Benazepril hcl side effects

Benazepril

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Benazepril belongs to the class of medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It is used to treat mildly to moderately high blood pressure. It works by relaxing blood vessels and reducing the workload of the heart. Benazepril may be used alone or in addition to diuretics (water pills) known as thiazide diuretics (e.g., hydrochlorothiazide).

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

5 mg
Each light yellow, capsule-shaped, scored, film-coated tablet, with “BE” over “5” on one side, contains 5 mg of benazepril HCl. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, titanium dioxide, yellow iron oxide, and zinc stearate.

10 mg
Each yellow, capsule-shaped, scored, film-coated tablet, with “BE” over “10” on one side, contains 10 mg of benazepril HCl. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, titanium dioxide, yellow iron oxide, and zinc stearate.

20 mg
Each light pink, round, unscored, film-coated tablet with “BE” over “20” on one side, contains 20 mg of benazepril HCl. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, red iron oxide, titanium dioxide, and zinc stearate.

How should I use this medication?

The usual starting dose of benazepril for adults is 10 mg daily. If this dose does not lower the blood pressure enough after 2 weeks, the dose may be increased gradually to a maximum of 40 mg daily. The usual dose is 20 mg daily.

Lower doses may be used for people who take other medications that lower blood pressure (e.g., diuretics), or for people who have kidney disease. It may take up to 2 weeks to see the full effects of the medication.

Benazepril may be taken with or without meals.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to benazepril or any ingredients of the medication
  • are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant
  • have a history of angioedema (a serious allergic reaction which causes the area around the throat and tongue to swell) after taking any medications known as ACE inhibitors (e.g., captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, ramipril)
  • have galactose intolerance or glucose malabsorption (a rare hereditary disease)
  • have diabetes or kidney disease and are taking aliskiren

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • abdominal pain
  • change to the sense of taste
  • constipation
  • cough (dry, persistent)
  • decreased sexual ability
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • heartburn
  • increased sensitivity to the sun
  • muscle or joint pain
  • nausea
  • ringing in the ears
  • sore throat or throat irritation
  • unusual tiredness

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • decreased urine output
  • dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting (signs of low blood pressure)
  • numbness or tingling in the hands or feet
  • signs of anemia (low red blood cells; e.g., dizziness, pale skin, unusual tiredness or weakness, shortness of breath)
  • signs of electrolyte changes (e.g., confusion, drowsiness, dry mouth, muscle fatigue, nausea, thirst, weakness)
  • signs of an infection (e.g., fever and chills, hoarseness, other flu-like symptoms)
  • signs of bleeding (e.g., bloody nose, blood in urine, coughing blood, bleeding gums, cuts that don’t stop bleeding)
  • signs of depression (e.g., poor concentration, changes in weight, changes in sleep, decreased interest in activities, thoughts of suicide)
  • signs of kidney problems (e.g., decreased urine production, swelling, fatigue, abdominal pain)
  • signs of low blood sugar (e.g., cold clammy skin, dizziness, fatigue, sweating)
  • signs of reduced liver function (e.g., stomach pain, itching of skin, yellow eyes or skin, abdominal pain, abdominal distention, fever, nausea, or vomiting)
  • signs of pancreatitis (e.g., abdominal pain on the upper left side, back pain, nausea, fever, chills, rapid heartbeat, swollen abdomen)
  • signs of too much potassium in the body (e.g., confusion, irregular heartbeat, nervousness, numbness or tingling in hands, feet, or lips, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, weakness or heaviness of legs)
  • skin rash with or without itching, fever, or joint pain
  • vision changes

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • chest pain
  • signs of a heart attack (e.g., chest pain or pressure, pain extending through shoulder and arm, nausea and vomiting, sweating)
  • signs of severe allergic reaction (e.g., swelling of face, mouth, hands, or feet (signs of angioedema), sudden difficulty swallowing or breathing)
  • symptoms of a serious skin reaction (such as skin rash; red skin; blistering of the lips, eyes, or mouth; skin peeling; fever; or joint pain)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Angioedema: Angioedema (a serious allergic reaction that causes the area around the throat and tongue to swell) may occur with the use of ACE inhibitors, including benazepril. If you experience swelling of the face, tongue, or throat, stop taking benazepril at once and get immediate medical attention. Other medications known as ACE inhibitors should not be taken in the future. People who have had angioedema caused by other substances may be at increased risk of angioedema while receiving an ACE inhibitor.

Diabetes: People with diabetes who take benazepril may experience reduced blood sugar control. If you have diabetes, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. You may find it helpful to increase the number of times a day your check your blood sugar.

Fluid and electrolyte balance: Increases in blood levels of potassium may occur in with the use of benazepril. This rarely causes problems, but your doctor will monitor your potassium levels regularly with blood tests. Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you experience symptoms of increased potassium in the body, such as confusion, irregular heartbeat, unusual nervousness, or tingling in the hands and feet.

Infection: Some people taking benazepril experience a reduction in the cells that fight infection (white blood cells), which results in infections. Tell your doctor as soon as possible if you begin to notice the signs of an infection such as fever or chills, severe diarrhea, shortness of breath, prolonged dizziness, headache, stiff neck, weight loss, or listlessness. Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor the number of specific types of blood cells in your blood.

Kidney function: Changes in kidney function have been seen in certain people who take this medication. The use of aliskiren may further increase risk of kidney problems for those at risk for this problem. If you have kidney disease, including narrowing of the blood vessels in the kidneys, or severe congestive heart failure, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Liver function: Occasionally, hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) occurs with the use of benazepril. If you have reduced liver function or liver disease, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

If you experience symptoms of liver problems such as fatigue, feeling unwell, loss of appetite, nausea, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools, abdominal pain or swelling, and itchy skin, contact your doctor immediately.

Low blood pressure: Occasionally, blood pressure drops too low after taking benazepril. This usually happens after the first or second dose, or when the dose is increased. It is more likely to occur in those who take water pills, have a salt-restricted diet, are on dialysis, are suffering from diarrhea or vomiting, or have been sweating excessively and not drinking enough liquids. If low blood pressure causes you to faint or feel lightheaded, contact a doctor.

Surgery: Benazepril may affect how anaesthetics work. If you are scheduled for surgery, inform all doctors involved in your care that you take benazepril.

Pregnancy: Benazepril, like other ACE inhibitors, can cause birth defects and even death to the developing fetus when taken by a women who is pregnant. Pregnant women should not take this medication. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking benazepril, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of benazepril have not been established for children.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between benazepril and any of the following:

  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • aldesleukin
  • alpha blockers (e.g., alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin)
  • aliskiren
  • allopurinol
  • alpha-1 blockers (e.g., doxazosin, prazosin, tamsulosin)
  • alpha-2 blockers (e.g., clonidine, dexmedetomidine, methyldopa)
  • amiodarone
  • amifostine
  • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, phentermine)
  • angiotensin II receptor blockers (e.g., irbesartan, losartan, valsartan)
  • antacids (e.g., aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide)
  • antipsychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone)
  • azathioprine
  • barbiturates (e.g., butalbital, phenobarbital)
  • beta-blockers (e.g., atenolol, carvedilol, propranolol)
  • calcium channel blockers (e.g., amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil)
  • canagliflozin
  • celecoxib
  • conivaptan
  • cyclosporine
  • diuretics (water pills; e.g., furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide)
  • drospirenone
  • duloxetine
  • erythropoietin
  • everolimus
  • ginger
  • ginseng
  • “gliptin” diabetes medications (e.g., linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin)
  • gold salts
  • grass pollen extract
  • heparin
  • iron dextran complex
  • levodopa
  • low-molecular-weight heparins (e.g., dalteparin, tinzaparin)
  • licorice
  • lithium
  • MAO inhibitors (e.g., moclobemide, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline)
  • medications that increase potassium levels (e.g., potassium supplements, salt substitutes containing potassium)
  • metformin
  • methylphenidate
  • nitrates (e.g., nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, isosorbide mononitrate)
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs; e.g., ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen)
  • obinutuzumab
  • other angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs; e.g., captopril, ramipril)
  • phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil)
  • potassium-sparing diuretics (e.g., spironolactone, amiloride, triamterene)
  • pramipexole
  • pregabalin
  • quinine
  • quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin)
  • rituximab
  • ropinirole
  • sacubitril
  • sirolimus
  • sodium phosphates
  • temsirolimus
  • tizanidine
  • tolcapone
  • tolvaptan
  • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, clomipramine, desipramine, trimipramine)
  • trimethoprim

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Benazepril

What is benazepril?

Benazepril (brand names: Fortekor®, Lotensin®, Apex®, Benazemav®, Benefortin®, Bexepril®, Nelio®, Prilben®, Vetace®) is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor used to treat heart failure, high blood pressure, and various types of kidney diseases such as chronic kidney disease and protein-losing glomerulonephropathies. It may also be useful for treating idiopathic kidney bleeding.

Its use in cats and dogs to treat cardiovascular and kidney disease is ‘off label’ or ‘extra label’. Many drugs are commonly prescribed for off label use in veterinary medicine. In these instances, follow your veterinarian’s directions and cautions very carefully as their directions may be significantly different from those on the label.

How is benazepril given?

Benazepril is given by mouth in the form of a tablet. It may be given with or without food, but if stomach upset occurs when dosing on an empty stomach, give future doses with food.

This medication should take effect within 1 to 2 hours; however, effects may not be visibly noticeable and therefore laboratory tests may need to be done to evaluate this medication’s effectiveness.

What if I miss giving my pet the medication?

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember, and then wait the recommended amount of time between doses. Never give your pet two doses at once or give extra doses.

Are there any potential side effects?

Side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Rare side effects may include tiredness or incoordination. Serious side effects include severe tiredness, skin rash, or fever.

This short-acting medication should stop working within 24 hours, although effects can be longer in pets with liver or kidney disease.

Are there any risk factors for this medication?

Do not use benazepril in pets that are allergic to it or other ACE inhibitors. Use cautiously in pets with low sodium, low blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, lupus, or blood cell abnormalities. Benazepril should be used with extreme caution in pets that have acute kidney injury and are critically ill. Do not use benazepril in pregnant animals unless the benefits far outweigh the risks and it should be used cautiously in lactating pets.

Are there any drug interactions I should be aware of?

The following medications should be used with caution when given with benazepril: allopurinol, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, antidiabetic agents, antihistamines, antihypertensive agents, apomorphine, angiotensin receptor antagonists, aspirin, azathioprine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, buspirone, cabergoline, corticosteroids, cyclosporine, dalteparin/enoxaparin, diazoxide, diuretics, fenoldopam, furazolidone, glycerin, heparin, interferon alfa, iodinated contrast agents, iron, lanthanum, lithium, methotrexate, mirtazapine, muscle relaxants, naltrexone, nitroglycerin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, opioids, pentoxifylline, pergolide, phenothiazines, polyethylene glycol, potassium supplements, prazosin, pregabalin, procarbazine, QTc prolonging agents, selegiline, sildenafil, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, thioguanine, trazodone, or tricyclic antidepressants.

Be sure to tell your veterinarian about any medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) that your pet is taking.

Is there any monitoring that needs to be done with this medication?

Blood electrolyte levels, kidney values, and a urinalysis should be monitored by your veterinarian within two weeks of your pet starting this medication. If using this medication to manage high blood pressures, your veterinarian will routinely measure your pet’s blood pressure to be sure that the medication is working. Monitor your pet for serious side effects.

How do I store benazepril?

Benazepril should be stored at room temperature below 86°F (30°C) and protected from moisture. Tablets that are dispensed in blister packs should remain in the pack until use; tablets that are removed from the blister pack should be used within 1-2 days, and then discarded.

What should I do in case of emergency?

If you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately. If they are not available, follow their directions in contacting an emergency facility.

Contributors: Rania Gollakner, BS, DVM © Copyright 2019 LifeLearn Inc. Used and/or modified with permission under license.

Medications That Can Cause Hair Loss

Try the Hair Loss Prevention Diet

Types of Medications That Can Cause Hair Loss

The reason that some medications cause you to lose your hair is that they are toxic to the hair follicles — the cells responsible for hair growth. When hair follicles become damaged, the normal cycle of hair growth is disrupted, which eventually leads to hair loss.

The medications listed below most commonly cause hair loss:

Anticoagulants (blood thinners). Anticoagulant medications, which can help stave off blood clots and prevent complications in people with certain conditions, including heart disease, can also cause hair loss. The type of hair loss caused by anticoagulants is known as telogen effluvium, which is hair loss that can affect the entire scalp, rather than just a specific area. Hair loss typically begins after about 12 weeks of taking a medication. Anticoagulants that can lead to hair loss include warfarin sodium (Panwarfarin, Sofarin, Coumadin) and heparin injections.

Gout medications. Allopurinol, a medication used to treat a form of arthritis known as gout, can also lead to telogen effluvium. Brand names include Lopurin and Zyloprim.

Beta blockers. Beta blockers are medications that reduce the workload of your heart and help to lower blood pressure. Beta blockers are known to cause telogen effluvium, and include:

  • Atenolol (Tenormin)
  • Metoprolol (Lopressor)
  • Nadolol (Corgord)
  • Propranolol (Inderal, Inderal LA)
  • Timolol (Blocadren)

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or ACE inhibitors, are another type of blood pressure medication. ACE inhibitors, such as those listed below, can lead to telogen effluvium as well:

  • Captopril (Capoten)
  • Lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil)
  • Enalapril (Vasotec)

Vitamin A. When taken in large doses, vitamin A may lead to telogen effluvium. The acne medication isotretinoin (Accutane) is derived from vitamin A.

Female hormones. Taking female hormones can trigger hair loss. Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) and hormone replacement therapy can lead to hormonal changes that may cause your hair to fall out. Hormonal medications that been known to cause telogen effluvium and female pattern baldness include birth control pills, estrogen, and progesterone.

Male hormones. Male hormones can also trigger hair loss. Men who take testosterone or anabolic steroids may experience male pattern balding.

Antidepressants. Certain medications used to treat depression and anxiety are also known to cause telogen effluvium, including:

  • Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep)
  • Amoxapine (Asendin)
  • Clomipramine (Anafranil)
  • Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane)
  • Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan)
  • Fluoxetine hydrochloride (Prozac)
  • Haloperidol (Haldol)
  • Imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil, Tofranil PM)
  • Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)
  • Protriptyline hydrochloride (Vivactil)
  • Sertraline hydrochloride (Zoloft)
  • Trimipramine (Surmontil)

Anticonvulsants. Anticonvulsants, or anti-seizure medications, can also lead to diffuse hair loss. These medications include trimethadione (Tridione) and valproic acid (Depakote).

7 Things to Avoid if You Have Hair Loss

Even though quite a few medications can cause your hair to fall out, the good news is that this form of hair loss is usually temporary. Talk with your doctor to find out if a medication could be causing your hair loss. If so, your doctor may be able to prescribe a different medication or recommend a treatment that will help minimize your hair loss.

Identification

Are you a new drug developer? Contact us to learn more about our customized products and solutions. Stay in the know! As part of our commitment to providing the most up-to-date drug information, we will be releasing #DrugBankUpdates with our newly added curated drug pages. #DrugBankUpdates Name Benazepril Accession Number DB00542 (APRD00063) Type Small Molecule Groups Approved, Investigational Description

Benazepril, brand name Lotensin, is a medication used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and chronic renal failure3,2. Upon cleavage of its ester group by the liver, benazepril is converted into its active form benazeprilat, a non-sulfhydryl angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor1.

Structure 3D Download Similar Structures

Structure for Benazepril (DB00542)

× Close Synonyms

  • Bénazépril
  • Benazepril
  • Benazeprilum

External IDs CGS-14824A Product Ingredients

Ingredient UNII CAS InChI Key
Benazepril hydrochloride N1SN99T69T 86541-74-4 VPSRQEHTHIMDQM-FKLPMGAJSA-N

Active Moieties

Name Kind UNII CAS InChI Key
Benazeprilat prodrug JRM708L703 86541-78-8 MADRIHWFJGRSBP-ROUUACIJSA-N

Product Images Prescription Products

Name Dosage Strength Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End
Unlock Additional Data
Benazepril Tablet 10 mg Oral Aa Pharma Inc 2007-05-15 Not applicable Canada
Benazepril Tablet 5 mg Oral Aa Pharma Inc 2007-05-15 Not applicable Canada
Benazepril Tablet 20 mg Oral Aa Pharma Inc 2006-03-24 Not applicable Canada
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 10 mg/1 Oral ETHEX 2007-03-28 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 5 mg/1 Oral ETHEX 2007-03-28 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 40 mg/1 Oral ETHEX 2007-03-28 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 20 mg/1 Oral ETHEX 2007-03-28 Not applicable US
Lotensin Tablet 10 mg/1 Oral Validus Pharmaceuticals LLC 1991-06-21 Not applicable US
Lotensin Tablet 20 mg/1 Oral Novartis 1991-06-25 2016-02-01 US
Lotensin Tablet 10 mg/1 Oral Physicians Total Care, Inc. 2003-11-04 Not applicable US

Additional Data Available

  • Application Number Application Number

    A unique ID assigned by the FDA when a product is submitted for approval by the labeller.

    Learn more

  • Product Code Product Code

    A governmentally-recognized ID which uniquely identifies the product within its regulatory market.

    Learn more

Generic Prescription Products

Name Dosage Strength Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End
Unlock Additional Data
Benazepril Tablet, coated 40 mg/1 Oral International Laboratories, Llc 2013-09-19 2018-06-06 US
Benazepril Tablet, coated 20 mg/1 Oral Direct_Rx 2019-01-15 Not applicable US
Benazepril Tablet 20 mg/1 Oral Stat Rx USA 2010-02-02 Not applicable US
Benazepril HCl Tablet 10 mg/1 Oral Northwind Pharmaceuticals 2016-06-23 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 10 mg/1 Oral Trigen Laboratories, Inc. 2012-11-15 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet 10 mg/1 Oral A-S Medication Solutions 2010-02-02 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, film coated 5 mg/1 Oral Preferreed Pharmaceuticals Inc. 2016-03-15 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, coated 20 mg/1 Oral St. Mary’s Medical Park Pharmacy 2014-01-01 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet, coated 20 mg/1 Oral Nucare Pharmaceuticals,inc. 2014-01-01 Not applicable US
Benazepril Hydrochloride Tablet 5 mg/1 Oral AvKARE, Inc. 2009-07-29 Not applicable US

Additional Data Available

  • Application Number Application Number

    A unique ID assigned by the FDA when a product is submitted for approval by the labeller.

    Learn more

  • Product Code Product Code

    A governmentally-recognized ID which uniquely identifies the product within its regulatory market.

    Learn more

Mixture Products

Name Ingredients Dosage Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End
Amlobenz Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (5 mg/1) Capsule Oral Rebel Distributors 2010-04-19 Not applicable US
Amlobenz Benazepril hydrochloride (20 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (10 mg/1) Capsule Oral Rebel Distributors 2010-04-19 Not applicable US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (20 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (5 mg/1) Capsule Oral PD-Rx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2007-05-18 Not applicable US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (2.5 mg/1) Capsule Oral Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. 2007-05-18 2020-02-29 US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (2.5 mg/1) Capsule Oral Rising Health, Llc 2012-09-05 Not applicable US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (5 mg/1) Capsule Oral REMEDYREPACK INC. 2019-03-01 Not applicable US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (40 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (10 mg/1) Capsule Oral Apotex Corporation 2013-12-30 Not applicable US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (20 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (10 mg/1) Capsule Oral Mylan Pharmaceuticals 2012-02-20 2019-01-31 US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (2.5 mg/1) Capsule Oral Actavis Pharma, Inc. 2010-10-15 2018-12-31 US
Amlodipine and Benazepril Hydrochloride Benazepril hydrochloride (10 mg/1) + Amlodipine besylate (5 mg/1) Capsule Oral Nucare Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2012-09-05 Not applicable US

International/Other Brands Briem (Pierre Fabre (France)) / Cibacen (Novartis (Belgium, Philippines, Switzerland, Turkey), Meda (Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Spain)) / Cibacen WS / Cibacene (Meda (France)) Categories UNII UDM7Q7QWP8 CAS number 86541-75-5 Weight Average: 424.4895
Monoisotopic: 424.199822016 Chemical Formula C24H28N2O5 InChI Key XPCFTKFZXHTYIP-PMACEKPBSA-N InChI InChI=1S/C24H28N2O5/c1-2-31-24(30)20(14-12-17-8-4-3-5-9-17)25-19-15-13-18-10-6-7-11-21(18)26(23(19)29)16-22(27)28/h3-11,19-20,25H,2,12-16H2,1H3,(H,27,28)/t19-,20-/m0/s1 IUPAC Name 2-amino}-2-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-1-benzazepin-1-yl]acetic acid SMILES 1(CCC2=CC=CC=C2N(CC(O)=O)C1=O)N(CCC1=CC=CC=C1)C(=O)OCC

Pharmacology

Indication

Benazepril is indicated for the treatment of hypertension5. It may be used alone or in combination with thiazide diureticsLabel.

Associated Conditions

  • Diabetic Nephropathies
  • Heart Failure
  • High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)
  • Uncontrolled Hypertension
  • Nondiabetic nephropathy

Pharmacodynamics

Benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, is a prodrug which, when hydrolyzed by esterases to its active Benazeprilat1, is used to treat hypertension and heart failure, to reduce proteinuria and renal disease in patients with nephropathies, and to prevent stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death in high-risk patients5,3,2. Benazepril and Benazeprilat inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in human subjects and animals5,1. ACE is a peptidyl dipeptidase that catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor substance, angiotensin IILabel. Angiotensin II also stimulates aldosterone secretion by the adrenal cortexLabel.

Mechanism of action

Benazeprilat, the active metabolite of Benazepril, competes with angiotensin I for binding at the angiotensin-converting enzyme, blocking the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin IILabel. Inhibition of ACE results in decreased plasma angiotensin IILabel. As angiotensin II is a vasoconstrictor and a negative-feedback mediator for renin activity, lower concentrations result in a decrease in blood pressure and stimulation of baroreceptor reflex mechanisms, which leads to decreased vasopressor activity and to decreased aldosterone secretionLabel.

Target Actions Organism
AAngiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Humans

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Structured data covering drug contraindications. Each contraindication describes a scenario in which the drug is not to be used. Includes restrictions on co-administration, contraindicated populations, and more.

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Structured data representing warnings from the black box section of drug labels. These warnings cover important and dangerous risks, contraindications, or adverse effects.

Learn more Absorption

Bioavailability of oral dosing is 3% to 4% in horses6. In humans at least 37% of oral benazepril is absorbed and reaches peak plasma concentration in 0.5 hours to 1 hour7. Other studies have shown a peak plasma concentration at a median of 1.5 hours1.

Volume of distribution

The final population pharmacokinetic model in one study estimated the volume of distribution to be 203±69.9L8.

Protein binding

Benazepril is 96.7% protein bound while benazeprilat is 95.3% protein boundLabel.

Metabolism

Cleavage of the ester group (primarily in the liver) converts benazepril to its active metabolite, benazeprilatLabel. Benazepril and benazeprilat are conjugated to glucuronic acid prior to urinary excretionLabel.

  • Benazepril benazeprilat

Route of elimination

Benazepril and benazeprilat are cleared predominantly by renal excretion in healthy subjects with normal renal functionLabel. Nonrenal (i.e., biliary) excretion accounts for approximately 11%-12% of benazeprilat excretion in healthy subjectsLabel.

Half life

The half life of the prodrug benazepril is 2.7±8.5h1. The half life of the active metabolite benazeprilat is 22.3±9.2h1 The accumulation half life of benazepril is 10 to 11 hoursLabel1.

Clearance

The final population pharmacokinetic model of one study estimates the clearance to be 129±30.0L8.

Toxicity

The most common adverse effects include headache, dizziness, fatigue, somnolence, postural dizziness, nausea, and coughLabel,4.

The most likely symptom of overdosage is severe hypotensionLabel.

Affected organisms

  • Humans and other mammals

Pathways

Pathway Category
Benazepril Action Pathway Drug action
Benazepril Metabolism Pathway Drug metabolism

Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs Not Available

Interactions

Drug Interactions This information should not be interpreted without the help of a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing an interaction, contact a healthcare provider immediately. The absence of an interaction does not necessarily mean no interactions exist.

  • All Drugs
  • Approved
  • Vet approved
  • Nutraceutical
  • Illicit
  • Withdrawn
  • Investigational
  • Experimental
Drug Interaction
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1-(3-Mercapto-2-Methyl-Propionyl)-Pyrrolidine-2-Carboxylic Acid 1-(3-Mercapto-2-Methyl-Propionyl)-Pyrrolidine-2-Carboxylic Acid may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
1-benzylimidazole 1-benzylimidazole may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
2,4-thiazolidinedione The risk or severity of hypoglycemia can be increased when Benazepril is combined with 2,4-thiazolidinedione.
2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylthioamphetamine 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylthioamphetamine may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine 4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
4-Methoxyamphetamine 4-Methoxyamphetamine may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.
7,8-Dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline 7,8-Dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline may increase the hypotensive activities of Benazepril.
Abediterol Abediterol may decrease the antihypertensive activities of Benazepril.

Additional Data Available

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    Extended description of the mechanism of action and particular properties of each drug interaction.

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  • Severity Severity

    A severity rating for each drug interaction, from minor to major.

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  • Evidence Level Evidence Level

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Food Interactions

  • Benazepril may decrease the excretion of potassium. Salt um may increase the risk of hyperkalemia. substitutes containing potassi
  • Food slows absorption without decreasing the quantity absorbed.
  • Herbs that may attenuate the antihypertensive effect of benazepril include: bayberry, blue cohash, cayenne, ephedra, ginger, ginseng (American), kola and licorice.
  • High salt intake may attenuate the antihypertensive effect of benazepril.
  • Take without regard to meals.

Synthesis Reference

Wei-Hong Tseng, “ASYMMETRIC SYNTHESIS OF A KEY INTERMEDIATE FOR MAKING BENAZEPRIL AND ANALOGUES THEREOF.” U.S. Patent US20020183515, issued December 05, 2002.

US20020183515 General References External Links Human Metabolome Database HMDB0014682 KEGG Drug D07499 KEGG Compound C06843 PubChem Compound 5362124 PubChem Substance 46507884 ChemSpider 4514935 BindingDB 50021153 ChEBI 3011 ChEMBL CHEMBL838 Therapeutic Targets Database DAP000584 PharmGKB PA448561 RxList RxList Drug Page Drugs.com Drugs.com Drug Page PDRhealth PDRhealth Drug Page Wikipedia Benazepril ATC Codes C09BA07 — Benazepril and diuretics

  • C09BA — ACE inhibitors and diuretics
  • C09B — ACE INHIBITORS, COMBINATIONS
  • C09 — AGENTS ACTING ON THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM
  • C — CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

C09AA07 — Benazepril

  • C09AA — ACE inhibitors, plain
  • C09A — ACE INHIBITORS, PLAIN
  • C09 — AGENTS ACTING ON THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM
  • C — CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

AHFS Codes

  • 24:32.04 — Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors

FDA label (323 KB) MSDS (350 KB)

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials

Phase Status Purpose Conditions Count
1 Completed Not Available Healhty 1
1 Completed Not Available Healthy Volunteers 5
1 Completed Other Healthy Volunteers 2
1 Completed Treatment Fasting 1
1 Completed Treatment Fed 1
1 Completed Treatment Healthy Volunteers 2
1, 2 Recruiting Treatment Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura Nephritis 1
2 Completed Treatment Alport Syndrome 1
2 Recruiting Treatment Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura Nephritis 2
2 Terminated Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific 1
3 Completed Prevention Atherosclerosis / Cardiovascular Heart Disease / Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) / Diabetes Mellitus / High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / High Cholesterol / Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 1
3 Completed Treatment Diabetes 2
3 Completed Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) 2
3 Completed Treatment Renal Alteration 1
3 Terminated Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) 1
4 Completed Treatment Albuminuria 1
4 Completed Treatment Albuminuria / High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 1
4 Completed Treatment Congestive Cardiomyopathy 1
4 Completed Treatment Diabetes Mellitus / High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) 1
4 Completed Treatment Diabetes / High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / Proteinuria 1
4 Completed Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) 3
4 Completed Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / Left Ventricular Hypertrophy 1
4 Completed Treatment High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) / Induction of intra-operative hypotension 1
Not Available Completed Not Available Healthy Volunteers 2
Not Available Completed Treatment Microalbuminuria 1
Not Available Completed Treatment Renal Function Disorder 1
Not Available Terminated Treatment ACE Inhibitor / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / Dose-Response Relationship, Drug / Progression, Disease / Proteinuria / Renal Insufficiency,Chronic 1
Not Available Terminated Treatment Chronic Renal Failure (CRF) 1
Not Available Terminated Treatment Renal Insufficiency,Chronic 1

Pharmacoeconomics

Manufacturers

  • Apotex inc etobicoke site
  • Aurobindo pharma ltd
  • Biokey inc
  • Genpharm inc
  • Huahai us inc
  • Ivax pharmaceuticals inc sub teva pharmaceuticals usa
  • Mylan pharmaceuticals inc
  • Ranbaxy laboratories ltd
  • Sandoz inc
  • Teva pharmaceuticals usa inc
  • Watson laboratories inc florida
  • Zydus pharmaceuticals usa inc
  • Novartis pharmaceuticals corp

Packagers

  • Advanced Pharmaceutical Services Inc.
  • Amneal Pharmaceuticals
  • Apotex Inc.
  • Apotheca Inc.
  • A-S Medication Solutions LLC
  • Atlantic Biologicals Corporation
  • Aurobindo Pharma Ltd.
  • Bryant Ranch Prepack
  • Cardinal Health
  • Caremark LLC
  • Corepharma LLC
  • Direct Dispensing Inc.
  • Direct Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Dispensing Solutions
  • Diversified Healthcare Services Inc.
  • Doctor Reddys Laboratories Ltd.
  • Eon Labs
  • Ethex Corp.
  • Greenstone LLC
  • H.J. Harkins Co. Inc.
  • Heartland Repack Services LLC
  • International Laboratories Inc.
  • Ivax Pharmaceuticals
  • KV Pharmaceutical Co.
  • Lake Erie Medical and Surgical Supply
  • Liberty Pharmaceuticals
  • Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Murfreesboro Pharmaceutical Nursing Supply
  • Mylan
  • Novartis AG
  • Nucare Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Ohm Laboratories Inc.
  • Palmetto Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • PCA LLC
  • PD-Rx Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Pharmaceutical Utilization Management Program VA Inc.
  • Physicians Total Care Inc.
  • Preferred Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Prepak Systems Inc.
  • Ranbaxy Laboratories
  • Rebel Distributors Corp.
  • Resource Optimization and Innovation LLC
  • Sandoz
  • Southwood Pharmaceuticals
  • Stat Rx Usa
  • Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
  • UDL Laboratories

Dosage forms

Form Route Strength
Capsule Oral
Tablet Oral 10 mg
Tablet Oral 20 mg/1
Tablet Oral 20 mg
Tablet Oral 5 mg
Tablet Oral 10 mg/1
Tablet Oral 40 mg/1
Tablet Oral 5 mg/1
Tablet, coated Oral 10 mg/1
Tablet, coated Oral 20 mg/1
Tablet, coated Oral 40 mg/1
Tablet, coated Oral 5 mg/1
Tablet, film coated Oral 10 mg/1
Tablet, film coated Oral 20 mg/1
Tablet, film coated Oral 40 mg/1
Tablet, film coated Oral 5 mg/1
Tablet, film coated Oral 5.00 mg/1
Tablet, coated Oral
Tablet, film coated Oral
Tablet Oral
Tablet Oral

Prices

Unit description Cost Unit
Lotensin 20 mg tablet 2.08USD tablet
Lotensin 10 mg tablet 2.0USD tablet
Lotensin 40 mg tablet 2.0USD tablet
Lotensin 5 mg tablet 2.0USD tablet
Lotensin HCT 20-12.5 mg tablet 1.97USD tablet
Lotensin HCT 10-12.5 mg tablet 1.95USD tablet
Lotensin HCT 20-25 mg tablet 1.94USD tablet
Lotensin hct 10-12.5 tablet 1.9USD tablet
Lotensin hct 20-12.5 tablet 1.9USD tablet
Lotensin hct 20-25 tablet 1.9USD tablet
Lotensin hct 5-6.25 tablet 1.9USD tablet
Lotensin HCT 5-6.25 mg tablet 1.31USD tablet
Lotensin 20 mg Tablet 1.14USD tablet
Benazepril hcl 10 mg tablet 1.07USD tablet
Benazepril hcl 20 mg tablet 1.07USD tablet
Benazepril hcl 40 mg tablet 1.07USD tablet
Benazepril hcl 5 mg tablet 1.07USD tablet
Lotensin 10 mg Tablet 0.99USD tablet
Lotensin 5 mg Tablet 0.84USD tablet
Apo-Benazepril 20 mg Tablet 0.79USD tablet
Apo-Benazepril 10 mg Tablet 0.69USD tablet
Apo-Benazepril 5 mg Tablet 0.58USD tablet

DrugBank does not sell nor buy drugs. Pricing information is supplied for informational purposes only. Patents

Patent Number Pediatric Extension Approved Expires (estimated)
Unlock Additional Data
US6162802 No 2000-12-19 2017-12-19 US

Additional Data Available

  • Filed On Filed On

    The date on which a patent was filed with the relevant government.

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Properties

State Solid Experimental Properties Predicted Properties

Property Value Source
Water Solubility 0.0105 mg/mL ALOGPS
logP 1.14 ALOGPS
logP 1.54 ChemAxon
logS -4.6 ALOGPS
pKa (Strongest Acidic) 3.53 ChemAxon
pKa (Strongest Basic) 5.36 ChemAxon
Physiological Charge -1 ChemAxon
Hydrogen Acceptor Count 5 ChemAxon
Hydrogen Donor Count 2 ChemAxon
Polar Surface Area 95.94 Å2 ChemAxon
Rotatable Bond Count 10 ChemAxon
Refractivity 115.23 m3·mol-1 ChemAxon
Polarizability 44.98 Å3 ChemAxon
Number of Rings 3 ChemAxon
Bioavailability 1 ChemAxon
Rule of Five Yes ChemAxon
Ghose Filter Yes ChemAxon
Veber’s Rule No ChemAxon
MDDR-like Rule Yes ChemAxon

Predicted ADMET features

Property Value Probability
Human Intestinal Absorption + 0.5732
Blood Brain Barrier 0.7082
Caco-2 permeable 0.7279
P-glycoprotein substrate Substrate 0.8466
P-glycoprotein inhibitor I Inhibitor 0.7426
P-glycoprotein inhibitor II Non-inhibitor 0.7565
Renal organic cation transporter Non-inhibitor 0.8239
CYP450 2C9 substrate Non-substrate 0.7518
CYP450 2D6 substrate Non-substrate 0.8563
CYP450 3A4 substrate Substrate 0.5632
CYP450 1A2 substrate Non-inhibitor 0.8232
CYP450 2C9 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.6875
CYP450 2D6 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.8266
CYP450 2C19 inhibitor Inhibitor 0.5461
CYP450 3A4 inhibitor Inhibitor 0.5425
CYP450 inhibitory promiscuity Low CYP Inhibitory Promiscuity 0.6038
Ames test Non AMES toxic 0.8377
Carcinogenicity Non-carcinogens 0.9435
Biodegradation Not ready biodegradable 0.9713
Rat acute toxicity 2.2082 LD50, mol/kg Not applicable
hERG inhibition (predictor I) Weak inhibitor 0.9787
hERG inhibition (predictor II) Inhibitor 0.6696

ADMET data is predicted using admetSAR, a free tool for evaluating chemical ADMET properties. (23092397)

Spectra

Mass Spec (NIST) Not Available Spectra

Spectrum Spectrum Type Splash Key
Predicted GC-MS Spectrum – GC-MS Predicted GC-MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
MS/MS Spectrum – , positive LC-MS/MS splash10-0ufu-0917700000-5f1f2ae9b1d7afc6eee5

Taxonomy

Description This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Kingdom Organic compounds Super Class Organic acids and derivatives Class Carboxylic acids and derivatives Sub Class Amino acids, peptides, and analogues Direct Parent Dipeptides Alternative Parents Alpha amino acid esters / Benzazepines / Aralkylamines / Fatty acid esters / Azepines / Dicarboxylic acids and derivatives / Benzene and substituted derivatives / Tertiary carboxylic acid amides / Amino acids / LactamsCarboxylic acid esters / Azacyclic compounds / Dialkylamines / Carboxylic acids / Organopnictogen compounds / Organic oxides / Hydrocarbon derivatives / Carbonyl compounds show 8 more Substituents Alpha-dipeptide / Alpha-amino acid ester / Benzazepine / Alpha-amino acid or derivatives / Azepine / Fatty acid ester / Aralkylamine / Dicarboxylic acid or derivatives / Monocyclic benzene moiety / Fatty acylBenzenoid / Tertiary carboxylic acid amide / Carboxylic acid ester / Amino acid or derivatives / Amino acid / Lactam / Carboxamide group / Carboxylic acid / Secondary aliphatic amine / Azacycle / Secondary amine / Organoheterocyclic compound / Organic nitrogen compound / Organonitrogen compound / Carbonyl group / Organooxygen compound / Hydrocarbon derivative / Organic oxide / Organopnictogen compound / Amine / Organic oxygen compound / Aromatic heteropolycyclic compound show 22 more Molecular Framework Aromatic heteropolycyclic compounds External Descriptors dicarboxylic acid monoester, ethyl ester, benzazepine (CHEBI:3011)

Targets

Binding Properties

×

Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
IC 50 (nM) 1.7 N/A N/A 10669559
IC 50 (nM) 2 N/A N/A 8021921 / 8254612

Details Binding Properties1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Inhibitor General Function Zinc ion binding Specific Function Converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II by release of the terminal His-Leu, this results in an increase of the vasoconstrictor activity of angiotensin. Also able to inactivate bradykinin, a potent… Gene Name ACE Uniprot ID P12821 Uniprot Name Angiotensin-converting enzyme Molecular Weight 149713.675 Da

Enzymes

Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Protein complex binding Specific Function Catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a co-substrate for homocysteine remethylation to methionine. Gene Name MTHFR Uniprot ID P42898 Uniprot Name Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase Molecular Weight 74595.895 Da

  1. Jiang S, Yu Y, Venners SA, Zhang Y, Xing H, Wang X, Xu X: Effects of MTHFR and MS gene polymorphisms on baseline blood pressure and Benazepril effectiveness in Chinese hypertensive patients. J Hum Hypertens. 2011 Mar;25(3):172-7. doi: 10.1038/jhh.2010.50. Epub 2010 May 6.
  2. Jiang S, Hsu YH, Niu T, Xu X, Xing H, Chen C, Wang X, Zhang Y, Peng S, Xu X: A common haplotype on methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene modifies the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on blood pressure in essential hypertension patients–a family-based association study. Clin Exp Hypertens. 2005 Aug;27(6):509-21.
  3. Jiang S, Hsu YH, Xu X, Xing H, Chen C, Niu T, Zhang Y, Peng S, Xu X: The C677T polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is associated with the level of decrease on diastolic blood pressure in essential hypertension patients treated by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Thromb Res. 2004;113(6):361-9.

Transporters

Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Proton-dependent oligopeptide secondary active transmembrane transporter activity Specific Function Proton-coupled intake of oligopeptides of 2 to 4 amino acids with a preference for dipeptides. May constitute a major route for the absorption of protein digestion end-products. Gene Name SLC15A1 Uniprot ID P46059 Uniprot Name Solute carrier family 15 member 1 Molecular Weight 78805.265 Da Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Peptide:proton symporter activity Specific Function Proton-coupled intake of oligopeptides of 2 to 4 amino acids with a preference for dipeptides. Gene Name SLC15A2 Uniprot ID Q16348 Uniprot Name Solute carrier family 15 member 2 Molecular Weight 81782.77 Da

  1. Knutter I, Wollesky C, Kottra G, Hahn MG, Fischer W, Zebisch K, Neubert RH, Daniel H, Brandsch M: Transport of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors by H+/peptide transporters revisited. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2008 Nov;327(2):432-41. doi: 10.1124/jpet.108.143339. Epub 2008 Aug 19.
  2. Kitagawa S, Takeda J, Sato S: pH-dependent inhibitory effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on cefroxadine uptake by rabbit small intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles and their relationship with hydrophobicity and the ratio of zwitterionic species. Biol Pharm Bull. 1999 Jul;22(7):721-4.

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Drug created on June 13, 2005 07:24 / Updated on February 02, 2020 04:09

Benazepril Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 2, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

For the Consumer

Applies to benazepril: oral tablet

Warning

Oral route (Tablet)

Discontinue benazepril hydrochloride as soon as possible when pregnancy is detected, as injury and death to the developing fetus may occur with use of drugs that act directly on the renin-angiotensin system.

Along with its needed effects, benazepril may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking benazepril:

Less common

  • Chills
  • cold sweats
  • confusion
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

  • Arm, back, or jaw pain
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • diarrhea
  • fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  • feeling of warmth
  • fever
  • general feeling of tiredness or weakness
  • itching
  • joint or muscle pain
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • nausea
  • rapid breathing
  • rapid weight gain
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • skin rash
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • sweating
  • tingling of the hands or feet
  • unusual weight gain or loss

Some side effects of benazepril may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Headache

Less common

  • Cough
  • dizziness
  • sleepiness or unusual drowsiness

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to benazepril: oral tablet

General

The most common side effects were headache, dizziness, somnolence, and postural dizziness.

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Headache, dizziness, somnolence, postural dizziness

Frequency not reported: Hypertonia, paresthesia

Hematologic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Decreases in hemoglobin (a low value and a decrease of 5 g/dL)

Frequency not reported: Thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, eosinophilia

Dermatologic

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Asthma, bronchitis, dyspnea, sinusitis, cough

Metabolic

Frequency not reported: Uric acid increased, blood glucose increased, hyponatremia

Cardiovascular

Frequency not reported: Flushing, electrocardiographic changes, hypotension

Gastrointestinal

Frequency not reported: Nausea, pancreatitis, constipation, gastritis, vomiting, melena

Genitourinary

Frequency not reported: Urinary tract infection, frequent urination, impotence, proteinuria

Hepatic

Frequency not reported: Serum bilirubin increased, liver enzymes increased

Immunologic

Frequency not reported: Infection

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Arthritis, arthralgia, myalgia

Other

Frequency not reported: Fatigue, asthenia

Psychiatric

Frequency not reported: Anxiety, decreased libido, insomnia, nervousness

1. “Product Information. Lotensin (benazepril).” Ciba Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Medical Disclaimer

More about benazepril

  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Images
  • Drug Interactions
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 15 Reviews
  • Drug class: Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
  • FDA Alerts (1)

Consumer resources

  • Benazepril
  • Benazepril (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Lotensin

Professional resources

  • Benazepril Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +2 more

Related treatment guides

  • Diabetic Kidney Disease
  • Heart Failure
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Left Ventricular Dysfunction

There may be an interaction between benazepril and any of the following:

  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • aldesleukin
  • alpha blockers (e.g., alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin)
  • aliskiren
  • allopurinol
  • alpha-1 blockers (e.g., doxazosin, prazosin, tamsulosin)
  • alpha-2 blockers (e.g., clonidine, dexmedetomidine, methyldopa)
  • amiodarone
  • amifostine
  • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, phentermine)
  • angiotensin II receptor blockers (e.g., irbesartan, losartan, valsartan)
  • antacids (e.g., aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide)
  • antipsychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone)
  • azathioprine
  • barbiturates (e.g., butalbital, phenobarbital)
  • beta-blockers (e.g., atenolol, carvedilol, propranolol)
  • calcium channel blockers (e.g., amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil)
  • canagliflozin
  • celecoxib
  • conivaptan
  • cyclosporine
  • diuretics (water pills; e.g., furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide)
  • drospirenone
  • duloxetine
  • erythropoietin
  • everolimus
  • ginger
  • ginseng
  • “gliptin” diabetes medications (e.g., linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin)
  • gold salts
  • grass pollen extract
  • heparin
  • iron dextran complex
  • levodopa
  • low-molecular-weight heparins (e.g., dalteparin, tinzaparin)
  • licorice
  • lithium
  • MAO inhibitors (e.g., moclobemide, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline)
  • medications that increase potassium levels (e.g., potassium supplements, salt substitutes containing potassium)
  • metformin
  • methylphenidate
  • nitrates (e.g., nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, isosorbide mononitrate)
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs; e.g., ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen)
  • obinutuzumab
  • other angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs; e.g., captopril, ramipril)
  • phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil)
  • potassium-sparing diuretics (e.g., spironolactone, amiloride, triamterene)
  • pramipexole
  • pregabalin
  • quinine
  • quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin)
  • rituximab
  • ropinirole
  • sacubitril
  • sirolimus
  • sodium phosphates
  • temsirolimus
  • tizanidine
  • tolcapone
  • tolvaptan
  • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, clomipramine, desipramine, trimipramine)
  • trimethoprim

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Benazepril

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