Blog cancer stage 4

Welcome to our metastatic breast cancer blog! This space is for women and men living with a stage IV/metastatic breast cancer diagnosis, the people who care about them, and anyone who wants to understand more about living with stage IV disease.

Here is some of what we’ll be sharing with you in this space:

  • original writing from people living with MBC
  • feature articles about people living with MBC
  • insights from our stage IV Community forum
  • interviews with healthcare professionals who specialize in MBC

Stay tuned and check back for new posts!

  • 16 People Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer Share Advice for the Newly Diagnosed
  • What I Wish My Friends Knew: Insights From Our Stage IV Community Forum
  • Metastatic Breast Cancer on the AnaOno Fashion Week Runway
  • Six Tips for Caregivers From People Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • Seven Things People With Metastatic Breast Cancer Want You to Know About Joining a Clinical Trial
  • Eight Tips to Help You Move Forward After a Metastatic Breast Cancer Diagnosis
  • Tips From Real Women on Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • What Happens if Metastatic Breast Cancer Treatment Stops Working?
  • Jeanne’s Video Blog
  • Krista Curley and Family: Life and Love With MBC
  • MBC Awareness: One Day Is Not Enough
  • Scanxiety and Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • Inspiration and Motivation if You Need It: Strategies From Our Stage IV Community
  • Moving Forward in the Face of Fear (Part 1)
  • Moving Forward in the Face of Fear (Part 2)

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Last modified on October 10, 2019 at 10:04 AM

When Stacy Hanson was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in early 2017, she immediately assumed she had no viable treatment options. Now that she is living a full, active lifestyle with her incurable yet treatable disease, she wants others to know that they can, too.

Hanson, 49, is on a clinical trial that she began in the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber. The trial, combining immunotherapy and a PARP inhibitor, is doing the job: her metastatic breast cancer (also known as stage IV or advanced breast cancer) is currently in check, and a breast tumor that had appeared in her liver is now greatly reduced in size.

Clinical trials are scientific studies in which new treatments—drugs, diagnostic procedures, and other therapies—are tested in patients to determine if they are safe and effective.

Hanson is tolerating her treatment extremely well. She is enjoying time with her family, her full-time job as a sales executive, and, when her busy schedule allows, a few hours of semi-solitude on her paddleboard.

“There is no cure for stage IV metastatic breast cancer, but there is life after this diagnosis,” says Hanson, who lives with her husband, Kent, and six-year-old daughter, Lucy, in Jacksonville, Florida. “I’m focused on spreading that message.”

Hanson and her daughter, Lucy.

Just 2 percent of women (and men) with metastatic disease are on clinical trials, and Hanson says many people she talks to are not aware there are trials that can help them.

She was once one of those people. Initially diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, Hanson had 16 weeks of chemotherapy and 35 radiation treatments in Florida. She was scheduled for a lumpectomy, but upon learning that she was a carrier of the BRCA1 gene mutation—which greatly increases the odds of another breast cancer or ovarian cancer diagnosis—instead opted for a bilateral mastectomy, oophorectomy (ovary removal surgery), and hysterectomy.

By March 2015, she completed chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation, and had started on adjuvant endocrine therapy. Then, two years later, doctors found a lesion on her liver. Her breast cancer had metastasized into triple-negative, stage IV disease.

Florida doctors offered Hanson standard treatment options, but wanting to learn more, she sought a second opinion at Dana-Farber. Erica Mayer, MD, MPH, senior physician in the Breast Oncology Center at the Susan F. Smith Center, said that in addition to standard therapies, there were several promising clinical trials that might be options for Hanson. The best option for her—a trial that is exploring a combination of two drugs in patients with the BRCA-1mutation—had an opening right away.

Hanson started on the trial in March 2017. In addition to oral medication she took daily, she and Kent spent nearly a year traveling to Boston each three weeks for immunotherapy infusions. Family and friends cared for Lucy back home.

“There is no cure for stage IV metastatic breast cancer, but there is life after this diagnosis.”

The results were so encouraging that Mayer felt comfortable transferring Hanson’s care back to Florida when an arm of the trial opened there in early 2018. The tumor in Hanson’s liver has shrunken considerably, and no other new tumors have emerged. She now has more time for her advocacy work, which includes raising funds for stage IV metastatic breast cancer research and clinical trials, and educating patients with the disease about trial opportunities.

“We are thrilled that the clinical trial combination therapy has been so successful in fighting Stacy’s cancer,” says Mayer.

Hanson knows there is a 50 percent chance that Lucy may also carry the BRCA1 gene, which Hanson inherited from her father. But until Lucy is tested as a young adult, Stacy will focus her energy on spreading the word to others.

“There is a lot that people don’t know—like the fact that you can inherit the BRCA1 gene from your father, not just your mother,” says Hanson. “You just need to find the options open to you, and take advantage of them.”

Hanson on her paddleboard.

Contents

Living with Stage 4: The breast cancer no one understands

A disease no one ‘gets’

Sadly, people don’t “get” mets. In fact, a recent survey sponsored by Pfizer Oncology shows just how misunderstood it is. Sixty percent of the 2,000 people surveyed knew little to nothing about MBC while 72 percent believed advanced breast cancer was curable as long as it was diagnosed early. Even more disheartening, a full 50 percent thought breast cancer progressed because patients either didn’t take the right treatment or the right preventive measures.

“They’ve built an industry built on four words — early detection equals cure — and that doesn’t even begin to define breast cancer,” said Schoger, who helped found Breast Cancer Social Media, a virtual community for breast cancer patients, caregivers, surgeons, oncologists and others. “Women are blamed for the fate of bad biology.”

The MBC Alliance, a consortium of 29 cancer organizations including the biggest names in breast cancer (think Avon, Komen, Susan Love), addressed this lack of understanding and support as well as what many patient advocates term the underfunding of MBC research in a recently published landmark report.

“The dominance of the ‘breast cancer survivor’ identity masks the reality that patients treated for early stage breast cancer can experience metastatic recurrence … a few months 20 years or more after initial diagnosis,” the report states. “Public messaging about the ‘cure’ and survivorship is so pervasive that people diagnosed at stage 4 with MBC can be stigmatized by the perception that they’ve failed to take care of themselves or undergo annual screening.”

‘You end up on Mars’

Schoger’s breast cancer — called invasive lobular carcinoma or ILC — came back 15 years after her original diagnosis and treatment.

“You think you’re going to be flying to Chicago and land at O’Hare and you end up on Mars,” she said of her April 2013 mets diagnosis. “It’s not well known that you can have late recurrence. I even had an oncology nurse tell me ‘Oh, you’re cured’ at eight years.”

Schoger’s doctors threw everything at her cancer after her initial diagnosis: mastectomy, chemotherapy, radiation and the daily medication tamoxifen, a form of hormone (or endocrine) therapy designed to cut off the food supply of her estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer.

But with MBC, the treatment philosophy is different.

“With primary cancer, they say, ‘We’re going to pull out all the big guns. We’re going to put it in permanent remission,’” she said. “With MBC, you use as little as possible to get the biggest effect. You attempt to stabilize the disease.”

For Schoger, that means a daily aromatase inhibitor (AI), which shuts down estrogen production even further to starve her cancer, along with a monthly infusion of Xgeva, a bone strengthening agent designed to combat the bone-zapping side effects of her AI treatment.

Schoger said she will remain on this therapy until it stops working. Then, like most patients with MBC, she’ll move on to something else.

“With metastasis, you’ll have times where you’re responding well and your disease is stable,” she said. “And then there will be a scary time of progression. Then there will be a new treatment, a time of stability again, then — boom — progression. And it’s all sort of going down each time that happens.

“None of us knows which way our disease is going to go,” said Schoger, who has lost many friends to MBC. “Everybody hopes for the longest possible time for the first therapy you’re given. But some women have aggressive disease and just blow through their therapies.”

From ‘cured’ to stage 4

Others, like Teri Pollastro, a 54-year-old stage 4 patient from Seattle, respond surprisingly well.

Diagnosed with early stage ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in 1999, Pollastro underwent a mastectomy but did not receive chemotherapy, radiation or tamoxifen, since her cancer was ER negative.

“They used the C-word with me, they told me I was cured,” she said. “Every time I went back to my oncologist, he would roll his eyes at me when I had questions.”

In 2003, Pollastro switched to Seattle Cancer Care Alliance where she saw Dr. Julie Gralow, a breast cancer oncologist and clinical researcher at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Gralow discovered Pollastro’s cancer had metastasized to her liver.

“My husband and I were in shock,” said Pollastro of her mets diagnosis. “You don’t go from being cured to stage 4.”

Pollastro went on Herceptin, a type of immunotherapy for women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, and did six months of chemotherapy.

“I felt better right away with the treatment,” she said. “But the problem is, it stopped . That’s what you can expect with mets. And there’s always some residual cancer. And that starts percolating.”

And along with mets, she also had to deal with many misconceptions regarding her disease.

“People don’t understand the word metastatic to begin with,” she said. “They’d say, ‘Oh now you have liver cancer? How could that happen? Doesn’t it go to the other breast first? And when I’d tell them I was stage 4, they’d give me pity or stay away or see me a year later and think I was a ghost. They couldn’t believe I was alive.”

The Mercer Island, Washington, mother of two, who often counsels newly diagnosed patients, sometimes even found it difficult to relate to early stage breast cancer survivors.

“They’re like, ‘I did this’ and ‘I did that’ and ‘I beat cancer’ and they think they’re going to be fine and I think, ‘Well, so did I,’” she said. “Or people will ask me, ‘Aren’t you worried about all that radiation you’re getting from your scans?’ and I’ll think, ‘Are you kidding me? You think I’ve got a choice here?’”

New targeted therapies

As new treatments are slowly being approved, MBC patients are starting to have more choices, though.

Gralow said the Human Genome Project has led to a much better understanding of breast cancer with all of its subsets and behavior patterns. Therapies are no longer “one-size-fits-all” but targeted for each cancer subset.

“We still have a long way to go and we are still losing too many women … but there is a lot more hope for many years of good quality life for a patient diagnosed with a metastatic recurrence now than there was two decades ago,” she said.

One new drug, Perjeta, has shown particular promise when teamed with Herceptin and chemo, bumping survival rates in HER2-positive mets patients by nearly 16 months.

“That’s meaningful,” said Gralow. “If you look at the old textbooks, we used to predict that you’d live a year or maybe two at most. And if you were HER2 positive, it was much shorter.”

Pollastro, who was on Herceptin for seven years, has also benefited from new therapies. In 2004, she participated in a vaccine clinical study run by Fred Hutch’s Dr. Nora Disis and also received targeted radiation therapy at a cancer treatment center in Rochester, New York. As a result, she’s currently NED (no evidence of disease).

But she’s still cautious about using the word “cured.”

“The longer I go, the less worried I get,” she said. “But I feel like I’m on a merry-go-round and I keep waiting for it to stop. I’ve lost a lot of friends and feel bad about that. I have a little survivor’s guilt. But It’s like musical chairs. I keep wondering, ‘When am I going to miss the chair?’ So far, I’ve been lucky.”

Schoger, whose disease has stabilized but not disappeared entirely, said she, too, feels lucky.

“I feel like I’m on Easy Street,” she said. “I’m not on chemo right now, I’m on endocrine therapy and it’s shrinking the cancer and relieving symptoms.”

As for the stigma surrounding mets, there are signs that that, too, may be starting to shrink, thanks to the work of advocates.

“This is the first year since I can remember that I’ve seen media reports that have included women with metastatic disease,” said Schoger. “And the MBC Alliance report was very blunt about how the survivorship story has masked the issues of the mets community. If an alliance of breast cancer organizations comes out and makes that strong statement, that’s phenomenal progress. That’s a great step forward.”

*Editor’s note: Jody Schoger died of metastatic breast cancer in May 2016. In her own words, she is finally “done with treatment.”

Diane Mapes is a staff writer at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She has written extensively about health issues for NBC News, TODAY, CNN, MSN, Seattle Magazine and other publications. A breast cancer survivor, she blogs at doublewhammied.com and tweets @double_whammied. Email her at [email protected]

The Best Breast Cancer Blogs of 2019

With roughly one in eight women developing breast cancer in their lifetime, the odds are good that nearly everyone is affected by this disease in some way. Whether it’s a personal diagnosis or that of a loved one, finding answers to your questions and a supportive community of people who understand the experience can make all the difference. This year, we’re honoring breast cancer blogs that educate, inspire, and empower their readers.

This national nonprofit organization was created by and for women living with breast cancer and is committed to helping those impacted by the disease. With comprehensive information (medically reviewed) and multiple methods of support, this is a great place to find answers, insights, and experiences. On the blog, advocates and breast cancer survivors share personal stories on everything from cold caps to art therapy, while the Learn section takes you through every detail from diagnosis to treatment and beyond.

I Hart Ericka

Ericka Hart is a cancer warrior, sex educator, speaker, and activist working to challenge medical racism and ingrained cultural modes and attitudes about illness. When she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer, she realized that her treatment failed to address both her identity and her sex life. Now, Ericka is leading the charge in changing this for other young QTPOC (queer and trans people of color) cancer patients and survivors.

My Cancer Chic

Anna is a young breast cancer survivor. When she was diagnosed at just 27, she struggled to find other young women going through the same experience. Her blog became a place to share not just her cancer story, but her passion for all things style and beauty. Now, three years into remission, she continues to inspire young women through wellness, positivity, style, and self-love.

Two-time breast cancer and domestic abuse survivor Barbara Jacoby is on a patient advocacy mission, and her Let Life Happen website is a wonderful place to find inspiration through news and personal stories. Browse a great mix of breast cancer information, advocacy guidance, and tips for taking control of your patient experience, plus Barbara’s own experiences from diagnosis to remission.

Finding support for follow-up care after cancer treatment can be challenging. For Marie Ennis-O’Connor, it wasn’t until her final day of treatment that her breast cancer diagnosis and its aftermath really hit. That’s when she felt cut adrift. To help make sense of the experience of cancer, she began her blog. It was a place to discuss the post-treatment limbo she was experiencing, and today, it serves as a great resource for women who find themselves in the same spot.

Breast Cancer Care

Breast Cancer Care is a community of nurses, volunteers, and people affected by breast cancer in the United Kingdom. Together, they work to ensure that everyone who is diagnosed with this disease gets the support they need and deserve. Through education and support groups, the group is making important information accessible, while also ensuring a truly vital level of emotional support.

A resource specifically for young women with breast cancer, this organization understands the multiple age-specific issues at hand. From fertility, diagnosis during pregnancy, childcare, careers, and financial security, Rethink Breast Cancer understands the complexities of cancer at this stage in life. They work to connect young women navigating the same experience and offer age-appropriate support and resources.

Breast Cancer? But Doctor… I Hate Pink!

Ann Silberman is here for anyone who needs to talk to someone with personal experience as a breast cancer patient. She’s candid about her own journey with stage 4 metastatic breast cancer, from suspicion to diagnosis to treatment and beyond. In spite of it all, she’s sharing her story with humor and grace.

Nancy’s Point

Nancy Stordahl’s life has been irrevocably altered by breast cancer. In 2008, her mother died from this disease. Two years later, Nancy was diagnosed. On her blog, she writes candidly about her experiences, including loss and advocacy, and she refuses to sugarcoat her words.

MD Anderson Cancerwise

The MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Cancerwise blog is a comprehensive resource for cancer patients and survivors of all kinds. Browse first-person stories and posts from healthcare professionals, plus information about everything from treatment and survivorship to side effects, clinical trials, and cancer recurrence.

Sharsheret is a Hebrew word for chain, a powerful symbol for this organization that seeks to provide support to Jewish women and families facing breast and ovarian cancers. Fortunately, their information is available to everyone. From personal stories to an “ask the expert” series, there’s a wealth of information here that’s both inspiring and informative.

This organization is helping women with breast cancer by broadening the perspective to include life outside of treatment. In addition to information about navigating the breast cancer journey, the site features posts related to general wellness, fitness, style, nutrition, and inspiration.

The Breast Cancer Society of Canada Blog

For expert information about the latest research, treatments, medical breakthroughs, and clinical trials, The Breast Cancer Society of Canada is a great resource. On the blog, visitors can also read stories from researchers and survivors alike. The profiles of researchers fighting to find a cure are incredibly inspiring, as are the first-person narratives from the fearless women battling the disease.

Breast Cancer Now

The UK’s largest breast cancer charity believes breast cancer is at a tipping point, with higher survival rates than ever before, but more diagnoses as well. Breast Cancer Now is dedicated to funding important breast cancer research to help eliminate this disease. Readers will find medical news, fundraising activities, research, and personal stories on the blog.

Some Girls Prefer Carnations

Nicole is a microbiologist, wife, mother of two, and a survivor of inflammatory breast cancer. On her blog, she writes candidly about her aggressive treatment and recovery, and the many ups and downs of her journey. In spite of her health issues, Nicole is always looking for the silver lining and serves as a truly inspiring role model.

Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Dubbed The Progress Report, the blog of The Breast Cancer Research Foundation is a great place to stay current with the community. Latest news shared here includes science coverage and fundraising spotlights.

I’m Taking Charge

Feeling powerless is common for those diagnosed with breast cancer. This blog understands that, and is working to empower every woman to take back what cancer stole. With comprehensive information relating to breast reconstruction and advice for finding your new normal, plus survivorship stories, news, legislation, and activism, this is a wonderful resource for regaining a sense of control and comfort in your own body.

Cancer Network

The Cancer Network is a valuable resource for anyone interested in specific information about current breast cancer treatments, therapies, clinical trials, and studies. Posts are written by medical professionals, which makes this information more on the technical side.

Breast Cancer News

In addition to current news and research about breast cancer, Breast Cancer News offers columns like A Lump in the Road. Written by Nancy Brier, the column shares Nancy’s personal experience with triple negative breast cancer and chronicles the fears, issues, and challenges she’s facing.

Worldwide Breast Cancer

Worldwide Breast Cancer is a nonprofit working to change the picture of breast cancer around the world. The organization’s creative “Know Your Lemons” materials are working to overcome taboo, fear, and literacy issues, while also educating women across the globe about breast health. On the blog, readers will find personal stories, tips for effective self-exams and first mammograms, information about the organization’s breast health app, current news and advocacy efforts, and much more.

If you have a favorite blog you’d like to nominate, please email us at [email protected]

Jessica Timmons has been a writer and editor for more than 10 years. She writes, edits, and consults for a great group of steady and growing clients as a work-at-home mom of four, squeezing in a side gig as a fitness co-director for a martial arts academy.

The five breast cancer bloggers you need to know about

Everyone’s experience of breast cancer is different, but there are a lot of brilliant breast cancer blogs out there covering the issues you are facing – here are five of our favourites to get you started.

Detrice Matthews

Detrice is a young mum with breast cancer. After being diagnosed when she was just 32 years old, she began her blog to provide a positive space to talk about what it’s like living with breast cancer, away from the facts and the figures. She aims to give other people an insight into what her, and so many other people are going through, with her creative flair for poetry and turning the difficult day to day into something special.

Liz O’Riordan

http://liz.oriordan.co.uk/BreastCancerBlog.html

Liz is a breast cancer surgeon with breast cancer. She is a Consultant Oncoplastic Breast Surgeon who discovered at the age of 40 that she had breast cancer. Since then she has been writing about her experiences as she tries to retain some form of normality and control as she goes through treatment. She does this all while continuing to undertake incredible sporting feats from a Colourun to triathlons, plus cycling to chemotherapy in her Breast Cancer Care cycle top.

Black Chick Tit Cancer – Miranda Ashitey

Miranda began her blog in August 2014 after finding out she had breast cancer. She writes about her diagnosis and treatment, but also her achievements and her milestones. She is funny and candid while providing a unique insight into what it’s like to live with a disease like breast cancer when you also have past mental health issues. Miranda addresses the good and the bad, from the issue of fertility to reaching her cancerversary with a voice that is very definitely hers.

A Bit of a Boob – Betsy

In May this year, Betsy was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 59. Her life is filled with being a wife, sister, mum, nana and friend, but now also a breast cancer blogger. Betsy explores the fact that every person’s path to, through and beyond breast cancer is different. She writes about hers and how she is learning to cope with her diagnosis, treatment and living with a new form of ‘normal’. Betsy’s blog is relatively young having started writing this October, but we’re already addicted to her tongue in cheek style and wicked sense of humour.

Living My Pink Life – Abigail Marshall

Abi was diagnosed with primary breast cancer in 2012, and in 2014 she discovered it had developed into secondary breast cancer – Abi has documented this all in her blog ‘Living My Pink Life’. She says she is writing so that people will find something to relate to, as she shares her experiences of side effects, fundraising efforts and the day to day realities of living with secondary breast cancer.
Abi writes with heaps of positivity and is a great advocate for not limiting yourself. She refuses to let her blog be a morbid place and fills it with honesty and her lust for life.

Want to read more from women sharing their experiences of breast cancer? Take a look over at our VITA magazine to read more real-life articles.

Top Breast Cancer Blogs of 2018

October is known for two things: Halloween and Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It makes a lot of sense; both of these events are frightening in their own way. Unfortunately, when you are diagnosed with breast cancer, you can’t just dress up as a ghoul or goblin and demand free candy from strangers who think you look adorable (although honestly, wouldn’t that be great?). The scary part has only just begun. For a newly diagnosed patient, finding good blogs or resources can be life changing. You are not alone!

We have reached out to our three favorite breast cancer bloggers to ask a few questions about their journey in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. These women are powerful with their words, honest in their writing, and speak from the heart.

Beauty Through The Beast

Chiara wears our Pure Silk Square Scarf in this photo!

Why We Love This Blog:

Model, fundraiser, social media personality, former teacher, blogger, and breast cancer warrior Chiara D’Agostina writes about battling breast cancer in style on her blog Beauty Through The Beast (beautythroughthebeast.com). After six additional surgeries following her double mastectomy due to infected implants, Chiara decided to forgo implants in favor of going flat. Now, she fearlessly bears her scars and advocates for body positivity on her blog and Instagram. Chiara has been featured in numerous media publications, including the Wall Street Journal and Oprah Magazine. If you’re looking for a blog that provides first hand stories and advice, resources, book recommendations, and fashion inspiration, you must check out Beauty Through The Beast!

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A post shared by BeautyThroughTheBeast™️ (@beautythroughthebeast) on Jan 3, 2018 at 6:17pm PST

Interview with Chiara D’Agostina:

Q- What was your inspiration behind starting your blog?

A- I felt alone and looked to connect with others going through a similar situation. In treatment, I didn’t go out much, so I relied on the computer and telephone. My friend suggested I create a project where I can express my feelings and what I’m going through, both as a catharsis and in hopes of reaching someone that may feel similarly alone.

Q- How did you react to your initial diagnosis of breast cancer?

A- I was stunned, terrified, and I thought “Why me?” then, “Why not me?” I felt like a black cloak of doom covered me and I lost sight. All of a sudden all the bright-eyed wishes and hopes and ambitions I had felt ripped from my future. I became depressed, terrified, lost and anxious, like a deer in headlights. I developed a small sense of control when I became more active in my treatment.

Q- What has helped you most through your treatments?

A- Validation from social work oncologists, mental health professionals and some other thrivers that the ups and downs of going through this devastating diagnosis is normal and needs to be addressed. Also, I find comfort in holding children, playing with children and playing with my cats. Finally, in person and phone support groups at SHARE Cancer Support, Cancer Support Community, Cancer Care along with attending numerous breast cancer conferences and meeting other lovely thrivers that give me hope – has helped me tremendously.

Q- What advice would you give to a recently diagnosed patient?

A- Get 2 notebooks—one for you to write in and the other for the person to take you to appointments so they can also take notes to help you remember and interpret what was said. For every doctor you go to, ask for a copy of every piece of paper—scan results, discs, etc…you may want a second or third opinion and having your own copies can speed up the process. Bring someone with you to appointments. Unless your loved ones have gone through cancer, they may not understand and you may feel isolated—reach out to those who do understand. There’s plenty of support for you and your caregiver. You don’t have to go through this alone. One step at a time—each person is different and reacts to medications differently. Try not to compare yourself—the information can be so overwhelming and frightening. There are many clinical trials that are showing promising results, hold on to that hope!

Q- How did you react to and handle the hair loss associated with your treatments?

A- I was devastated when I lost my hair. It wasn’t the first time I shaved my head, the other times were for rebellion. Each time I felt like something that defined me as a woman, or as pretty, or would grab attention, was being stripped of me. At the age of 42, I didn’t want that. I spent lots of time and money on my hair, and as a tactile person, I love the feeling of hair on my face, neck and shoulders. I felt naked without the hair, alone, isolated. I’m told I have a “good head” for being bald—I tried to channel my inner Sinead O’Connor but I didn’t have her strength nor her determination. I felt defeated. I tried on wigs and felt fake and weird and angry that I felt the need to wear a fake rag on my head to go to Target to buy soap. I took it off and just wore hats. I questioned—am I wearing wigs for me or for others? Neither is wrong, it’s just an individual’s decision based on each circumstance! I eventually bought brightly colored wigs and wore those for fun.

Q- How has the experience of having breast cancer changed you?

A-Breast cancer has given me the opportunity to open my throat chakra and speak my truth no matter what. I’ve gained some friends, lost many friend and familial relationships, have received aide from caring strangers and have seen a few close friends die. I do things with purpose, I listen to my self and my body— I’m still very depressed and anxious and alone and scared. I don’t know how to do metastatic breast cancer gracefully, but somehow I continue to put one foot in front of the other. And when I get in my way, I try and think of all of you—we are in this together. Let’s hold hands as we go through this together.

I stopped working as a high school Italian teacher and now I attend breast cancer conferences to learn and connect and see how I can help spread the word about resources and information. I enjoy reaching out a hand and listening to someone’s story and having a human connection. In the end, it isn’t about how much stuff you have, or me—it’s about the connections you’ve made and the memories. I love collecting memories 🙂

Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer

Why We Love This Blog:

Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer (stupiddumbbreastcancer.com) is Ann Marie Giannino-Otis’ candid, meaningful, and hilarious blog. With a name like “Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer,” how could you expect any less? As Ann Marie shares her story, gives first hand advice for dealing with breast cancer, and discusses important women’s issues, you’ll feel like you’re talking to a friend. Diagnosed with breast cancer as a young woman with young children, Ann Marie gives a unique and relatable perspective. In the effort to promote awareness and early detection, Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer has contributed over $750,000 to a variety of breast cancer organizations.

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Interview with Anne Marie Giannino-Otis

A- I wanted a space that my family could read about my DX and I would not be bombed with calls. I was shocked to see so many relating to my posts. From Ireland to Asia they would message me.

Q- How did you feel about you initial diagnosis of breast cancer?

A- I was confused because my reality was altered. I thought cancer was easy because of ads and marketing. I was scared to tell my kids because they would have their innocence taken away and I hated that.

Q- What helped you cope during your treatments?

A- A corn bag in the fridge after radiation was the BEST!! It was so soothing.

Q- What one piece of advice would you give to a recently diagnosed patient?

A- Do not look back, you are not going that way. Do not look forward, it is too uncertain. Stay in the moment.

Nancy’s Point

Nancy Stordahl writes the bold blog, Nancy’s Point (NancysPoint.com). We love Nancy’s fearless ability to call out social issues surrounding breast cancer; this is a blog that will make you feel heard and validated, and get you thinking. She shares her breast cancer experience as well as her experience as a caregiver to her mother who died from metastatic breast cancer, giving a touching testimony. She also gives advice, tells others what they can expect, shares helpful resources, and even gives book recommendations. Nancy is the author of three books: Getting Past the Fear: A Guide to Help You Mentally Prepare for Chemotherapy; Cancer Was Not a Gift & It Didn’t Make Me a Better Person; and Facing Your Mastectomy & Making Reconstruction Decisions.

Interview with Nancy Stordahl:

Q- What inspired you to write a breast cancer blog?

A- My mother’s experience inspired me. She was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in 2004. In 2007, her cancer metastasized. She died in 2008. I decided to share the unvarnished truth about that experience from a daughter’s perspective and had planned on writing a book and blog about it. Then, wham, along came my diagnosis in 2010. I share candidly about all of it on my blog. I refuse to sugarcoat about awareness; most people are aware. Let’s get to what really matters – improving and saving the lives of those living with mbc.

Q- Such a terrifying situation to watch your mother pass away from cancer, let alone being diagnosed with cancer merely two years later. We had to know, how did you feel about your initial diagnosis?

A- No one expects to hear the words, ‘you have cancer’. I didn’t either. So yes, I was shocked. Even though I had learned my mother was brca2+ (after her diagnosis), I never expected to be diagnosed, at least not so soon.

A- My journal and my pen. Besides the support of my family (including my dogs), journaling helped keep me sane. I kid you not, it did. I highly recommend it.

A- I hated it. It was hard, really hard. And it really irked me when I’d hear things like, it’s only hair or it’ll grow back. I write about hair a lot on the blog too! Losing your hair is a big deal, and it’s OK to admit it.

A- In addition to your family, seek out support from others. This could be via a face-to-face support group, an online support group, blogs or friends. It’s vital to have others to commiserate with, learn from and vent and share with. Sometimes you have to hold back a little with those closest to you. Finding additional support from others with whom you can be completely candid is so incredibly helpful. Besides helping you, this also takes some of the load off your loved ones. And you don’t feel you need ‘to do cancer’ a certain way. Be real. Be you. It’s enough. (Sorry, that’s two things, but I couldn’t leave the latter out!)

These women are full of amazing advice, and reading their blogs is nothing short of inspirational. The combination of humor, emotion, and power makes these blogs incredible, and it’s no secret why we have chosen them as our favorite blogs about breast cancer.

A huge thank you to these incredible women who utilize their passion to help others through sharing their own personal experience. Hopefully, you too will be able to find some humor, joy, and inspiration through these women and their personal journeys.

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Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer

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Sometimes you just need to find a connection or a voice that echos your own during your battle with breast cancer or during your recovery. Where better can you find that without leaving the comfort of your couch than the hundreds of blogs out there?
Some of the biggest things we are proud to offer are support, guidance, knowledge, and awareness. We’ve said it before and we will say it again: finding your tribe and support group before, during, and after your treatment is imperative to your well being. You need love and support to help fight your battles, even if that just means sitting with a friend, bringing a family member to your treatments, or sharing your story with others. No matter what that looks like for you, make it your own and an important part of your life. There might even be some support and love found in places you never expected and from people you’ll never meet. You can read all the books, pamphlets, and articles give to you by your doctor. But finding a voice that echoes your own is very important. It makes you feel heard, relatable, seen, and not alone.
Some of the best places to find this connection today is in the hundreds of blogs written by men and women who are or have been in your shoes, and by their family members. You don’t have to go far to look for them, just from the comfort of your home on your phone or computer. We wanted to share some of the top blogs out there that deal with breast cancer on a multitude of topics. No matter where you are on your journey, you will find a voice for exactly what you need to read and hear. If these blogs don’t speak to you, there will be one out there waiting for you.
My Cancer Chic
From the heart and pen of a young breast cancer survivor named Anna, comes My Cancer Chic. Anna was diagnosed at 27 and during her treatment, it was hard to find women to connect with that were age and going through the same thing she was. She created her blog to share her story to hopefully find others like her and a place to pour her passion for style and beauty into. She is now three years into remission and carries her mission statement of love, support, and fashion for all who need it.
To read Anna’s blog, follow the link below:

Breast Cancer? But Doctor…I Hate Pink!
The tough as nails Ann Silberman is the author of this blog whose “never back down” motto shows in every post. Her to the point, honest, and truthful experiences give a real day to day insight into her treatments, therapies, and live victories she enjoys along the way. She’s very open about her Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer and fills her blog with joy, humor, and grace. Her blog chronicles from the beginning of her experiences in 2009 to today.
To read Ann’s blog, follow the link below:

Booby and the Beast
Writer Jen Campisano was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer at 32 and started her blog to keep friends and family updated. When she beat her diagnoses, her blog turned its focus towards mothers needing help to handle their metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. She is a proud activist working hard to raise awareness, fighting to find a cure, and is currently writing a book.
To read Jen’s blog, follow the link below:

Let us Be Mermaids
Written by Susan Rosen, she uses the unique and beautiful image of a mermaid to remind women fighting with metastatic breast cancer that just like mermaids, they are strong, sensual, feminine, and incredible beings. The blog and the comparison serve as a reminder that everyone is inspired and awed by their presence. She’s finding beauty in a time when it’s easy to lose that feeling.
To read Susan’s blog, follow the link below:

The Breast Place
We want to make sure our followers and the beautiful women we work with know that we also have our own blog. We write two blog posts a month for our patients, friends, and those looking for comfort and information. Our blogs range from updates within our offices, to day to day life, and educational tidbits. They have a consistent thread of support and inspiration through them all.
To visit our blog, follow the link below:

You have a voice that needs to be heard. If you haven’t found yours yet, we hope these blogs and these women help a little bit every day.

The 10 best breast cancer blogs

Breast cancer can have an impact on many aspects of your daily life. Everyone copes with their diagnosis differently, but breast cancer blogs can provide you with the latest breast cancer breakthroughs, educational information, and support. We have found the best breast cancer blogs.

Share on PinterestBreast cancer blogs offer support from organizations who specialize in breast cancer, as well as from people who have been diagnosed with the disease.

In the United States, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women after skin cancer. There are around 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,410 new cases of non-invasive breast cancer diagnosed in U.S. women per year.

Besides lung cancer, death rates associated with breast cancer are higher than for any other type of cancer.

Receiving a breast cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. It can often be helpful to learn about breast cancer to make informed decisions about your care, discuss your feelings, keep in close contact with friends, family, and other loved ones, and speak with other breast cancer survivors.

Breast cancer blogs can put you in touch with individuals that are sharing similar experiences and provide a supportive community so you feel that you are not alone. Here are Medical News Today’s top 10 choices of breast cancer blogs.

Breastcancer.org

Breastcancer.org are a non-profit organization that simplify complex medical information about breast health and breast cancer for women and their friends and family.

They are dedicated to providing information on breast cancer that is up-to-date, reliable, and complete, in order to help women make the best decisions about their treatment and care.

The most recent posts on Breastcancer.org’s blog include information on what biosimilar medicines are and whether they are as effective as the original drugs, advice from cancer experts on ways that caregivers can also take care of themselves, and Harvey’s account of life as a male with a BRCA mutation.

Visit the Breastcancer.org blog.

Cancerwise

Cancerwise is the blog of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The Center is devoted to cancer education, prevention, and patient care.

Their mission is to eliminate cancer in Texas, the nation, and the world. They aim to achieve this through high-quality programs that integrate cancer research and prevention, patient care, and education for medical students, trainees, healthcare professionals, and the public.

Cancerwise’s breast cancer blog includes personal stories such as twin sisters’ account of learning that they have the BRCA1 mutation and choosing to have double mastectomies, newlywed Becky’s decision to commemorate her breast cancer survivorship with a tattoo, and what Stacey learned from her first mammogram.

Visit the Cancerwise blog.

Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Living Beyond Breast Cancer (LBBC) provide programs and services for people affected by breast cancer. Their goal is to offer trusted information and a community of support that is accessible and respectful. LBBC’s resources are reviewed by leading healthcare experts and individuals living with breast cancer.

LBBC serve people with all stages and types of breast cancer. They provide specialized programs for young women, men, African Americans, and LGBT individuals.

The latest posts on LBBC’s blog include Lovelyn’s experience of sorting out the financial implications of breast cancer, Emily’s story of talking about her breast cancer diagnosis with her children, and Rebecca’s reflection on pregnancy and breast-feeding after breast cancer.

Visit the LBBC blog.

Rethink Breast Cancer

Rethink Breast Cancer are a Canadian charity with a mission of empowering young people worldwide who are impacted by breast cancer. Rethink aim to bring relevant awareness to individuals who are age 40 years and younger, and foster a new generation of influential breast cancer supporters.

Rethink are about thinking differently about breast cancer. They are taking a breakthrough approach to breast cancer education, resources, community engagement, advocacy, and fundraising. Rethink say, “No pink ribbons required.”

The most recent posts and news on Rethink’s blog cover topics such as suggestions of mastectomy-friendly swimwear, 10 things not to say to someone with cancer, and how to build upper body strength and confidence post-surgery.

Visit the Rethink Breast Cancer blog.

The Breast Cancer Charities of America

The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) are a non-profit that exist to eliminate breast cancer as a life-threatening condition. BCCA say that they are the new voice of breast cancer, that they are passionate and filled with energy and vision, and that they will not stop until breast cancer is no longer life-threatening.

The BCCA offer cutting edge, state-of-the-art, evidence-based programs that focus on nutrition, exercise, and social support, in addition to educating, empowering, and encouraging women to be proactive in preventing and surviving breast cancer.

Posts on the BCCA’s blog include a 15-minute workout for days when you do not feel like exercising, what you might be forgetting to incorporate into your wellness routine, and the unveiling of the truth behind National Bikini Day and how to celebrate your body.

Visit the BCCA blog.

Nancy’s Point

Nancy’s Point is the blog of Nancy Stordahl. Nancy is an educator, author, blogger, and freelance writer, and she was diagnosed with stage 2b breast cancer in 2010.

Nancy’s mother died in 2008 from metastatic breast cancer, and since then she has learned that she carries the BRCA2 mutation. “My life has been forever altered by this disease. For me, there is no going back.”

Through her blog, Nancy candidly shares her breast cancer story with posts such as what you should take to chemo, facing a bilateral mastectomy, and how 7 years after diagnosis, Nancy still has not adjusted to having an oncologist. Nancy refuses to sugarcoat breast cancer and invites you to browse around.

Visit the Nancy’s Point blog.

Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

Marie Ennis O’Connor writes the blog Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer. Marie was aged just 34 years when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She believed that breast cancer only happened to older women and quickly came to realize that “cancer is no respecter of age.”

Marie started Journey Beyond Breast Cancer to help make sense of her breast cancer experience and integrate it into her life. While she found advice online for people who were newly diagnosed or going through treatment, she found very little information about how to cope post-treatment. Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer is a space where survivors of breast cancer can share their experiences: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer aims to enrich people with breast cancer’s discovery and healing process through posts including 10 things Marie wishes she had known when diagnosed with breast cancer, how cancer affects relationships, and what happens when cancer treatment ends.

Visit the Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer blog.

Sharsheret

Sharsheret, which is Hebrew for “chain,” are a national organization that support Jewish women and their families who are facing breast and ovarian cancer. Sharsheret have served almost 70,000 women, families, community leaders, students, and healthcare professionals from across all 50 states.

Their mission is to offer a community of support for women of Jewish backgrounds who have been diagnosed with breast cancer or have a greater genetic risk of developing it.

Recent posts on Sharsheret’s blog include the triumphs of 120 cancer survivors, options available for fertility preservation after a cancer diagnosis, and understanding what breast density is and what it means for you.

Visit the Sharsheret blog.

Let Life Happen

Let Life Happen is the blog of award-winning blogger Barbara Jacoby. Barbara shares her two-time breast cancer journey, domestic abuse experience, and patient advocacy mission through multiple online publications.

Barbara offers high-quality content in a style that is full of energy and delivered in a down-to-earth and humble way. Healthcare professionals worldwide recognize and approve much of the information on Let Life Happen.

Let Life Happen’s breast cancer blog explores subject matter such as scarring after breast cancer surgery, discussions with your doctor about reconstruction after radiation, and understanding the myths about breast cancer.

Visit the Let Life Happen blog.

Detrice Matthews

Dee Matthews, who lives in the United Kingdom with her husband and two young children, is the founder of the blog Detrice Matthews. In 2014, when she was just 32 years old, Dee was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer.

Detrice Matthews aims to be a helpful and positive insight into having breast cancer at a young age. Dee says that while other websites quote statistics, side effects, and outcomes, often the most useful information comes from real people going through real experiences.

Posts by Dee include honest accounts of her breast cancer journey, with titles such as the way we once were, the next chapter, and this time around, as well as a poem called “One last smile,” which was written for a friend of Dee’s who lost her battle with breast cancer.

Visit the Detrice Matthews blog.

Blog

  • Learn
    • The Basics
      • What is Breast Cancer?
      • Who Gets Breast Cancer?
      • Your Medical Team
      • Words to Know
    • Types of Breast Cancer
      • DCIS and LCIS
      • Hormone Receptor-Positive
        • Diagnosis and Testing
          • Hormone Receptor Status
        • Treatments and Research
          • Hormonal Therapy
          • What Is Hormonal Therapy
          • Types of Hormonal Therapy
          • Importance of Menopausal Status
          • Targeted Therapy
          • Targeted Therapies for Hormone-Positive Breast Cancer
        • Side Effects
          • Bone Loss
          • Bone Pain
          • Chemobrain
          • Hair Loss
          • Insomnia and Fatigue
          • Menopausal Symptoms
          • Secondary Cancers
          • Sexual Side Effects
        • Living With HR-Positive Breast Cancer
          • Fertility and Future Pregnancy
      • HER2-Positive
        • Diagnosis and Testing
        • Treatments and Research
          • Targeted Therapy
          • Targeted Therapy for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
        • Side Effects
          • Chemobrain
          • Menopausal Symptoms
        • Living With HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
          • Ending Treatment and Your Emotions
      • Triple-Negative
        • Risk Factors
        • Diagnosis and Testing
        • Treatments and Research
          • Common Treatments
          • Chemotherapy
          • Why Aren’t There Targeted Therapies?
          • Finding a Doctor for TNBC
          • Clinical Trials as a Treatment Option
          • Follow-Up Care for TNBC
        • Side Effects
          • Chemobrain
          • Hair Loss
          • Hand-Foot Syndrome
          • Insomnia and Fatigue
          • Menopausal Symptoms
          • Mouth Sores
          • Nail and Skin Changes
          • Nausea and Vomiting
          • Neuropathy
          • Neutropenia
          • Secondary Cancers
        • Living With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
          • Fitting In
          • Fear of Recurrence
          • Dealing With Uncertainty
          • Dealing With Negative Comments
      • Metastatic
        • How Breast Cancer Metastasizes
        • What Makes Metastatic Breast Cancer Different
        • Feelings of Loss
        • Bone Metastases
          • Monitoring Bone Metastases
        • Brain Metastases
          • Monitoring Brain Mets
        • Liver Metastases
          • Monitoring Liver Metastases
        • Lung Metastases
          • Monitoring Lung Metastases
        • Diagnosis and Testing
          • Coping With Your Diagnosis
          • Tests You May Have
          • Second Opinions and MBC
          • MBC as Your First Diagnosis
          • MBC as a Recurrence
          • Hormone Receptor-Positive MBC
          • HER2-Positive MBC
          • Triple-Negative MBC
        • Treatments and Research
          • Being in Treatment for Life
          • Goals of Treatment
          • Making Treatment Decisions Throughout Your Care
          • Clinical Trials for MBC
          • Metastatic Trial Search
          • Hormonal Therapy for MBC
          • Targeted Therapy for MBC
          • Chemotherapy For MBC
          • Radiation Therapy for MBC
          • Surgery for MBC
          • Yoga and MBC
        • Side Effects
          • Bone Health and MBC
          • Bone Pain and MBC
          • Chemobrain
          • Depression and Anxiety and MBC
          • Hair Loss and MBC
          • Hand-Foot Syndrome and MBC
          • Heart Health and MBC
          • Insomnia and Fatigue and MBC
          • Menopausal Symptoms and MBC
          • Mouth Sores and MBC
          • Nail and Skin Changes and MBC
          • Nausea and Vomiting and MBC
          • Neuropathy and MBC
          • Neutropenia and MBC
          • Pain and MBC
          • Sexual Side Effects
        • Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer
          • Building Your Community of Support
          • Stress and Anxiety
          • Self-Care for Stress and Anxiety
          • Coping With Stress in Relationships
          • Fertility and Metastatic Breast Cancer
          • Money, Insurance & Career
      • Inflammatory
      • Lobular
    • Diagnosis and Testing
      • How Cancer Is Staged
      • Tests You May Have
        • Biopsy
        • Genetic Tests
        • Genomic Tests
        • PET Scan
        • Blood Tests
        • Bone Scans
        • CAT Scans
        • Chest x-rays
        • Mammograms
        • Ultrasound
        • MRI
      • Your Pathology Report
      • Facing Your Diagnosis
        • Coping With the News
        • Sharing the News
    • Treatments and Research
      • Getting a Second Opinion
      • Surgery
        • Lymph Node Surgery
        • Preventive Mastectomy
        • Making Decisions
        • Ovarian Ablation
        • Preparing for Surgery
        • Recovering After Surgery
      • Chemotherapy
        • Types of Chemotherapy
          • Capecitabine
          • Carboplatin
          • Cisplatin
          • Cyclophosphamide
          • Docetaxel
          • Doxorubicin
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          • Fluorouracil
          • Gemcitabine
          • Ixabepilone
          • Paclitaxel
          • Liposomal Doxorubicin
          • Nab-Paclitaxel
          • Vinorelbine
        • Common Regimens
          • AC
          • AC-T
          • ACTH
          • CAF
          • CMF
          • FAC
          • TAC
          • TC
          • TCH
          • TH
          • THP
        • Preparing for Chemotherapy
      • Radiation Therapy
        • Whole Breast Radiation
        • Partial Breast Radiation
        • Available Schedules in the U.S.
        • Radiation Side Effects
      • Breast Reconstruction
        • Immediate vs. Delayed Reconstruction
        • Tissue Reconstruction
        • Implant Reconstruction
        • Nipple Reconstruction
        • Regenerative Tissue Reconstruction
        • Using a Prosthesis
      • Targeted Therapy
        • Targeted Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer
          • Abemaciclib
          • Alpelisib
          • Everolimus
          • Palbociclib
          • Ribociclib
        • Targeted Therapy for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
          • Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine
          • Lapatinib
          • Pertuzumab
          • Neratinib
          • Trastuzumab
        • PARP Inhibitors for BRCA-Positive Breast Cancer
          • Olaparib
          • Talazoparib
      • Hormonal Therapy
        • What Is Hormonal Therapy
        • Importance of Menopausal Status
        • Types of Hormonal Therapy
          • Aromatase Inhibitors
          • Fulvestrant
          • LHRH Agonists
          • Megestrol Acetate
          • Ovarian Ablation
          • Ovarian Suppression
          • Tamoxifen
          • Toremifene Citrate
        • Common Questions
      • Immunotherapy
        • Types of Immunotherapy
          • Atezolizumab
          • Pembrolizumab
      • Clinical Trials
        • FDA Approval Programs
        • Breast Cancer Clinical Trial Resources
        • Clinical Trials Resource Center
      • Biosimilars
      • Complementary Therapy
        • Types of Complementary Therapy
          • Acupuncture
          • Art Therapy
          • Expressive Writing
          • Guided Imagery
          • Hypnosis
          • Massage Therapy
          • Medical Marijuana
          • Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction
      • Yoga and Breast Cancer
        • Getting Started With Yoga
        • Common Yoga Poses
        • Popular Yoga Styles
        • Special Situations
          • Yoga and Lymphedema Risk
          • Yoga and Metastatic Breast Cancer
    • Side Effects
      • Anemia
      • Bone Loss
      • Bone Pain
      • Chemobrain
      • Depression and Anxiety
      • Diarrhea
      • Fear of Recurrence
        • Why Fear of Recurrence Happens
        • Common Fear of Recurrence Triggers
        • Managing Your Fear of Recurrence
        • Getting Support for Fears of Recurrence
      • Hair Loss
        • Scalp Cooling to Help Prevent Hair Loss
      • Hand-Foot Syndrome
      • Heart Health
      • High Cholesterol
      • Insomnia and Fatigue
        • Managing Insomnia and Fatigue
        • Treatment for Insomnia and Fatigue
      • Lymphedema
        • Lymphedema Risk
        • Treating Lymphedema
      • Menopausal Symptoms
      • Mouth Sores
      • Nail and Skin Changes
      • Nausea and Vomiting
      • Neuropathy
      • Neutropenia
      • Pain
      • Secondary Cancers
      • Sexual Side Effects
      • Weight Gain
      • Weight Loss
    • Living With Breast Cancer
      • Body Image
        • How Breast Cancer Impacts Your Body Image
      • Bone Health Basics
        • Treatments and Your Bone Health
        • Bone Health Tests
        • Improving Bone Health
        • Medicines To Protect Bones
      • Diet, Nutrition and Exercise
        • Making Meals Healthy
        • Tips for Healthy Eating
      • Emotional Health
        • Diagnosis and Your Emotions
        • Treatment and Your Emotions
        • Ending Treatment and Your Emotions
        • Common Emotions Related to Breast Cancer
        • Post-Traumatic Growth
        • Helping Yourself Emotionally
        • Seeing a Professional
        • Medicines for Emotional Health
          • Medicines for Anxiety
          • Medicines for Depression
        • Where to Go for Help
      • Fear of Recurrence
        • Why Fear of Recurrence Happens
        • Common Fear of Recurrence Triggers
        • Managing Your Fear of Recurrence
        • Getting Support
      • Fertility and Breast Cancer
        • Am I In Menopause?
        • Birth Control and Breast Cancer
        • Protecting Your Fertility During Treatment
        • Making Decisions About Protecting Fertility
        • Determining Fertility After Treatment
        • Getting Pregnant After Early Breast Cancer
      • Genetics and Family Risk
        • Signs Breast Cancer May Be BRCA-Related
        • Genetic Counseling
        • Genetic Testing
        • Genetic Test Results and What They Mean
        • Genetic Test Results and Treatment Decisions
        • Genetic Testing and Your Relationships
        • Sharing Your Genetic Test Results With Family
        • Sharing Your Genetic Test Results At Work
      • Job and Financial Concerns
        • Breast Cancer and the Workplace
        • Telling Employers and Coworkers About Your Diagnosis
        • Work Accommodations and Disability Benefits
        • Offsetting the “Hidden Costs” of Breast Cancer
        • Getting Organized for Health Insurance
        • Private, State and Federal Insurance
        • Navigating Your Heatlh Insurance
        • Dealing With a Claim Denial
        • Other Ways to Get Insurance
        • Financial Planning
        • What is the ACA?
      • Sex and Intimacy
        • Birth Control and Breast Cancer
        • Maintaining Sexual Life
        • If You Feel Pain During Sex
        • Sexual Side Effects
        • Body Image and Sexuality
        • Improving Sexual Health With Medical Approaches
        • Improving Sexual Health With Self Care
        • Talking With Your Partner About Sex and Intimacy
        • Talking With Your Healthcare Team About Sex and Intimacy
      • Signs of Recurrence
    • Learning from Others
      • Ask the Expert
    • Additional Resources
  • Get Support
    • In Person
    • Online
    • By Phone
      • Guides to Understanding
      • Breast Cancer Worksheets
    • 5 Ways We Can Help
    • Get Involved
    • Additional Resources
    • Videos
      • Expert Videos
      • Let’s Talk About It
      • Style How-To’s For Women with Breast Cancer
      • Treatment Prep
  • How You Can Help
    • Donate
      • Donate Now
      • Gift in Honor or Memory Of
      • Matching Gifts
      • Planned Giving
      • STOCK & DONOR ADVISED FUND GIFTS
      • Workplace Giving
    • Volunteer
      • Get Involved
      • Leadership Volunteer Programs
        • Community Connector
        • Hear My Voice
          • I Raise My Voice…
          • My Metastatic Memoir
        • Helpline
        • Young Advocate Program
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      • Volunteer Resources
        • Community Connector Portal
        • Hear My Voice Portal
        • Helpline Portal
        • Young Advocate Portal
    • Raise Money for LBBC
      • Reach & Raise
      • Host an Event – DIY
      • Social Media Fundraising
    • Reach & Raise
      • Reach & Raise On the Road
        • How to Hold an Event
      • Reach & Raise: FAQ’s
    • Attend an Event
      • Reach & Raise (Yoga on the Steps)
      • Butterfly Ball
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      • DIY Fundraisers
    • Partner With Us
      • Partners and Sponsors
    • Shop to Support
      • Accessories
      • Apparel
      • Beauty & Skin Care
      • Dining & Beverage
      • Personal Care
      • Services
      • Sports & Outdoors
      • Frequently Asked Questions
    • 25th Anniversary Campaign
    • Share Your Story
    • 2019 Butterfly Ball
  • News & Opinion
    • Updates from the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

Best Breast Cancer Blogs 2019

Best breast cancer blog if you are seeking support…

Living Beyond Breast Cancer

If you have breast cancer or are a survivor of breast cancer, Living Beyond Breast Cancer may be a useful resource for you. When you navigate to this non-profit’s blog page, we’re’ confident you will feel embraced by their mission. Offering in-person, phone, or online support, this community is here for you.

Their blog articles show their commitment to facing emotional, overwhelming questions and thoughts by your side. Whether that is coming to terms with your diagnosis or realizing life after breast cancer, they cover it all.

Best breast cancer blog if you are seeking to change your lifestyle post-diagnosis…

Thebreastcancercharities.org

This favorite breast cancer blog is an excellent resource for support, providing access to a community dedicated to living to the fullest, regardless of the diagnosis. Here you will find blog articles describing fun healthy recipes like Pumpkin Spice Protein Bars or finding positive self-help books for your journey. If you are looking to make a lifestyle change related to your breast health, this is a great place to start. Beyond the breast cancer blog, they share tangible patient resources such as financial or transportation assistance.

Best breast cancer blog if you are looking for a personal story….

Booby and the Beast

This intimate breast cancer blog will take you on a journey through the experience of one brave soul fighting breast cancer. Jen was only 32 years old when she was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer. While her situation is no longer terminal, she is still fighting. Her story is filled with tales of her two children, the acknowledgment of tough days, and the joy of living in the moment. No matter your situation, Jen’s story is not one to be missed.

Best breast cancer blog if you want to support the cause…

Wear it Pink

Look no further! Wear it Pink day is part of a more significant fundraising effort to spread awareness about breast cancer. Their breast cancer blog features their research as well as different ways to fundraise and support the cause. And it’s not too late! Wear it Pink day is on October 18th, so hop on to their breast cancer blog and join the efforts if you are inclined.

Witty and real: But Doctor, I Hate Pink

These 6 Breast Cancer Blogs Are Must-Reads, No Matter Where You Are On Your Journey

By G. H.

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These bloggers take their readers along on their personal journeys, sharing their struggles, triumphs, realizations and coping strategies. In doing so, they become a source of inspiration, camaraderie and priceless hope. Though these bloggers span ages and diagnoses, each of their blogs is a must-read for anyone touched by the disease.

Ann Silberman’s sharp sense of humor is the first thing you’ll notice when reading her posts on But Doctor, I Hate Pink. Ann was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer in 2012 and was given a prognosis of one to two years. A self-described “metastatic breast cancer ass-kicker,” she chooses to live in the moment and approach every day with appreciation. Ann’s heartfelt, true-to-life words allow her readers to experience the world through her eyes, and leave them inspired to approach a breast cancer diagnosis the way she does: with grace, class and wit.

Transformational: Let Life Happen

After surviving not only breast cancer, but domestic abuse as well, Barbara Jacoby decided to use her harrowing experiences as fuel to create lasting change. Let Life Happen is Barbara’s way of spreading awareness about these two important women’s issues and sharing personal insights about overcoming challenge and creating happiness. Barbara is also the creator of When Breast Cancer Happens, a worldwide support network for women with breast cancer featuring countless resources, books and survivor stories that will empower women to “respond promptly, effectively and confidently to their situation.” Her positive energy is contagious, and will leave you feeling optimistic and inspired to affect change.

G. H. was raised in Minnesota, but currently calls Seattle her home. She’s a blogger, editor, and journalist, and she’s written everything from news reports to restaurant reviews. If she’s not putting pen to paper, G. H. is probably experimenting in the kitchen, chilling out on her yoga mat, or running through a city park. Proper greatergood_ctg_belowcontent

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