rind.

Watermelon can even be part of a low carb meal.
If you want to promote this fruit from snack to entrée, try one of Atkins most popular watermelon recipes: Watermelon, Feta and Cucumber Salad. It also makes a great side dish for your next summer picnic.

Amount of Carbs in Watermelon

Welcome to the nutritional carbs content in 1 different types of watermelon, ranging from 7.55 g to 7.55 g per 100g. The basic type of watermelon is Watermelon, raw, where the amount of carbs in 100g is 7.55 g.

7.55 g of carbs per 100g, from Watermelon, raw corresponds to 6% of the carbs RDA. For a typical serving size of 1 cup, balls (or 154 g) the amount of Carbohydrate is 11.63 g. This corresponds to an RDA percentage of 9%.

The percentage of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for carbs is based on a 130 g RDA level for a mature adult.

Watermelon, raw – Nutritional Content and Chart

The full nutrition content, RDA percentages and levels for Watermelon, raw should be considered along with the carbs content. This food profile is part of our list of food and drinks under the general group Fruits and Fruit Juices.Other important and carbs related nutrients are Sugar, Calories, Protein and Fat. For this 100g serving in your diet, the amount of Sugar is 6.2 g (7% RDA), the amount of Calories is 30 kcal (2% RDA), the amount of Protein is 0.61 g (1% RDA) and the amount of Fat is 0.15 g. The nutritional content and facts for 100g, which includes Sugar, Calories, Protein and Fat is shown in the RDA chart below as percentages of the recommended daily allowance along with the carbs levels in watermelon.

Our proprietary nutritional density score gives a nutritional value out of 100 based on 9 different vitamins, minerals and macro nutrients. Watermelon, raw has a nutritional value score of 19 out of 100.Comparing the carbs content and the nutritional density in 100g for Watermelon, raw; We class this as a medium to low carbs content item.In terms of overall nutritional value we class this as an item with a medium nutritional density value.

Comparing carbs in watermelon vs pasta

The amount of carbs in pasta is 25 g per 100g.As carbs percentage of the RDA this is 19 %. Comparing with Watermelon, raw, in 100g contains 7.55 g of carbs. As a percentage of the RDA this is 6 %. Therefore, pasta has 17.45 g more carbs than Watermelon, raw. In terms of carbs percentage this is 231 % more carbs. Pasta has an overall nutritional value score of 14 out of 100, whereas Watermelon, raw has a nutritional value score of 19 out of 100.Watermelon, raw also has the highest amount of carbs for the 1 different watermelon items.

Amount of carbs per 100 Calories

100 calories of watermelon, raw is a serving size of 3.33 g, and the amount of Carbohydrate is 25.17 g (20% RDA). Other important and related nutrients and macronutrients such as Protein, in 100 Calories are as follows; Sugar 20.67 g (23.33% RDA), Protein 2.03 g (3.33% RDA), Fat 0.5 g (0% RDA). This is shown in the carbs RDA percentage chart below, based on 100 Calories, along with the other important nutrients and macro nutrients.

Content per Typical Serving Size 1 cup, balls (or 154 g)

For the food Watermelon, raw the typical serving size is 1 cup, balls (or 154 g) which contains 11.63 g of Carbohydrate. The carbs percentage of the recommended daily value for this serving is 9 %.

To give 100% of the RDA, 11.1 servings of the typical serving size 1 cup, balls (or 154 g) give the complete RDA. In terms of the gram weight and total content for this serving the Sugar content is 9.55 g, the Calories content is 46.2 kcal, the Protein content is 0.94 g and the Fat content is 0.23 g. The percentages are shown below in the carbs chart, for the typical serving of carbs and the related and important nutritional values.

Macronutrients in Watermelon, raw

The amount of protein, fat and carbs from this food described above is measured in grams per 100g and grams in a typical serving size (in this case 1 cup, balls or 154 g), although it is also useful to give the number of calories from protein, fat and carbohydrate which are the most important macronutrients. For this serving in your diet here are the macronutrient calories. The total calories from carbohydrate is 41.9 (kcal).From protein the number of calories is 3.2 (kcal).The number of calories from Fat is 1.9 (kcal).

Grams of carbs in watermelon (per 100g)

This list of 1 types of watermelon, is brought to you by www.dietandfitnesstoday.com and ranges from Watermelon, raw through to Watermelon, raw where all food items are ranked by the content or amount per 100g. The nutritional carbs content can be scaled by the amount in grams, oz or typical serving sizes. Simply click on a food item or beverage from the list at the bottom of the page to give a full dietary nutritional breakdown to answer the question how many carbs in watermelon.

The list below gives the total carbs content in the 1 items from the general description ‘watermelon’ each of which show the carbs amount as well as Sugar, Calories, Protein and Fat.

The corresponding Calories for watermelon ranked by the amount of carbs per 100g is shown below in the watermelon calories chart.

Effect of Preparation and Storage on carbs

The level of carbs can be affected by the method of storage for example canned or frozen and also by the method of preparation for example either raw, cooked or fried. The total food items which are raw is 1 item. The highest amount of carbs from the 1 raw items is in Watermelon, raw where the content is 7.55 g per 100g. For this serving the amount of Sugar is 6.2 g, the amount of Calories is 30 kcal, the amount of Protein is 0.61 g and the amount of Fat is 0.15 g.

Highest carbs Content per 100g

Using the list below for the 1 different watermelon nutrition entries in our database, the highest amount of carbs is found in Watermelon, raw which contains 7.55 g of carbs per 100g. The associated percentage of RDA is 6 %. For this 100g serving the Sugar content is 6.2 g, the Calories content is 30 kcal, the Protein content is 0.61 g, the Fat content is 0.15 g.

The lowest amount of carbs in 100g is in Watermelon, raw which contains 7.55 g. This gives as percentage of the recommended daily allowance 6 % of the RDA. For this 100g serving the amount of Sugar is 6.2 g, the amount of Calories is 30 kcal, the amount of Protein is 0.61 g, the amount of Fat is 0.15 g.

The difference between the highest and lowest values gives a carbs range of 0 g per 100g. The range for the other nutrients are as follows; 0 g for Sugar, 0 kcal for Calories, 0 g for Protein, 0 g for Fat.

Highest Amount of carbs per Serving

Please remember that the above gives an accurate value in 100g for high carbs foods in your diet. For example 100g of Watermelon, raw contains 7.55 g of carbs. However, there are other factors to consider when you are assessing your nutritional requirements. You should also take into account portion sizes when you are considering the carbs nutritional content.

The food with the highest carbs content per typical serving is Watermelon, raw which contains 11.63 g in 1 cup, balls (or 154 g). The percentage of the recommended daily value for this serving is 9 %. For this serving the Sugar content is 9.55 g, the Calories content is 46.2 kcal, the Protein content is 0.94 g and the Fat content is 0.23 g.

Nutritional Information Summary

From the list below you can find a full nutrition facts breakdown for all foods containing carbs which can be scaled for different servings and quantities. We have also sorted our complete nutritional information and vitamin database of over 7000 foods, to give a list of foods high in carbs.

If you know anything about the keto diet, it’s that sugar is off limits. That means most fruit, which naturally contains sugars, is pretty much off the table. Pineapple? Nope. Bananas? Not a chance.

Believe it or not, though, there are some fruits you can still incorporate into a keto meal plan with a little strategy. “In order to stay in the altered metabolic state of ketosis, most people will only be able to consume 20 to 50 grams of net carbs per day,” says Ginger Hultin, R.D., spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That means you’ll have to carefully portion out and track your fruit intake to make sure it fits into your total carb allowance for the day. “An apple, for example, contains about 20 grams of net carbs, so eating just one could max out all of your carbohydrates for the day,” she explains.

When you need something sweet, go for fruits as low in carbs and sugar as you can get your hands on. The following five fruits are your best bets for satisfying your sweet tooth without throwing yourself out of ketosis.

1. Berries

Small amounts of berries are commonly included in keto diets. “One cup of blackberries or raspberries contains between six and seven grams of net carbs,” says Hultin. Meanwhile, strawberries contain eight and blueberries contain 17. Hultin recommends sticking to half-cup servings to keep net carbs as low as possible.

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In addition to vitamin C and other antioxidants, berries also provide fiber, which can help ward off or alleviate the constipation many people experience on keto.

2. Avocado

Almost forgot avocado is a fruit, didn’t ya? “Avocado is a very keto-friendly fruit because it is so high in fat,” Hultin says. In fact, they’re 80 to 90 percent fat, which perfectly mimics a keto diet.

“One cup of sliced avocado contains just two grams of net carbs so it’s one to include at any meal and snack to boost fiber, B vitamins, and vitamin C,” she says. Add avocado to omelets or salads, or whip up a tasty homemade guac.

3. Watermelon

When the summer sun is beating down, keto-eaters will be happy to know that watermelon can fit into their diets. “Since watermelon has such a high water content, it will fill you up and help keep you hydrated,” says Dana Angelo White, R.D., A.T.C.

Related: 5 Mistakes People Make When They Go Keto

Still, keep portions to a minimum. One cup of diced watermelon contains 10 grams of net carbs, which isn’t so bad for a fruit, but can certainly mess with ketosis if you go overboard.

Honeydew and cantaloupe melons can also work on a keto diet—just keep in mind that they’re higher in net carbs, with about 14 grams per cup each.

4. Citrus

Don’t worry, the lemon and lime you put in your water are a-okay on a keto diet. Lemons and limes, in particular, provide vitamin C and other antioxidants for just four to five grams of net carbs, says Hultin.

Oranges and grapefruit, though? Proceed with caution. These citrus fruits contain three to four times as many net carbs and may not be as easy to fit into your daily limits.

5. Tomatoes

Technically a fruit, tomatoes are loaded with antioxidants like lycopene, along with vitamin C and other nutrients. Plus, fresh tomatoes (especially in the summer) are bursting with natural sweetness! One cup of cherry or grape tomatoes, for example, contains four grams of net carbs.

Related: Want To Try Keto? Here’s What A Healthy Day Of Eating Fat Looks Like

Keep in mind that green, orange, and yellow heirloom tomatoes are typically higher in carbs—and that packaged tomato products, like tomato sauce and ketchup, aren’t the same as whole tomatoes. A single tablespoon of ketchup for example, contains almost four grams of sugar. (And who ever uses just one tablespoon?)

To bring out tomatoes’ natural sweetness, White recommends roasting them. From there, you can add them to anything from salads to vegetable sides to proteins.

Consider this infographic your keto-friendly fruit grocery list:

Diggin’ What’s Good? For more essential health facts, tips, and inspiration, join our Facebook communities, Eating Healthy and Staying Fit, today!

Calories in Watermelon

Here are the calories in watermelon determined by size, serving style, or weight, whichever you prefer.

In this section of our website, you will also find counter charts for other foods such as fruits and vegetables.

At the bottom of this page, there are page links to the free calorie charts (and carbohydrate charts) for fruits and vegetables.

The charts may be used as daily guides for either weight loss or weight maintenance.

Fruits are part of a healthy diet, but they are not all equal.

Some fruits contain significantly more calories and carbohydrates than other fruits.

Therefore, compare the calorie and carbohydrate content of your favorite fruits and choose wisely. On our website, we have both calorie and carbohydrate charts for fruits and vegetables.

So, lets find out more!

Calories in Watermelon by serving style

    Here are the calories counts according to serving style.
  • 86 calories in one wedge (1/16th of a whole)
  • 32 calories in an average 3½ or 100g serving
  • 37 calories in 10 average size watermelon balls
  • 74 calories in 20 average size watermelon balls
  • 111 calories in 30 average size watermelon balls
  • 148 calories in 40 average size watermelon balls

Calories in Watermelon by weight

    Here are the calories according to the weight:
  • 144 calories in 16 oz, or 1 lb, or 454 grams/li>
  • 90 calories in 10 oz or 284 grams of watermelon
  • 72 calories in 8 oz or 227 grams of watermelon
  • 54 calories in 6 oz or 170 grams of watermelon
  • 36 calories in 4 oz or 114 grams of watermelon
  • 18 calories in 2 oz or 57 grams of watermelon
  • 9 calories in 1 oz or 28 grams of watermelon

Calories counts by size

    Here are the calorie counts according to the size of the melon.
  • 1355 calories in 1 whole fruit (15″ long x 7½” diameter)
  • 677½ calories in a half of a whole watermelon
  • 338¾ calories in a quarter of a whole watermelon

Calorie counts by cup measurement

    Here are the calories by American cup measurement:
  • 11½ calories in a quarter cup diced
  • 23 calories in a half cup of diced watermelon
  • 46 calories in one cup of diced watermelon
  • 92 calories in two cups of diced watermelon
  • 138 calories in three cups of diced watermelon

Web pages relating to the calories in watermelon


Now that you have the calories in watermelon, for the calorie counts of other fruits, and vegetables, and for free fruit and vegetable calorie counter charts, see the page links listed below.

You may print out the charts is you wish and use them as daily guides.

Also, for a list of fat burning foods and information about the thermic effect of foods, see the Fat Burning Foods page.

You will find the link to that page on the menu/navigation buttons.
Calories in Vegetables
Calories in Fruit
If you are looking for more on calorie counting, see the CALORIES PER DAY page, which is the first page in the calorie section of our website. The link to that page is given at the very bottom of this page.

Recommended book list for this section

The books are available at some good bookstores, especially Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk, usually in Kindle and paperback form, sometimes as hardbacks. If you found the calories in vegetables useful, these books are excellent further reading suggestions.

  • Dr. Dennis Bradford, Compulsive Overeating Help: How you can stop Food Cravings, Food Addiction, or Emotional Eating in 6 Simple Steps!
  • Weston Price, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, 8th. ed.
  • Dr. Loren Cordain, The Paleo Diet
  • Brian Wansink, Mindless Eating.

On most pages of our website, we aim to recommend the very best books available according to the topic of each page. We endeavor to make the best suggestions based on experience and our many years of work and research in the fields of health and fitness. We suggest only books that we have read and can wholly commend.

It’s often quite a challenge to eat healthy.

So many foods carry a “health halo” and it’s increasingly difficult to cut through the hype. Here’s the reality about some of the most common and stubborn myths about about our favorite foods.

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Honey is a healthier choice than white sugar

Honey is believed to have antibacterial properties and fight inflammation but the claims are unproven.Damian Dovarganes / AP

Honey is found in nature, so it’s a healthier version of sugar, right? Wrong.

White sugar comes from either sugar cane or sugar beets — both plants, and equally “natural.”

Both honey and sugar have about 16 calories per teaspoon. All of these are added sugars, to name a few, and should be used sparingly:

  • brown sugar
  • agave
  • brown rice syrup
  • molasses
  • evaporated cane syrup
  • Demerara sugar
  • date sugar

While there are many personal testimonials about the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects of honey, these results are based on laboratory studies, and are unproven in the “real world.” Nearly all of the health claims for honey are unproven outside of research settings.

Eating chocolate is good for your health

Dark chocolate contains flavanols that have been shown to modestly lower blood pressure, but those results may not translate to the kind people typically eat.Getty Images Trending stories,celebrity news and all the best of TODAY.

All chocolate is not created equal. The known health benefits of chocolate come from a specific kind of antioxidant called flavanoids (or flavanols). But most chocolate doesn’t have enough of the these flavanols to make a dent as a health booster.

Even 70 percent cacao might not be flavanol-rich, because of variability in the processing of the chocolate, from cacao bean to the ready-to-eat product. While laboratory studies show that flavanols can modestly lower blood pressure and “relax” blood vessels, making blood flow more easily — this research typically uses purified preparations.

Translated to what real people are eating, the impact of eating regular dark chocolate on your health is hardly impressive. For example, a modest lowering of blood pressure was observed in people consuming a quarter of a pound of dark chocolate daily for three weeks.

At 160 calories per ounce, that’s 640 calories per day from chocolate alone, about 1/3 of the recommended daily intake.

A specially processed cacao bean, called CocoaVia, containing much higher amounts of flavanols is available as a cocoa powder in single serving packets. Considered a dietary supplement, and not a food, it can be used like standard cocoa powder.

Frozen yogurt is a low-sugar choice

Complete myth. Frozen yogurt is always going to be a lower-fat choice, compared to ice cream, but it’s not a low-sugar option.

Here’s why: When the fat content is lowered in foods, more sugar is often added to balance the taste.

The only way to know for sure is to read the label, or go online for the information. The taste test is not reliable when it comes to frozen yogurt and sugar content. And often the toppings, added because we think it’s not as sweet, contribute further added sugars.

Low- and no-added sugar options are available for frozen yogurt, using low-calories sweeteners and always clearly labeled.

Watermelon is loaded with sugar

Just because watermelon tastes sweet doesn’t mean it’s high in sugar.Lauren Salkeld

Not true. While watermelon does contain fruit sugar —fructose — like all other fruits, it’s nearly 92 percent water. Just because it tastes sweet doesn’t make it high in sugar.

The confusion comes from estimates of how watermelon impacts blood sugar. Watermelon has a high glycemic index, a term associated with quick rises in blood sugar after a food is consumed. The higher the number, the faster the rise in blood sugar. Watermelon’s glycemic index is around 75 out of 100.

This is a misleading number. A more important term relates more accurately to how blood sugar responds to a particular food. This term, called glycemic load, is very low for watermelon — meaning that blood sugar is not changing much after eating it. Glycemic load is the more important term relevant to health.

There are multiple health benefits to watermelon. Not only is it low in calories, around 45 calories per cup, a serving size contains:

  • 20 percent of daily vitamin C needs
  • 17 percent vitamin A
  • a bit of fiber

As a red fruit, it’s also loaded with the antioxidant lycopene, with an even higher concentration than tomatoes!

And with all that water content, it’s also a good source of hydration.

Madelyn Fernstrom, Ph.D is NBC News Health and Nutrition Editor. Follow her on Twitter: @drfernstrom

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